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Morning journal and courier. [volume] (New Haven [Conn.]) 1848-1894, September 15, 1884, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015483/1884-09-15/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE LARGEST BAILY STGATSPAPER I1V THE CITY.
THE CAUBIKfiTON PVBLISHISG CO.!
OFFICE, 400 STATE STREET.
VOL. Ln.
i"W HAVEN, CONST. MONDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 15, 1884.
NO.-. 240
We have a few par
ticularly cheap things
tn flannel Suitings
and Cloths now on sale.
J. N. ADAM & CO.
During this week we
mean to try to sell a
quantity of Nottingham
Lace Curtains by mak
ing them cheaper than
they ought to be.
J. N. ADAM & CO.
We are selling blank
ets cheaper than the
other dealers,
f. N. ADAM & CO.
Wo
WW V l-V V f V
iared to offer better val
ue in flannels, plain
and twilled, medium
andheayy, scarlet, grey,
blue and white, than at
any previous time.
J. N. ADAM & CO.
We have just received
the first delivery of our
importation of Kid
Gloves for the fall
trade.
J. N. ADAM & CO
We have just opened
a complete line of Quilt
ed Comfortables, which
we contracted for with
the leading manufac
turers so7ne time ago.
The Sateen Quilt is a
novelty.
f. N. ADAM & CO.
etiAY'S SPECIFIC MEDICINE.
TRADE MARK Tn ami EnonTRADC MARK
car. for JVmlml Wk-
1 tfa.t follow M. KaonM
V otB.lf-ire! lo of
V jf M.mory, Cnlreiml I
J Htd,FlnlU Bk.
& -T DinTOofVWon,Pis-
f VS. nr.01dA. mod m
XL E . "VA. other dlw thtl-ltd
K.wak of fwirn-tioert to Tcfan. SMMy. whB fevgfctafnn
Whom lh mwitcln. Ii bocht D. fct ufw, Vll ; nSw J to tt
mnfrtnre, Un reqnftmlt- 1. 1 tl.l thrr , E
precompiled with. S twiM... trtUofow. Ito
"otSico.tcf ooimtOTfto, w. Ian adopUd lh. YiUew Wiwppw ;
"rrrSVwtlcMtan D onrpMBpW1. wfclcL w. nifR to m4 flw2 b.
mlllo UToMu TrVSp He MW.. It K.U by .11 dnrat
tl wpc'kpfoiWpnckrfr$iorwiir..ltfrw) mil o
lk.r!itoftfcoBy,lTifdiw!i)
The Cray Medicine Co., Buffalo! N. T.
SOIaD BY RICHARDSON CO..
sew javz cox.
GEORGE W. BUTTON,
ARCHITECT.
Fruit, Foreign and Domestic,
WHOLESALE and RETAIL.
mStf
1.075 Chapel street.
Horses and Carriages For Sale
and To Let.
Carriage Making in all its branches. Repairing
and painting a specialty. Anyone wishing to buy
or sell an outfit will find it to their advantage to
give us m cau. .
ClILLOM &. CO.
jegltf 108 FRANKLIN STREET,
REMOVAL.
ore have removed to our new
Building .
Tios. 821-823 Grand Street,
Which is very spacious, well lighted, and four en
tire floors on which to display our new styles or
Furniture of all Kinds.
We are now carry a very large stock and will be
ble to meet the demands of our constantly increas-
ng trade.
tw it! SAME LOW PRICES
And Liberal Terms as hare here
tofore been tne ieaiure 01
of this establishment.
1 J. KELLLT & CO.,
Nos. 821 etrt d Q2Q
GRAND STREET.
6
Ensrlish Branches.
"TV MiSS MARY S. JOHNSTON will take a limited
1 number of private pupils in the English
sel514t NO. 57 WHITNEY AVENUE.
' ltlme. LBvalave -
R
ESUMES her instructions in French and Ger-
. maa on September l t h. -
88 18t 870 CONGRESS AVENUE.
MRS. CANFIELD'S SCHOOL
276 Crown Street,
Will reopen MONDAY. Sept. 32. el0 9t
The Elderase.
TJTAMILY and Day school, 136 gherman Avenue.
1 rww, nf otiwlw fmm JHm!li-i7 1n Collegiate.
Special attention given to English Language and
Literature. Beopens Heptemrjeraj. 1110
s3 18t MISSES BANGS, Principals.
Miss JVott'B
Enzllih and. Frencli Family rn.nA Day
Ncliool tor Vouiik Iadles.
S3 Wall street. New Haven, Conn. The 12th year be
gins i uesaay, sept. xa.
Circulars sent upon ap
plication.
se i w
C. A. DOUGLASS,
TEACHER OF PIAJSfO,
295 Columbus Avenug.
au80 lmo :
A Training Class Tor Klntergart-
- ners. . . ... . . . v
WiU open in New Haven, Conn., 6eptember23. For
circulars address MISS ANGELINE BROOKS, 15
Home Place, New Haven, uonn. , '
jy3 2taw, tham3m ' ;
TWIss Li. A. miller's
School of Musio
Reopens sept. ia, l
ln.lraiMntfllinniicTaiieM
Good instruction given at moderate prices. Offlce
hours rrom x to 7 p. m. na uapei oimtt)
Room 2. sei am
mixs Annah 3. Chanin
"ITTTLL commence Vocal and Instrumental In-
WV otmwtirtTi 9, Tnsiirn.nne Klllldin. on Sept. 11.
Lesson hours, Monday and Thursday each week,
from 2 until CH o'clock. For terms, Sc, inquire at
M I'. ... . -Kin rm riianal ot mif nr
at mv residence. No. 30 cottage sreet. sws im-
MISS 0RT0N AND MISS NICHOLS,
Day School for Young Ladies and
nn wTTTiWE'eTii v jav.twr f'irfnln.ra mn m
obtained on application at
MRS. PARDEE'S
Will
reopen Wednesday, Sep
tember 17th,
AT
133 COLLKVE STREET,
where application may be made.
Greenwich Academy.
TTmipJ T.it-ernrv Ponrses. with Musical Institute and
Commercial College. Founded 1802. Both
sexes. Influences decidedly religious. Home care
and comforts. Charmingly located on Narragan
ett Bay, and on direct.route from New York to
Boston. Grand opportunities for salt water bathing
and boating. Terms, moderate. Opens Sept. 1
Catalogue free.
Rev. O. II. FERNALD, A. HT., Prlncl-
pal. jKast oreenwicn, . a.
PIANOFORTE
HARMONY AND COMPOSITION
MRS. BRAND
Has recommenced her lessons for the season, and
has vacancies for a few pupils. Terms moderate.
121 YORK. STREET,
s2 3mo Two doors from Crown.
West End Institute
Will reopen on Thursday, Sept.
vain.
KnArl.il advantages for ttae Study of
Elocution & Free-hand Drawing.
Lessons are given in any branch of Decorative
Work in oil or water colors or mineral colors on
porcelain; also Repousse brass work. For terms,
send ror circular to rtuwe hltccu
IfcwE "O" & JI C2 .
F. A. FOWLER,
TEACHER OF
PIANO, ORGAN and HARMONY.
AUSTIN BUILDING, 337 CHAPEL STREET,
- Rooms 8 and 9.
Jl correct touch a specialty. ' au30tf
Miss Fanfiie Howe.
CULTIVATION OF THE VOICE (Italian method)
and PIANO INSTRUCTION.
Charles T. Howe,
FLUTE AND PIANO INSTRUCTION,
108 CROWN STREET, NEAR TEMPLE STREET.
selStf .
Grove Hall, No. 83 Grove Street.
MISS OTONTFORT'S SCHOOL for Young
Ladies and Little Girls will begin the tenth
year on Wednesday, tsepiemoer rrcutunm wo
taught by a Parisian lady, resident in family. The
studio which is open to pupils not otherwise con
nected with the school will be in charge of a lady
who has had thorough art training in Europe. While
especial attention will be given as before to draw-
colors various novelties in decorative work will be
introaucecu
CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC,
MTJSXC. VocAland Instramentftl and Tonlngr.
ART. Drawing. Painting, Modeling and Portrait.
OBATOBV. I.lterRtuic aud IMtfmxtm.
HOJtf IJ. Elejrant accommodations for 600 lady Btu3entj
FALfj rrXUtltl begins Sept. nth. Beantifnlly Bl d
Calendar free. Address E. T&OKJEE. Director. '
FOAJIKLIll iMtCABEi BOSTON, MASS
No. 817 Chapel street. Thorough commercial train
ing for young men end ladies. Evening sessions.
AtjdIv for circular eivine full information. sl3
YALE BUSINESS COLLEGE.
NIGHT SCHOOL. .
Terms 10 for Three Months.
Apply at
No. 37 Insurance Buildings
se!5 tt. c. LOyERlBGE.
XLLTDIFGTiEAirD
White Lead,
Varnishes, Glue, all grades,
Sand Paper, Glass,
mixed Paints, all shades.
Sponges.
THOMPSON & BELDEH.
396 AND 398 STATE STREET,
COURIER BUILDING.
TfiOY STEAM LAUNDRY.
AN INTRODUCTION.
"TT"E have been established in this city nearly a
VY year, but have never before had a direct in
troduction to the readers of the CouniSR. We came
to New Haven with the intention of establishing a
FIRST-CLASS LAUNDRY, and from the liberal
patronage we have had we are confident we have
fully succeeded ln onr endeavor. We
wish to add that our equipment is unexcelled; our
resources are unlimited, and our knowledge of the
business, we will let those who know us judge;but the
rapid growth our business has had is due to nothing
but the quality of our work and the gentlemanly
manner in which we use all.
Goods called for and delivered without extra
charge.
Telephone connection; '
- .
A.J. CRAWFORD & CO.,
80 CENTER STREET.
se8tf
17 LECl'RO-VOLTAIC TiI,T and other Euctrio
tJ Appuakces are sent on SO Days Trial TO
KEN ONLY, YOUNG OH OLT, who are Buffer
ing from Nervous Debujtt, Lost Vitality,
Wastlxo Wraknssses, and all those diseases of a
pEaj&osA:, KATUEg, restiltlu rrom Abcsfs and
Othsa !xv3s. Speedy relief and complete
restoration to Hkaltu, Viuob and Manhood
Odaramtxkd. Send at ooce for Illustrated
Pamphlet free. Addreea
VOLTAIC BELT CO.. Mom hall, HTfcb. .
II m 1
.:P! . . 1fcp m
TRUNKS. TRUNKS, TRunKS.
BAGS ! BAGS ! BAGS !
A complete stock of Tourists'
Articles. The only exclusive trunk
store in the city. . Trunks, Bags
and Sample Cases made to order.
Repairing a specialty. Old trunks
taken in exchange. ' Good Goods
at Low prices at
CROFTJT & CO.'S,
210 Claapol Street
BELOW THE BRIDGE.
L C. Pl'AEP & sim,
CHICKENS 1 1
ForBroilmgmd Roasting.
riwuMi Specialty.
L C. PFAFF & SON
7 and 9 Church Street. ;
; REAT
IIDSTJIIEE
Closing-Out Sale I
OF
COMETS, HOOP SKIRTS
AND
BUSTLES
IN OUR
CORSET DEPARTMENT,
Bolton & Neely,
SUCCESSORS
E. IflAIiliEY & CO.
jy
Rubber Hose !
LARGEST STOCK,
LOWEST PRICES
IN THE CITY.
FOSKETT & BISHOP,
BRANCH STORE,
462 STATE STREET,
Opposite our Old Stand.
mylOSm
ELECTRICITY IS LIFE.
Whv will oeerole dins' to the absurb idea that thav
must take medicine? Electricity will reach where
medicine has failed, as 15 years1 experience has
proved. If you are troubled with Catarrh, or Neural
gia, or Rheumatism, Throat or Lung Troubles, Gen
eral Debility, Headache, Kidney Disease, try
ELECTRICITY.
Go and see Dr. Cummuies. His method differs
from all others. His success is wonderful.
Ladies treated successfully. Ladies can consult
with the Doctor's wife afternoons. Consultation
free.
DS?.rW.CUMIHGS,
Wo 4L Church Street.
ocl3 WOOD'S BLOCK.
Not only to the suites
Wasted by disease doe
uuuges r ooa suppie
fment the proper medi-
Icme and bring bade
ptremrth and comfort.
out tne aeiicate motner
will find its dailv use
ijustwhat is needed to
icnecK ana supplement
;tne arammaae upon na
ture's forces.- Try it,
mothers, and be con.
kinced. Recipes to suit
Jdifferent tastes accom
pany each can. It does not tax the digestive organs,
but is strengthening to both invalids and children
Sold by druggists. 35c. up. WOOLRICH & CO.,
auouiXKunCT,
FLOUR $4.80 A BARREL.
No matter what vonr erocer says, flour never was
so cheap since the war ; and you can buy at Hughes'
WBolesale store by the barrel, half barrel or bag, at
prices from $4. S'O and upwards. We save you
1 per Darrel Dy coming to neaaquaruers.
WHOLESALE BUTTER PRICES,
so tubs choice creamery butter SSMc. Der lb. 50
tubs fine butter 20e. per lb. Ten pounds (wooden
tubs) butter $2.20 per tub. 25 pounds (wooden tubs)
butter S5.00 per tub. Butter in 6 pound pails $1.37
per pail.
Tea, Wholesale and Retail.
Fine tea (Japan dust) 20c. per pound. Good
Japan tea 30c. per pound. Choice tea (Oolong or
Japan) 40c per pound. Best tea in market (with
china cup and saucer free) 50c. per pound.
Lenijrli Coal Cheap At
GEO. W. II. HUGHES',
Independent Coal Dealer, 34 Church St.
TURFING AND GRADING.
James H. KIucDonald,
PRACTICAL GARDENER,
21 Martin Street.
Order Book at F. S. Piatt's Seed Store, 374 and 37
State street. se8 lot
"JIBS. M. E. COWLES, M.
CHRONIC DISEASES A SPECIALTY.
93 Olive Street.
Office hours 10 to 12 and 11 to 4. ' "ml5 3m
PALL HATS.
$1, S1.25, Sl.SO,
$1.75, $3.00, $3.25,
$2.50, $3.00.
ALL THE LATEST
HATS
Now ready at prices fur. below
formerly.
KILB0URN & CO'S, 816 Chapel St.
Large Invoice
OF-
aOSSAMER CLOAKS
TO BE SOLD
For the Next Thirty Days,
EACH AT 95 CENTS.
AT THE
GOODYEAR RUBBER STORE.
73 Church Street,
CORNER CENTER,
Opposite the Postofflce.
F. C. TTJTTLE,
- Proprietor.
yi
E.S.STEVENS
WILL SELL
TEA, COFFEE, MEATS,
Vegetables and Groceries
AT REDUCED PRICES.
97 WH ALLEY AVENUE
Telephone. Goods deliveredS3
selO
Household Ammonia.
In the Toilet, Nursery, Laundry or House Cleaning
insures neaitn, ou,y buu wwimiiww.
.... For sale by
J. D. DEWELL & CO., :
suiTeodSms and all Grocers. '
LNjjHI I II AM,
Nervous Dtbilityc'.i
Hie People s
Dry
BL-ANKETS
FROM
AUCTION.
We have received another
Auction ,rand shall olfer them on
MONDAY MORNING
' 1 ... - '
at prices which we will GUAKAJVTJEE to be
than equal value can he bought for elsewhere in this
city. . .' . '
A comparison solicited.
A GRAND BUHIBITION
of fliie Turkish Rugs, Portias and Embroideries of Pal
ace Work sold at less than
by native Armenians from
last but a few weeks. Ask
hundred years old Rugs.
PROCTOR, MAUI S CO,
NEW HAVEN.
UNRIPE FRUIT, Impure Water, Unhealthy Cli
mate, Unwholesome Food, Malaria, Epidemic
and Contagious Diseases, Cholera Morbus, Cramps,
Fains, Indigestion, Diarrhoea, Colds, Chills, Simple
Fevers, Exhaustion, Nervousness, or loss of Sleep
that beset the traveller or household at this season,
are nothing to those protected by a timely use of
SANFORD'S GINGER, the Delicious Summer
Medicine.
AS A BEVERAGE, with hot or cold water,
sweetened, or hot or cold milk, or added to
ice water, lemonade, effervescent draughts and min
eral waters, it forms a refreshing and Invigorating
beverage, unequalled in simpucity and purity by
any tonic medicine, while free from alcoholic reac
tion. Avoid mercenary dealers, who for afew cents'
extra profit try to force upon yon their own or
otlu-rovfho!i you call for SANFORD'S GINGBR.
Bold by wholesale and retail druggists, grocers,
etc.. everywhere.
Potter Drug and Chemical Co., Boston.
I. S. MILLER, M. -D.
318 Chapel Street, between Or
ango and Church Streets.
Residence, - Tontine Hotel
- NEW HAVEN, CONN.
OFFICE HOURS S to 12 a. m., 2 to 6 p. m, 7 to
g. m.
UNDAY 9 to 10 a. m.. 5 to p. m. m7Hm
Elastic Hose.
KNEE OAFS, ANKLETS AND
ARM PIECES.
Silk Abdominal Supporters.
For the relief of corpulency, enlarged veins and
weak joints. Since we commenced the manufac
ture of the above, using only fresh imported stock,
we are able to furnish the best fitting and most dur
able goods that can be made. A fact that our regu
lar customers do not fail to appreciate.
OUR STOCK OF TRUSSES,
Manufactured especially for our retail trade, in
eludes almost every form of Truss of any value in
market, which with our facilities for making to or
der special appliances and long experience in the
treatment of Hernia, enables us to guarantee relief
and comfort to every one needing support.
t
Personal attention given to tho selection and
roper adjustment of all appliances.
E. L. Washburn, Jl". D.,
CM SJ MOEC
AND
OX
ST.
BENEDICT BUILDING.
DEPOT CARS PASS THE DOOR.
White Brandy
OR Preserving.
The
Erenuine article.
EDW. E. HALL & SON.
B3
ABDEEW GOODMAN,
'
N0S. 160,
1A9 (TROW NT.
v' "
Fine Assortment of Fancy and. Staple
Orocerles.
FLOUR! FLOUR J
At reduced prices.
Old Government Java Coffee 25c per lb.
Fine Butter 25c per lb, 4 1-2 lbs $1.
Splendid Cream uneese loc per iu.
5 3 boxes sardines 25c. r " .
a-ID cans uryuou iuw,bhci v.
3-lb cans Brook Trout 45c.
Large assortment of Canned Meats.
Great variety of fruits received every day.
FINE WINES, CLARETS, SHERRIES AND BRAN
DIES.
Call and see us. Goods delivered to any part or tne
city. .
ANDREW GOODMAN,
o. 160 and 168 Crown sireei
GOODMAN'S BUILDING, FOUR DOORS FROM
CHURCH STREET, NEAR GRAND OP
ERA HOUSE.
aul2 . . Union Copy.
REMOVAL.
THE
NEW YORK BRANCH
LOAN O F F ICE
NOW PERMAFENTLY LOCATED AT
42 Church Street.
10 OY LOANED.
Liberal advances made on all kinds of personal
property.
Unredeemed Pledges
For sale at low prices.
Square Dealing With AH.
(SOLOMON FRY.
frio
Mrs. E. Jones Young,
DENTIST,
S3 Chapel,cor.State,Street R'd'g
Qver xirOOKS S. lo s an, ouu 1 ur ommo.
- All wotk wnrnuuM,
iffSf -. Offlce hours from 9 a. m. to
5 p.m. -
jag.
Claret and Sauterne Wines.
-tTV hKTA reonfved t.hi dav 100 cases of Esche
YV Bauer & Co. 's Wines, our own direct importa
tion from Bordeaux. Having handled these Wines
for the past twenty -two years we can confidently
recommend them for purity and general excellence
to all of our customers desiring reliable and
"straight" Wines. EDW. 15. MALI, & HON,
jy2i 770 Chapel 8treet.
FIRST-CLASS GROCERIES.
TEA.
COFFEE.
SPICES.
rvannnd imods. Fresh Fruit, all kinds, dailv.
Choice Creamery Butter. A full line of Sea Food
all kinds m their season, races as low as tne tow
est.
Orders taken and goods delivered.
EDWARD F. DOBAKB, '
aujet 860 State Street, eer. Clark.
Goods
Sore
large lot of Blankets from
the far East. This sale will
to see .the three and four
PREPARED with the utmost skill from IMPOR
TED GINGER, CHOICE! AROMATICS and
the purest and best of MEDICINAL FRENCH
BRANDY, from the world-renowned vintners,
Messrs. OTARD, DUPUY & CO., COGNAC, ren
dering it vastly superior to all other " Gingers," all
of which aro made with common alcohol, largely
impregnated with poisonous fusil oil, and strength
ened with cayenne pepper. .
AS A PURE FRUIT STIMULANT, for the
aged, mentally and physically exhausted, care
worn, or overworked, for delicate females, especially
mothers, for those recovering from debilitating dis
eases, and as a means of reforming those addicted
to an excessive use of alcobolia stimulants, it is
unequalled in the whole range of medicines. Be
ware of imitations. SANFORD'S is the finest
ginger in the world, and, notwithstanding the high
cost of its ingredients, is the cheapest family medi
cine. Sold everywhere.
Potter Drag and Chemical Co., Boston.
HENRY A. DANIELS, M. D.,
144 LEXINGTON AVENUE. NEAR 2Uth STREET
NEW YORK.
Hours, 8 to 1 and 5 to T.
Diseases of the Nervous iy3ten!, t Jenito Urinary
orsrans, impotence and sterility.
m6daw3m
"THE "ANDREWS,"
HEELER & CO., Eastern Agciits.
SEND FOR CIRCULAR.
83 TO 91 WASHINGTON STREET, CORNER ELM.
a2mwsfimnr BOSTON.
hit i itttti i fimTTTiTiTn nmnn
IMJMAUlUmM SlUb
20 PER CENT. INVESTMENT.
Books -are now open f oil subscriptions to
the issue of the balance of 3,000 shares
of Preferred Stock . of the "Footb
Patent Fin Company," of New York, drawing 3 per
cent, dividends quarterly, at par value of $5 each.
Subscribers to this preferred stock will receive a
bonus of shares of the Common Stock of the com
pany, drawing 8 per cent, yearly, making this a 20
per cent, investment.
"Footers Pin Patents, which are operated by this
Company, are issued in England, France, Germany,
Belgium and United States, bearing date January,
1883, and are operated there under royalty to this
company by Messrs. Kirby, Beard & Co., Raven
hurst Works (the largest makers of Pins in the
worlds and in France. Germany and Belgium by
Rattisseau Freres, factories at Orleans and Paris.
The sale of our goods manufactured under royalty
to this company has enormously - increased each
season all over the world, and this company now
propose to manufacture exclusively tnemseives.
The proceeds derived from sale of this preferred
stock will be used in the purchase of a factory al
ready in operation in the State of Connecticut to
make "Foote Patent Hairpins.'" Invisible Pins,
! Safety Fins, Touet nns. &c, &c.
Amoni
un, j. luf, u.ii., u.w.
the leading Wholesale Houses who handle
nong i
goods
our g.
NEW YORK. Calhoun, Robinson t Co.,
Mills & Gibb, Dunham, Buckley & Co., Sylvester,
Hilton & Co., H. B. Claftin & Co., Wm. H. Lyon &
Co., Bates, Reed & Cooley, Sweetsor, Peinbrook &
Co., Butler, Clapp & Co., Halsted, Haines & Co.,
Harbison & Loder, E. S. Jaffrey & Co., T. J. Rob
erts, and all retail houses.
BOSTON. Coleman, Meade & Co., Brown,
Durrell & Co., Sheppard, Newell & Co., R. H. White
& Co., Jordan, Marsh & Co.
OHICAGO.-Marshall Field & Co., J. V. Far
well & Co., Mandall Bros.
It A IXITTIOllE. Hodges Bros.
SYRACUSE. Sperry, Neal & Hydo.
ST. IjOCIS. Rosenheim. Levis & Co., Wm.
Barr D. G. Co.
PHILADELPHIA-Hood, Bonbright & Co.,
John Wannemaker and others
PROVIDENCE. Callender, McAuslan &
Troup.
SAN FRAN CISCO. Hoffman Bros. & Blum,
Schweitzer, Sachs & Co., and also houses in every
other city in the United States.
The duty on these goods is45 percent, ad valorem,
besides being protected by Patents. Goods of this
class consumed in the United States alone last year
were valued at over $3,000,000.
The officers of the company refer to Hon. Clinton
nice. No. 1 Washincrton Buiklin?. New York. Presi-
dent: Messrs. Morris, Browne Co., Bankers, New
"WHr? Oashier Columbia Bank.
York; Cashier Columbia Bank, comer Fifth avenue
and 42d street. New York; Messrs. Joseph. Stines &
Co., Bankers, 20 Exchange Place, New York.
For further information or prospectus, parties
wishing to subscribe address
E. W. WILLETT,
Sec'y Foote Patent Pin Company,
Offices 2 & 3, 205 Broadway, N. Y.
Jy31tf .
W. II. TRfiWHELLA,
MANUFACTURER OF MATTRESSES.
Hair, Cotton, Husk Excelsior; also Feather Beds,
Pillows, Bolsters, etc. Renovating Mattresses a
Specialty. Will call and deliver at residence In city.
Jrncestne jjowest. ni las i t A i r.iv l ivc. r. x ,
alvdom JNew waven, conn.
266th EDITION. PRICE ONLY $ I
BIT iTI A I Li POST PAID.
KNOW THYSELF.
A Great Medical
Work on
Manhood.
Exhausted Vitality, Nervous and Physical Debili
ty, Premature Decline in Man, Errors of Youth and
the untold miseries resulting from indiscretion or
excesses. A book for every man, young, middle
aged and old. It contains 125 prescriptions for all
acute and chronic diseases, each one of which is
invaluable. So found by the author, whose exper
ience for S3 years is such as probably never before
fell to the lot of any physician. 800 pages, bound in
beautiful French muslin, embossed covers, full gilt,
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Monday, September 15, 18S4.
REPUBLICAN NOMINATIONS.
FOB PRKSft)ENT,
J AMES 6. BLAINE, or Maine.
roa vice president,
JTOIIn'a. LOGAN, of Illinois.
State Electoral Ticket.
F.I.KOTORK-AT-LARaE,
Theodore D. Woolset, of New Haven.
Charles -A. Williams, of New Condon.
DISTRICT ELBCTOBS,
1st District I. Lutheb Sfeitcek, of Suffield.
2d District Joseph E. Sillimak, of Chester.
3d District James S. Atwood, of Plainfield.
4thDistrict Frederick Miles, of Salisbury.
For State Officer..
FOR GOVERNOR,
HENEY B. HARRISON, of New Haven.
FOR LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR,
LOBRIN A. COOKE, of Barkhamsted.
FOR SECRETARY OF fsTATE,
CHARLES A. RUSSELL, of Killingly.
FOR TREASURER,
V. B. CHAMBERLAIN, of New Britain.
FOR COMPTROLLER,
LUZERNE I. MUNS0N, of Waterbury.
XII H VOTING AHJIY.
The officials of the census office estimate
that the population has increased about
twelve per cent, since the census was taken
in 1880. Estimating the increase of voters
at the same rate it is found that the number
of male inhabitants twenty-one years of age
and over in the United States, omitting the
territories, is in round numbers 14,000,000.
Of this number 9,000,000 ore native white,
3,500,000 foreign born, and 1,500,000 colored.
New York has 600,000 .foreign born males
over 21 years of age.- Next in the list come
Illinois and Pennsylvania, with 300,000 each;
Ohio, fourth. In the list of foreign, bora, vo
ters, having bnt 200)000 foreign born citi
zens over 21 years of age. Wisconsin has
nearly as many, the number being but a
fraction below 200,000. Massachusetts and
Michigan have nearly 200,000 each; Califor
nia, Iowa, Minnesota and Missouri about
130,000 each. The State with the largest
number of colored voters is Georgia, which
has nearly 150,000 males above 21 yeai of
age. Mississippi has nearly as many, and
Virginia has 130,000. Connecticut has 56,
000 foreign voters out of a population of
200,000. Probably considerably more than
50 per cent, of the foreign voters of this
State are Irish. Florida has about 70,000
voters, of which nearly one-half are colored,
and 4,000 foreign born. The foreign-born
vote of Florida is largely Cuban. Illinois
has over 850,000 voters, of which 300,000
are foreign born, and 15,000 colored. Among
the foreign born citizens of Illinois the Ger
mans and Irish are about equal in numbers,
with a sprinkling .of Norwegian, French and
Italian. Maryland, which has been spoken
of as possibly a doubtful State, has 250,000
voters 50,000 of them colored, .and 40,000
foreign born. Massachusetts has 550,000
voters about 190,000 of them foreign born,
and 6,000 or 7,000 colored. The majority of
foreign born citizens in that State are Irish.
In New Jersey there are 330,000 voters 10,
000 colored and 100,000 foreign born proba
bly more than 50 per cent, of the foreign
element being from Ireland. New York has
500,000 voters, 600,000 being foreign born,
the majority, of course, from the Emerald
Isle. There are also in that Stats
over 20,000 colored voters. North
Carolina has in its 300,000 voting
population 120,000 colored voters.
South Carolina, which has 225,000 voters,
has 125,000 colored and 4,000 foreign-born,
Ohio, out of 900,000 voters, has 200,000 for
eign-born and nearly 25,000 colored. The
large majority of the foreign-born element of
Ohio is German. Pennsylvania has 1,000,
000, about 300,000 of them being of foreign
birth and 25,000 colored. Tennessee, which
has 300,000 voters, has about 90,000 colored
votes and 10,000 of foreign birth. Virginia
has, out of 370,000 .votes, 140,000 col
ored and 10,000 of foreign birth. West Virgin
ia has 150,000 voters, 10,000 of them foreign
born and 7,000 colored. Wisconsin has over
200,000 voters, a large proportion being Ger
mans and a considerable percentage Scandi
navians. The colored vote in Wisconsin is
very small, being no more than 2,000 out of
the 400,000 voters in that State. The State
with the smallest number of voters is Neva
da, which, supposing it to have increased
double the general ratio, will have in this
election less than 40,000 voters, while Dela
ware has but 45,000, Oregon 70,000, and
Rhode Island a little over 75,000.
EDITORIAL NOTES.
School election to-day, but no great excite
ment. Governor Cleveland made a brilliant speech
at the Elmira State fair. Among the gems
was the following: "The soil remains in its
place ready to be tilled."
The running expenses of the big Brooklyn
bridge are now at the rate of $300,000 per
year, and Mayor Low thinks that this sum is
at least $100,000 too large.
According to the latest results of the finest
instrumental tests as to the propagation of
electricity an electric signal travels at the
rate of sixteen thousand miles a second.
Of two hundred and seventy ' fulminate
factories started in Europe during- the pre
sent century two hundred and sixty-one
have disappeared by explosion. Fulminates
are now made in small quantity at a time in
low sheds. These are so arranged that an
explosion throws them over and little dam
age is done.
The 'gangs" which infest New York have
beautiful and significant names. These are
some of them: "The Potash," "the Thomas
Street," "Rotten Bow," "Ligktning Char
ley's," "the Push Akmgs," "the Keep
Mums," "the Never Sweats," " "Slim Jim's
Regulators," "the Merry Ramblers," "the
Forty Thieves," etc.
Adulteration of leather is the latest, and
comes from Germany. It is accomrjlished
by soaking the tanned hides in glucose and
arying them, which adds to their weight and
apparent solidity and increases their value.
it was detected by soaking the leather in
water for twenty-four hours.
The New York Star asserts that the Ger
mans of New York are not unitedly in favor
of Cleveland, notwithstanding the efforts of
Carl Schurz and the Staats Zeitung. An in
fluential German informs the Star that,while
the Germans on local and even on State is
sues are apt to act together, on the presiden
tial question they will act independently, and
many of them will give their support to the
Republican candidate.
Mr. Walton, a lock-maker, of Birmingham,
England, is about to exhibit at the Wolver
hampton exhibition, in case 247, a master
key which he claims is capable of opening
22,600 patent lever locks, all the locks to be
different that is to say, each of the 22,600
locks may be different in their wards and
combinations. . . The key weighs thuee ounces,
and is nickel plated. It has taken Mr. Wal
ton, the inventor, three years to complete
the drawings of the different wards and com
binations which enable this extraordinary
product of human ingenuity to be made.
Master keys capable of opening one hundred
different combinations have been known to
thq trade for many years, but nothing ap
proaching the key in question has ever been
accomplished before.
The First Congregational church in Nan
tucket, Massachusetts, has formally author
ized Miss Louise S. Baker, who has acted as
its stated supply for nearly four years, to ad
minister its sacraments, to admit members
into it, and to "perform all other duties per
taining to the ministerial office." "This,"
says the Boston Congregationalist, "amounts
to an exceptional case of ordination by the
church. But, as the church did not ask the
advice of its sister churches and no advice
was given it by them, the action taken
whether in the judgment of sister Congrega
tional churches wise or otherwise does not
affect them. One main issue likely to be
come practical, we should think, would be
whether this ordination be sufficiently ac
cording to 'the usage of the denomination to
confer the power of legally solemnizing mar
riage under the statute as to which opinions
might differ."
The French inventors of a steerable balloon
are, it seems, not unlikely to be forestalled
by German competitors in the same field of
labor. A Dr. Woelf ert has accomplished at
Kiel two successful experiments in aerial
navigation. The balloon, like that of Cap
tain Renird, is cigar-shaped. Its cubic con
tents are 500 metres. If filled with ordinary
gas it can carry a load of 350 kilogrammes,
bnt if filled with hydrogen gas it will take as
much as 800 kilogrammes. A height of 2,000.
metres was attained at each experiment. One
of the voyages lasted two and a half hours,
during which Dr. Woelfert is said to have
navigated against a northeast wind of a force
of from two to three metres the second. It
is stated that a special motor, the nature of
which is not described, of five-horse power,
is in course of construction for Dr. Woelfert,
with which he feels confident of being able to
navigate in the face of . strong winds. The
weight of this machine will be but one-fourth
of the carrying capabilities of the balloon.
Dr. Woelfert, it is added, is negotiating
with the German Admiralty for the establish
ment of a balloon trial ground and works at
Kiel.
Hereafter.
When we are dead, when you and I are dead.
nave rent ana tossea aside eacn eanniy let
ter And wiped the gravelust from our wondering
eyes,
And stand together, fronting the sunrise.
1 think tnat we shall Know eacn otner better.
Puzzle and pain will lie behind us then;
All will be known and all will be forgiven;
We shall be glad of every hardness past;
And not one earthly snaaow snau oe case
ao aim tne Dngntness or tne Dngnt new
Heaven.
And I shall know, an-1 you as well as I,
wnac was the ninaenng tiung our wnoie lives
throiie-h.
Which kept me always shy, constrained, dis
tressed; Why I, to whom you were the first and best.
uoiua never, never oe my oesi, witn you.
Why, loving you as dearly as I did.
Ana prizing you aoove an eartniy gooa,
yet was cold and dull when vou were bv.
And faltered in my speech or shunned your eye,
uiiauie quit; w tsuy uie luiuk A wuuiu.
Could never front you with the happy ease
ui tnose wnose perrect trust nas cast out
fear.
Or take, content, from Love his daily dole.
ixil longea to grasp ana oe ana nave tne wnoie.
jxa mi ih.i men luug bo Bee, uid ueai uo near.
My dear Love, when I forward look, and think
or an these baming barriers swept awav.
Against which I have beat so long and strained.
Of all the puzzles of the past explained.
Susan Coolidge in the Independent.
MAGIC.
"lis the last roast of summer. Philadel
phia Call.
We understand that the mosquitoes pro
nounce the openwork sleeve now so much af
fected by the ladies as perfectly enchanting.
Boston Transcript.
How dreadfully bad men are is seen by the
fact that the most angelic woman does not of
ten remain an angel very long after she has
married one. Philadelphia Call.
Here is a seeming incongruity: Men can by
no possibility become female clerks, but
there is nothing to prevent women becoming
mail clerks. San Francisco News Letter.
A New Jersey defaulter tried to kill him
self after being informed of his crime. The
news should have been broken to him more
gently, as he had probably not heard of it.
Oil City Derrick.
There is a girl in Turner, Me., who smokes.
chews, shaves, swears and wear's a man's
hat. Her unconquerable propensity for ice
cream is the only thing that betrays her.
Burlington Free Press.
'That is what you call the music of the
future," remarked Fogg, in reference to the
baritone player in the band. "At any rate,
he manages to keep ahead of the time right
along." Boston Transcript.
At a magic lantern exhibition in a country
town the other day the man who was hand
ling the instrument threw under the title of
Solitude a picture of an aged female on
the screen. Immediately the dozen old maids
in the audience took it as a personal insult
and left the hall.
"Doan yer call me er lie," said an old ne
gro to an acquaintance with whom he was
disputing. "Doan call me er lie, fur I want
take it!" i er is er nei "on, wall, et yer
shoves it on me, I ain' gwin ter kick. Now,
whut yer gwint ter do 'bout it! Neber takes
er lie lessen er man shoves it on me." Ar
kansaw Traveler.
Two citizens of Ukiah recently struggled
for the possession of a watermelon. The
stronger of the twain was victorious,- and
was about to walk off with the prize when
his antagonist pulled a knife and stabbed
him to the heart. Danger lurks in the wa
termelon from every conceivable point of
view. The safest plan is to eat clams. San
Francisco News-Letter.
A young law student in the southwest
went to an old judge to be examined for ad
mission to the bar. After a desultory con
versation the judge said: "Well, young fel
low, hang out your shingle and go ahead."
"But you have not examined me." - "Never
mind," was the brilliant reply, "if you
don't know no law you won't get no practice,
so you won't do no harm nohow." Boston
Post.
The tallest bird known to ornithologists was
found by Professor Herbert in the lower
eocene deposits near Paris, France. It was
over twelve feet in height and could have
bitten a man's head off as easily as a wood
pecker can nip a cherry. We cannot be too
thankful that this bird has gone out of fash
ion and existence. Ladies would have want
ed to wear it on their hats,' and the price
would have been frightfully high. And be
sides, men who sat behind such bonnet .or
naments in the theaters would be unable to
see whether a ballet or a prayer meeting was
in progress on the stage. Norristown Herald.-
Tariff" Revision.
The great practical difficulty in tariff leg
islation is that it must be the result of a
scramble, in which the most adroit and ac
tive get the advantage. The theory of pro
tection is plain and simple enough. It is
that the duties on imports should be bo ad
justed as to put our domestic producers on
an equality or give them a slight advantage,
as compared with their foreign competitors
in our markets. It is easy to state the theo
ry; it is easy to state the theory; it is next to
impossible to put it in practice, because it
requires a knowledge of the conditions of all
produce industries, which cannot be attained
except by a systematic inquiry beyond the
power of individuals. As things now are,
there is always a demand from some quarter
or another for changes in the tariff. Some
one interested in a certain industry thinks it
inadequately protected, or believes he can
convince a majority in Congress that it is.
He gathers a mass of statistics bearing upon
the subject and submits them to the Com
mittee on Ways and Means, and, if he ob
tains a favorable report, to the House. His
facts, are disputed, and an equally formidable
array of statistics is produced on the other
side. The general subject of protection and
free trade is debated at length. The discus
sion is deprecated, and the desired change is
opposed by members who are not unfriendly
to At, because they fear that, when Congress
begins to meddle with the tariff, it will hot
know where to stop, and may bo led to
make changes which will seriously derange
commerce and production. No schedule of
duties would be entirely satisfactory to eve
rybody, and the special knowledge which
would make it possible to determine whether
objections to any proposed schedule are rea
sonable, or whether it is on the whole fair to
all interests and well adapted to the prevail
ing conditions, if anyone has it, is not' acces
sible to members of Congress. Individual
members are well instructed as to the inter
ests of their constituents, but no one has
that thorough knowledge of the whole sub
ject which is necessary in order .to adjust
equitably conflicting interests, nor is there
any source accepted and trusted by all from
which the facts needed as the basis of a sat
isfactory tariff could be drawn.
The need of such a body of trustworthy
statistics was forcibly set forth by Mr. Car
roll D. Wrieht, chief of the bureau of labor
statistics, in his paper read bafore the Social
Science association at baratoga on Wednes
day. The title of his paper was "Scientific
Revision of the Tariff." He not onlv showed
the need andthe advantages of scientific
method in a work which has been done in a
clumsy and unscientific way hitherto, but he
gave in outline a plan of the investigations
necessary to provide scientific data for the
work. There should be, first, a classification
of all articles on which duties are now paid,
showing the duties on each, whether intend
ed for protection or for revenue only, which
of these articles are produced in foreign
countries and in what countries, what duties
have been imposed under various tariffs, and
what may be considered natural industries of
each foreign country in competition with
those of the United States. Second, classi
fied data concerning the composition of all
leading articles which pay duty, showing the
percentage of labor, raw material, etc., in
each; the cost, including all elements up to
the selling price in the country of produc
tion, a list of jobbing and retail prices in the
country of production, the cost of importa
tion, the jobbing and retail priees of the im
ported articles in this country, and of like
articles produced here, and the prices of such
articles with and without duty charges, and
under various tariffs. Third, classified data
showing the amount of tax paid by consu
mers on account ot tne tarin, as snown oy
budgets of annual expenses of f amines in va
rious grades or lire; snowing aieu wiiau a per
capita tax or a property tax would be if our
national revenue were raised by either of
these methods of taxation, and a comparison
of the three methods of raising our public
revenue. This comparison would show which
method would bear most lightly on the peo
ple, and which would be most justly distrib
uted, and also whether the poor or the rich
pay more in proportion to their ability of the
revenue raised by the general government.
These, says Colonel Wright, are the leading
features of a plan for the foundation of an
equitable adjustment of the tariff. He il
lustrates his plan as follows:
If a single illustration ot the point l would
attain with regard to each leading industry is
required it will be found in the supposition
that if in woolen goods, alter the collection
and analysis of the information I have indi
cated and all other information relative there
to, it should be found that the American pro
ducer of broadcloth stands at a disadvan
tage of one dollar per yard as compared with
the British producer of the same kind of
goods, then a tax of one dollar per yard
would simply place the foreign and American
producer on an equality; in other words, the
American manufacturer of broadcloths, if a
tax of one dollar per yard were laid on his
product, would have no inducement to aban
don his factory in America and set it up in
England. If the tax of one dollar per yard
were not laid it would be for his interest to
abandon his factory in America and move to
England, or to Canada, or out of the country
somewhere where the same conditions which
give the foreign producer the advantage of
one dollar per yard exist, and there set up
his works. Having a tax, exactly and math
ematically determined, as essential to place
the foreign and domestic manulacturers on
an equality, the consumer of broadcloth is
simply aiding in preserving that equality
when he purchases broadcloth, and through
the duty which he pays he is not enabling
the manufacturer to ask any more for his
yard of broadcloth than he would if no duty
were laid, rne revenue is preserved and no
advantage given to the American producer,
nor is he placed at a disadvantage through
the location of his factories in this country
instead of in some other. If now Congress
wished to protect the American manufactur
er of broadcloth, that is to say, put him in a
position where the foreign producer of the
same goods could not compete with mm,
then any tax or rate of duty on broadcloth
above one dollar per yard would be essential,
and he could ask a higher price for his goods
on that account, and the home consumer
could purchase the foreign article if he
choose, athough it would be enhanced in
price on account of the duty beyond the one
dollar. The distance beyond the one dollar
per yard of the duty laid upon broadcloth
would determine whether the duty was a
protective one or a revenue duty only, and
the public would know exactly what kind of
duty it was paying.
The result of this illustration, if it could
be applied to all leading articles, would soon
define the lines of the parties in this coun
try, and would soon determine the question
of how far a tariff shall become protective.
Do not misunderstand me in the use of the
word protective. I use it in its literal sense,
and the protective duty excludes foreign pro
ducts. The consumers, under the basis I
qave indicated, would clearly understand the
question.
A Cliecrful Situation.
From the New London Day.
At this stage of the canvass in Connecticut
the Republicans have good ground for confi
dence. The situation is, beyond all ques
tion, far more favorable to the Republicans
now than it Was at a corresponding period in
the canvass of 1880.
There is a wider and deeper interest felt by
the masses of the party than there has been
in any previous canvass for many years.
This interest has shown itself in many pub
tic meetings, in the very general organization
of campaign clubs and in an unusual amount
of campaign work.
The Republicans of Connecticut as a body
are more than satisfied with the national
nominations of their party. Indeed, anyone
who takes the trouble to investigate as to the
sentiments of the Republican masses will
very soon beeome convinced that Mr. Blaine
was their first choice for the presidency,
and that they are supporting him with a
degree of enthusiasm far greater than they
have displayed for any other candidate
since the Republicans won their first na
tional victory in 1860. Equally plain will
it be to the careful observer of the drift of
party sentiment that the nomination of
General John A. Logan is received with
the heartiest approval by the Union vete
rans of the country, and that nowhere will
it be more cordially supported than in Con
necticut. The splendid State ticket placed before the
people by the Republicans admirably supple
ments the work of the national convention.-
On that ticket there is not a name that does
not carry with it elements of strength.
The nomination of Henry B. Harrison was
a most conspicuou illustration of the office
seeking the man. It is true that Mr, Harri
rison did . not write a letter declining the
nomination in advance; but it is equally true
that he did not surroundthe convention with
his political intimates to insist upon his nom
ination. On the other hand, the demand for
his nomination came spontaneously from all
sections, of the State, and the choice of the
convention rested upon him because of the
universal belief that he is in every respect
eminently fitted for the highest office in the
gift of the people of Connecticut, and that
he will bring to the discharge of its duties
the highest ability and integrity, and a dig
nity that will not need any self-assertion on
his part to impress it upon the people. Mr.
Harrison's nomination not only commands
the hearty support of Republicans, but is
cordially endorsed by the independent press
of the State. It is expected that Mr. Harri
son will deliver a few speeches during the
caxfass. It is safe to predict that he will
discuss the living issues of the day in a can
did and forcible manner, and that he will
not bore his audiences by making himself the
principal theme of his addresses.
Mr. Harrison's associates on the ticket are
representative Republicans of the different
sections from which they come. Individual
ly and collectively they add strength to the
cause. They are representatives of educa
tional interests, of manufacturing interests,
of mercantile interests and of the Union vet
erans. It only remains for Connecticut Republi -cans
to maintain the advantage they have
gained at the beginning of the canvass. This
they can do by plenty of hard and intelli
gent work from this time forward. In order
to win a substantial victory for Blaine and
Logan and Harrison it is only necessary to
bring the full Republican vote to the polls.
NEW FALL: GOODS.
Having commenced our pur
chases we will offer in every de
partment one of the best gtoek
f DRY" GOODS
in the city, at prices that
DEFY COMPETITION.
Our goods are selected with
great care us regards
PRICE AND QUALITY,
and our stock is large and varied
so that we crcii suit the most fas
tidious. We make no specialty
of the
CHEAP TRASH
so often quoted in glowing ad
vertisements, but we make a spe
cialty of
WILCOX & CO.,
767 .JSTJO 771
CHAPEL STREET.
DECORATIVE PAPER HANGINGS
PAINTS, OILS, GLASS, ETC
PLATT & THOMPSON,
64 and G6 Orange St. and 5 Center St.
jySS
FOR RHAUMATISM.
FOR RHEUMATISM.
Dr. Thomas' Eclectric Oil "makes
Sain hum." That is what Thomas G.
eail, of S3 East Swan sti-eet, Buffa
lo, N. Y.. says. Ho suffered from
Rheumatism several years, when the
malady yielded to Eclectric Oil like
frost in a June sun.
FOR A Ei A SI E 15 A CM.
FOK A LAME BACK,
Sirs. E. T. Sykes, SO Chestnut street
Springfield, Ohio, ''suffering," nhe
says, "perfect torturo with pain
and soreness throuerh back and
chest,"1 and her husband troubled
with a dry, hoarse cough (both cured
by this oil) make particular mention
of its "soothing and pleasant ef
fect s."
FOR THE WORST WOIJKDS.
FOR THE WORST WOUNDS.
"I was in the explosion at the
Grand Opera House, January 18.
There I received a bad cut on my
knee, and had to take to my bed.
Thomas1 Eclectric Oil helped me out
in almost no time." Charles Reed,
354 Jackson street, Milwaukee, W is.
sel5 6dlw
WE HAVE COMPLETED
Our arrangements for a
SUPERIOR STOCK
OF
FERTILIZERS !
Includins brands from tho following well known
manufacturers.
ltumiipiac Fertilizer Co.,
SI. J. Baker & Co.,
Stapes Formula and Peruvian
Guano Co.,
E, Frank oc,
f R. 3fciu j V oM
fLcKtcr Bros.
Our aim thU sioa will b3 to sell only goods that
we can guarantee, and to make our prices as low as
consistent with the quality.
Farmers and market gardeners intending pur
chases In this line should secure our lowest prices,
as we have made a marked reduction In Bi- Fish
Guanos. Complete Manures.
Call on or address
E. B. Bradley & Co.,
No. 406 State Street.
JylO gawaw
BADE MA1UC.)
Acknowledged the "STANDARD"
of LAUNDRY SOAP. There is but
One. Every bar is stamped with
a pair of hands, and no Gro
cer should be allowed to offer
any substitute. In the use of
WELCOME SOAP people
realize "VALUE RECEIVED" and
discover that superiority in
WASHING QUALITY peculiar to
this Soap.
A CABD. To all who are suffering from errors
and indiscretions of youth, nervous weakness, early
d."cay, loss of manhood, &c, I will send a recipe
that will cure you, FEEE OF CHARGE. ' This
great remedy was discovered by a missionary In
South America, sena seu-aaaresaea envelops to
Rev. Joseph T. Imus, Station D, New York,
jyUeod&irly. .
I

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