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Morning journal and courier. [volume] (New Haven [Conn.]) 1848-1894, October 11, 1884, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015483/1884-10-11/ed-1/seq-3/

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October 11, 1884.
VOL. LII.
ijwcial' Mottoes.
ITEMS OF INTEREST.
French Tricot Cloths or
excel all others for tailor-made suits. Full line or colors
now shown.
Rich Combinations ot every
are choice, and are being selected rapidly.
Another large invoice or those Black Rhadames at
$1.25 and $1.50, which are having so large a run. We
regret having run short or these the last part of week.
Those ladies waiting for them will find plenty this week.
Ladies', Misses' and Children's outside garments.
Latest styles, and best qualities. Examine them.
NEW GOOOS: NEW GOODS
Hosiery. Handerchiefs, Kid Gloves, Laces, Trim
mings, Buttons, Fringes, &c.
'.
K
W.F.GILBERT,
65:CHURCH STREET, opposite P.O.
I 79 to 89 RAILROAD AVENUE.
O
For Decorations and Illuminations a large stock
of Flags ana Chinese
hand. Also a full line
wholesale and retail
AT
G. J. MOFFATT'S
193, -497, 499 dxici.
BRING IT
f iol
reward at the
I " ' 5
TEMPLE OF MUSIC.
c. m. LOOMIS.
Summer f&esorls.
MONEY ISLAND HOUSE,
STOXY CREEK, COK1V.
This house has been refurnished and
is now open for the season. A laree.
Scool dining room is one of the features
of the house.
No mosquitoes ! Excellent View
FINE BATHING BEACH.
The steam yacht BEATRICE will connect at thf
Main Iiuui every hour and for every train.
Also with the I'iiii-AiKi.pmA at
Pot Island.
Billiard Tables and a fine Bar.
Postofllce address
STONY CREEK, CONN.,
H. D. KILLAM, .Proprietor.
HOUSE AND SIGN PAINTING,
GRAINING AND PAPERING.
Fine Selection of Wall Papers.
Elegant and Attractive Gilt Pa
pers, Borders to Match.
Contracts for Decorating.
TAINTS, OILS, VARNISH. WINDOW GLASS,
TIDTTOTJFa
uuvuuuu,
And all materials pertaining to the business.
RANSOM HILLS,
492 State Street, Todd's Block.
the: nuB royal.
A-H-T STOVE,
"ITITH new improvements, realizes fully that
W ideal of beauty and utility which the public
taste has long demanded in a heating stove. The
decorative features are of a high order. Its practi
cal features are PERFECT. The upper panels are
ornamented with LOW'S ART TILES. All the
edges and mouldings are steel finished. It has pat
ent dual grate, double fiues in base, double side
flues, gas tight magazine cover, with many other
valuable features. Hundreds have been sold in this
city. S. E DIBBLE, 539 Grand St.
se27tjanl
Coal and Wood.
EST quality furnished in any quantity. Coal
20n. 2rc and 30c Tier basket 85.50 ner ton. Oak
B
wood 25c per bbl 5 bbls for SI. Chestnut wood 20c
perbbl 6 bbls for 81. Large barrels. Don't get
barrels made expressly tor tne wood business, ur
ders by man promptly attended to. u
Factory and 897 George streets. se253m
ACCORDION PLEATER!
The nleater with which Mme. Sallade established
her business, and the sole device used by her for the
ilrst five years and still used on au Kinas 01 oox, ac
cordion and fancy pleatings is now offered for sale.
Send for circular. No. 8 East 18th at,, N. Y.
oc3daw3m
CAMPAIGN PORTRAITS.
22x28 Portraits of Blaine and Logan and Cleveland
and HendriCK s we are closing out at oc eacn.
AT
NORTHROP'S,
60 T CHAPEL STREET,
o" Just below the Bridge.
fljtas, PIVOT
CORSET
ELASTIC AND EAST
IN ANY POSITION.
This Corset expands and
contracts with 'the breathing
and yields to every move
ment of the wearer, making
an EASY and ELEGANT
FIT. For sale everywhere
PRICE $1.00.
For sale by .
M.A. T0MLINS0N,
New Haven, Conn.
sldawlm
KILBOURN'S
IE
CO
CO
3
CO
CO
. a r -r w y wnt
- - - - - .
Now ready at the vei v lowest nrices. Call and
818 Chapel
street, iw u, wuu.
oca
77
our own importation. They
conceivable design. These
.Lanterns constantly on
of Writing Materials at
' '
Paper Warehouse,
SOI State Street.
BACK !
ThatlL.au Kobe
from my carriage
you took
Thursday
evening just at dusk, and I
will give you five dollars. I
don't mind the whips that you
have taken, but this robe I
paid six shillings for last June
in London, and I prizeit Iiigli-
Jly on that account. And again
wss .... 1.... .wwl ....I-
blankets tor live dollars. o
please call and get the above
PorvrrrrTOH
ftV Awn .
HIGH PRICES
SUCCESS
I! inn ns is in tie Face.
Xo Lack of Public Support
for
NORTON & CO.
THE CLOTHIERS,
Who are grasping for busi
ness with a determ
ined grip.
Prosperity Cannot be Argued Down.
Never before have we open
ed a Fall Season with
such a flattering out
look. It is a fixed fact that our Low
Prices is lifting onr busi
ness mpuntainward.
Wc have touched the chord that
vibrates the public heart .
in our behalf.
We have thrust ourselves into de
serving popularity by offer
ing only the best Clothing
for Men, Yonng IT! en
and Boys.
The power of Square Dealing,
Low Prices and the One
Price system adds strength
to our reputation.
Last week we caught a great
trade by oifering bargains in
Suits and Overcoats for all
ages, sizes and classes
never before heard
of in this section
of Blew Eng
land. The good work continues with dispatch.
Bargain Counters in every department.
Don't von buv until von have comnarnrl
r goods ana learned onr jlow .trices. Study
your own interests ana oe prompt.
OAK HALL,
1. 85 Clnrcl Street.
OClO
SAMPLES OF "
! WESTERN FARM LOANS
i .
j On Hand at 7 1-2 percent. Interest.
Choice In all Respects.
$900, security $3,000. $1,000, security $5,600.
il.400. Kecuritv 4.200.
These loans are all from one agency, bear the
annually.
Loans on hand of all sizes, with various rates of
A. WALKER,
85 Orange Street,
ocOdawlm
Cheese. -
"VJ Roquefort, Edam, Keufchatel, Cream, Eng-
ki muiuiy, aiurmwn, oquare" ana Ver
mont premium. . EDW. E. HAH & SON.
FAR HEIST.
FROM November 1st, a front office, Brst
Luuur noauiey isuuaing. Address
OClO 8t P. O. BOX 182.
fs. A PRIVATE family wish to let two or three
r Ti jt i .-iK .wius ou juwwuh i iivj 1111 ct.
FOB, RENT.
Ersv A SUITE of rooms having every modern
tf 'ill convenience, including steam heat. For par-
Kmuuw. inquire 01 J. i .n ur. oe own,
oclOtf Apothecaries, 13P Congress Avenue.
MTN CENTRAL LOCATION The large
J. wareroom, 74x24 feet. No. 78 Orange
street, second floor. Also a room of the
same dimensions on the third floor; also a room 48x
iiri over pto. 19 urange street, uura noor.
Office hours 9 to 12 a. m. .
E. B. BOWDITCH,
oc8 8t 74 Orange Street.
Building Lots For Sale,
jfty WE have several valuable Building Lots for
ip: ; saieonsiaie street.. Tney are desu-ame tor
ii5ifl.8tores, dwellings or a block of tenements. Be
tag central, they will always rent to good tenants at
prices that will pay a good percentage. Parties
seeking an investment for their money will io well
10 investigate, jpot particulars can at
JJLrlKWlJN'B RK.A I. ESXAT 1 UK HIVE,
oc4
759 Chapel Street.
REALTY EXCHAME!
Houses Lots, Bents, Loans.
WANTED.
M $12,000, first mortgage, on property worth
double the amount; money to be invested in
jjfi2j.unproving same.
$4,000 on property worth $7,000.
$ D0 on house and lot worth $2,500.
F. 31. DEKISON,
Room 4, corner Church and Chapel streets.
o4 OPEN EVENINGS.
FOR RENT,
5 rooms on Chapel street, $15 per month. 3 rooms
on George street, near Church.
FOR SALE,
Brick house, 12 rooms, all modern improvements,
SU 000. on Hamilton street. Brick house on Artisan
street, $4,000. Frame house and grocery store on
Putnam street, $2,800. Frame house on Oak street,
$3,000; rents for $384. Frame house on Hallock
street, $2,700. Nice lot on Martin street very cheap.
Lot on Jackson street 50x120 for $850. Lot on W ard
street 50x127 will be sold low. Valuable property
on George street, near Church, at a bargain. Money
to loan in sums to suit.
THOMAS O'BRIEN & CO
800 CHAPEL. STREET.
ocl
FOR SALE,
HOUSE. Barn and about 3 acres of land
vitH tiiiit. tnwi some five minutes1 walk
:U!L frnm bnmA cars: can be bought for $3,000;
terms of payment easy.
T.OTS on Nicoll street. Elm street. Orchard street,
FOR RENT,
A number of houses and tenements.
Money to loan on Real Estate. Inquire at
t39"Ofnce open evenings from 7 to 8.
L. F. COMSTOCK..
R. M. HOOKER,
REAL ESTATE AOEXT,
31 Exchange Building.
FOR SALE,
tA FARM of about 70 acres, in the town of
Southbury, 1J4 miles from N. E. R. R. depot,
with larere house, fine barns and outbuildings.
a large orchard stocked with choice fruit; 20 acres
of woodland; horse, carriage, cow and farming Im
plements. tOOU place lur summer uvniuent.
A good bargain for some one.
R. M. HOOKER,
se24
31 Exchange Building.
WILLIAM. H. WHEELEB,
RE1L ESTATE AND LOINS.
Money Loaned on Chattel Mortgages and other
securities at snort notice.
FIRE AND LIFE INSURANCE.
RENTS AND BILLS COLLECTED.
818 Cliaxel Street
Centrally Located.
tA GENTLEMAN and his wife, or a few sin
gle glentlemen will find a pleasant home,
with first-class board, by addressing Postofllce
Drawer 25. Best of references given and required.
sel2tf
FOR RENT.
tTHE store No. 755 State St., cor. Bradley,
with the fixtures: also 3 rooms in rear 119
Bradley St.. andfllrst floor of 757 State St.. 4
rooms; and first floor of 454 Orchard St., $10 a
month, and first floor of No. 108 Portsea street.
Inquire at-146 Crown street.
sead ui.vnu.N 1 1 -
FOR SALE,
tNo. 300 Oixwell avenue, west side and next
to the corner of Henry street, a new two f am
ilv house with J2 rooms, conveniently ar
ranged and desirable in all respects for a pleasant
home. The lot has a frontage of thirty-tliree feet,
and is about one hundred and twenty -five feet deep.
Price $3,500. Easy terms if desired.
Money to loan on first mortgage in sums to suit.
Eleven houses and thirty-one tenements to rent in
different parts of the city.
HORACE P. HOADLEY,
2 HOADLEY BUILDING.
ocG
Open evenings.
FOB RET,
FIVE Rooms within five minutes1 walk of
trio Plitxr TWnVit'. Wo tpr 1-Kjot- wAtor nnri
EHMLgas. Five rooms No. 24 Spring' street, near
the New York, New Haven and Hartford railroad
shops. Small house of five rooms, No. 10 Louis
street, air uaven; city water. Apply to
au28 792 Chapel street or 96 Olive street.
FOR BENT.
FIVE new tenements on Winter street at $10
and $11 per month.
, One new tenement on Brierht street for fill
per month.
t UK SA-lxK.
A larere number of one and two-familv cottaces
from $1,650 to $2,500 on easy installments.
. ju MiiAHMii, 4e suns,
16 Exchange Building,
aul4 Corner Church and Chapel St.
IN VIEW of the opening of the new railroad to
West Haven there will be some call for
Building1 Lots.
I have a tract of land, finely situated, close bv
West Haven Green, on Church street, 400 feet front
and 200 feet deep, which I will sell at $5 per front
foot, or will take less for the whole of it. There is
nothing else so favorably located that can be bought
nearly as low. EDWARD A. RAY.
axiti
FOB SALE,
TWO family house on Sylvan avenue, $900
kjjjji cash required. Two family house on Jackson
ytl!Lstreet, 400 cash required.
mStf GEO. A. ROOT, 808 Chapel St.
A. M. HOLMES,
HAS for rent the 2d floor of house Nn Ra
Houston St., $10 per month. Half of house
,No. 4. Lewis St. 190 Clinton Ave.. 1st floor.
10 Der month. Half of House 177 Meadow Kfc. sift
per month. 2d floor No. 12 Newhall St., $8 per month.
ana two rents on ivy jst., ior $a per month each.
Also for sale houses 78 Woolsey St., 190 Clinton Ave.,
29 Auburn St., and Atwater St., on easy terms.
7 v anreu X amy more nouses TO rem.
ma4 ut nuisat uhukuh htbiset.
HXN MAN'S REAL ESTATE
AND LOAN AGENCY.
Money to loan at 5 per cent.
Property in all parts of the citv for sale. Seashore
residences and lots at Savin Rock Shore and West
Haven. The. beautiful Savin Rock. inAlndinv sev
eral acres of natural grove. This is the finest loea-
uuu xw uuMa raiucuuu m uie oiate ana W1U DO
sold at a bargain. L. B. HINMAN
mya 63 Church St.
Cheap Homes.
A RARE OPPORTUNITY
FOR THE NEXT 30 DAYS,
Payments Made Very Easy.
To all in Want of a Permanent
Home.
I HAVE to offer for the next thirty days a
"i large number of houses and building lots in
iOLall sections of the citv. Prnnortv crir,
banks and individuals at prices far below their pres
ent value, and on such easy terms of payment that
any one paying an ordinary rent can soon own
uicu uwu JiuiucabcMi. Apply early to
SAJllIKl HALLIWELL,
80 CHURCH STREET, Benedict's Coal Office,
..... ............ ..... ...ii; II. in n W) JU O'CIOCK,
Mondays. Wednesdavs and SmI nwim-u .,... f
Offln. ;n ti.. B . . .
FOR I ir1 V"T
U HOT .IT. rn II I L1 c ? . . .
r. .... ... ....... vuruer on ice, meluu
riiiilL s"atm neat. Apply to
Tib tf a. r uu.
West Haven and Savin Rock
Keai t state.
FOR fill
PLEASANT locations for' building houses
FOB RENT,
t en gooa nouses iwrent in different parts of the
w 1 1 infjo, v,wua wu ui auuiDBB
WAT.TFP A -m-atw
au28 West Haven rv.r,.
FOR SALE OR KEST.
,IPiSS?- L.9! .t. it
SOX
. : uiunoii oe rented fur
nished or unfurnished. Possession immedi-
fur-
ately.
T. G. Sloan & Son,
Room 3, Benedict Building.
-OPEN EVENINGS. -
FOR SALE 9 l,SOO.
THE cheapest farm in Connecticut.
Twen-
.and large barn. Buildings nearlv nw
This nroperty must be sold, and l.on wiii'h., i.
A good portion of the purchase price can remain
S. E. BALDWIN'S
REAL ESTATE AGENCY, 818 CHAPEL STREET.
ocwaw
Far finln nnil Tn Ron
' FOR RENT Block House No. 239 dnnn
'ilif i . ... .v..' ....... . uoacsBiuu MINlCft
UJLRent low to a erood tenant for a term of a.
1." I II? MI 11' TTniHBKn R? Piamnnt ctnul
Lots on Howard avenue, Hallock ave
nue and in fcThe Annex."
Money to loan in sums of $500 on first Mortgage
at 6 per cent. Inquire of
WILXJAM C. ROBINSON. 1 No. 14 White's Build'g.
PHILIP ROBINSON, f opposite P. O.
ctours io to ix a. m., s to a p. m. oc3WcStStf
Local Weather Record.
mn nrrr. 10. 1AR4.
7:16 11:16 8:16 7:16 11:16
A. m. a. m. r.a. . r.u r.u.
Barometer 30.29 80.29 80.26 80.27 80.28
Thermometer... 36 56 .60 64 61
Humidity 84 60 44 : 68 80
Wiriu, in direction
and velocity in .
miles per hour.. NW1 NWS SW8 8W6 SW4
Weather Clear Clear Clear Clear Clear
Mean bar., 30.268; mean temp., 49; mean humid
''liax. "temp., 60.8; mln. temp., 88; rainfsll .00
inches.
Max. velocity of wind, 10 miles.
FOB OCT. 10, 1883.
Mean bar., 30.392; mean temp., 51; mean humid
ity, 63. m
Max temp., 66; mm. temp., 88.
J. H. SHERMAN, Sergt S. C. V. S. A.
A minus sign prefixed to thermometer read
ings indicates temperature below zero.
t A dash prefixed to rainfall figures indicates
precipitation too small to measure
BIRTHS.
WRAY In New London, Oct. 7, a son to Mr. and
Mrs. James P. Wray.
MARRIAGES.
STANTON RUGGEBERGH In St. Paul, Minn.,
i .... i . v... I ........ nf i;'v M Mi'l Iftiia Clniui
E. Stanton, of Crookston, Minn., and Mary Rugge
bergh, of New Haven, Conn.
DEATHS.
HALL In this city, Oct. 10, Mrs. Clarissa Hall.
Funeral from her late home. No. 22 Woolsey street,
at 1 :30 o'clock Sunday afternoon.
KEEFE In this city, Oct. 11, Mrs. Mary Keefe, aged
91 years.
Notice of funeral hereafter.
BARTLETT In this city, Oct. 10, of paralysis,
Mary E.. wife of Zenas nartiett, aged oi years
nrt 0 m froths.
HUBBARD In this city, Oct. 10, Zebina Hubbard,
aged 70 years.
Funeral services to be held at his late residence, 280
Grand street, at 9 a. m.. Monday, the 13th inst.
Turinl At. Sunderland. Mass. 2t
HOFMAN In this city, Oct. 9, Mary A., wife of
Christian Hofman, aged 32 years and 6 months.
Funeral Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from No. 54
congress avenue, iwiati ca oiiu iiicuuif uiviku
to attend. Burial at the convenience of the fami
ly. 2t
MARINE LIST.
PORT OF NEW HAVEN.
ARRIVED, OCTOBRR 10.
Sch Eliza, Coffin, lumber, Bangor.
SAILED.
Sch Lu, Jano, New York.
Sch Harry A Barry, from Bridgeport, Baltimore.
FOR RENT,
IfFWT.Y T?nrniRhfd Rooms in a new hoiis.
Tmnnaniant tn fha. --! 1 A cria irmlv fit.
FOR SALE,
OR EXCHANGE, a Farm of 100 acres; will
keep fifteen head of cattle; good buildings.
MUfLAddress
ocll Ct
UUA 33.
Pelham, Mass.
LOST,
ON Thursday morning-, Oct. 9, a pair of Gold
Spectacles. The finder will be rewarded by
leaving the same at
ROOlfl TO RET.
l A NICE, large front room with alcove, suit-
akin fn SWA ak. wmlamav. Wnnti).
ocll 2t
Courier Office.
A Cheap House.
M HOUSE and lot centrally located, within
five minutes' walk of the postofflce and depot;
modern improvemeuts; fruit, &c. For sale
very low. Inquire of S. B. OVIATT,
ocii or. v t;nurcn eireer.
FOR SALE.
JCM ONE second-hand beach wagon, two
SbiStSP- second-hand li&rht business wacons. and
one top buggy, one lumber- wag-on, and on e light
norse cart, inquire at, w. k.. wiiiujnu-,
ocll 2t Dixwell Avenue.
1,000 LBS. CHICKENS
At IS Cents a Pound.
Round Steak 14c lb. Loin Steak 18c, Porterhouse
Steak 20e. Corned Beef lie. Lamb 12c.
L. SCIIONBERGER'S,
ell 1, 2, 3 Central Market.
SUBJECT. I Shall Sell.
TfiDlf 863 Dixwell avenue.
lUllUi 02 Sylvan avenue.
102Kimberty avenue.
334 Munson street.
Lot for Skating Rink.
Pnlrlnn Tout If house and location are safc
nnillKll InAl. isfactorv. nrice sail be also.
J.Jel Bassett, 818 Chapel Street.
FARMS FOR SALE.
Farms for City Property.
Money in exchange for city property.
City property in exchange for money.
83,500 will secure a bargain. Full particulars at
Boom 1, Central Block, 793 Chapel street.
GEORGE A. ISBEIiL.
THE Farm in North Haven of Z. P. Turtle, de
ceased, will be sold at public auction on Wed
nesday, the 15th of October, at 10 o'clock, m., con
taining 18 acres of rich land, well watered, together
witn 7 acres of woodland: also all the farming im
plements and household goods.
u. a. j ir.ani.v i .
ocll It Executrix.
BROADWAY CASH STORE.
ONE CAR LOAD OF THE VERY BEST
NEW PROCESS FLOUR
Reduced to ft6.50 per barrel.
Reduced to $3.40 a naif barrel.
Reduced to' $5c a bag-.
This Flour is the best in the world. We warrant
every pound or money returned.
IHeat at Wholesale Prices.
PAUL JE'TE & BROS.,
101 AND 107 BIlOABWAl.
THE GENUINE
B
FOR 1884.
Manufactured by the
BOYNTON FURNACE GO.
For sale by the
FRANKLIN STOVE CO.,
Sole Agents for New Haven, Conn.
CALL AND EXAMINE.
oclleodtf 8pp
FOR SALE.
CHEAP, one 15-horse engine, horizontal; also a
hoisting engine, 10-horse, can be bought low
for cash. Inquire of JOHN DONOVAN,
OClO at 1 9 unaries Direct, iic. natcu.
FOR SALE,
A FINE young Saddle Horse or Pony 6
3?vears old: weighs about 800 pounds. In
quire in carriage shop at
OC1U C i oiamuiimu.
FOR SALE,
ON account of ill-health I offer for sale my en
tino ctAob tf Vftnlrpe notions, newin&r silk- tail
ors' trimmings, horses, wagons, &., together with
routed hich has Deen escaoiisnea iweniy-iouryoars.
A splendid opportunity for an active young man.
Anyone wishing to purchase will please call on or
address L. E. HENDEE,
ocIO ISt "West Haven, Conn.
MM at Is!
D. M. WELCH & SON
OFFER
ONE CAR LOAD
(200 BARRELS')
OF FINE PICKED APPLES,
Viz: Greenings, Baldwins and a few Spitzenbergs,
Northern Spy and Seek-No-Further.
Price $1.50 Per Barrel.
Vow Is Tour time to buv.
A Limited Supply of Seconds at
75 CENTS PER BARREL.
Everybody can buy a barrel of Apples at that
price. . -
Come and Look at Them.
D. M. WELCH & SON.
Nos. 28 and 30 Congress Avenue
Mrs. E. Jones Tonng,
DENTIST.
230 Chapel,cor.State,Street B'd'g
- over ii roots kjob xxv"u "
Ail worK whthumm.
Office hours from 9 a. m. to
5p.m.
oynton
Furnace
News by Telegraph
FROM ALL QUARTERS.
OHIO VOTERS AWAKE.
Roused To Their Work
By Blaine.
THE VOICE OF THE TRADES
Raised With Uo Uncer
tain Sound.
AN ALLY FOR CLEVELAND.
The mormons Working
For His Election.
1HE STBICCLE IIV OHIO.
Blaine Still Drawing Crowd Saow
inK Them With matchless Clear
ness the Issues or the Campaign
Thousands Now Aroused To Vote
the Republican Ticket.
- Cincinnati, O., Oct. 10. The Blaine
party left Columbus this morning at 10
o'clock. A delegation of gentlemen from
Illinois accompanied the party. A crowd of
five hundred persons cheered as the train left
Columbus. The first Btop was at Circleville.
Mr. Blaine was driven to the court house
where he spoke briefly to the five thousand
people present. Mr. Blaine said the eyes of
every State in the country were on Ohio to
day and that the action of Ohio on Tuesday
next was awaited with great solicitude by
the whole United States. He said the vote
would be taken as an index to the vote in
November. Speaking of the tariff he stated
that the action on the tariff this year would
probably decide the fate of a protective tariff
for the next century. Judge Tenney and
Governor Foster also spoke. A. crowd of
small boys followed Mr. Blaine's carriage and
cheered lustily for Cleveland.
London, O., Oct. 10. At Chillicothe five
thousand people gathered in the public
square, to welcome Mr. Blaine. Fifty girls
in wmte held floral arches under which
Mr. Blaine walked. When he was intro
duced he spoke of the beauty of the Scioto
valley. He urged the importance of the Oc
tober election, stating that it was Ohio's vote
in October, 1856, that gave strength to
General Fremont and in 1860 and
1864 elected Lincoln. It remains to
be seen whether in this great
conflict for the great principles Of a great
party the people of Ohio will maintain the
past record. Ex-Governor Foster and Judge
Tenney also spoke briefly. The train left for
Portsmouth at 1:30. A short stop was made
at Waverly; Mr. Blaine speaking from the
platform to one thousand people. He said
that all he came down the Scioto valley for
was to find out for his own satisfaction what
the Republicans were doing and that he had
traveled one thousand miles to see how Ohio
stood. He urged the people to get out a full
vote in October and to cut down
the Democratic majority. There was
an immense crowd at Portsmouth,
fifteen thousand crowding 4he streets.
There were five thousand Democrats from
Kentucky in the streets, it being the occa
sion of a Democratic meeting. Mr. Blaine
and party were conducted through the
crowded streets to the public square. A
howling mob followed Mr. Blaine's carriage,
yelling for both candidates. Seven or eight
men were knocked down and street fights
were numerous. There was immense cheer
ing when Mr. Blaine ascended to the stand.
He said there never was a political
contest when Ohio's voice was to decide to
such an extent a great national contest.
Every Ohio man should feel on Tuesday that
he is not only voting for a single but for the
wnole United States. '"I beg of you to be
ware of over-confidence in the great struggle.
See that laziness and laggardnesa keep no
Republicans away from tho polls on Tues
day." The train left Porteraoutb. at 5 o'clock.
The thirty-mile run to Ironton was made in
an hour. Here therewas a repetition
of the scene at Portsmouth. Thousands
from Kentucky joined the throng. Drunken
men howled, cannon were fired, fireworks
displayed and whistles blown. A large
torchlight procession paraded the streets.
Mr. Blaine made a brief speech from the
stand in the center of the town and was then
driven to a private residence for the
Bight. To-morrow the party goes" through
the Hocking Valley to Lancaster.
The Trades In lilne An Imposing
Business Plea For Republican Sue
cess fifteen Thousand ITIen Turn
Out Representing labor of Every
Class.
Cleveland, O., Oct. 10. To-night's in
dustrial parade was the most notable event
that has occurred in Cleveland . since the
great campaign of 1866. It was designed by
the tariff club as an evidence of the class of
men who are interested in the success of the
Republican ticket. There was the usual
torchlight procession, there being one thou
sand two hundred horsemen and five thou
sand footman. But the representa
tion of the trades and manufactures
was the most imposing. There were nine
hundred wagons belonging to three hundred
of the solid firms of the city, many of the
houses having ten to twelve wagons loaded
with their products. The Sturtevant
Lumber company had thirteen wagons
and five hundred men. The Ohio iron
and steel works had three hundred men.
Every wagon was brilliantly illuminated
with Chinese lanterns, calcium lights and
gasoline, making a fine display. The col
umn when in motion was seven miles long
and contained fifteen thonsandj embracing
workinemen of every class, representing
every branch of manufacture carried on in
the city. The line ot marcn coverea twelve
miles, along which the blocks were il
luminated. John Sherman addressed six
thousand people at the Tabernacle on the
tariff.
General Logan Back In Ohio. -
Cincinnati, O., Oct. 10. General Logan
arrived in this city at 7 :40 this morning on a
special train over the Baltimore & Ohio
road, accompanied by Judge O'Neil
of Lebanon and others. His arrival was al
most unexpected and none of the members
of the executive committee were at the depot
to receive him. The party immediately on
arriving were driven to the Little Miami depot
where they were breakfasted. They then
took the train for- Winchester, . Ohio, where
the general spoke at the fair grounds this af-
-. -. ... . st- . J J
ternoon. xie will return to tmuiimaLi aiiu
speak at Music Hall Saturday night.
Hendricks Also In The State.
Cincinnati, O., Oct. 10. Governor Hen
dricks arrived at noon to-day and was met
by a committee in two carriages and driven
to his hotel. About two thousand persons
were at the station on the arrival of the train
and loudly cheered him when he made his
appearance.
Sensations In Political Circles.
Cleveland, O., Oct. 10. A big sensation
in political circles was created to-day by the
action of the Central Israelite club number
ing one hundred and twenty-five persons.
One of the members recently became involved
in a litigation over a purchase of glass from
C. C Barnett, the Republican candidate for
Congress. At a meeting of the club last
night it was decided by a vote of the club to
expose Barnett and also decided to send all
the Blaine and Logan uniforms back to the
Republican headquarters, which was done
this morning. The club then endorsed C.
H. Foran for Congress and Sawyer for
sheriff, both Democrats. The Republicans
are blue.
Mayor Farley, although a Democrat, re
fused to allow the city flags to be displayed
for Hendricks' visit to-morrow. The Demo
crats are indignant. ,
PROGRESS OF TUB CAMPAIGN.
TCx--ivi-nr Sevmour Look. Over
the Tariff Question.
New York, Oct. 10. The following letter
from Horatio Seymour was issued by the Na
tional Democratic committee to-day:
To 8. M. Shaw, Esq., editor of the Freeman's Jour
n.i rvwwvt,wn ntAAo countv:
Dear Sir I regret that I cannot take an active
part in the pending political contest. I am unable
to do so on account of my health. I feel a deep in
terest in the result. The passions excited by the
events of the past twenty years have in a good de
ma anu m,A immt interests of our country
should now be considered in a way which will pro
mote its welfare. From feesie nationality
it has grown, within the lifetime of
mnv nf na?r titirona tn a neat Dower. Even if
the rate of our increase shall be less than hereto.
i fore, in about twenty -Ave years it wui nave a popu
lation of one hundred Bullions. Many who are now
living will be active citizens when it has gained this
position. We are on the eve of great events upon
which the results of the present canvass will have a
bearing. While there is much to animate us with
regard to the nation's future, we must bear In
mind that its growth and prosperity
"will also cause many dangers. They
will involve us in new relationships with na
tioiis. They will attract attention to bur affairs and
may excite unfriendly feelings. The Increase of
population and diffusion over new and distant ter
ritories add to the danger of sectional prejudices.
The future will demand thoughtful conduct of pub
lie affairs to prevent sectional passions, for with
the increase of population and of varied interests
they will be more easily excited.
I nfommately the canvass has been marked by
personalities which have turned away attention
from more important subjects. It is our duty to
learn how we can promote the interests of all pur
suits and not devote our attention to one at the ex
pense of the others. The speakers and the press
of the Republican party are arousing danger to our
agricultural and other interests by declaring that
it is the duty of every government to impose such
taxes on imports as will exclude the products of
other lands. Now there is but one of our pursuits
that needs such protection. Our farmers, our
mechanics (with a few exceptions), our commerce,
our carrying interests ask for no taxes to help them.
Our manufactures do need aid from the govern
ment. All parties have agreed that a large share of
our revenues should be raised by taxes upon im
ports. The late national Republican convention
artfully put forth the same doctrine;
but their press and ' speakers claim
that the term protection means that
taxes may be imposed for the sole purpose of aid
ing certain pursuits and they do this in terms which
practieally make war upon our agricultural and
other interests. They say it is a duty of our govern
ment to fence out the importations of foreign pro
ducts which conflict with our own. If this is true
then the governments of Europe are reproached be
cause they do not impose duties upon our agricul
tural products. A light duty upon onr grain pro
visions and dairy products would be destructive to
the prosperity of all parts of our
Union and all indussrial pursuits.
If duties are put upon our products in European
markets the disasters will be charged upon those who
claim to be the peculiar friends of the manufactur
ers and who speak for them. It would be easy for
Europe to retaliate. It would be but light duties to
shut out our products from their ports. We have a
striking proof of this in the effect of our own taxes
upon our carrying trade. In 1868 the tolls upon one
hundred pounds of wheat from Buffalo to New
York on our canals was ten cents. In 1870 efforts
were made to reduce them; these did not show
their influence .until 1676. In the ten
years prior to that time the balance
of traffic against our country was $817,8 674.
This State continued reducing canal taxes and at
length abolished all tolls. The reduction of taxes
led all other routes to reduce charges with the fol
lowing results: In 1888 it cost to carry a bushel of
wheat from Chicago to New York by lake and canal
twenty -five cents, by lake and railroad thirty-nine
cents, by all rail forty-two cents. -Last year the
cost by lake and canal was a fraction more than
nine cents, by lake and railroad twelve cents, by
railroad sixteen cents. The effect upon carrying is
shown by the reports of the general government.
While from 1866 to 1875 the balance of trade
against us was more than eight hundred mil
lion dollars, when those charges were reduced
the balance in our favor in eight years was more
than one thousand and three hundred million dol
lars. This shows what the effect would he if foreign
governments, following the teachings of the Re
publican press and speakers, should feel it their
duty to impose charges upon exports to their coun
tries equal to the reductions in the cost of carrying
from Chicago to New York in 1868. There are evi
dences that they mean to put charges on these ar
ticles and the Republican speeches are highly ap
proved by the British and continental journals.
France and other European countries have already
prohibited the importation of some of our "provis
ions, and they contemplate further action m the
same direction.
It is urged with truth that if we give prosperity
to our manufactures all other industries would be
benefited; but it is also time that if we harm our
farming, carrying and commercial pursuits, we
bring great disasters upon our manufactures. Our
agricultural interests are the most important.
There is no free trade party in our country nor one
opposed to raising the largest shares of our revenue
by taxes upon imports. The amount raised in this
way in 1884 was over 8194,500,000. No party
objects - to this method of raising revenue.
It can give no great offense nor
excite retaliation as it does not put taxes upon for
eign productions solely for the purpose of exclud
ing them. - The discussion between the parties has
been how the amount to be raised by taxation on
imports shall be apportioned. It is our duty then
at this election to consider the interests of all our
industries and to legislate not to build up one at the
cost of the others.
Cleveland to Stay In New Yoi-k.
New York, Oct. 10. In response to an
inquiry as to whether a Philadelphia paper
was correct in stating that he would visit
that city on October 18 Governor Cleveland
writes Henry Clay Lukens of this city: "I
have no idea of visiting any place outside
of New York State during the campaign. I
expect to adhere to my determination in this
respect."
A Clerical Puff For Cleveland.
New York, Oct. 10. In consequence of
the publication of a pamphlet accusing Gov
ernor Cleveland of bigotry, intolerance and
hostility to the Roman Catholic church John
E. Devlin, F. R. Coudert and several other
gentlemen yesterday wrote Rt. Rev. Francis
McNeirney, bishop of Albany, asking if with
his facilities for observation he had seen any
evidence of such hostility. To-day the bishop
replied:.
I have followed with some interest the course of
the Governor, and, relying solely on my resources
of personal knowledge. I am aware of no act of his
administration, which would argue a narrow, intol
erant spirit of hostility to the Catholic church or her
institutions. On the contrary I am led to believe
that he is actuated by a spirit- of fair dealing toward
her interests.
Bl Hauls by Sneak. Thieves.
Providence, K. L, Oct. 10. During the
absence of Mr. D. Albert Pierce from his
residence in Warwick on Thursday evening
a sneak thief entered the house while the
ladies were in the lower apartments and took
property amounting to upwards of $1,000.
The robbery occurred between the hours of
7 and 10 p. m. At Hill's Grove the burglars
entered the house occupied by Joseph Senter
and took $100 in money and a silver watch.
A WHALING BARK WRECKED.
The Crew Have a Bitter Experience.
New Bedford, Mass., Oct. 10. The whal
ing bark Seine, of New Bedford, was wreck
ed June 28th on the west coast of Africa, ten
miles south of Cape Frio. It is a desert re
gion, the Nourse river, eighty miles north,
affording the nearest fresh water. The crew
got ashore safely with four casks of bread
and a try pot, from which, through a pipe
formed of a boat pump and fog horn, they
conducted steam into the casks where it was
condensed into good water. The surf ran so
high that the men were more than a month
in getting three boats to an anchorage out
side. One was capsized and two Portuguese
seamen were drowned. .Edmund C. Dobson,
of New York city,the steward, not being able
to swim, did not dare to go in the
boats and despite all efforts to dissuade him
started alone to walk to the settlement. He
has not since been heard of. The three
boats proceeded to Little Fish Bay, two hun
dred and forty miles away, the nearest settle
ment. The other two boats were totally
disabled and the captain and nine men walked
one hundred and eighty miles north to a Por
tugese fishing station, crossing the Nourse
river on a raft. They replenished their store
of fresh water there, but were reduced to two
tablespoonfuls a day before they reached the
settlement.
WHERE FliAIHES HOLD SWAT.
A Church Destroyed With a Loss of a
Quarter ot a million.
Chicago, Oct. 10. The Rev. Dr. Kit-
tredge's church on Ashland avenue, the
largest church of the Presbyterian denomina
tion in this city, caught fire at 10:30 this
morning. By 12:30 o'clock the edifice was
entirely consumed, nothing but a heap of
debris remaining of what had been the finest
Presbyterian church in the West or JNortn-
west. ' The loss is placed at from $200,000
to $250,000. The insurance cannot be as
certained. Dr. Kittredge received a call
from Philadelphia two days ago.
Lost While Saving; His Valuables.
Somerset, Pa., Oct. 10. This morning
about 3 o'clock the residence of Josiah Ketch-
man, a well-to-do farmer living in New Cen
terville near this place, was totally destroyed
by fire. After extricating "his family from
the burning building Mr. Ketchman went
back to recover some valuables, when the
building collapsed, burying him in the flames.
Ketchman was thirty-six years old and leaves
a wife and three children. -
AN UNLUCKY NEIGHBORHOOD.
Starvation and Murder Lurking In Its
Houses.
Augusta, Me., Oct. 10. Sometime ago
Wilbur W. Heath, a Hallowell sailor, went
to sea, having arranged with .a grocer to sup
ply his family with provisions. After a few
weeks the grocar refused to con
tinue the arrangement. The widow strug
gled along valiantly, but failed to adequately
support her family of three children. Yes
terday the baby died of starvation in its
mother's arms. -Another child lay almost
dead, while the eldest and the mother were
in a starving condition. At this point their
condition was discovered and relief
supplied by neighbors. Mrs.. Heath did not
apply for aid for fear of being
sent to the town farm. Exactly opposite
Mrs. Heath's house, October 3, Mrs. McGee
died of starvation and abuse on the part of
her husband. On the same day five miles
away Thomas r . Malloy w.3 murdered by
an infuriated rumseller.
THE CHOLERA.
New Cases and Deaths Yesterday.
Naples, Oct. 10. There were seventy-five
new cases of cholera here to-day and twenty
eight deaths. At Genoa there were ten new
cases and thirteen deaths.
Naples, Oct. 11. Three were one hun
dred and seven new cases of cholera during
the past wenty-fonr hours and forty-one
aeatns.
The Episcopal Congress.
Detroit, O., Oct. 10. The last day of the
ninth Episcopal congress was devoted to the
discussion of the topic "Agnosticism." Rev.
Charles C. Tiffany of New York, Rev. D. H.
Green of Providence, R. I., and several other
gentlemen spoke. The evening sermon was
evoted to the discussion of the subject of
"Mission and evangelistic preaching." :
THE HORJHONS FOR CLEVELAND.
OneTenth or the Tithes To Help the
Democratic Ticket.
Chicago, Oct. 10. The National Republi
can committee to-day issued a circular in
which they claim to have information from a
reliable source that the Mormon church, at a
council in Salt Lake soon after Mr. Cleve
land's nomination, voted to give one-tenth
of the church tithings a very large
sum to aid in electing the Democratic
ticket. In return the Democratic National
committee promised that if a Democratic
Congress shall be elected Utah will be ad
mitted as a council, the council pledging that
in that event the State will send two Bemo
orats to the United States Senate.
FOR A HORRIBLE MURDER
Two Men and a Woman are Con
demned to Die.
Vienna, Oct. 10. The trial of Ritter and
his wife and Strachlinki for murder on ap
peal from the Rziszor assizes in which they
were sentenced, the first to death and the
other two to life servitude, ended in all three
being sentenced to death. The crime con
sisted in Ritter's enticing a young girl into a
cellar and with the assistance of the others
killing her with an axe and cutting the body
up to prevent detection of the
murder. The girl," who was a
Christian, had been seduced by Ritter,
who is a Hebrew., Strachlinki is a
Christian. He first confessed participation
in ths crime, but afterwards recanted, saying
he had been forced to make a false statement.
Three daughters of Ritter were also accused
of assisting to cutthe body up, but they were
discharged on the first trial for lack of evi
dence. It was claimed for the accused that
the charges were only part of the prevailing
anti-Semitic persecutions and the expenses
of the defense were borne by wealthy He
brews of Vienna. The case has caused much
excitement in Galacia where the murder was
committed.
The Failures of the Week.
New York, Oct. 10. There were 213
failures in the United States reported at
Badstreet's during the week, against 188 in
the preceding week, and 166, 125 and 177 in
the corresponding weeks of 1883, 1882 and
1881 respectively.
OUR NATIONAL COMMERCE.
Its Enormous Masnltude Shown By
Last Year's Statistics.
Washington, Oct, 10. Mr. Nimmo, chief
of the bureau of statistics, to-day handed in
his annual report to the Secretary of the
Treasury. The matter of chief importance
treated is the enormous magnitude of our
internal commerce. It is shown that the
value of the products of the various indus
tries of the United States is seven times the
total value of our foreign commerce, nearly
three times the total value of the foreign
commerce of Great Britain and Ireland, fivo
times the total value of the foreign commerce
including in each case both imports- and ex
ports. The total value of the products of
industry in the United States is also shown
to be a little more than twice the total value
of the exports of merchandise for all the
countries of Europe. The United States is
now the largest manufacturing country on
the globe. The value of the products of
American manufacture consumed at home is
five times the value of the manufactured pro
ducts of Great Britain and Ireland exported
to all other countries and more than fourteen
the value of the exports of manufactured
products from France to all other countries.
The relative value of the internal as com
pared with the foreign commerce of the
country is also illustrated by statements
showing that ninety-nine per cent, of the
coal mined in this country, ninety-five per
cent, or our iron ana steel products, ninety
five per cent, of the products of our leather
industry, more than ninety-nine per cent, of
our manufactures of wool, and ninety-seven
per cent. of our manufactures of
glass, glassware, earthenware and stoneware
are consumed in the United States.
Referring to the periods of phenomenal pros
perity and of phenomenal depression which
hare from the beginning marked the com
mercial and industrial growth of the. country,
he says: "Experience has proved these fluc
tuations to be but the symptoms of an ex
uberant and uncontrollable spirit of enter
prise outrunning the possibilities of a healthy
and well proportioned development even in
this land of abounding natural resources. "Mr.
Nimmo's report shows that the total value of
imports ana exports or merchandise aunng
the year ended Jane 30, 1884, amounted t
$1,408,211,302, or 138,809,014 less than
during the preceding year. The value of
domestic merchandise exported during the
year amounted to $724,964,852, or $79,258,-
780 less than during the preceding year, and
the value of imports amounted to $667,697,
693, or $55,483,221 less than the preceding
you. The exports of specie for the year
amounted to $67,133,813 and the imports to
$37,426,262. The excess of specie exports
during the year amounted to 29,707,121 as
against $3,303,902 during the preceding
year.
TELEGRAPHIC JOTTINGS.
The number of persons injured by the
cyclone in Catania is now estimated at five
hundred.
A. M. Sullivan, M. P. , who was supposed
to be in a dying condition Thursday night at
Dublin, has rallied somewhat in consequence
of a successful surgical operation.
Base ball yesterday: At Detroit, Detroits
2, New Yorks 2; at Philadelphia, Athletics 9,
Baltimores 1; at Richmond, Louisvilles 11,
Virginias 4; at New York, St. Louis 3, Met
ropolitans 1; at Brooklyn, Cincinnatis 4,
Indianapolis 3.
LOCAL NEWS.
To St. Louis.
Rev. Dr. Hawes, formerly pastor of the
North church in this city, leaves here next
Wednesday for St. Louis, where he will re
main for several weeks. He will occupy one
of the leading pulpits of that city during his
absence.
Maud S. In Prime Condition.
Hartford, Oct. 10. Mr. Bair reports to
day that Maud S. is in grand condition for
her great trial speed next Tuesday and the
managers of Charter Oak Park publish an
announcement this afternoon that if she
beats her record they will consummate the
achievement by awarding to her a cup with
the time made by her engraved thereon.
A Young- Man Drowned.
Bridgeport, Conn., Oct. 10. George
Baisard, aged twenty-six, was found drown
ed this afternoon in Piatt's mill pond, near
Easton. It is not known whether the drown
ing was accidental or a case of suicide. Cor
oner Holt is investigating.
Republican Rally and Flag Raising
at Beacon Falls.
To-night the Republicans of Beacon Falls
will have a grand rally. They will raise a
banner. George H. Cowell, of Waterbury,
and E. B. Gager, of Birmingham, will deliver
addresses. There will be a torchlight pro
cession in which, besides the local company,
a company from Seymour and the Seymour
drum corps are expected to participate.
THE DANBURY FAIR.
Eighteen Thousand People Present
Yesterday.
The beautiful October weather of yesterday
was appreciated by the managers and visitors
at the fair now being held at Danbnry. It
is safely estimated that there were . 18,000
persons present yesterday and a more orderly
crowd it would be hard to find. There were
but few policemen present and good order
was maintained without then" aid. There
were 14,089 paid admission tickets received
at the gates on Thursday. The officers of
the association estimate that there were 1,500
attendants connected with the 200
rented privileges, which include the res
taurants. 'These attendants and the men
with the exhibits and with the horses and
others that have free admissions indicate
that there were nearly 17,000 persons present
and a larger attendance yesterday.
The fair was materially increased by the
exhibits from New Haven. The carriage
makers of this city sold some of their wagons
that were on exhibition. R. B. Bradley &
Co. and J. T. Leighton & Co., of Broadway,
had agricultural implements at the fair. C.
H. Miller received diplomas for Brunswick)
Balke, Collender company's billiard table.
The B. Shoninger Co. had Silver Bell pianos
and organs of the firm's manufacture. - The
Singer Manufacturing company had an ex
hibition showing the latest inventions as ap
plied to the Singer machines.
The.Wheeler & Wilson and the Howe
bands, of Bridgeport,gave a beautiful concert
in one of the tents during the entire afternoon.
Each band played ten choice selections, which
were attentively listened to by spectators on
the comfortable seats provided by the man
agement. "While one band gave the concert
in the tent the other band played in front of
the grand stand.
The pacing race was won on Thursday by
N. Hubbard's Dandy, best time 2:33. The
friends of the horse. M. C, which contested
for this purse, are surprised thit he did not
win a part of the money, as he can with
proper treatment pace much Taster than the
time made. M. C. is owned in this city.
SUMMARY FBES FOR ALU
J. J. Webster, ch. m. Lucy Fleming 3 1 1 1
J. W. DriscoU, ch. g. Tom Berry 18 4 4
C. Dickerman, b. g. Dan Smith, S 2 2 2
W. H. Nelson, b. m. Huntress 5 4 8 3
W. A. Allen, b. g. Ossian Pet 4 5 6 5
Time, 2:31, 2:31, 2:27H, 2:30. ,
SUMMARY 2:87 CUSS.
J. H. Lewis, br. m. Isolene 1 1 2 1
J. W. Driscoll, bk. m. May Jefferson 3 S 1 8
J. GrifBn, b. g. Doctor..: 8 2 6 5
A. Wilkinson, b. m. Katy Jordan 5 4 8 2
W. H. Petri, for. m. M. J. B. ...... 1 4 7 4 4
William Riley, bk. g. Nigger 7 6 5 6
J. J. Webster, b. g. volunteer Wilkes.. . 6 5ildr.
Time, 2:87, 2:89, 2:36, 2:38.
The managers are to be congratulated on
the very successful Danbnry fair.
POLICE COMMISSIONERS.
Objections to the First and Sixth Ward
Voting Places A Surgeon For the
Police and Fire Departments Con
sidered. A special meeting of the Board of Police
Commissioners was held last evening for.the
purpose of considering a change in the vot
ing places of the First and Sixth wards. The
last voting place in the First ward was at the
police station on Court street and many
voters objected to the place as not calculated
or well arranged for a general election.
Mayor Lewis stated that he had called the
meeting because so many objections had been
made in regard to the location of the voting
places of the First and Sixth wards. The
First ward voting place was designated as the
general police oflice in Court street.
Commissioner Catlin said that the lower
rooms in Peck's Opera House had been rent
ed for a museum. Mr. Leary, who keeps a
saloon on the other side of the opera house,
had said that he would close his bar and
rent the front of his store for election pur
poses. Mayor Lewis said that it was evidently im
proper to hold an election in the police build
ing. He said that rooms could be obtained
in the State House.
Hon. C. B. Bowers said that there was a
large number who objected to voting in the
police station. He said the objection was
very widespread.. He thought the basement
of the old State House would be the best
place to receive and eount the votes in a
State and national election.
Mr. Catlin moved that John Leary's store
be selected as the voting place for the First
ward.
Councilman Bollman said he was in doubt
and suggested that the matter be referred to
a committee.
George J. Hiller spoke in favor of a vot
ing place in Crown street and designated Mr.
Leary's place.
John W. Lane favored Leary's place or
the old State House.
On motion of Commissioner Bollmaii a
committee of two consisting of Commisaion
ers Sloat and Bollman were appointed to re
vise the list for voting places, and report at
the next meeting of the Board.
Alderman Klenke and Councilman Gunn
appeared in objection to the Sixth ward vot
ing place as being too far out of the way,
and the matter was referred to the same com-
At 9 o'clock Mr. Ruff of the Board of Fire
Commissioners and Messrs. Welch, Brown,
Redmond and Jerome .appeared before the
Board in regard to the plan of the Police
Board of selecting a physician of the Board.
Mr. Bollman said that since Dr. Bissell
was appointed polico surgeon all candidates
for positions on the force had been examined
by the police surgeon, although the matter
was afterward temporarily waived as to the
examinations. He said that no provision had
been made for the payment of a police sur
geon, but every candidate for position on the
force had paid the surgeon for examination
as to his qualifications. No physician had
ever been provided for men affected with or
dinary illness. ,
On motion of Commissioner Bollman a
committee of two was appointed to consider
the selection of a surgeon to act for both
boards in the examination of candidates for
admission, and in case of the same when in
jured or sick while in the discharge of duty.
Messrs. Bollman and Sheldon were appointed
such a committee.
POLITICAL,.
WIlRlns old Guard, Attention!
You are hereby ordered to meet at Masonic Hall
on Wednesday evening, October 15th, for drill.
Per order, -George R. Lauieu, Captain,
Perry T. Walker, First Sergeant.
Religious Services.
Calvary Baptist Chitrch. Preaching to-morrow
morning and evening by Rev. Mr. Busfleld, of
Grand street Baptist church.
First Baptist Bran-ch (82 Nash street). Sabbath
school at 8 o'clock. Preaching in the evening at 7:30
o'clock by the Rev. 8. D. Phelps.
Uniteo Church. Preaching in the morning at
10:30 by Rev. Edward Y. Hmcks, of Andover. Mass.,
and in the evening at 7:30 a praise service, to
which the public is cordially invited.
Advent Church. Beers Street Social meeting
In the morning at 10:30. Preaching at 2:30 and 7:30
p. m. by F.lder H. Munger, of Chicopee Falls, Mass.
Strangers welcome. Seats free.
Spiritualists' Hall (102 Orange street). Rev.
M. H. Houghton will speak on Sunday afternoon at
three o'clock. Subject, "Has life any meaning? If
so,what?" The public are invited to be present.
College Street Church. Preaching by the
pastor, Rev. William W. McLane, D. D., to-morrow
at 10:30 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. Sunday school at 12
m. Young people's prayer meeting at 6:30 p. m.
First Baptist Church (Wooster Square.)
Preaching fin the morning by pastor. Rev. W.
H. ButricK. Sabbath school and young men's
Bible class at 12 m. Praise and prayer service at 7
p. m.
Davenport Church (Wooster Square). I. C.
Meserve, pastor, will preach in the forenoon at 10:30.
Sunday school in the afternoon at 2:30. Chapel
service in the evening at 7 o'clock. Strangers, wel
comed to all the services.
Howard Avenue Chvrch. To-morrow evening a
special service for railroad men will be held. Divis
ion No. 77, B. of L., will attend. Rev. Dr. Newman
Smyth and Professor S. K. Baldwin will speak.
Railroad men and their families are cordially invi
ted. First M. E. Church. Rev. D. A. Goodsell, D. D.,
pastor. Divine service at 10:30. 2:30 and 7:30.
The nasttor will nreaeh morning and evening. Af
ternoon Sabbath school. Evening subject, "The
First Christian Home." Young people's meeting at
6:15 p.m.
Gospel Union English Hall, corner of Court
and State streets. Gospel Union anniversary at
English Hall to-morrow evening at the usual hour,
with brief addresses from Rev. Dr. Harris, of Yale
Theological seminary, Kev. trot, ueorge T. LAdd,
Mr. H. O. Williams and others.
' Humphrey Street Congregational Church.
Rev. Spencer H. Bray, pastor, will preach morning
and evening, suopect ior me evening. is me
Young Man Safe?'' Sunday school at 2 p. m. Young
people's prayer meeting at 6:30 p. m. Seats all
tree. A cordial welcome to an.
St. John Street M. E. Church. The pastor.
Rev. A. H. Wyatt, will begin to-morrow a series of
three Sunday morning sermons on ''What the
blood of Christ does for us." The pastor invites es
pecially unconverted men and women. A cordial
welcome to all. Service at 10:30 a. m.
Good Samaritans. The Good Samaritans will
hold a temperance meeting at Peck's Grand Opera
House Sunday evening. There will be addresses, mu
sic by Thomas' orchestra and "B" quartette and a
recitation by Edwin A. Lewis. Voluntary contribu
tions at the door.
Trinity Methodist Episcopal Church (Dwight
Place, corner George street). Preaching at 10:30
by the Rev. A. H. Mead and at 7:30 by Rev. C. B.
Ford. Bible school at 2:80 p. m. The following
Sunday Rev. Dr. J. O. Peck will be present and at
the evening service will preach to young men on
"Sowing Wild Oats."
Church op the Holy Spirit, Second Univerealist.
Rev. Phoebe A. Hanaford, pastor. Services at 10:30
and 7:30. Sunday school and adult Bible classes at
noon. Conference meeting Tuesday evening. Ser
mons to-morrow by the pastor. Morning: "Cross
and Crown" (Heb. xii, 2; 1 Pat. V 4.) Evening;
"The Christian's Death" (Rev. x?v, 13.) All are
cordially invited.
PURE ABSOLUTE
NECESSITY,
OF HEALTH.
BLOOD
THE marvellous results of Hood's Sab
sapakilla upon all humors and low
conditions of the blood (as prov
en by the cures effected) prove
it the best BLOOD MEDyr ICINE.
Such has been the sue- cess of
this article at home .Jathat near
ly every family inX wholeneigh
borhoods have been taking it at
the same time. tp It eradicates
scrofula, vital.
es the Wood, y thereby restoring
and renovat- ins the whole sys
tem. Hood's f Sarsapamlla purl
fies the
blood. Hood's Sassa-
PAHILLA
cures dyspepsia. Hood's
rlARSA-
fNN
p aril la cures bilious.
jess.
Sab-
A peculiar point in Hood's
saparilla is that it builds
up and strengthens the system, while it
eradicates disease, and as nature's great
assistant proves itself invaluable as a pro
tection from diseases that originate in
changes of the seasons, of climate and of
life.
SCROFULA.
135 Howard Street, 1
Lowell, Mass., Jan. it. f
Messrs. C. I. Hood & Co.: Gentlemen
I have used Hood's Sarsaparilla in my
family for scrofulous humor with wonderful
success, and am happy to tell you that it is
the best medicine we ever used. I do sin
cerely advise any one who is troubled with
scrofula to give this valuable remedy a trial,
and assure them they will not be disappoint
ed. Very truly yours,
(Coburn Shuttle Co.) C. C. FICKEBLNG.
Hood's Sabsapabuxa is sold by all Drug
gists. Price 1 per bottle; six for $5. Pre
pared by C. L HOOD te CO., Lowell, Mass.
WASTED,
A WOMAN as cook and laundress a Swede pre
ferred.' Apply at
ocl02t 67 MANSFIELD STREET.
A SITUATION by a young girl of experience as
seamstress in a private family, or would do
work with a dressmaker. A good ho;ae more an
object than wages. Inquire at
oc0 8t 24 HALLOCK STREET.
WASTED,
BOOKKEEPERS, clerks, salesmen, waiters,
cooks, porters, packers, printers, painters, car
penters, machine hands, and all kinds of male help
Also 4 salesladies, assistant bookkeeper, clerks
laundresses, cooks, waitresses, table girls. All such
helD furnished. Call and insnect the hest m-atom
ever presented at Shepard's headquarters, 119 Or
ange street. Help wanted for the West. oc9
WANTED.
A WOMAN to cook and do general housework. A
Swede preferred.
OCB II 01 mANtit l&Lil) STREET.
WAJVTED,
To BUY lot of Second-hand Furniture and Car
pets. Highest cash price paid. Orders by mail
fjrumpuy ttLienuea to at
jai I XS CH U KUtl IS HEIST.
Intelligence Office.
EMPLOYMENT nftlrm fnr male anrf femnlea.
Help of different nationalities can be supplied to
uiiraiciuinOT, uuaruing nouses, noteis ana res
taurants. The proprietor of this establishment pays
great attention in the choice of girls and women be
fore sending them to AU situations. Calls from the
country at any distance are promptly attended to.
Invalid and wet nurses at short notice. Male help
. " wiu iwiu luuiuH always reariv.
MRS Tl MIII.f.IfJAV
a26tf
197 George, corner Temple street.
To Whom it may Concern !
MONEY liberally advanced in sums
to suit on all kinds of merchan
dise and personal property of ev
ery description at
EDWARD ENGEL'S
Old and Reliable Money Loan Office,
311 and 318 STATE STREET, New Haven, Conn.
All legal transactions strictly Confidential. ja5
MRS. DR. J. A. WRIGHT,
Psycliometrist and Clairvoyant.
Consultation on Business, Minerals, Health and al
personal .matters.
Readings of Character by Handwriting, Photograph
or nair.
Price Gentlemen, $2; Ladies, Jl.
Mrs. Wright can be consulted at her office, fift Op.
ange street, daily, S a. m. to 8 p. m. ui28tf -
nUxtninmzuts.
CARLL'8 OPERA HOUSE.
Wednesday and Thursday, Octo
lcr 15tli and 16tli.
''An unmistakable success." N. Y. Herald.
Ruth's Devotion !
Or Blue and Circy.
Under tho auspices of Messrs. Shook & Collier,
of the
UNION SQUARE THEATER, N. Y.
Willi a Notable and Especially Chosen
Cast.
All the Original Scenery and Appointments.
Seats now on sale at Loomis'. Admission 25 and
50 cents. Reserved seats 73c and 81. ocIO fit
CAHLL'S OPERA HOUSE!
Grand Event of the Season.
Engagement Extraordinary of the Celebrated
French Society Star.
Tuesday, October l llli.
RHEA!
In the New and Powerful Five Act Drama,
YVONNE!
Written expressly for Rhea by Francois Mons at a
cost of $10,000.
SYNOPSIS OF VYONNE:
Act 1 The Accusation. Act 2-The Robbery.
Act 3 Courtship. Act 4 The Masked Ball. Act 5
The Fatal Letter. Every lady and child pur
chasing a reserved seat will receive an elegant sou
venir, consist ing of a book of Rhea's Poems.
Seats now on sale at Loomis'. Admission 25 and
50 cents. Reserved seats 75c and $1. ocl0 4t
PECK'S GRAND OPERA HOUSE.
NEW HAVEN.
ONE WEEK,
9 PERFORMANCES, COMMENCING
MONDAY, OCT. 13.
Positively Farewell Tour ! !
Manager John D. Mi shier has the honor to present
Prof. Cieo. Bartholomew's
EQUINE PARADOX,
20 EDUCATED HORSES. 20
Re-arranged Programme.
New, Original and Attractive Features.
Do Everything but Talk.
EVERY EVENING AT 8 O'CLOCK.
3 5IATIXEES 3
Wednesday, Friday, Saturday, 2:30.
SPECIAL PRICES.
Gallery, 25. Admission, first floor, 35. All re
served seats, 50 cents. For sale at Loomis'.
oc9 9t
One week, commencing Monday, Oct. 13.
33 Consecutive Performances at tho Union Square
Theater, New York.
PROF. CROMWELL'S
ART ENTERTAINMENTS!
They consist of magnificent illustrations of Tours
in Many Lands, the Artistic Gems of Europe and
America, and the Natural Wonders of the World,
accompanied with a descriptive Chat by the Way
side. Monday, Germany; Tuesday, S-itzerland;
Wednesday and Matinee, London; Thursday, the
Holy Land; Friday, Paris; Saturday Matinee,
Homes of England; Saturday, Rome. General ad
mission, 25c; reserved seats, 25c extra. Seats se
cured at Edward Downes & Co.'s, 829 Chapel street
(next to Cutler's) and at Box Office, Opera House.
oclltf
New Haven Ojera House.
HORACE WALL, Lessee and Manager.
OCTOBER 10 ANO 11,
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY NIGHTS AND SAT
URDAY MATINEE.
Atkinson's Comedy Company in Two Great
Comedies,
PECK'S BAD BOY
AND HIS PA,
And Peck's new Comedy,
THF GROCERYMAN AND PECK'S BAD BOY.
The funniest Comedies oti earth. Played by com
edians who act and siner. The great Goat Scene will
make you smile, titter, laugh, scream, yell.
Reserved seats at Edward Downes & Co.'s, 829
Chapel street (next to Cutler's) and at box office of
Opera House. Prices 81, 75, 50, a" cents. Matinee
50 and 25 cents. Monday, October 13, and during
the week, Professor Cromwell and his great Art
Entertainment. . ocB At
The New HavenDjmng Association,
HAMILTON PARK,
NEW HAVEN, CONN.,
October 21,. 23 and 23, 1881.
Premiums - - $2,000.
First Bay, Tuesday, October 21.
1. Purse $250. 2:40 Class. 135, $02, $38, $S5.
2. Purse $400. 2:80 Class. S200, $100, $60, $40.
Second Day, Wednesday, October 22.
' 3. Purse S2O0. 2:45 Class $100, $50, $30, $20.
4. Purse 8100. 2:84 Class. $200. $100, $B0, $40.
5. Purse $50, Road wagon race, $25, $15, $10.
Tblrd Day, Thursday, October 23.
6. Purse $300. 2.37 Class. $150, $75. $45. $30.
7. Purse $400. Free to all. $200, 100, $00, $40.
Entrance fee, ten per cent, of purse, should ac
company the nomination, and will in all cases be
required before noon of the day of starting. Four
entries required to fill and three to start.
Rules and regulations of the National Trotting
Association, as amended to February 13, 1884, will
govern. Any horse distancing the field will receive
but one premium.
Entries close Tuesday, Oct. 14. 1884. Address H.
L. BRADLEY, 448 State street, New Haven, Conn.
Ofllcers: V. C. Watkrhousk, Prest.; H. L. Brad
ley, Sec'y; F. D. Butbicks, Treas.
oc8 6t
BUxVAKIiL'S MUSEUM.
Arrival of the Miraculous HARRIS SISTERS,
QUADRUPLET OF GIRLS,
Four in one at one birth
FOUR MIDGET SISTERS.
Miss Myrtle Kingsland's
AUTOMATON PASSION PLAY.
SEE THE
"W la.it o 3ZSlxDxao,nt
AT BUNNELL'S,
ADMISSION 10 CENTS,
With reserved seat 2d cents.
MATINEES EVERY DAY.
October 20, Grand Comic Opera.
DANCING.
Instruction in the above art, either private or in
classes, given by
MISS ITIAM IK C. GILL,
daughter of the late Prof. Gill. Circulars obtained
at music and book stores. Call on or address UIS8
MAMIB C. GILL. 815 Crown street. so8 Sm
Medical Treatment Free.
ON Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, at her
office 109 Orange street, between tne hours of
10 and 12 a. m.. Dr. Adelaide Lambert will treat the
poor gratuitously, giving special attention to wo
men and children se26 lm
MANICURE.
FI.VGER IV AILS BEAUTIFIED.
MRS. DANIELS has returned from her vaca
tion, and her office is now open for business,
at 095 Chapel street. Biting of the nails brittle
nails, hang nails and all diseases of the nails cured.
Office hours from 9 to 12 and from 2 to 4.
ocl0 6t
CHARLES A BROOKS,
IE.H.HOAO, I
1 Commercial Banv. I
i U. W X1AYJSH, l.U.N.V.
Newton. Kansas,
" LEM AJX -
Investment SKcrmrrrEs In Ths Market.
either personally!- by mail. Beit references.
CHABJLES A. BROOKS ixS
001 638 Chapel .trees

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