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Morning journal and courier. [volume] (New Haven [Conn.]) 1848-1894, September 12, 1884, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015483/1884-09-12/ed-1/seq-1/

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"" ' TOE LARGEST DAILY NEWSPAPER IN THE CIX. ... : , . '
THE CARRIXGTOK PUBLISHING CO. - : ---.-. - . OFFICE, 400 STATE STREET.
: - - - ,- I,,. ' 11 fj. 11 - - , m mlim i, ''
TOL. Lil. fW HAVEN, QONN. . FRIDAY MOKNIXG, SEPTEMBER 12, 1884. NO. 238
We have a few par
ticularly cheap things
tn flannel buttings
and Cloths now on sale.
J.WADAM&'CX
During this week we
mean to try to sett a
quantity of Nottingham
Lace Curtains by mak
ing them cheaper than
they ought to be.
J. N. ADAM & CO.
We are selling blank
ets cheaper than the
other dealers.
. N. ADAM & CO.
We are now pre
pared to offer better val
ue in flannels, plain
and twilled, medium
and heavy, scarlet, grey,
blue and white, than at
any previous time.
J. N: ADAM & CO.
We have just received
the first delivery of our
importation of Kid
Gloves for the Jail
trade.
J. N. ADAM & CO.
We have just opened
a co7nplete line of Quilt
ed Comfortables, which
we contracted Jor with
the leading manufac
turers some time ago.
The Sateen Quilt is a
novelty.
J. N. AD AM & CO.
GHAT'S SPECIFIC MEDICINE.
TRADE MARK Tn Gmi E.oumTKAPK HARK
Rbmedt. As unfailing
curt for Seminal Wak-
yt- taraOld Ag, and Butnr
w,l other dlMMMtbstfaadtar'
BwAMr-ulvertuwmta to r-fund iMny, BintaM)
Whom the mwdiciue 1 boh.io hoi Wfroltat nter y on to Uu
AaufBetarcn, wma tarn j r-r"
wjiltoil -! Th.ilfic MrtleiM It b7 .11 draI
t lper pM-kw, uxnckiMje. for 4fccwUH. Matin, by Mil t
1The QMi7Wed'icineto6o., Buffalo, N. Y.
I BOLD BY RICHARDSON CO.,
SSV iUTXH. COVI.
GEORGE W. BUTTON,
Airriix:r!T.
Fruit, Foreign and Domestic,
WHOLESALE and RETAIL.
mStf
1.175 cnapel street
morses and Carriages For Sale
and To Let.
Carriage Making in all its branches. Repairing
uul painting a specialty. Anyone wishing to buy
or Ball an outfit will find it to their adrantage to
give ua a call.
CULLODI Sc CO.
jtflltf 108 FRANKXDf STRJElia'.
REMOVAL.
We nave removed to our new
Build!?
Nos. 821-823 Grand Street,
Which la rery apacious, well lighted, and four en
are floors on which to display our new styles of
Furniture of all Kinds.
"We art now carry a very large stock and will be
Die ta meet the demands of our constantly increas
ng trade.
THE SAME I0W PRICES
And Liberal Term f nave .here
tofore been tne feature of
or this establishment.
P. J. KELLLY & CO.,
XtTocs. 821 a,rd. 8B3
GRAND STREET.
M flutes
4 J.
1 9.
Mme. Lavalave
RESUMES her inBtructions in French and Ger
man on September 15th.
: . a818t 870 CONGRESS AVENUE.
MRS. CANFIELD'S SCHOOL
276 Crown Street,
Will reopen MONDAY. Sept. 22. selO 9t
EAMILY and Day school, 136 Sherman Avenue.
Course of study from Primary to Collegiate.
,1 1 ninnn . 1.'.. ..1 l.-ll 1 Ollffl.BI'l, fijlfl
H IKS mi nLLtinivu gim w --""."' f- o
Literature. Reopens September 23. The
. s8 18t MISSES BANGS, Principals.
MiB Nott'8
English and French Family and Day
Scnool for Young Ladles.
S3 Wall street, New Haven, Conn. The 12th year be
gins Tuesday, Sept. 23. Circulars sent upon ap
plication.
C. A. DOUGLASS,
TEACHER OF PIANO,
295 Columbus Avenue.
au20 lmo
Miss. I.. A. ltliller's
Sobool o Musio
Renneni sent. 15. ISSf .
Tnii.l .nil nKtramiital lffuslc Xailfirhc.
. Aflnl tnatn,, (fin criven at moderate prices. Office
nours rrom to 7 p. m. iib vnapei sirroi,
Miss Annab J. Cbapin
llFll.T. HHnnwnm Vncal and Instrumental In-
W struction, 27 Insurance Building, on Sept. 11.
Lemon hours. Mondav and Thursday each week.
from 2 until OK o'clock. For terms, &c, inquire at
M. Stetnert's music stoi e. No. 777 Chapel street, or
at my residence, Wo. 30 cottage street. sea im-
MISS 0RT0N AND MISS NICHOLS,
- . Successors to the Misses Edwards, will
re-open their English and French
Day School for Young Ladies and
LitlA Girls
On WEDNESDAY. SEPT. 24. Circulars can be
VUUU1KU Wl ayuiiui uuu cv
se21m NO. 57 ELM STREET.
MRS. PARDEE'S
SCHOOL
Will reopen Wednelajr, Sep
tember 17tb,
AT
133 COLLEGE SXREET,
wnere appncauon may ue iiiuue.
s512t
Greenwich Academy.
Usual Literary Courses, with Musical Institute and
Commercial College. Founded 1802. Both
sexes. Influences decidedly religious. Home care
and comforts. Charmingly located on Narragan
mett BftT) and on direct route from New York to
Boston. Grand opportunities for salt water bathing
and boating. Terms moderate. Opens Sept 1.
Catalogue free.
Rev. O. II. FERNALD,A. M., Princi-
pal, Eat Crecnwlch) It. I.
PIANOFORTE-
HARMONY AND COMPOSITION
MRS. BRAND
Has recommenced her lessons for the season, and
has vacancies for a few pupils. Terms moderate.
121 YORK STREET,
g2 Smo Two doors from Crown.
West End Institute
Will reopen on Thursday, Sept.
SnRrlal advantasrei forthe Study of
Elocution & Free-hand Drawing.
Tjwvtns are pnven in anv branch of Decoration
Work in oil or water colors or mineral colors on
porcelain; also repousse brass work. For terms,
send for circular to 99 Howe street, a23 lm
ICE TJ S I O -
F. A. FOWLER,
TEACHER OF
PIANO, ORGAN and HARMONY.
AUSTIN BUILDING, 387 CHAPEL STREET,
Rooms 8 and 9.
A correct touch a specialty. au30tf
Miss Fannie C. Howe.
CULTIVATION OF THE VOICE (Italian method)
and PIANO INSTRUCTION.
Charles T. Howe,
FLUTE AND PIANO INSTRUCTION,
102 CROWN STREET, NEAR TEMPLE STREET.
selStf
Grove Hall, No. S3 Grove Street.
MISS MOSTFORT'S SCHOOL for Young
Ladies and Little Girls will begin the tenth
year on Wednesday, September 24. French will be
taught by a Parisian lady, resident in family. The
studio which is open to pupils not otherwise con
nected with the school will be in charge of a lady
who has had thorough art training in Europe, w niie
especial attention will be given as before to draw
ing from objects and to painting .oil and water
colors, various novelties in decorative work will be
introduced. s9 14t
JTEW EWGLAIVO
CONSERVATORY OFf MUSIC.
MUSIC. Vocal and Instrumental and Toning.
ART. Drawing. Painting, Modeling and Portraiture.
ORATORY. Literature and Languages.
F OM E. Eleeant accommodations f orfioo lady student
ALL. TEXtBI begin Sept. nth. Beautifully 111 d
Calendar free. Address B. TOCRJEB. Director. 1
FBANHXia SQUARE, BOSTON, MASS
aJ
No. 847 Chapel street. Fall term begins Monday
September 1st. Day and evening sessions. Apply
for circular giving full information. . aull
HOPKINS GRAMMAR SCHOOL.
Preparing; Rot for tne Classical and
Scientific Departments of Tale
College.
FallTerm Opens Thursday, Sep
tember 18.
For particular information call on or address W.
L. CUSHINQ. 16 Elm street. sel lat
YALE BUSINESS COLLEGE.
New Haven, Conn.
BANKING DEPARTMENT.
opens mondat; September i.
For further information call at the College.
Office No. 37 Insnrance Rulldlng,
Or enclose three two cents stamps for new illus
trated catalogue giving full particulars. Address
an!8 R. C. LOVEB1DCE.
I & J. 1.
57, 59 & 61 ORAMEST.,
FURNITURE DEALERS
'. AND .
UNDERTAKERS,
Have the finest Painted Bedroom Suits in the city.
New Parlor Suits, Walnut Bedroom Suits.
The best Spring Bed for the monev.
Splint, Rattan, CJone and Rush Seat Chairs in
great vurreLjr, us low us can oe oougnt. .
UNDERTAKING
promptly attended to night or day. with care.
Bodies Dreserved without ice in th rtAot
- Also Sole Agents for Washburn's Deodoring and
Disinfecting Fluid.
A new lot of Folding Chairs and Stools to rent for
Large Invoice
OF
i GOSSAEER CLOAKS
I TO BE SOLD
For the Next Thirty Days,
j f EACH AT 95 CENTS.
' , - - AT THE
GOODYEAR RUBBER STORE.
j '73 Church Street,
J , ( ' CORNER CENTER,
Opposite the PostoCRce.
F. C. TU'lTLE,
Proprietor.
lb $
If
Blair
TRUNKS, TRUIS. TR.1KS,
BAGS ! BAGS ! BAGS
A Mimnlete stock of Tourists
Articles. The onlv exclusive trunk
store In the city. Trunks, Bags
and sample uases inaae to oraer.
Repairing a specialty. Old trunks
taken In exchange. Good Goods
at Low prices at
CROFUT & CO.'S,
210 Obapel Street
BELOW THE BRIDGE.
L C. PFAIT & SON,
CHICKENS ! !
For Broiling and Roasting'.
Prims Beef a Sjecially.
L. C. PFAFF & SON
"Tand'9 Church Street.
GREAT
MIDSTJMEll
Closing-Out Sale I
OF
CORSETS, HOOP SKIRTS
AND
BUSTLES
IN OUR
CORSET DEPARTMENT,
Bolton & Neely,
SUCCESSORS
E. I VIXtY & CO.
Jyi4
Rubber Hose I
LARGEST STOCK,
LOWEST PRICES
IN THE CITY.
EOSKETT & BISHOP,
BRANCH STORE,
462 STATE STREET,
- Opposite our Old Stand.
mylO 3m
ELECTRICITY IS LIFE.
Whv will iieorjle cliner to the ahmirh IiIaa. that, ttiav
must take medicine ? Electricity will reach where
medicine has failed, as 15 years1 experience has
proved. If you are troubled with Catarrh, or Neural
gia, or Rheumatism! Throat or Lruur Troubles. Gen
eral Debility, Headache, Kidney Disease, try
ELECTRICITY.
Go and see Dr. Oummines. His method differs
from all others. His success is wonderful.
Ladies treated successfully. Ladies can consult
with the Doctor's wife afternoons. Consultation
free.
DR. J. W. CUMMINGS,
Wo 4 CHnrch Street.
:13 WOOD'S BLOCK.
Not onlv to the suites
Lasted by disease doe
idere's Food sutmle
pnent the proper medi
Jcine and bring; back
jstrengxn ana comrort,
lout the delicate mother
(will find its dailv use
I just what is needed to
fcheck and supplement
tne orainmaaeupon na
ture's forces. Try it,
mothers, and be con,
vinoed. Recirjes to suit
Jdifferent tastes accom-
Eany each ean. Itdoes not tax the digestive organsu
ut is strengthening to both invalids and children
Sold by druggists. 35c. up. WOOLRICH & CO.,
auauitwat
FLOUR $4.59 A BARREL.
No matter what vour trrocer savs. flour never was
so cheap since the war; and you can buy at Hughes
Wholesale store by the barrel, half barrel or bag, at
prices from $4. so and upwards. We save you
$ 1 per barrel by coming to headquarters.
WHOLESALE BVTTEB PRICES,
50 tubs choice creamery butter. 22ic. per lb. 50
tubs fine butter 20c. tier lb. Ten pounds ( wooden
tubs) butter $2.20 per tub. 25 pounds (wooden tubs)
butter $9.00 per tub. Butter in 6 pound pails $1.37
PerPaU- L .
wnoieiaie uuu netttii.
Fine tea (Japan dust) 20c. per pound. Good
Japan tea 30c. per pound. Choice tea (Oolong or
Japan) 40c. per pound. Best tea in market (with
china cup and saucer free) 50c. per pound.
benign i ohi i;hchp a
OEO. W. H. HITCHES'
Independent Coal Dealer, 34 Church St.
TURFING AND GRADING.
James II. MacDonald,
PRACTICAL GARDENER,
21 Martin Street.
Order Book at F. S. Piatt's Seed Store, 374 and 37
State street. se8 lot
MRS. M. E. COWLES, M. I.,
CHRONIC DISEASES A SPECIALTY.
93 Olive Street.
Office hours 10 to 12 and 11 to 4. ml5 3m
266th EDITION. PRICE ONLY $ I
BY in AIL. POSX PAID.
KNOW THYSELF.
A Great Medical Work on
Manhood.
Exhausted Vitalltv Kervnna B.nH Thval,nl rkAhilf-
ly, Premature Decline in Man, Errors of Youth and
the untold miseries resulting from indiscretion or
excesses. A book for every man, young, middle
aged and old. It contains 125 prescriptions for all
acute and chronic diseases, each one of which is
invaluable. So found by the author, whose exper
ience for 23 years is such as probably never before
; v" . ' I'.ij oici.iu, ouu pages, oonna ui
beautiful French muslin, embossed covers, full gilt,
sruaranteed to be a finer work in aviw em... me
chanical, literary and professional than any other
work sold in this country for $2.50, or the money
will be refunded in every instance. Price only $1 by
uuu., lkuu. xuusLrutive sample 6 cents, oena
now. Gold medal awarded the author by the Na
tional Medical Association the officers of which he
refers.
The Science of Life should be read by the young
for instruction, and by the afflcted for relief. It wiU
benefit all. London Lancet-
There is no member of society to whom The Sci
ence of Life will not be useful, whether youth, par
ent, guardian, instructor or clergyman. Anronaut.
Address tne i-eaixxly Medical Institute, or Dr W.
H. Parker, 4 Bullfinch St, Boston, Mass" who may
be consulted on all diseases renniHn .hii
perienee. Chronic and obstinate diseases that have
specialty. Such treated sui
uaiiieu uie iuu uimuiaerpflYM I I li1 A T Clans a
without an instance of fail T1 TT"V TI T. H1
in i fullv
Jr . FALL HATS.
" SI, 1.25, $1.5,
1-T5 2.00, $3.25,
3.50, 3.00.
ALL THE LATEST
HATS '
Now ready at prices far . below
lormerly.
KILBOURN & CP'S, 816 Chapfx St
E. D. HENDEE,
SUCCESSOR TO
W. D. BRYAN,
CUSTOM TAILO R,
NO. 13T CHURCH ST.
ft
Dry
BLANKETS
FROM
Auction.
We have received another large lot of Blankets from
Auction, and shall offer them on
MONDAY MORNING
at prices which we will GUARANTEE to be
than eqnal value can be bought for elsewhere in this
city. . r " '
A comparison solicited. ' -""
A GRAND EHHIBITION
of fine Turkish Rugs, Portias and Embroideries of Pal
ace Work sold at less than
AUCTION
by native Armenians from
last but a few weeks. Ask
hundred years old Rugs.
PROCTOR
NEW HAVEN.
AS A PURE FRUIT STIMULANT, for the
aged, mentally and physically exhausted, care
worn, or overworked, for delicate females, especially
mothers, for those recovering from debilitating dis
eases, and as a means of reforming those addicted
to an excessive use of alcoholic stimulants, San
ford's Ginger, is unequalled in medicine.
UNRIPE FRUIT, Impure Water, Unhealthy Cli
mate, Unwholesome Food, Malaria, Epidemic
and Contagious Diseases, Cholera Morbus, Cramps,
Pains, Indigestion, Diarrhoea, Colds, Chills, Simple
Fevers, Exhaustion, Nervousness, or loss of Sleep
that beset the traveller or household at this season,
are nothing to those protected by a timely use of
SANFORD'S GINGER, the Delicious Summer
Medicine. Avoid mercenary dealers, who for a few
cents extra profit try to force upon you their own
or others when you call for SANFORD'S GIN
GER. Sold by wholesale and retail druggists,
grocers, etc.. everywhere.
Potter Drug and Chemical Co., Hotton.
I. S. M1XJLER, M. D.
31S Chapel street, Between, or
ange and Church Streets.
Residence, - - Tontine Hotel
NEW HAVEN, CONN.
OFFICE HOURS 8 to 12 a. m., 2 to 6 p. m;7to
p. m.
SUNDAY !) to 10 a. m.. 5 to 6 p. Tn. m7 3m
Elastic Hose.
KNEE CAPS, ANKLETS AND
ARM PIECES.
Silk Abdominal Supporters.
For the relief of corpulency, enlarged veins and
weak joints. Since we commenced the manufac
ture of the above, using only fresh imported stock,
we are able to furnish the best fitting and most dur
able goods that can be made. A fact that our regu
lar customers do not fail to appreciate.
OUR STOCK OF TRUSSES,
MoTiiifnMiired esneciallv for our retail trade, in
eludes almost every form of Truss of any value in
market, which with our facilities tor making to or
der special appliances and long experience iu the
treatment of Hernia, enables us to guarantee relief
and comfort to every one needing support.
Personal attention given to tne selection ana
roper adjustment of all appliances.
E. L. Washburn, JL D.,
B4 CHUIIOIE
AND
61 CJIHHSTTEMFl.
BENEDICT BUILDING.
DEPOT CARS PASS THE DOOR.
jyio
Wnite Hran (Iv
or Preserving. The genuine article.
JUL W . Jli. HA-LiLI OL OWit.
ANDREW aOODMAtf,
NOS. 160, 162 CROWN ST.
fine Assortment or Fancy and Staple
Orpcerles.
FLOl'B! FLenti
At reduced prices.
Old Government Java Coffee 25c per lb.
Fine Butter 25c per lb, 4 1-2 lbs $1.
Splendid Cream Cheese 15c per lb.
3 boxes sardines 25c.
31b cans broiled Mackerel 45c
S-lb cans Brook Trout 45c.
Large assortment of Canned Meats.
Great variety of fruits received every day.
FINE WINES, CLARETS, SHERRIES AND BRAN
DIES.
Call and see us. Goods delivered to any part of the
city.
ANDREW GOODMAN,
Nos. 160 and 162 Crown Street
GOODMAN'S BUILDING, FOUR DOORS FROM
CHURCH STREET, NEAR GRAND OPERA-HOUSE.
au!2 Union Copy.
REMOVAL.
THE
NEW YORK BRANCH
L O A N O P P ICE
- NOW PERMANENTLY LOCATED AT
42 Church Street.
M 0 OY LOANED.
Liberal advances made on all kinds of personal
property.
Unredeemed Pledges
For sale at low prices.
Square Dealing With All.
SOLOMON FRY.
lyio
Mrs. E. Jones Young,
DENTIST,
230 ChapeI,cor.State,Street B'd'g
Over iirooss at o "
All work warranted.
rrrfV1?. Office boors from 9 a. m. to
5 p. m.
Ja.
FIUCEIS
the far East. This sale will
to see the three and four
t
AS A BEVERAGE, with hot or cold water,
sweetened, or hot or cold milk, or added to
ice water, lemonade, effervescent draughts and min
eral waters, Sahfobd's Gingtib forms a refreshing
and invigorating beverage, unequalled in simplicity
and purity by any tonic medicine, while free from
alcoholic reaction.
PREPARED with the utmost skill from IMPOR
TED GINGER, CHOICE AROMATTCS and
the purest and best of MEDICINAL FRENCH
BRANDY, from the world-renowned vintners,
Messrs. OTARD, DUPUY & CO., COGNAC, ren
dering it vastly superior to all other ' Gingers," all
of which are made with common alcohol, largely
impregnated with poisonous fusil oil and strength
ened with cayenne pepper. Beware of imitations.
SANFORD'S is the finest ginger In the world, and,
notwithstanding the high cost of Its ingredients, is
the cheapest family medicine. Sold by druggist,
and grocers everywhere. ;
Potter Urns; md- Chamieal Co.. Boston. :'
sr.
IS1
DOES
WONDERFUL
CURES OF
KIDNEY DISEASES T
AND CJ
LIVER COMPLAINTS, o
Because It sets on the LIVER, BOWELS and
KIDNEYS at tlio same time.
Because it cleanses the system of the poison
ous humor. tiuLt develope in Kidney and Uri
nary DlseMes, Biliousness, Jaundice, 'Constipa
tion. Piles, or in Rneumatism, Neuralgia, 2Ter
voua Disorders and all Female CompLaiatQ.
&-S0LW PROOF OF THIS.
TV WILE. StTRELY" CURE
CONSTIPATION, PILES,
and RHEUMATISM,
By kh K K ACTIOH" of all toe organs
and functions, thereby '
CLEANSING the BLOOD
restoring th normal poorer to throw off dineiuo.
TH0U8ANDS OF CASES
of tJi worst forms of these terrible diseases
have been quickly relieved, and in. a short time
PERFECTLY CURED.
PRICC, $1. LIQUID OB DRY, SOLD BY DRUGGISTS.
Dry can he sent by mail.
WKLLB, BlCHAKDSOEf & Co., Borlinjfton, Vt.
3 Send stamp for Diarr Almanac Cpr 1884.
DR. DAVID
KENNEDY'S
REfiEDY
Vor tHe Cnr or Kidney and Jjlrer Com
plaints. Constipation, and all disorders
arising from an impure state of the BLOOD.
To women who suffer from any of the ills pecu
liar to their sax it is an unfailing friend. All
Druggists. One Dollar a bottle, or address Dr.
David Kenned yj Bondout, K. Y.
THE NARROW ESCAPE
Of a mm.aachnselt. Engineer Timely
WarnbiE of TIr. John Spencer, Bag
gtgemaster of II. 6c A. R. It.
Sleen after fatigue, and health after disease, are
two of the sweetest experiences known to man.
Fourteen years is a long; time in which to suffer, yet
Mr. Peter Lawler of Dalton, Mass., had led a miser
able life for that period through the presence of
stone in the bladder. That he sought in all direc
tions tor a cure is an almost supernuous statement.
He did obtain temporary relief, but nothing more.
Last January he called on Dr. David Kennedy of
Rondout, N. x., who said, after examination: ''Mr.
Lawler, you have stone in the bladder. We will first
try DR. DAVID KENNEDY'S FAVORITE REM
EDY before risking an operation.1 A few days
later the following letter passed through the Ron
out postofdee:
Dalton, Mass;, February 6.
Dear Dr. Kennedy The day after I came home I
passed two gravel stones, and am doing nicely now.
PETER LAWLER.
Dr. Kennedy now has the stones at his office, and
they are sufficiently formidable to justify the claim
that KENNEDY'S FAVORITE REMEDY is the
leading specific for stone in the bladder. In his let
ter Mr. Lawler mentions that FAVORITE REMEDY
alsocured him of rheumatism. The subjoined cer
tificate tells its own story:
Old Berkshire Mills )
Dalton, Mass., April27, 1883. )
Mr. Peter Lawler has been a resident of this town
for the past seventeen years, and in our employ for
fifteen, and in all these years he has been a good
and respected citizen of the town and community.
He has nad some chronic disease to our knowledge
for most of the time, but now claims to be, and is,
in apparent good health.
CHAS. O. BROWN. President.
Dalton, Mass., June 9, 1884.
Dr. Kennedy Dear Friend Thinking you might
like to hear again from an old patient, I am going
to write you. It is now three and a half years since
first I went to see you. As I told you then I was
troubled with Kidney Disease for about fifteen
years, and had seven of the best doctors to be found,
but I received only temporary relief until I visited
you and commenced taking your "Favorite Rem
edy." I continued taking the Remedy according
to your directions, and now consider myself a well
man. Very graciously yours,
PETER LAWLER.
Our letter of April 27, 1882, holds good as far as
Mr. Lawler's testimony is concerned regarding his
health. CHAS. O. BROWN.
Dalton, June 9, 1884.-
aul4eod&wlmnr
ALL LEADING BRANDS
White Lead.
Tarnishes, Glue, all grades,
Sand Paper, Olass,
nixed Paints, all snades.
Sponges. :
THOMPSON & BELDEN.
396 AND 398 STATE STREET,
COURIER BUILD IN GF.
ael
MAH & CO
The Oldest Ially Paper Published
in Connecticut.
THE CAEEINQTON'PlJBtJSHIN'Q CO.
SWOLB COPIES TWO CKNTH.
Delxvtcbid bt Carmtcm nr tbx Cut, 12
CENTS A WlKK, 42 CKST8 A MoWFH, $5.00 A
Ysab. Thk Samx Tkems Br Kail.
Rate, of AdTertl.lnK.
SITUATIONS WANTED, one Insertion SOo; each
subsequent insertion 25c.
WANTS, RENTS, and other small advertisements
occupying not more than six lines, one Insertion
75c; each subsequent insertion 25c
One square (one inch) one insertion, $1.20: each
subsequent insertion, 40 cents; one week, $3.20; one
month, $10.00.
Yearly advertisements at the following rates:
One square, one year, $40; two squares, one year,
$70; three squares one year, $100. -
Obituary notices, in prose or Terse, 15 cents per
line. Notices of Births, Marriages and Deaths, 60
cents each. Local Notices 20c per line. :
Advertisements on second page on. price and a
half.
Yearly advertisers are limited to their own Imme
diate business, and their contracts do not include
Wanted To Let, For Sale, etc.
Special rates furnished on application for oon tracts
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Friday, September 13, 1SS4.
REPUBLICAN NOMINATIONS.
FOB PRK8IDENT,
JT AMES G. BLAINE, or 91 aloe.
FOB VICE PRESIDENT,
JOHN A. LOGAN, of Illinois.
State Electoral Ticket.
ELSCTORS-AT-IJUtOE,
Theodore D. Woolset, of New Haven. .
Charles A. Williams, of New London.
DISTRICT ELECTORS,
1st District I. Luther Spencer, of Suffield.
2d District Joseph E. Silliman, of Chester.
3d District James S. Atwood, of Plainfield.
4thDistrict Frederick Milks, of Salisbury.
For State Officers.
FOR GOVERNOR,
HENRY B. HARRISON, of New Haven.
FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR,
LORRTN A. COOKE, of Barkhamsted.
FOR SECRETARY F f STATE,
CHARLES A. RUSSELL, of KiUingly.
FOR TREASURER,
V. B. CHAMBERLAIN, of New Britain.
FOR COMPTROLLER,
LUZERNE I. MUNSON, of Waterbury.
PACTS FOB WORKERS.
That useful and mnch-lalked-abont being
the American Workingman must feel
somewhat flattered by the attention paid him
in political platforms, in the newspapers and
on the stump. He must think that he is a
very important personage, especially about
election time. The advocates of both the
great parties are busy telling what they (the
parties) have done for him. And it is very
plain that the advocates of the Republican
party have much the best of the discussion.
It would be hard to find any legislation by
the Democratic party when it was in power
designed to foster industry and benefit labor.
But when the Republicans came into power
they soon began to demonstrate their genu
ine interest in the laboring element of
the country. In a powerful editorial the
Washington National Republican calls atten
tion to two of the grandest measures in the
interest of labor with which the 'pages of
history are marked which the Republican
party put into effect on the first day of 1863.
These were the liberation of the slaves and
the passage of the homestead law.
The destruction of slavery, it is pointed
out, opened up a virgin field to the army of
free labor. To-day in Georgia, Tennessee,
the Carolines, Virginia and Alabama work-
ingmen by the thousands are making a liv
ing in iron mines, coal mines, cotton facto
ries, foundries, rolling mills, blast furnaces,
and other forms of industries,' where twenty-
five years ago the workingman was barred
out and unwelcome. Such manufacturing
cities as Roanoke, Virginia, and Birmingham,
Alabama, are as directly the result of Repub
lican legislation as they would have been had
the party passed laws and provided means
for their building.
The homestead law put it in the power of
the humblest toiler to enter any part of the
public domain and take unchallenged pos
session of an estate which through his indus
try would soon enable him to put
himself ' and his family beyond the
shadow of want. "The bound
less West is dotted with prosperous home
steads acquired through this grand poor
man's law, the owners of which but for its
munificent provisions would to-day be labor
ing in the crowded marts of industry with
out the prospect of more than a hard-earned
living. And the gracious bounty of the
homestead law is still held out to every poor
man in the land."
The Republican party has followed these
two great enactments by laws tending in the
same general direction, and the benefits
which have been conferred on laboring men
and women by them ' are not few or small.
The party intends to continue to help labor
ers by maintaining the policy of protection,
and on this ground, if no other, all interested
should vote with the party.
EDITORIAL NOTES.
No "fizzle" about the Republican rally last
evening.
Terrible things are happening nowadays.
Wtadtstaw Andrzejewski, a baker of Law
rence, Massachusetts, has failed.
Good judges declare that seventy per
cent, of the votes cast in Maine the other
day by Irish-American citizens were cast for
Governor Robie, the Republican candidate
for governor.
The new divorce law in France has given
sweet relief to one long-suffering couple
named Granville. They were married fifty
years ago. The lady's age was then sixteen,
and fifteen days after the wedding she ob
tained a separation from her husband.
Typhoid fever is epidemic in the vicinity
of Columbia, South Carolina, and the local
physicians have observed the curious fact
that a large majority of cases are located di
rectly in the paths of the disastrous torna
does which swept through the State last
spring.
The Providence Journal thinks that the in
teresting ethnological statement that "the
faces of Europeans, as a rule, are broader
tnan those of Americans" may have been
made from observations at a Democratic mass
meeting after the reception of the news from
the Maine election.
In 1864 Thomas A. Hendricks, now the tail
of the Democratic dog, said he trusted life
still remained in the masses, and that they
had not been sunk so low by the four years
of despotism but that they could rise to crush
out abolitionism and "hurl the smutty old
tyrant at Washington out of political exist
ence." 0Mr. Hendricks is S good man for the
Independents to vote for.
Several hundred "ftl1 frame houses are
now building in Belgium for use at Vivi and
other stations established by Stanley along
tne (jongo. As Stanley possessed no facili
ties for making lumber, his European assis
tants were compelled to live in tents or huts,
and the discomforts of living in that way
added largely to the sick list. The Interna
tional association is building at Boma, nine
ty miles above the mouth of the Congo, a
sanitarium, to which it proposes to send its
invalid agents for treatment. Better facili
ties for preserving health and caring for the
sick are among the innovations to be intro
duced on the Congo.
The prohibitionists of Maine are not as
consistent as they are fanatical. The amend
ment to the State constitution which was
adopted by the voters on Monday provides
that "the manufacture of intoxicating li
quors, not including cider," and their sale
and keeping for sale, shall be forever pro
hibited. Now, it is a notorious fact that
"hard" cider contains a considerably larger
percentage of alcohol than lager beer, and is
far more intoxicating in its effects. Indeed,
the "cider drunkard" is often the most hope
less, as he is in many places the most com
mon, victim of intemperance in New En
gland. ;
Dr. Schweinfurth, who will soon start on
another African tour, is at present busily en
gaged in examining and classifying the rem
nants of wreaths found in the recently dis
covered tombs of Egyptian kings and sent to
Berlin by Professor Maspero, the director of
the museum at Cairo. The various parts are
first softened in hot water, then dried and
placed on paper for examination. When
identified, each flower is put under an air
tight glass frame, to which is attached a label
with the name of the plant and the king in
whose sarcophagus it was found. Forty-six
distinct species have so far been identified,
all corresponding closely to those found in
the present day in Upper Egypt. Dr.
Schweinfurth has already provided the mu
seums of Berlin, Vienna and Leyden with
these specimens of his skill.
City councils are often very queer bodies,
to put it mildly. The aldermen of New York
have just granted, without any consideration
of which the city got a share, a street rail
road franchise for which the city had been
offered $1,000,000. In Chicago the street
railroad companies have been able to secure
from the aldermen of that city the sole leg
islative authority there a gratuitous exten
sion of .their privileges for twenty years,
while a new company, composed of responsi
ble men, stood ready to pay the city $1,000,-
000 for the lapsed privilege, and pay besides
a permanent percentage on the receipts from
the roads. In Kansas City a local politician
has been given, outright, by the city council,
a street railroad privilege for which a respon
sible offer of $100,000 had been made. By
and by it will begin to be thought that city
councils are a failure.
There is some Democratic harmony visible
in the discussion of the tariff question.
Speaker Carlisle's clerk, Mr. Nelson, says that
Mr. Grover Cleveland urged New York
members of Congress to vote for the Morri
son bill, and the New York World says that
Ml. Nelson is "a liar." Mr. Watterson
wants to know what the World means by
"such an insidious attack on the character
of the Democratic nominee." It goes on to
say: There can no doubt in the mind of any
observant man that the election of Grover
Cleveland means the revision of the tariff,
i . . . If he (Grover Cleveland) is not a
Democrat, if he is not in sympathy with the
organization in its great work of reform, he
has no right at the head of the ticket. If he
does not favor tariff reform, the votes going
to him in the West are obtained under false
pretenses. Democratic success means a radi
cal revision of the tariff, or it has no mean
ing at all. . . . The World owes it to
the party in the West to retract its statement
concerning the position of Governor Cleve
land. What are we here for if not to reform
the tariff?
DIFFERENT.
When an officer is dismissed from the army
he is said to be cashiered. When a cashier
is dismissed from a bank he is generally of
ficered. Same thing, only different.
"Wny does a dog chase his tail?" a philo
sopher asks. We do not think it will add
much to the sum of human knowledge to
answer this question correctly, but we im
agine a dog chases his tail because there's a
flea on the-end of it. Somerville Journal.
"Bah Jove!" exclaimed a young slim to
his girl at the races, "I'm just a dollar out."
At this moment a fatherly-looking old fellow
broke him all up by learning over his should
er and asking, "Does your mother know
you're 'out,' sonny?" N. Y. Journal.
A New York physician has discovered a
curiosity in the shape of a girl with two sep
arate and distinct palates. Gracious! we
hope that sort of girl won't become the fash
ion. Girls get enough enjoyment out of ice
cream now without doubling the pleasure
and thus increasing the inducement to ask
for it. Wilmington Star.
A Mormon with twenty wives is not nec
essarily twenty times as miserable as the
tnan with only one. For instance, when one
of them gets mad and wants to break his
head with the broom are there not nineteen
othera to stand around and protect and save
him and to call her "a horrid, nasty, cruel
thing?" Fall River Advance.
The Oil City Derrick wants to know what
a "pelerine" is. Such ignorance in the edi
torial profession is deplorable. A pelerine
is an article of dress worn by the female sex,
and differs from the pelisse, and the redin
eote,and the fichu, and the satin merveilleux
polonaise, and those things. We supposed
everybody knew what pelerine is. Norris
town Herald.
He had been at Coney Island all day and
was struggling to get his boots off: "I never
(hie) go down to the island," he said to his
wife," and look (hie) out ver the broad ex
panse of sea, 'thout being (hie) filled with
wonder." "Filled with what?" she asked.
"Wonder." "Wonder! That's a brand
of whiskey I never heard of." New York
Sun.
: "Well, Brown, old man, what is your plat
form for this campaign?" asked a young man
about town of a convivial acquaintance. "I
don't know, my boy, but I guess it will be
reform. I struck father to-day for a ten and
he shut down on me. He said it would be a
tariff for clothes and shoes only this year. I
guess I'll have to -bolt if I want to settle my
bills." Williamsport Breakfast Table.
Jenkins was in the pantry trying to open a
can of tomatoes, and making a good deal of
unnecessary noise about it. "What in the
world is the matter?" demanded his wife
from the kitchen. "What are you trying to
open that can of tomatoes with?" "Can
opener, of course," he growled back. "Do
you suppose I am trying to open it with my
teeth?" - "No; I thought perhaps, judging
from your language, you were trying to open
it with prayer." New York Mail.
A YOUNG GIR.L'8 PERIL.
Fascinated toy a Snake, WhlcU Wind.
Itself Abont Her Ankle.
From the Huntington (Pa.) Newa .
Miss Elizabeth Carson, aged 20 years, of
Roxbnry, was directed to repair to the black
berry patch, a short distance from the house,
and gather berries for supper. When the
young girl had filled her basket she experi
enced a peculiar sensation in her left ankle,
which appeared as though wound tightly
with a rope. Miss Carson, to her unspeak
able horror, discovered -that a huge black
snake had coiled itself around her ankle, and
was drawing itself up tighter so as to posi
tively stop the circulation in the limb and
cause the most excruciating pain. She had
no sooner set her eyes upon the reptile than
it charmed her, and she was rendered power
less to free herself. How long she remained
in this condition Miss Carson is unable to
say, bnt thinks it must have been over ten
minutes. -
- The snake wound itself so tightly around
her ankle that the muscles of her leg were
drawn out of their natural position, and the
.ircnlation of the blood having been checked,
the contortions of the muscles had the effect
of drawing the eyes of the snake from that
of the victims, thus breaking the charm.
Volition having retarned, Miss Carson pulled
her sun-bonnet from her head and, winding
it around her right hand, caught the snake
by the head, uncoiled it from her ankle and
threw it with such force against a stone fence
near by as to kill it instantly. It was after
ward found to measure five feet three inches
in length. Miss Carson reached home in an
exhausted condition. Medical assistance was
promptly stmmoned, and everything done to
relieve her sufferings, but it is feared that
gangrene will ensue, on account of the with
ered condition of the limb, which is rapidly
falling away. The mucles of the ankle have
been reduced to mere threads, and the cir
culation of the blood was entirely stopped.
AN UNKNOWN SET.
The Chrlstadelphlan- Creed and the
Strange History or Its Followers.
From the Buffalo Express.
Thomas Williams of Waterloo, la., is one
of a small and almost wholly unknown sect
called Christadelphians. His discourse in
this city tended to show the belief of the de
nomination which he represents. His hear
ers were few in number, only a small portion
of them differing in religious creed from the
speaker. Williams stated that the Christa
delphians were the result of a revival brought
about some forty or fifty years ago by a Dr.
Thomas of London. Dr. Thomas had come
to this country, settling in Virginia, where he
was for some time among the Campbellites.
He disagreed in belief with Alexander Camp
bell, and started a new sect by lecturing
through the country and editing a paper
called The Herald of the Kingdom as a relig
ious organ The bible is made the founda
tion of all beliefs of the sect. It holds that
there is one God inhabiting light, unap
proachable, set everywhere present by uni
versal spirit; that Jesus of Nazareth was a
moral man born of Mary by the holy spirit,
and thus constituting the son of God; that
he was put to death as a sin offering, and af
terwards resurrected and take into heaven,
where he is to remain until his second com
ing. It is claimed that man when created was a
living soul with the possibility of being mor
tal or immortal. By sin he became mortal
subject to death; that in death he is abso
lutely unconscious, and therefore depends
upon a resurrection future life; that immor
tality does not exist in man, but will be im
parted to him as a reward after resurrection
and judgment. The wicked, instead of suf
fering everlasting torments, are to be put out
of existence.
Christ, at his second coming, which is to
be an appearance in the flesh, will rule for
100 years, during which time men will be
born and die as in the present dispensation.
The resurrection and judgment of the whole
world will take place, the wicked being de
stroyed and the righteous receiving immor
tality. Thereafter, throughout all times, the
righteous shall inherit the world in mate
rial bodies with Jesus Christ as a king in the
flesh over all. The denomination have no
clergy ,the meetings being conducted by com
petent lay brethren.
The Christadelphians have existed as a sect
in Buffalo for about eighteen years, during
which time weekly services have been held
amoncr members until recently at their va
rious houses. The members at present num
ber less than a dozen.
THE THIKIBLE.
The Orlsln or the Useful Little Ar
ticle. From the Dorcas Magazine.
The thimble is a Dutch invention that was
first brought to England in 1695 by one John
Lofting,who began its manufacture at Isling
ton, near London.gaining thereby both honor
and profit. Its name was derived from the
words thumb and bell, being for a long time
called thumble, and only lately thimble. Old
records say that thimbles were first worn on
the thumbs; but we can scarcely perceive
how they could be of much use there. Form
erly they were made of brass and iron only,
but of late years steel, silver, gold, horn,
ivory and even pearl and glass have all been
used for making thimbles. I saw some very
beautiful ones in China that were exquisitaly
carved, of pearl, and bound with gold, and
the end also of gold. These pearl thimbles
are quite as costly and far prettier than those
made entirely of gold. Usually there is a
pearl sheath for the scissors, and a dainty
needle-book of pearl, edged with gold, to ac
company the thimble, and the whole is in
closed in an exquisite little pocket case
shaped like a book and bound iu satin and
red.
A thimble owned by the queen consort of
Siani is shaped like a lotus bud, this being
the royal flower of that country, and almost
everything about the court bearing, in a
greater or less degree, some impress of the
lotus. This thimble is of gold, thickly stud
ded with diamonds that are so arranged as to
form a lady's name and the date of marriage.
It was a bridal gift of the king, who, having
seen the English and American ladies at his
court using thimbles, took this method of
introducing them among his own peo
ple. In Naples, very pretty thimbles, composed
of lava from Mount Vesuvius, are occasion
ally sold, but rather as curiosities than for
rare utility, being, from the extreme bitter
ness of the lava, very easily broken. I have
also heard of thimbles . made of asphaltum,
from the Dead sea, and of one composed of
the fragment of the old elm tree at Cam
bridge, Mass. .under which General Washing
ton stood when taking command of the
United States army in July, 1775; but I do
not suppose that any of these were intended
to be used in sewing. .
In the ordinary manufacture of gold and
silver thimbles, thin plates of the metal are
introduced into the die and then punched in
to shape. But in Paris the French have a
way of their own, quite different from ours,
for making gold thimbles, that are said to
be much more durable than those made in
the usual way. Pieces of very thin sheet
iron are cut into disks of about two inches in
diameter. These, after being heated to red
ness, are struck by means of a punch into a
succession of holes of a gradually increasing
depth to give the proper shape. The thimble
is then trimmed,, polished and indented
around its outer surface with tiny holes. It
is next converted into steel by a process called
cementation, then tempered, scoured, and
brought to a blue color. After all this is
completed a thin sheet of gold is introduced
into the interior and fastened to the steel by
a mandrel, while gold leaf is attached firmly
by pressure to the outside, the edges being
seamed in a small groove made to receive
them. This completes the thimble that will
last for years. The steel used in its con
struction will scarcely wear out in a long life
time, and the gold, if worn away.is easily re
placed. The Elr.t Rothschild.
Letters from Frankforton-the Main.
No trace will be left of the houses in which
Borne, the German writer, and Meyer Ams
chel Rothschild, the founder of that family's
fortunes, first saw the light. Since 1872
only a single row of houses was left, as one
side of the street had been pulled down after
the fall of two houses, when thirty-one per
sons were buried in the ruins. Looking at
the Judengasse in its present aspect one is
struck by the narrowness of the hoHses.
They have three stories facing the street, and
the whole of the facade is studded with small
windows. The gables are pointed, and access
is gained to the houses by three or four steps.
The doors open into a dark passage , at the
other end of which is a worm-eaten wooden
staircase, the boards of which bend as one
puts one's foot upon them. The rooms are
small and low-pitched, and they are inhabit
ed by a few of the poorest and most squalid
families, Jews snd Christians alike. The
room upon the ground floor is used as a shop
by dealers in old clothes, shoemakers and
tinkers. Several of the wealthiest merchants
in Germany at the present time may regard
these hovels as the homes of thier ancestors
who are now replaced by these poor wretches.
There is little that is picturesque about the
Judengasse, and those who have had their
coriosity whetted by the descriptions in "Bae
deker" will have seen nothing comparable to
what one comes across in Italian ghettos,
More curious than the Judengasse is a tavern
hard by where Jewish beggars meet a night
fall. This tavern, kept by a man named
Levy, consists of one long room, the walls of
which are painted yellow. Little drink is
consumed there, but the customers take their
meals there and play cards. Bound a circu
lar table a cosmopolitan company, consisting
of JeWB from Poland, where the caftan and
long curls are still worn, as well as from
Paris and Berlin, may be seen conversing in
low tones, and upon the evening when the
correspondent paid a visit to the place, in the
company of a detective, several women were
there knitting, one of them being one of the
handsomest persons he had ever seen, with
magnificent eyes, and white skin, and jet
black hair encircled by a handkerchief of red
wool.
An African "Charmer'." Victims.
From the Pall Mall Budget.
An African mail steamer some time since
brought an account of a discovery of human
remains in a bush near the town of Lagos,
which to the belief that the victims had been
decoyed there and butchered, as all of the
skeletons appeared to be those of women.
The last steamer which reached Liverpool
from West Africa has brought some further
particulars on the subject. The native,
Adeoshun, who is under arrest charged with
the murders, has for some time past been re
garded as a Ju-Ju medicine man, and had
great influence over the women of Lagos ow
ing to his dealings in "charms" and "fetish."
The first charge against Adeoshun which was
investigated was that of the murder of Mrs.
Selina Cole. This lady disappeared myste
riously some time since, and it was thought
that she had been sold into slavery. Subse
quently her husband became aware that cer
tain property which formerly belonged to his
wife was in possession of the accused. A
search warrant was obtained and the goods
to the value of some 150 were found on the
premises of Adeoshun, all of which was said
to belong to Mrs. Cole. The matter having
been taken up by Inspector Willoughby, of
the Honssa police, a bush near the town was
searched and the search resulted in the dis
covery of first four skeletons and subsequent
ly eight more twelve in all. The remains
of Mrs. Cole were among the number. It is
said that the accused, by the aid of his
charms, was believed by the women of the
colony to be able to bring them wealth.
From Mrs. Cole alone it is asserted that
Adeoshun obtained some 5,000 previous to
her disappearance. It is stated that the pris
oner induced his victims to meet him in a
lonely part of Ikoyi (near where the bodies
were found) and there compel them to kneel
down with their eyes blindfolded. A live
fowl was then put into each hand of the vic
tims and while in this position it is believed
they were despatched by the aid of some
heavy weapon. So great was the excitement
among the people of the place, particularly
among the women, while the prisoners ex
amination was going oq that a force of Hous
sas had to be stationed at the police court to
protect him from the violence of a mob of
about three thousand people.
The steamer Block Island got aground near
Deep River Wednesday morning during a
heavy fog while going from Norwich to Mid
diet own, and could not get off until noon.
Consequently the excursion of the Baptist
Sunday school of Middletown was postponed
antil Friday.
NEW FALL GOODS.
Having commenced our pur
chases we will offer in every de
partment one of the best stock
of
DRY GOODS
in the city, at prices that
DEFY COMPETITION.
Our goods are selected with
great care as regards
PRICE AND QUALITY,
and our stock is large and varied
so that we can suit the most fas
tidious. We make no specialty
of the
CHEAP TRASH
so often quoted in glowing ad
vertisements, but we make a spe
cialty of
STANDARD GOODS.
WILCOX & CO.,
767 771
CHAPEL STREET.
DECORATIVE PAPER HANGINGS
PAINTS, OILS, GLASS, ETC.
11. ATT & THOMPSON,
64 and 6G Orange St. and 5 Center St.
jiysi5
W. IS. TRB1V1IGLLA,
MANUFACTURER OF MATTRESSES.
Hair, Cotton, Husk Excelsior; also Feather Beds,
Pillows, Bolsters, etc. Renovating Mattresses a
Specialty. Will call and deliver at residence in city.
Prices the Lowest. 81 EAST WATER STREET,
a!7d6m New Haven. Conn.
rriHE LITTLE ACHE IN SMALL of
I back, the slight pain over the hips,
the weary, worn-out feeling, are very
significant and warn you of serious re
sults that will follow. Attend to them
at once. Use BURDOCK BLOOD BIT
TERS, which will relieve these little
aches and pains, and save you a lone
spell of sickness, doctor bills, &c.
N AFTER-DINNER
HEADACHE is
V unpleasant, and to
a business man
the stomach is
of BURDOCK
unprofitable. usually
the cause. One dose
BLOOD BITTERS, 15 or
20 minutes af-
ter eatmer will stop such
a headache, and
orth remember-
do you good. This is w
ing.
BURDOCK BLOOD BITTERS'
A BILIOUS HEADACHE IS EASILY
cured if you use the right medicine
which is BURDOCK BLOOD BITTERS.
The headache is so very uncomfortable
and the medicine so cheap; do not delay
but call at your druggist's and get a bot
tle. JOUR STOMACH AND FOUL
breath can be quickly regulated by
RDOCK BLOOD BITTERS, and you
will not require more than one bottle to
prove this statement. Try it and be
convinced, s8 Odlw
MANOTACTMNu STOCK.
20 PER CENT. INVESTMENT.
Books are now open for subscriptions to
the issue of the balance of 3,000 shares
of Preferred Stock of the "Foot.
Patent Pin Company," of New York, drawing 3 per
cent, dividends quarterly, at par value of $5 each.
Subscribers to this preferred stock will receive a
bonus of shares of the Common Stock of the com
pany, drawing 8 per cent, yearly, making this a 20
per cent, investment.
"Foote's Pin Patents,"which are operated by this
Company, are issued in England, France, Germany,
Belgium and United States, bearing date January,
188a, and are operated there under royalty to this
company by Messrs. Kirby, Beard & Co., Raven
burst Works (the largest makers of Pins in the
world), and in France, Germany and Belgium by
RattisseauFreres, factories at Orleans and Paris.
The sale of our goods manufactured under royalty
to this company has enormously increased each
season all over the world, and this company now
propose to manufacture exclusively themselves
The proceeds derived from sale of this preferred
stock will be used in the purchase of a factory al
ready in operation in the State of Connecticut to
make "Foote Patent Hairpins," Invisible Pins,
Safety Pins, Toilet Pins &c, &c.
Among the leading Wholesale Houses who handle
our goods are, in
NEW YORK. Calhoun, Robinson & Co.,
Mills Gibb, Dunham, Buckley & Co., Sylvester,
Hilton & Co., H. B. Claflin & Co., Wm. H. Lyon &
Co., Bates, Reed & Cooley, Sweetser, Pembrook &
Co., Butler, Clapp & Co., Halsted, Haines & Co.,
Harbison Sc. Loder, E. 8. Jeffrey & Co., T. J. Rob
erts, and all retail houses.
BOSTON. Coleman, Meade & Co., Brown,
Durrell & Co., Sheppard, Newell & Co., R. H. White
& Co., Jordan, Marsh & Co.
CHICAGO. Marshall Field & Co., J. V. Far
well & Co., Mandall Bros.
BA LXIMOBE. Hodges Bros.
SYRACUSE. Sperry, Neal & Hyde.
ST. LOUIS. Rosenheim, Levis & Co., Wm.
Barr D: G. Co.
PHILADELPHIA Hood. Bonbright & Co..
John Wannemaker and others
Troup.
K V FRANCISCO.-Hoffman Bros. & Blum.
Schweitzer, Sachs & Co., and also houses in every
other city in the United States.
The duty on these goods is 45 percent, ad valorem,
hsoiries beine protected by Patents. Goods of t,hi
class consumed in the United States alone last year
i j n . .... a - nnn wi
were vm utm w. '-.-' w,vw,vw.
The officers of the company refer to Hon. Clinton
Rice, No. 1 Washington Building, New York, Presi
dent; Messrs. Morris, Browne & Co., Bankers, New
York; Cashier Columbia Bank, corner Fifth avenue
and 42d street, New York; Messrs. Joseph Stines &
Co., Bankers, 80 Exchange Place, New York.
For further information or prospectus. 'nartiM
wishing to subscribe address
. Sec'y Foote Patent Pin Company.
Offices 8 & 8, WJ5 BroadwayVN V.
s3

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