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Morning journal and courier. [volume] (New Haven [Conn.]) 1848-1894, September 27, 1884, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015483/1884-09-27/ed-1/seq-3/

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NOW
HOMDAT MORNING, September 88, we will be ready to display the hand
somest and most extensive assortment of Fall and 'Winter Dress Goods ever shown in New
Haven. We nOge a visit to convince yon. "We guarantee
Reliable Styles, Best of Fabrics and Bottom Prices.
FINE DRESS GOODS.
Every desirable novelty of the season, French Tricot Cloths, Corkscrews, Cheviots,
French Plaids, Scotch Tartans, Oriental Embroidered Cashmeres, Astraohan Foulee, Bro
caded Plashes and Velvets, Beautiful Combinations in Plaids, Figures and Stripes, Uncut
Velvets, Fancy Plashed, Princess Satins, Black and Colored Satin Duchess, Tricot Weave in
Satins. Latest Paris Fashions in outside garments. Fancy Velvet Fronts, New Laces, &c.
7?)
K
W. F.
65 CHURCH
it'
I 79 to 89
Printed Pads, Noiseless Slates, Topic and Compo
sition Books and Writing Material of all kinds
AT
G. J. MOFFATT'S
4QO, 497, -4,00 azicl
A Piano worth $350 for $250.
A Piano worth $300 for $200.
A Piano worth $150 for $90.
A Piano worth $100 for $60.
A Piano worth $50 for $25.
We have now on hand a large number of Instruments which we
have taken in trade, which we have put Us perfect order and are
now offering at
MERELY NOMINAL PRICES.
They must be sold to make room for a fine, carefully selected as
sortment of
NEW INSTRUMENTS.
irthose wishing to purchase will call and see as they will proba
bly find jnst what they want, at a price much lower than they ex
pected, and will suffer NO IMPORTUNITY TO PURCHASE. "
TEMPLE OF MUSIC.
Open Till November
THE BEACH HOUSE
Will remain open through SEP
TEMBER and OCTOBER for the
accommocation of guests.
E. FREEMAN.
se3 Ira
MONEY ISLAND HOUSE,
STOIOr CREEK, COMM.
Thin house has been refurnished and
is now open for the season. A large,
leool dining room Is one of the features
of the house.
No Ittosquitocs I Excellent View !
FINE BATHING BEACH.
The steam yacht BEATRICE will connect at the
Main Land every hour and for every train.
Also with the Philadelphia at
Pot Island.
Billiard Tables and a fine Bar.
Fostofflce address
STONY CREEK, CONN.,
H. D. KILLAM, Proprietor.
auTtf
WINDOW GLASS,
PAINTS, OILS
-AND
VARNISH.
THOMPSON & BELDEN,
896 And QQ8
mVC.TJEl STH33ET.
se25
D. M. WELCH & SON
OFFEB
Grain Bargains Tils Witt.
TWTOTHINQ like the success we are having with
J our Red W. Brand of Patent Flour. We be
lieve this to be the very finest quality of New Pro
cess, and have sold one hundred barrels this month,
and in every case the purchaser has been delighted
with it. Try it. Every barrel warranted.
Our sale of Momaja Coffee at 25c per pound is
Steadily on the increase. We never since we have
been in the Coffee trade sold as much Coffee as last
week. Remember 1 Ground to order, warranted to
suit. Everybody delighted with it. Try it.
Worlds of the finest Early Rose Potatoes. Price
very low. See them. ,
h Pears, Plums. Grapes, finest Concords. 6c lb.
Finest Delaware Sweet Potatoes cheap.
Try Our Cereal Flakes.
A Splendid article for Invalids and children; 13c
"Shredded Oats are just the thing for breakfast;
cooks in ten minutes. 15o a package for 85c.
Remember we are the Bottom Prices for every
thing in the grocery, provision and vegetable line.
-' - j ? , t
D. M. WELCH & SON. '
Bios. 28 and 30 Congress Avenue.
35 Register copy.
Straightening West River.
Crrr Enonrara's Ojtick, 17 City Hall i
New Hi. Conn.. Sept. 23. 1884. f
SEALED PROPOSALS will be ; received at this
office until 8:00o'c!ock Tuesday evening, Sep
tember 80, 1HS4.
For straightening the channel of West River,
fmm Martin street to Whallev avenue.
Blank form of proposals, and any information
concerning pians, specincauons, oodos, etc., wiu ue
furnished upon application.
No proposal will be received after the time speci
fied, and all proposals not as the blanks furnished.
or not propeny nuea out will oe rejected.
The rieht to reiectanv or all bids is reserved.
By order of the Joint Special Committee on
stralgmening west ruver.
ALBERT B. HILL,
aep23,24,27.29,30 City Engineer.
DON'T GO BEGGING
AROUND among the retail dealers for lower
prices, but come to headquarters where prices
are always low.
Choicest Creamery Batter 2Se lb, 412
oonndi for fel.OO.
Good Sweet Table Butter 20e lb. 10 lb tabs But
ter 2.20 per tub. S lb pails Butter (1.87 per paUL
Good Family Flour $4.50 & barrel. Best Family
Flour $6.50 a barrel. By the bag B5c 80c and $1.00.
Best Old Government Java Coffee 9Gc pound.
Japan Tea (dust) 20c pound. New crop Japan Tea
86c pound. Best Tea 60c pound, with china cup and
saucer tree, rure rainng jruwaer ouc pouna.
Lehigh Coar.
t is.:ded at hit wharf, fresh mined, best au&li
m 25c a too- cheaper than the combination price J
mAM mm .
GEO w. n. injuries,
Independent coal Dealer,
84 CHURCH STREET. sS4
HSUSfTQID SISII PAINTING.
GBAINING AND PAPERING.
Fine Selection of Wall Papers.
Elegant and Attractive Gilt Pa
pers, Borden to Match.
Contracts for Decorating.
PAINTS, OILS, VAKNISH, WINDOW GLASS,
BRUSHES,
And all materials pertaining to the bnslneas.
RANSOM HILLS,
493 State Street, Todd' Block.
OPEN.
GILBERT,
STREET, opposite P. O.
,
RAILROAD AVEMJE.
Paper Warehouse,
GOl State Street.
FALL
Starting the Heavy Weight
Trade of 1884-85.
Injecting more Business steam
to the Square Inch than
Ever Before.
DETERMINED TO BEAT ALL
FORMER RECORDS.
We have the Brain, and Control
the Material Force to Accom
plish the Busy Task.
We are Prepared toCatch
More Trade than in
Seasons Gone by.
THE PULSATORY PUSHER,
Has secured the best styles
in existence. Bought goods
that other dealers in this
city will not handle, made
by Rogers, Peet & Co., Day
ton & Close and other first
class New York honses.
Our own manufacture
comes in Tor a share of de
serving praise, as it repre
sents the most conspicuous
feature of our increasing
business.
We show everything for
Old Men and Young Hen.
All the new things for Big
Boys and Children.
Quality, make and fit un
equalled. Business kept up.
Expenses kept down. Low
prices marked in plain fig'
ures. Goods exchanged or
money returned. IV trou
ble to show goods.
We cannot boast of the
largest store in this State :
but we can lay claim to the
best and largest business
in New Haven.
Let us Furnish Your Attire
Norton & Co.,
OAK HALL,
No. 85 tllli Stall
FLOUR.
Jnst a word on this subject. I keep the
best. And no other will make more bread
to the barreL
I extend an invitation to those who are
dissatisfied to come and trade with me. -
Beet of goods and a good assortment at the
very lowest rates. Orders called for in any
part of the city, and goods delivered prompt-
HARRY LEIGH,
GROCER,
670 Chapel Street.
Telephone. 36
OPENING
NORTON,
teal Lgslate.
FOR RENT.
TWO nicely furnished large rooms; also
I :(d single room in a private house, with all mod
LriB ern conveniences, at -se8
8t 4 HOME PLACE.
FOR RENT.
i&Sr A LARGE furnished room on State street,
I i "1 one block from Chapel street, suitable for two
Juia&gentlemen, with board. Possession at once.
riee, with board, $10 per week. Inquire at the
se24tf STAFFORD DINING ROOMS.
BOARD AX1 ROOMS.
t&&f A PLEASANT suite of rooms on first floor
I with board, furnished or unfurnished. Also
lafaJLsingle rooms with all modern conveniences at
Se Ol 0 OljlVJS BTtutJirr.
R. M. HOOKER,
REAL ESTAT AGENT,
31 Exchange Building.
FOR SALE,
fft A FARM of about TO acres. In the town of
I i! i oouiuuury, i? miles rrom n. E. K. K. depot,
r.. ll! with larSTA house, fine hUni .YiH nuthnilriinmi
a large orchard stocked with choice fruit- ea
oi wuuumuu, worse, carnage, cow ana tanning lm-
Good place for summer boarders.
A good bargain for some one.
R. M. HOOKER,
81 Exchange Building,
FOR BENT,
FURNISHED and unfurnished rooms, with
w wiuiuub uuaro. inquire at
se23 6t
968 CHAPEL STREET.
For Sale and To Rent.
M FOR RENT Block House No. 839 Orangs
street. Perfect order. Possession at once.
Bent low to a good tenant for a term of years.
FOR SALE House No. 57 Piemont street.
Lota on Howard avenue, Hallock ave
nue and in "The Annex."
Honey to loan in sums of $500 on first Mortgage
ad q wertsit. xuuuire or
WILLIAM C. ROBINSON. 1 No. 14 White's Build'g,
PHILIP ROBINSON, f opposite P. O.
Hours 10 to 12 a. m., 8 to 5 p. m. ocaW&Stf
FOR REST.
Ill U lJf T.t O.... 1 . I
liiiS) with the fixtures; also 3 rooms in rear 119
. -i:L lillt-ir st. and fimt flruw fltal. cH A
rooms; and first floor of 454 Orchard St., 910 a
month, and first floor of No. 108 Porteea street.
Inquire at 146 Crown street.
WIjUBUJS 11 AIjIj.
FOR RENT,
As a Private Residence Only,
M. THE pleasant, centrally located premises
l No. 27 College street. Contains 14 finished
hiMtJL rooms, and all the modern appliances.
BEECHER'S EXCHANGE,
se23 t 844 CHAPEL STREET,
FOR SALE,
A LOT on Bishop street, near Orange st. If
sold soon will be sold for less than any lot on
the street.
MEE WIN'S REAL ESTATE OFFICE,
I) 759 Chapel Street.
FOR SALE CHEAP,
. A HOUSE suitable for two families.
For particulars call at
R. E. BALDWIN'S
REAL ESTATE AGENCY, 818 CHAPEL STREET.
sauaaw
West Haven and Savin Rock
Real Estate.
FOR SALE,
P17EASANT Inn&tionM for huilriino hniioM
M on the principal streets at very low prices.
Houses for sale on easy terms.
JFOK REM,
Ten (rood houses f w rent in different Darts of the
village. Call on or address
W L A.. MAlr1!,
West Haven Conn.
FOR SALE,
k. A GOOD two-family house, nearly new ; 11
my.il rooms; gas and city water; about 8 minutes
i2ILwalk westerlv from the nostofllce. can be
bought for $3,500. Terms of payment easy.
A number of good lots in different parts of the
city; price low.
FOR KENT,
A first-class house on Howe street.
A number of tenements of 3 and 4 rooms.
Money to loan on Real Estate. Inquire at
NO. 70 CHURCH STREET. ROOM 2.
"Office open evenings from 7 to 8.
E. F. COHSTOCK.
FOR BENT.
(Wi HOUSE of 10 rooms, pleasantly located,
tyjji corner Chapel and Park streets. Possession
MalLgiven October 1st. Apply at
1,194 CHAPEL STREET,
se!7 tf David W. Buckingham.
FOR RENT,
WHOLE or HALF of corner office, includ
ing steam heat. Apply to
GEORGE H. FORD.
816 tf
Centrally Located.
tA GENTLEMAN and his wife, or a few sin
gle glentlemen will find a pleasant home,
with first-class board, bv addressing Postoffice
Drawer 25. Best of references given and required.
$5,000 WANTED.
First mortgage, first-class
house and lot and
first-class note.
HORACE P. HOADLEY,
all
8 HOADLEY BUILDING.
FOR SALE OR RENT,
THE house. No. 387 Crown street, lot 50x
140. Good fruit. House can be rented fur
: nished or unfurnished. Possession immedi-
T. O. Sloan & Son,
Room 3, Benedict Building.
-OPEN EVENINGS.
STORE FOR SALE.
t LIGHT, clean stock of valuable goods will
be disposed of low for cash, or would ex
change for real estate.
Also a small lot of 20.000 fine Cierars to be disposed
of at some price.
tiEORGE A. ISBELL,
Office, Room 1, Central Block, 793 Chapel street.
FOR RENT,
tFTVE Rooms within five minutes1 walk of
the City Market. Water closet, water and
p-jih Five rooms No. 24 Soring street, near
the New York. New Haven and Hartford railroad
Bhops. Small house of five rooms, No. 10 Louis
street, nair uaven: city water, aiipiv to
Apply to
J. HELLER.
au28
793 Chapel street or 98 Olive street.
FOR RENT.
tFTVE new tenements on Winter street at $10
and $11 per month.
One new tenement on Bright street for $11
per month.
A large number of one and two-f amilr cottages
from $1 ,650 to $2,500 on easy installments.
S. ll. DLAlUItliK ii etc swns,
16 Exchange Bnlldlng,
aul4 Corner Chnrch and Chapel Sts.
WILLIAM H. WHEELER,
REAL ESTATE AND RENTS
The care and rental of real estate a special tv.
TJnrented properties supplied with good tenants.
noney Eunusneaoaiieai instate ana collaterals at
short notice. Fire and Life Insurance risks placed
with sound and reliable companies only. Rents
wanted at once three whole houses for reliable ten
ants. Undivided attention to delinquent tenants.
Office 14 Phoenix Building, 818 Chapel street. Open
evenings. jy31tf
THOMAS O'BRIEN & CO
Real Estate and Loan Agents,
800 CHAFEBL STREET.
$50,000 to loan at 5 and 6 per cent, in sums to suit.
For sale, double house and lot. 60x150 on Chanel
street, for $7 500. Large two family house on
Orchard street, opposite Charles street, for $2,850
a bargain. A small house and large lot on Congress
avenue; will be sold for much less than it is worth,
as the owner is leaving the city. Two houses on
Wallace street, near Grand, for sale very cheap.
unice open every evening.
TN VIEW of the opening of the new railroad to
JL west uaven were win oe some call lor
Building Lots.
I have a tract of land, finely situated, close by
West Haven Green, on Church street, 400 feet front
and 200 feet deep, which I will sell at $5 per front
foot, or will take less for the wbnlA of it Them in
nothing else so favorably located that can be bought
nearly aa low. iIJWAiu) A. rvAx.
a2ltf
von. sun
TWO family house on Sylvan avenue, $800
i! voou rcajuii-eu. iwQ kiiiiiiv nouse on jacicson
.."It ... taut . . i
HBbm voau ICKUIXVU.
m8tf GEO. A. ROOT. 808 Chanel St
A. M. HOLMES,
HOUSE MOVER.
HAS for rent the 2d flnnr t hraioa XVt an
Houston 6t., $10 per month. Half of house
10 ier month. Half of TTnnw it? Mmic at. i
iuvuvii, u uwr au. jc in Hwuaii est.- so per mouto.
and two rents on Ivy St., for $8 per month each.
Also for sale houses 78 Woolsey St., 190 Clinton Ave..
auuuxu wfc, wu ain ot,, un easy terms
Wanted Thirty more houses to rent.
ma4 OFFICE 59 CHURCH STREET.
HINMAN'S REAL ESTATE
AND LOAN AGENCY
Honey to loan at 5 ner cent.
Property in all parts of the city for sale. Seashore
residences and lots at Savin Rock Shore and West
Haven. The beautiful Savin Rock, including sev
eral acres of natural grove. This is the flnesf loca
tion for a hotel or residence in the State and will be
WW 1. 1. HINM1H
mv2 68 Church St.
Clieap Homes.
A RARE OPPORTUNITY
FOR THE NEXT 30 DAYS,
N.
Payments Hade Very Easy.
To all in Want of a Permanent
Home
I HAVE to offer for the next thirty days a
I large number of houses and building lots in
liiiiiiiH" sections of the city. Property of savings
banks and individuals at prices far below their pres
ent value, and on auch easy terms of payment that
any one paying au vruinary rent can soon own
tneir own noiueawaui. aj4n eariy w
SAMUEL HALLIWELL,
80 CHURCH STREET, Benedict's Coal Office,
Office hours in the evening, frem 8 to 10 o'clock.
Mondays, Wednesdays and Saturdays. sesKtf
MI3JIATUKE ALMANAC.
SEPTEMBER 27.
Su Rises, 6:43 Moon Rises, I Hish Water,
Bus Bits, 5:44 j 11:18 4:82
BIRTHS.
JONES In Cheshire, Sept. 25, a daughter to Mr.
and Mrs. James T. Jones.
MARRIAGES.
PRENTICE BISHOP In Litchfield, Sept. 24, at
the Congregational Church, by Rev. Charles Sym
ington, Charles Hills Prentice, of Hartford, and
Miss Kate B., daughter of Charles B, Bishop, of
rdtcnneia.
DEATHS.
AS HER In this city, Sept. 25, Adolph Asber, aged
SS years.
The funeral will take place from the Court street
Temple at 1 o'clock Sunday afternoon.
FROHMEYER In this city, Sept. 26, Daniel Froh-
meyer, aged years ana x montns.
Funeral takes nlace from his late residence. No. 4
Clark street, Sunday, at 8 o'clock p. m. Friends
ana relatives are coraiauy invitea to aroena wiuii
out further notice..
DODGE In this city. Sept. 26, Mrs. Lydia E. Dodge,
agea ei years, a montns ana 10 aays.
Funeral Monday at 2 p. m.
WEISSBARTH In Foxon, Sept. 23, Charles G.
Weissbarth. aed 59 vears.
Funeral services from his late residence. Saturday.
Sept. 27 at 2 o'clock. Relatives and friends are re
spectfully invited to attend without further no-
MARINE LIST.
PORT OF NEW HAVEN.
ARRrVKD, KKFTEMBKR 26,
Sch Mattie Holmes, Holmes, Baltimore.
Sen Grade D Chambers, Lane, Baltimore.
Sch Carrie Howes, Cranmer, Baltimore.
CI.EARED-
Sch Mary Vreeland, Clark, Philadelphia.
Sch James Ives, Ives, Baltimore.
Sch A J Bentley, Rankin, Baltimore.
FOR RENT.
THE store 701 Grand street; is a good stand
t"j! fortonsorial rooms or ladies' hairdressing
In-
quire up stairs, same building.
se271t
FOR RENT.
A VERT pleasant front room with alcove,
Njjj; furnished or unfurnished, without board. Lo-
kanlLcation central and very desirable. Address
se27 2t H., P. O. DRAWER 10, City.
FOR RENT,
GROVE HAT.T. 83 Grove street. New Ha
ven, Conn. Furnished throughout and ad
mirablv adapted for a large and commodious
boarding house, with all modern improvements.
inquire on xtu r auMUBisa.
se27eod4t
New Seedless Raisins.
"VTEW Syrup, New White Beans, New Smoked
1 Halibut. Graham Wafers. Graham Bnllets.
Preserved Ginger in syrup, Green Ginger, Mixed
opiu. pnai in m, xicii t I'lJi o, ivi muc Liy
1. S. COOPER,
s27 378 8XAXE STREET.
EIGHMIE PATENT SHIRT,"
Is the BEST In tbe World.
Only to be had in this city of
X. I. ME R WIN,
SOLE AGENT FOR NEW HAVEN.
Office ( at Residenoel. No. 28 College street. Postal
orders promptly filled. s27
W. S. SANFORD. Auctioneer.
OF ITALIAN ART.
AN elegant collection of Florentine Marble
Etruscan, Roman, Pompeii. Medici and An.
tique Vases, Urns, Card Receivers, Basket, and a
larce varietv of narlor and mantel ornaments. Also
statuettes, Night and Morning, and other works of
art.
The above collection will be on exhibition Monday
afternoon, in store No. 783 Chapel street, in the
Register Building, and the sale will begin at 7
o'clock, and following evenings until the stock is
sold, During the day goods will be sold at private
sale.
Ladies and all lovers of fine art are respectfully
invited to examine the goods. se27 4t
AUT STOVE,
"TTTTH new improvements, realizes fully that
YV ideal of beauty and utility which the public
taste has long demanded in a heating stove. The
decorative features are of a hish order. Its Dracti-
cal features are PERFECT. The upper panels are
ornamented with LOW'S ART TILES. All the
edges and mouldings are steel finished. It has pat
ent dual grate, double Hues in base, double side
flues, gas tight magazine cover, with many other
valuable features. Hundreds have been sold in this
city. S. . BIBBLE. 539 Grand St.
FLOWER POTS.
ALL SIZES.
COMMON AND ORNAMENTED.
FLOWER STANDS,
IN WOOD AND WIRE.
DUTCH BULBS.
Large Assortment at Low Prices.
Send for Catalogue.
FRANK S. PLATT,
374 and 376 State Street,
Seven Per Cent. First Mortgage
ON
Improved City Real Estate,
Coating nearly fonr times the amount
of tbe mortgage.
Messrs. Poor, White & Greenough
45 "Wall Street, N. If., are authorized to re
ceive subscriptions, at 101 and interest, for any part
of 400,000, seven per cent bonds, forming the only
incumbrance upon improved real estate, situated in
the heart of the city of Minneapolis, and costing
$1,500,000. The bonds are due July 1st, 18M, with
interest at seven per cent. 1st of January and 1st of
July, payable in gold at the. Farmers' Loan and
Trust Company of New York, to whom the mort
gage deed is executed, with all the usual provisions
of real estate mortgages, including policies of in
surance payable to said trustees.
The mortgage property comprises the land and
buildings2O0xlT0 feet on Hennepin avenue,fcnown as
West's Hotel and stores. The hotel is a magnifi
cent fire-proof structure, eight stories high, con
taining 400 rooms, unsurpassed by any similar
building in the United States, and the six stores ad.
joining have an annual rental of $24,000, while the
hotel would readily command a rental of $75,000.
It is now fully opened and equipped, and doing the
anticipated large business under management of
tbe owner, who has gained a fortune as proprietor
of the Nicollet House in the same city. The need of
increased hotel accommodation has been universally
in Minneapolis to meet the extraordinary increase
of population and commercial activity in that com
munity, which now comprises 100,000 people, of a
character lending profitable support to most extend'
ed hotel accommodation.
The safest guide, however, to investors will be
found in expert and disinterested local opinion
garding a security; hence the subjoined certificates
have been obtained from the most competent and
trustworthy .authorities in Minneapolis -concerning
the properties securing the mortgage.
First Certificate from the constructing architect
showing that the property cost $1,500,000.
Second Opinion of the six leading National,
banks of Minneapolis, that under no imaginable con
tingency can the security prove insufficient.
Third Opinion of four leading attorneys of that
city that the titles of the premises is perfect. '
These certificates are appended in full in the
prospectus, togetner with form of bonds.
In view of the above evidence, confirmed by our
own personal examination and investigation, we
mfve no hesitation in recommending the above
bonds as an unusually safe and profitable form of
investment. ,
The public Is familiar with the same form of
curity based on farm mortgages, but the present is
a rare opportunity to obtain equal rate of interest
with city property as security.
Subscriptions for bonds should be addressed to
the undersigned prior to the 4th of October. Origi
nals of the certificates above described may be ex
amined at our office, together with abstract of ti
tle, etc.
POOR, WHITE & GREENOUGH,
45 WALL STREET, N. V.
New York, September 85, 188t sCTTt
News by Telegraph
FROM ALL QUARTERS.
BLAINE AND LOGAN
Meet in the Square at
Cleveland
IN PRESENCE OF THOUSANDS.
An Inspiring Scene Tor
the Crowds.
THE FIREBUGS AT CLEVELAND
Frantic Efforts to II urn
the City.
MEETING IN A SQUARE.
Blaine and Logan At Cleveland
Seventy-five Thousand People
Wildly Cheer While the Candi
dates Clasp Hands In Friend y
Greeting Blaine's Last Honrs In
Buffalo.
Buffalo, N. Y., Sept. 26. The corridors
of the Tifft House were thronged this morn
ing with persons anxious to see the Repub
lican candidate for President. Mr. Blaine
arose about 10:30, feeling rested and quite
well. After breakfast he was called upon
by James D. Warner, chairman of the State
committee, and the Hon. A. S. Draper, with
whom he waa closeted until noon. He then
held an informal reception in the hotel par
lors. Among the earliest 'callers were ex
Governor Foster of Ohio, Judge Foraker, M.
A. Hanna and other prominent gentlemen.
Shortly before 1 o'clock the party were driv
en to the depot amid cheers from the crowd
assembled at the hotel. The special train
left at 1 p. m. for the West and three cheers
were given as it passed out of the depot.
Mr. Blaine is accompanied by his son Wal
ker, Andrew Devine, J. H. Manley, Judge
xenney ana tne Onio delegation.
Cleveland, O., Sept. 26. The city is dec
orated with flags and banners in honor of
Blaine and Logan's visit. As the Tuscarawas
train bearing Logan came up to the Union
depot at 2:05 p. m. the spacious building was
filled and the hilltops were thronged with
people anxious to see the statesman. A de
tachment of twelve policemen, the light ar
tillery and the veteran corps, were drawn up
within the depot to receive him. Outside
the depot eight hundred veteran soldiers and
sailors wearing badges stood in line. The
band struck up a patriotic air as the train
rolled up and the crowd cheered. General
Logan stepped from the platform in company
with ex-Mayor Herrick. General Leggett's
carriage awaited them at the depot entrance.
The procession moved up Water street to
Superior. The employes of the numerous
wholesale houses along the route cheered
lustily. Logan raised his hat and seemed at
home among the people. He was escorted t
General Leggett's residence. Owing to the
fact that the Lake Shore train on which Mr.
Blaine was to arrive from Erie at 7:30 for
some reason unknown arrived at 7 p. in.,
just half an hour ahead of time, he was not
met at the depot by the Young Men's Re
publican club, which was just forming in
line at headquarters, but notwithstanding
this upwards of five thousand men and
women were on hand to catch a glimpse of
the statesman. The streets were beautifully
illuminated with Chinese lanterns and the
buildings were decorated with flags. When
the' vehicle which bore Mr. Blaine reached
the Kennard House Hon. Amos Townsend
stepped forward and said:
'Fellow citizens I have the honor to introduce
to you our candidate for President of the United
Btaies, tne non. james w. Blaine. "
Attain the cheers rent the air and finally
when Blaine was allowed to pros eed he said
w a vuice jjeri.ecLijr uuuiuie tuiu distinct:
"I thank vou for vour cordial welcome to the
city of Cleveland, a city I always visit with pleasure
and leave with regret. I thank the young men for
this grand reception. It is a hopeful sign that the
young men in this year of 1881 are taking so active
a part in the national canvass. It augurs of good
results. I again thank you."
Blaine and Logan met for the first time
during the campaign in the public square.
It was a stirring event, and when thev stood
before the crowd of seventy-five thousand
the eaect was magical and every heart m
the vast assembly must have felt a tinge of
enthusiasm. Both statesmen viewed, the
seventy-five thousand men, some of whom
were mounted. Th9 gatherings on the
square were addressed by General Logan, ex
Secretary of the Navy Goff and Gen
eral E. F. Noyes. Aside from
the great outdoor meetings there was
another not so large but no less enthusiastic
held at the Tabernacle where Hon. Hannibal
Hamlin and Judge West of Ohio spoke.
The speeches were short "Glad to see you;
good bye," etc. But even the presence of
the distinguished visitors seemed to arouse
enthusiasm. Taken all in all to-night's
demonstration was one of the largest polit
ical meetings ever Held in Cleveland.
FROZEN TO DEATH.
A Young Woman Frozen Stiff While
Climbing Long's Peak.
Denveb, Sept. 26. Miss I. C. Welton, of
New York, was frozen to death Tuesday in
making the ascent of Long's Peak. She
was caught in a snow storm.
Miss Welton had been spending the season
in Colorado and was for the past week on
Estes Park. Monday evening she went to
Mr. Lamb, the guide on Long's Peak, and
arranged for ascending the Peak Tuesday
with Lamb's son. The ascent was made
safely. While coming down they encoun
tered a fierce snow storm and the lady was
thoroughly chilled. Lamb assisted her
as well as he could until alter o o'clock,
when her strength 'failed. He carried her
half a mile, then his strength gave out. The
night was very dark and the trail rough and
rocky. He told her their only safety rested
in his going seven miles further to his
father's house for aid. At ten oclock he left
her alone and nearly frozen on the bleak
mountain side. Ue returned with his
father at 4 in the morning, only to find Miss
Welton dead. The remains were brought
to Longs treet and will be sent to New York.
Miss Welton was highly cultured, a great
lover of nature and very self-reliant. A
heavy storm is reported from Leadville to
day. A MALIGNANT DISEASE.
Strange and Fatal Outbreak On Long
' Island.
Southampton, L. I., S6pt. 26. A malig
nant disease which baffles medical skill is
prevailing in the village of Atlanticville. A
number of deaths have occurred and new
oases are reported to the board of health to
day. The disease has taken the form of an
epidemic and is spreading rapidly. Both
children and adults are affected, and there is
sickness or death in almost every house in
the village. The disease first appeared two
weeks ago. Since then almost every family
in the village has been affected. In some in
stances the entire family is sick. So malig
nant is the malady that persons have died
after an illness of two days. Beds are being
buried and burned to prevent the disease
from snreadins?. - It is pronounced to be ma
lignant dysentery. Others assert that it is a'
form of cholera. Persons are leaving the
place to avoid the disease. A meeting of the
county board of health will be held to con
sider the situation.
- THE CAMPAIGN.
General Xtntler Talks to' the Boston
People. -
Boston, Sept. 26. General Butler is al
ways warmly welcomed by the Boston public
and to-night was not an exception. Faneuil
TTall Tremont Temple and the Meionaon
were all filled and all their audiences were
addressed by General Butler himself. Eaefa
audience also' listened to the political views
of other speakers, among whom were Hon.
Thomas F. Grady, Edward Hamilton, Colonel
Thomas W. Clarke, Charles H. Litchman,
Joseph H. O'Neil and others. At all three
places General Butler was attentively listen
ed to and warmly applauded. At Faneuil
Hall the General arraigned the old parties for
the cut and dried workings of their
caucus and convention machinery and sug
gested that if the candidates were picked out
of the gutter there would often be a ehance
of eettine better men. A change. he
thought, might be achieved if the voters
would cast their ballots according to their
convictions and not because their fathers
voted with Andrew Jackson for the Demo
cratic ticket. General Butler while In Fan
euil Hall was presented with a drum that
naa seen service at JMew Orleans and a floral
horseshoe, which ha received with short
speeches of thanks. At Tremont Temple
General Butler continued In a imllr strain,
concluding that if his constituents would
only stand together they would surely win at
last, although he might never do so. The
address at theMeionaon was begun late and
was not protracted. In all essential particu
lars it only repeated those previously deliv
ered. rammany to Bib a City Ticket.
New York, Sept. 26. At the meeting of
the Tammany Hall committee on organiza
tion tnis evening the resignation of ex-Senator
Grady was nresented and aecentao. Tha
roll of delegates forthe twenty-four districts
was called and all reported that everything
was working harmoniously for the national
Democratic ticket. The county convention
will meet on Monday, when it is irenerallv
understood that Tammany will nominate a
ntrAlCrhf, fif.lrAt. Wifli TTnnl, SXmt, wlin Miunk
ly made such a determined fight in the
1 1 J . . . ...
waru iu. laucnneu against tne passage or tne
VmaJms- . T " 1 1 .... .. .
MvcMAnaj Buiinue rauxuaa urn, as its canal
date for Mayor.
RE.HARKABLE tlRGEBT.
An Iron Breech pin Taken From the
Brain.
MtrKCTE, Ind., Sept. 26. By the explosion
of a gun last April an iron breech pin 1J
inches long and weighing 615 grains was
blown into the brain of Emerson McColm, of
this city. This heavy piece of iron, several
pieces of bone and apiece of his felt hat were
withdrawn from quite a distance in his head
and without trepanning by making an open
ing in his frontal bone through whieh half a
teaspoonful of brains oozed. The wound has
healed and the patient experiences no incon
venience except zrom tne not rays of tne sun
and is as well as ever. The case is among
the most remarkable on- record.
Death or John W. Garrett.
Deer Park, Md., ' Sept. 26. John W.
Garrett, president of the Baltimore and Ohio
Railroad company, died here at 5:25 this
morning, after a protracted Alness, in the
sixty-fifth year of his age. He had been at
this place for some time and it was supposed
that the mountain air would be of benefit to
him, hut his mental as well as physical
prostration was so great that he could not
rally.
Baltimore, Md., Sept. 26. The members
of the Stock Exchange held a special meeting
to-day and passed resolutions expressing re
gret at the death of Mr. Garrett and sympa
thizing with the family in the bereavement.
Similar action will be taken by both branches
of the city council and the corn and flour
exchanges. -
The remains of Mr. Uarrett arrived at
Camden station in this city at 7:20 o'clock
this evening and were immediately convey
ed to the family seat at Montioello. There
was an immense crowd at the depot when the
train bearing the body of the dead railroad
king arrived.
The active pall bearers of Mr. Garrett's
funeral on Sunday will be Samuel Spencer,
second vice president of the railroad com
pany; Orlando Smith, general freight agent;
Andrew Anderson, assistant to the president;
William Oilman, vice president of the Mary
land Central railroad, C. Nitze, J. S. Frick,
w. rl. vvmtnuge and ui. jn. tl. uortan.
Among the honorary pall bearers will be
General George B. MoClellan, John King, jr.,
president of the Erie railroad, and United
States Senator H. G. Davis of West Vir
ginia. John W. Garrett was born in Baltimore
July 31, 1820, and was the second son of the
late Robert Garrett. His education was
completed at Lafayette college in Pennsylva
nia, when he entered his father's counting
room and was at the age of nineteen made a
partner in his father's business. His first
connection with the Baltimore and Ohio rail
road was in October, 1857, when he was
made director of the company, a
time when the embarrassment of
the road was of a most serious
character. In 1858 Mr. Garrett was elected
to the presidency of the company, which po
sition he has since retained. The practical
wisdom of the policy inaugurated by Mr.
uarrett was shown at the close of tne nrst
year, the aggregate net gains of the company
during the first year of his admistration be
ing $725,325.18. In the second year the im
provement of the affairs of the company were
even more marked than during the first year.
During the war the geographical position
of the road placed its lines in constant
jeopardy, but the indomitable will and
energy of Mr. Garrett made the road
useful for the tranfser of troops at all times,
and the practical utility of the road was nev
er lost. After he became president and gave his
time so largely to the duties of his office, the
directors by unanimons vote increased his
salary from $4,000 to $10,000 per year. This
increase Mr. Garrett declined. He repeatedly
declined to accept the offer of the presiden
cies of other railroads, though accompanied
in one case by an offer of a salary of $30,000
and another by a proposal to give him $50,
000 a year. Mr. Garrett was also at the
head of the banking house of Robert Gar
rett & Sons.
THE TELEPHONE SUIT.
Kx-Judje II1II Continues His Argu
ment.
New York, Sept. 26. The fifth day of
the great telephone suit before Judge Wal
lace in the United States cirouit court
opened this morning with a continuation Of
ex-Judge Hill's argument for the defence.
The court room was by no means well filled.
The counsel in the case, with the exception
of 'ex-Senator Conkling, were present at the
opening, as were Professor A. G. Bell, his
father Alex. Mellville Bell, and several di
rectors of the Bell company. Continuing
his line of argument, ex-Judge Hill said that
there was no reason to believe that Draw
baugh stole the idea of the construction of
the telephone from anyone else. The testi
mony which had been produced would not
warrant or suggest such a belief. Witness
had asserted under oath that Drawbaugh's
telephone had been in working order pre
vious to 1874, the year in which Mr. Bell
claims to have made his invention. Mr. Hill
then proceeded to discuss the growth and
development of the Drawbaugh telephone.
His remarks were enforced by the presenta
tion to the court of the several crude instru
ments with which Drawbaugh experimented.
Before Mr. Hill had concluded his explana
tions the front of Judge Wallace's desk pre
sented the appearance of a shelf in an in
ventor's workshop. Mr. Hill said that the
world to-day was not in the possession of a
single telephonic principle with which Mr.
Drawbaugh was not acquainted at the time
when he had completed his first successful
instrument.
THE CHOLERA.
Yesterday's List or New Cases And
Deaths.
Naples, Sept 26. There were 252 new
cases of cholera here to-day and ninety-seven
deaths. There were fifty-one new cases and
twenty deaths at Genoa and seventy-seven
deaths elsewhere in Italy. Seven deaths oc
curred at Alicante, one at Barcelona and four
at Toulon.
SAD ACCIDENT AT TAFTVILLE.
At a. Republican Flag Raising the Pole
Falls and Kills One Woman and Fa
tally Injures Another.
New London, Conn., Sept. 26. The
Blaine and Logan guards marched to Taf t
ville this evening to assist at a Republican
mass meeting and flag raising in that town.
They were met by the TaftvQle company and
escorted to the place where the platform had
been erected for the speakers. After several
addresses had been made the flag was run
up. As it neared the top of the pole, which
was a very long and heavy one,
it caught and stuck fast. Somebody in
the crowd pulled one of the guy ropes to
loosen the flag, when the pole snddenly split
near tha base and fell into the crowd. One
lady, Mrs. Paul Tefrault, the wife of a well
known citizen, was Instantly killed and an
other woman, name unknown, was so badly
injured that she cannot survive the night.
The meeting broke up in great confusion and
further proceedings were postponed until a
future date.
THE CLEVELAND FIREBUGS.
Two More Attempts to Burn the Town.
Cleveland, Sept. 26. This afternoon
there were two more attempts to bum the
city, one being in the . Brush electric light
building where no accidental fires could
originate, and the other in the Case block,
equally as unlikely to be accidental. The
authorities are vigilant and hope to obtain
a clue to the perpetrators.
Indians Levying Tribute on Raneh-
. . '. -j men.
St. Paul, Sept. 26. A Winnipeg special
says information has been received there
which confirms the report that the chiefs of
the South Piegan Indians are extorting mon
ey from the Canadian ranchmen for allowing
the latter to drive herds through the reserve
from Montana to Manitoba. The "Indiana
demand ten cents on every . head of cattls
and if the money is not paid they shoot as
many cattle as they think will pay the duty
on the number left. It is said they are in a
starving condition, which accounts for their
action. .
The Bicycle Raeei At Boston.
Boston, Sept. 26. In the bioycle races to
day the two mile straightaway amateur race
was won by Gaskell of London, England
The two mile 6:50 class was won by Hunter
of Beverly, Mass. R. Chambers of Manches
ter, England, won the one mile race.
Woodside, of Chicago, took the three mile
professional race and Hunter captured the
twenty mile for American amateurs only and
the $150 Columbia prize cup.
: The Italian Treasury Robbed. -
Roue, Sept. 26. The government treasury
has been robbed of $300,000.
The Failures or the Week.
New Yore, Sept. 26. There were 201 fail
ures in the United States reported to Brad
Btreet's during the week, against 06 in the
preceding week and 164, 173 and 112 in the
corresponding weeks of 1883, 1882 and 1881
respectively.
A Cashier Murdered and Robbed.
Chattanooga, Term., Sept. 26. Sam
Hayes, cashier of the Greenwood coal com
pany on the Cincinnati Southern railroad,
was found dead on the track this morning.
His clothes had been rifled and his watch is
missing. He was murdered" for the nnroose
of robbery. How much was stolen is not
known. Two bullet holes were found in his
head.
Fatal Accident at a Fair.
Cleveland, O., Sept. 26. A report
reached here to-day that at a county fair at
Erie, Penn., to-day a grandstand fell, killing
fifteen or twenty persons. The story is con
tradicted by a special dispatch just received
from Erie at 10 p. m. which says: "A terri
ble accident occurred at the fair. An aero
naut was about to ascend in a balloon, when
it shot up with a rush, tearing from the
earth the wooden supporters, one of which
struck Samuel C. Perrin, killing him in
stantly. James Wadsworth and W. P. Ed
wards were seriously injured. The grand
stand story is a hoax."
Base ball yesterday: At Chicago, Provi
dence 8, Chicagos 3; at Detroit,' Detroits 9,
Bostons 2; at Buffalo, New Yorks 2, Bnffalos
2; at Cleveland, Fhiladelphias 10, Clevelands
2; at Baltimore, Baltimores 10, Louis villes 7;
at New York, Metropolitans 17, Brooklyns 2;
at Norfolk, Virginias 13, Norfolks 0.
LOCAL NEWS.
BOARD OF EDUCATION.
Resignation
polntmenti
or Teachers New Ap--Discussion
On the Sub-
ject.
A meeting of the Board of Edncation was
held last evening. Present, Messrs. Welch
(presiding), Harrison, Zunder, Plunkett,
Strong and O'Brien.
The Committee on Schools reported the
resignation of Mabel C. Willard, Kate H.
Gower and Jessie M. Woodworth. The res
ignations were accepted.
Committees for the ensuing year were
elected as follows:
On schools M. Zunder, F. E. Harrison, J.
D. Plunkett.
On finance H. M. Welch, A. W. Parma-
lee, Phillip Pond.
School buildings Henry F. Peck, Thomas
O'Brien, H. H. Strong.
Superintendent Dutton stated that there
was great difficulty in procuring teachers and
thought there would be a scarcity for five
years to come.
Mr. Harrison thought that the training
school had not yet commenced to produce its
fruit in teachers, which forced the Board to
go outside for talent in this line.
The Committee on Schools reported the
following appointments and changes in teach
ers: Nellie J. Barker, No. 3 Ferry street,
salary $350; Mary A. Maher,No. 12 Wooster,
salary $350; Marion H. Jameson, No. 9 Win
chester, salary $630: Sarah C. Woodward.
No. 7 Dixwell avenue, salary $650; Maggie
w . mason, wo. a JNew Haven orphan asylum.
salary $550; Bessie E. Howes, No. 7 Welch
school, salary $600; Carrie A. Burwell, No. 5
(jedar street, $doU; lizzie J. Minor, No. a
Cedar street, salary $400; J. E. Van Tassel,
No. 1 Welch school, salary $600; L. Jennie
Colby,High school, salary $780.
Mr. O linen said that there was a growing
dissatisfaction among the taxpayers because
many of the appointments of teachers were
taken from outside of New Haven.
Mr. Dutton explained that it was very dif
ficult to get competent teachers inside of
New Haven. The graduates of the High
school or most of them did not care to teach,
and hence they were really obliged to go
outside to hire teachers. He said he cer
tainly had no disposition to do this if he
could find competent teachers at home.
Mr. Crimen said that there was no use in
trying to disguise the fact that the public
were of the opinion that the Board were in
the habit of going outside to hire teachers
when they could procure good ones at home.
Mr. Plunkett said he could not see that the
Board had gone outside any further than
was absolutely necessary. He was glad this
question had come up at this time instead of
just before a school election.
Mr. Dutton said he would be very sorry to
have the Board adopt' the rule that they
would not go outside of New Haven to em
ploy teachers, as it would be detrimental to
the best interests of the public schools.
John G. Chapman appeared before the
Board and exhibited his hand grenades
for the extinguishing of fires and urged
thetr adoption by the school board. He said
he would be glad to give an exhibition at any
time that might suit the convenience of the
Board. The matter was referred to the Com
mittee on School Buildings to inquir eand re
port. A Pleasant Ending.
The Ingersoll phalanx with the Wheeler &
Wilson band were handsomely entertained
at Downs' City Hall dining rooms last even
ing at midnight after their long and weary
march. They cheered Charley Downs and
the citizens on the sidewalk cheered them
and the band. It was a pleasant wind up of
their parade.
To Receive the Uniforms To-night.
The Blaine and Logan veterans are re
quested to meet at Republican headquarters,
48 Church street, at 7:30 this evening, to re
ceive their new uniforms, and hold a short
drill preparatory to the escort of the speak
ers to and from the Opera House on Monday
evening.
Applications to be Registered.
Every man who supports Blaine and Logan
and who expects to vote for the first time in
New Haven this fall, should make certain that
he has an application to be registered made
out and given to the Republican registrar of
his ward. Such applications will be made
out on request at Republican headquarters,
which are open day and evening. See that
you are registered without delay.
The Bradley License.
Yesterday afternoon Colonel Dexter R.
Wright made application to the county com
missioners for a reopening and rehearing in
the case of Charles W. Bradley, jr., who was
refused a license by the board a few days
ago. Colonel Wright thinks the case was.
not thoroughly tried and desires to put on
additional witnesses. Hugh Dailey opposed
the motion. The commissioners reserved de
cision. Personal.
Col. Healey is chief marshal for the big
Democratic procession next week.
Dr. J. J. Barry, formerly a well known
practising physician of this city, is danger
ously ill at the hospital. He was brought here
from Bridgeport.
William McGovern, of Menden, who was
injured bo badly recently in that city that
one foot was amputated, has so far recovered
as to be able to ride out.
Mr. S. Collins, formerly of this city, 1 re
cently in the hotel business in Vermont, has
accepted a position in the office of the Hotel
Devonshire, New York, opposite the Grand
Central depot.
Orange Blossoms.
Mrs. Charlotte B. W. Thayer,of this city,
and Albert H. Anderson, of East Hartford,
were united in marriage last Wednesday
evening at the residence of the bride's pa
rent's, 1,367 West Chapel street Rev. W. H.
Butrick performed the ceremony. After the
silken knot was tied Mr. and Mrs.' Anderson
held a reception. Many friends and ac
quaintances of the happy pair were present,
including a number from other cities, and
a moat enjoyable time was had. Numerous
and costly presents were given them .and all
assembled expressed the best wishes for their
happiness through life. After a bridal trip
Mr. and Mrs. Anderson will take up their
residence in East Hartford.
FAIR HAVEN.
Grand Republican Rally To-Night at
Central Hall.
A grand Republican rally will be held at
Central Hall, Fair Haven, corner East Grand
and South Front streets, at 8 o'clock this
(Saturday) evening, Sept. 27th, when Colonel
A. D. Shaw, at present United States consul
at Manchester, England, will speak on the
subject of "Protection."
. Colonel Shaw, having visited hundreds of
large manufacturing establishments in
Europe, has become fully conversant Vith
the condition of workingmen there.
Every man having at heart his own in
terest and that of his family should hear
him.
East Roek Park Carriages.
H. H. Thompson commenced his trips to
the summit of East Rock Park yesterday and
the public greatly appreciated his enterprise.
The carriage leaves Jarman's store near the
corner of Church and Chapel streets at 9:30
a. m., 1 and 3:15 p. m., returning at 11:30 a.
m., 2:45 and 5 p. m. The accommodation
will be duly appreciated by the public.
Death of Mr. Daniel Frohmeyer.
Mr. Daniel Frohmeyer died at his resi
dence, No. 4 Clark street, early yesterday
morning of paralysis of the brain. He had
been in poor health about two years. He
was respected by a large circle of friends and
was a member of the Tentonia Singing socie
ty and of Conn. Rock lodge of Masons. He
leaves a wife. His age was 65. The funeral
takes place Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock.
Death or James -Eagan a Famous
Pitcher.
James Eagan, a well known ball player,
died at the county jail yesterday afternoon
of brain fever after an illness of three weeks.
He had been at the jail since last March un
der sentence for theft.
Eagan was of Waterbury and has a father
and mother and other relatives living there.
He was once pitcher on the Brooklyn nine
and later was a pitcher for the Waterburys.
The New Sheriff's Office.
Sheriff Gates will occupy the new sheriff's
office, in the county building annex as soon
as the apartment is furnished. The present
sheriffs office on the first floor of the main
building is to be used by the county com
missioners, as it adjoins their present office,
and will afford the additional room which
they have long felt the need of. There is al
ready one doorway between the apartments,
and another was cut through yesterday.
Funeral ofMrs. Lucius Fitch.
The funeral of Mrs. Sarah P. Fitch, of
Westville, took place yesterday afternoon, at
tended by many friends including many
prominent people of the city. Deceased was
the beloved wife of Mr. Lucius W. Fitch,
long connected with the Treasury depart
ment of Yale college, and was a much es
teemed member of the United church. Rev.
Dr. Hawes officiated at the funeral. The in
terment was in the Grove street cemetery.
Religious Services.
Fxrst Baptist Branch (83 Nash street).
-Preach-
ing at t p. ill. oy jrroi. saroour.
St. John Street M. E. Church. Preaching by
the pastor, Bev. A. H. Wyatt, at 10:30 a m. Praise
and prayer service at 7:15 p. m. Bible school at
12:15. A cordial welcome given to strangers.
Advekt Church. Beers Street Social meeting
in the morning at 10:30. Preaching at 2:30 and 7:30
E. m. by Elder H. Munger, of Chicopee Falls, Mass.
trangers welcome. Seats free.
United Church. Rev. Llewellyn Pratt, D. D., of
Hartford, will preach in the morning at 10:30. and
in the evening at 7:30. Sunday school at the close
f the morning service.
Church op the Messiah, First Universalist,
(Orange street, near Elm). Rev. S. Gilbert, the
pastor, will preach morning and evening. The
public cordially invited.
Coixeqe Street Church. Preaching bv the
pastor, Rev. William W. McLane, D. D., to-morrow
at 10:30 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. Sunday school at 12
m. Young people's prayer meeting at 6:30 p. m.
First Baptist Church fWooster Sauare.1
Preaching in the morning at 10:30 by Prof. Harris of
the Theological seminary. Sunday school at 12 m.
Praise service in the lecture room at 7 p. m.
Davenport Church (Wooster Square). Rev. I. C.
Meserve, pastor. Preaching at 10:30 a. m.
Chapel service in the evening from 7 to 8. Sunday
school in the afternoon at 2:30 p. m. Strangers
welcomed to all these services.
First M. E. Church. Rev. D. A. Goodsell, D. D.,
pastor. Divine service at 10:30. 2:80 and 7:30. The
pastor will preach morning and evening. Afternoon
Sabbath school. Evenine .subject "Further
counsel concerning the tongue." t Young people's
meeting at 6:15 p.m. " '
Humphrey Street Congregational Church.
Preaching by the pastor. Rev. Spencer H. Bray, at
10:30a. m. and 7:30 d. m. Moraine: subiect "The
service of song in the sanctuary of God." Subject
for evening, "Sin tax and blood money." Sunday
school at 2 p. m. Young people's prayer meeting
at 6:30 p. m. Pews all free.
Trinity Methodist Episcopal Church (Dwight
Place, corner George street). Preaching at 10:30
and 7:80 by the pastor. Rev. Dr. J. O. Peck. Bible
school at 2:30 p. m. The pastor will commence a
series of sermons to young men to-morrow evening
The first subject will be "Night life among young
men." A special invitation to young men to be
present is extended by the pastor.
City Missions. Rev. W. D. Mossman, city
missionary. Meeting at 1G4 Ivy street at 3 p. m.
upen air meeting at tne ena oi juorns street ai :ov
p. m. Children's meeting at corner or urcnara ana
Goffe streets (public park) at 5 p. m. Evening ser
vice at uetnany cnapei, corner urcnara nnu uait
streets, at 7:30 p. m,
Church op the Holy Spirit, Second Universalist.
Rev. Phoebe A. Hanaford, pastor. Services at 10:30
and 7:30. Sunday school and adult Bible classes at
noon. Conference meeting Tuesday evening. Ser
mons to-morrow by the pastor. Morning: "The
just shall live by faith," Hab. ii, 4. Evening: "The
apostles' creed," Acts viii, 37. All are cordially in
vlted. MILLINERY BUSINESS FOR SALE.
IN consequence of ill-health, stock, fixtures and
good will of a thriving trade, centrally located.
Business established 15 years. Apply at Room 14,
818 Chapel street. se26tf
FOR SALE,
A 5-YEAR old grav horse: well broken:
kind: no tricks: owner no use for same:
weight about U60 pounds; sell cheap. Apply at
se26 2t 23 EXCHANGE BUILDING.
ON Saturday, Spt. 27, at 10 a. m.. at the store
761 and 763 Chapel street, will resume regular
weekly sales, and continue them every Saturday at
the same hour through the season. Full line of
second-hand furniture and carpets. se36 gt
BIG REDUCTION
In Prices of Poultry.
Spring Chicken 22c lb. Also 50 baskets of Peaches
received this morning, at a cheap figure, at
L. SCHONBERGER'S,
se26 1)2,8 Central Marfcet.
EAST ROCK PARK SUMMIT.
A CARRIAGE will leave F. T. Jarman's store,
corner Church and Chapel streets, for Kast
Rock Park summitt every pleasant day, commenc
ing Tuesday, September 23. Leave New Haven at
9:30 a. m., j and 3:15 p. m. Leave Summit at 11:30
a. m., 2:45 and 5 p. in. Fare for round trip 50 eta.
se26 6t
H. H. THOMPSON.
TO LOAN THIS DAY.
$1,500 and $2,000 on improved property.
LIVERY BUSINESS WANTED
In exchange for real estate.
J.Mel Bassett, 818 Chapel Street.
District of "New Haven, ss. Probate Court, (
September 25. 1884. f
ESTATE of HANNAH POTTER, late of New
Haven, in said district, deceased.
The Court of Probate for the district of New Ha
ven hath limited and allowed six months from the
date hereof for the creditors of said estate to ex
hibit their claims for settlement. Those who neg
lect to present their accounts, properly attested,
within said time, will be debarred a recovery. All
persons indebted to said estate are requested to
make immediate payment to
8. DELIA YALE,
se26 2dlw Administratrix.
W. S. SANFORD, (Auctioneer.)
will IT Ti
OF dining room and boarding house furniture,
carpets, &c. Will sell on Monday, September
29, at 10 a. m., at Nos. 151 and 153 State street, op
posite Whiting street, all the furniture, including
carpets, chamber seta, bedsteads, bedding-, mattras
es, quilts chairs, washstands, &c. ; also the entire
fixtures of a first-class dining- room. Large range.
ice box ana some three or four other heating-
stoves. Sale rain or shine. Terms cash.
s26 2t
Dipensaiy.
ON Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, at her
office 109 Orange street, between the hours of
10 and 12 a. m.. Dr. Adelaide Lambert will treat the
poor gratuitously, giving special attention to wo
men and children. se251m
Coal and Wood.
B
EST quality furnished in any quantity. Coal
20c 25c and 30c per basket $5.60 per ton. Oak
wood 25c per bbl-rf bbls for $1. Chestnut wood 20c
perbbl (fbblsfortl. Large barrels. Don't get
barrels made expressly for the wood business. Or
ders by mail promptly attended to. B. FLYNN, 4
Factory and 397 George streets. se25 3m
Non-Taxable Securities.
10 shares Naugatuck Railroad Co.'s stock.
10 shares New Haven Water Co.'s stock.
5 shares New York and New Haven R. B. Co.'s
stock. '
25 shares New Haven Electric Co.'s stock.
$1,000 Northampton Railroad 8 per cant. bond.
For sale by
McALISTER & WARREN,
87 ORANGE STREET.
5 8t
WANTED,
A BOOKKEEPER wants a situation. A man with
J- V. many years practice, able and trusty, with
best testimonials. Address TAYLOR,
827 4t Box 863, Meriden, Conn.
WASTED.
SITUATION by a German girl as cook in a
nvi ituiuiy. inquire at
2t 259 WOOSTER STREET.
B WANTED.
Y a middle-aged man m situation in a grocery
n8? to drive a delivery wagon. Address
8637 P. P.. P. O. BOX 818.
. IV 4 Ifc." Vk
SmjATION by a capable g-irlto do general
Good city
reference. Inquire at
inno I ..... i .
....... u raiv lumuv
eexi it
l.66 CHAPEL STREET.
WANTED,
MALE and female help at Shepard's Bureau, 110
Orange street. Branch offices in Providence
and Worcester. All fees paid in advance. Receipt
given and money refunded if not suited. Call and
inspect our references from 200 hotels and 1,000 pri
vate families. . - . . e26 2t
WANTED,
AT Shepard's Bureau, 119 Orange street, ground
floor, situations for several good general ser
vants. Having leased our offices for a number of
years customers who register with us now on the
contract system pay but once a quarter. Call and
inspect our references. segfl 2t
WANTED,
A GOOD and competent girl to cook and do
general housework. References required.
Apply from 12 to 8 at
498 WINTHROP AVENUE,
se263t Near Whallev.
nrivTvn
A8ITUATION to do general housework or
laundry work. Good reference. Call at
se26 2t 65 WHITNEY AVENUE.
WANTED.
RUG CLERK, with two or three years experi
ence. Best of reference required. Address
APOTHECARY.
new naven 1 . u.
AT Shepard's Grand Union Employment Bureau,
through ladies' department, salesladies, cash
iers, clerks, housekeepers, cooks, general servants.
Offices all on ground floor. Call and inspect. se22
AT Shepard's Employment Bureau, ground floor,
119 Orange street, bookkeepers, salesmen.
Branch ofllces in Providence, R. I., and Worcester,
WANTED,
A PROTESTANT girl for general housework in
a small f amfly at West Haven. Must be ca
pable and experienced. To such good wages and a
good home. Apply at Room 1,
81 CHURCH STREET,
ae'9" ; In the afternoon.
WANTED.
A FEW good insurance solicitors for New Ha
ven; also live, energetic men in all principal
cities and towns in Connecticut as agents for a pop
ular life and accident society. Liberal contracts
made with good parties. Apply or address
.... H- MOULTON, 811 chapel Street,
aulBtf NftW t)on rnn
To BUY lot of Second-hand Furniture and Car
pets. Highest cash price paid. Orders by mail
promptly attended to at
ja!7 28 CHURCH STREET.
Intelligence Office.
EMPLOYMENT olllce for males and females.
Help of different nationalities can be supplied to
private families, boarding houses, hotels and res
taurants. The proprietor of thisestablishmentpays
great attention in the choice of girls and women be
fore sending them to All situations. Calls from the
country at any distance are promptly attended to.
Invalid and wet nurses at short notice. Male help
for families and farm hands always ready.
. MRS. T; MULLIGAN,
a2utf 197 George, corner Temple street.
To Whom it may Concern !
MONEY liberally advanced in sums
to suit on all kinds of merchan
dise ana personal property of ev
ery description at
HOWARD ec;ei.'s
Old and Reliable Money Loan Office,
341 and 843 STATE STREET, New Haven, Conn.
All legal transactions strictly Confidential. ja5
MRS. DR. J. A. WBI&HT,
Psychometrist and Clairvoyant,
Consultation on Business, Minerals, Health and al
Personal Matters.
Headings of Character by Handwriting, Photograph
or Hair.
Price Gentlemen, $2; Ladies, gl.
Mrs. Wright can be consulted at her office, 98 Or
ange street, daily, 9 a. m. to 8 p. m. m28tf
xtzxtti'mxosnts.
ON FREE EXHIBITION,
Tlie Famous Autotype Collection
from Paris.
FOR A FEW DAYS ONLY,
T Evarts Cutler's Art Store Chapel street, com-
Drisine also the sulendid collection of thn
A'
Hermitage at St. Petersburg. seSTtf
.Hon day and Tuesday Nights,
September 29 and 80.
Production of the great London and Paris success an
ADAMLESS EDEN.
Gorgeous costumes, charming and original music,
chorus of beautiful women. The east or characters
in this play is composed entirely of females, and is
to be placed on theatrical record as one of the
greatest novelties of the modern stage.
Reserved seats at Edward Dowries & Co.'s, 829
Chapel street, next to Cutler's, and at Box Office,
Opera House. Prices $1, 75, 50, 35 cents.
Friday, Saturday Matinee and Night, the great
English Drama, v
THE SILVER KING,
By the Boston Theater Company. se27 3t
New Haven Opera House.
HORACE WALL, Lessee and Klaaaeer,
SATURDAY NIGHT, SEPT. 27.
Only appearance this season of the greatest living
Dialect Comedian. Mr.
J. K. EMMET,
Who will enact his new play, 'called the
Strange TJlrrlageor
New songs by Mr. Emmet, dances, with banjo,
guitar and drum, solos, and an orchestra of 14 musi
ci ans.
Reserved seats at Edward Downes & Co.'s, 899
Chapel street, aud at box office of Opera House,
Prices, $1, 75, 50. 3j cents.
Monday and Tuesday night, Sept. 29 and 30, THE
ADAMLESS EDEN Burlesque Company, composed
entirely of females. The latest great English and
American rage. se253t
CARLL'S OFUKA HOLSlI
Friday and Saturday, Sept. 26-27.
MATINEE SATURDAY AT 2.
A. G. Gunter's Comedy Co.
ID. JML.
THE MAGNETIC COMEDY.
No play has ever had so direct and enthusiastic an
endorsement from the New York Press.
Herald "A declared success."
World A complete success "
Journal A marked success."
Telegranr "A very great hit. " -
It will be played by the following magnificent cast:
Frank Mordaunt, Helen Parr, Charles Burke, Elsie
Moore, Elizabeth Andrews, Robert P. Gibbu, D. H.
Wilson, E. C. Coyle, La Petite Loudanese, George
Jones, Mille Marie Alberto, Master William Wilson.
Reserved seats now on sale at Loomis'.
Admission 25 and 50 cents. Reserved seats 75c
and 81. se23 5t
BUKTSTEIili'S MUSEUM.
(Peck's Grand Opera House.)
GRAND SUCCESS !
Two Grand Performances Daily.
Afternoon at 2:30. Evening at 800.
Dcors open one hour previous.
Change and Complete New Bill Each Week.
CHRISDIE 4 ZELTNER'S PANTOMIME.
MISS MYRTLE KINGSLAND
With the Great Automatic Wonder,
SENATOR FRANK BELL.
ADMISSION 10 CENTS
per floor. To Musei
floor, 20 cents.
ONE TICKET ADMITS TO ALL.
DANCING, DEPORTMENT, GERMAN
ABO
LIGHT CALISTHENICS.
I BEG to announce that I shall be at ATHENETJM
HALL, New Haven, Conn., corner Church and
Center streets ,on Wednesday afternoon, October 8,
1884, from 3 to 0 o'clock, to consult those wishing
instructions in any of the Fashionable Dances, and
to accept names for afternoon and evening classes.
In the instruction of my pupils I shall endeavor to
Introduce such exercises and dances as will not only
benefit them physically, but educate them for social
life, and in their intercourse with each other teach
them that there is morality in their amusements.
Personal references given if required.
For terms apply at the hall.
Respectfully,
Prof. T. A. HOLLAND.
N. B. Member of the Society of Professors of
Dancing, New York. se27,2do7,8
NOTICE.
THIS is to forbid the trusting of anyone on my
account without a written order from me
S27 3 HENRY SUTTON.
IVTR A. M. Loomis can be seen at Temple of Mus
XTX ic Hall during the week. Classes meet Wed
nesday and Saturday. Circulars at book and music
stores- s2otf
DANCING.
Instruction In the above art, either private or in
classes, given by
MISS JIAniK C. Oil. I.,
daughter ot the late Prof. Gill. Circulars obtained
at music and book stores. Call on or address MISS
Mamtec. GILL, 815 Crown street. aeS Cm
DANCING.
I will continue to give lessons, either private or In
classes, at my residence, 476 CHAPEL STREET.
r selS 2m ' MRS. A. W. SPKBRY.
FOR SALE,
ONE 5-horse engine and boiler, in first-class or
der. Call to A, A. BALL & SON,
se86 2t Iron Builders. 18 Audubon street.
Antique, Modern and Inlaid Fur
niture Repaired.
FRENCH polishing done. Second-hand fiimt
ture bought and sold. 804 ELM STREET
rtAAi Ttmutv.T. Kav TTavai, rv,nn . 1
THE FORT BASOOM CATTLE RAISING CO
828 Chapel Street '
Nw Hivsw, Conn., Sept. SO, 1884
T1HE first quarterly dividend of two and one-half
for the quarter ending September 80, 1H84, has been
jlikAlAHaH nA YTA1 A A V. A ill .
uawuMjauiAi, uiDuuiu) ot Lne com nan v on
anil afralnrnha1nf 1 QUI " -
wu. wvv vwwuv lOM, 11X71,
ThA trrHTIRfMl Virw-ktra nlnu ah nrii. k
B8t t E. K. BRADLEY, treasurer.

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