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Morning journal and courier. [volume] (New Haven [Conn.]) 1848-1894, October 13, 1884, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015483/1884-10-13/ed-1/seq-1/

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$5 per Year.
THE LARGEST DAILY NEWSPAPER HV THE CITY.
OFFICE, 400 STATE STREET.
THE CARKIHGTOIf PVBUSHDfG CO.
NEW HAYEK, CONN. MONDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 13, 1884.
NO. 262
VOL. LII.
Messrs. ... r.r, o
. .'. i: jl ; , ';':! ' ; 1; t . - ; s
FostEr, Paul & Co.,
of Grenoble, y ranee and
Berlin, Germany. .
have appointed
their sole agents
in New Haven
for -the sate of tfte world
renowned Foster
Kid Gloves.
These gloves, which are
fitted with improved
hooks that will not
catch in lace, wear out
sleeve-linings, nor acci
dentally unfasten, are
made in three qualities,
the best being stamped
thtis:
Price, in 5 hooks $2,
zn 7 hooks $2.25.
The second quality is
stamped ---
Price, in 5 hooks $1.50,
in 7 hooks $1.75-
The third quality is
stamped
Price, in 5 hooks $1,
in 7 hooks $1.25.
SWf? agents for New
Haven.
SCOLLOPS.
New Salt Mackerel, Spanish Mackerel. Hard ami
1.1. ii n i. unl;,,4. KVlc ?.frkerel- Round
ml I.ons Clams. Iobstcra, Oysters, etc., etc.. the
iicst m tne marKec
Seed's Market, 59 Cliurcli Street
OPPOSITE THE P9TOFFKE.
, H. W. SMITH, Manager.
GEORGE W. BUTTON,
A nrillTECT.
Fruit, Forclsn and Domestic,
rr.Stf 1.075 Chapel Street
JOHNSTON'S
PREPARED KALSOMiNE
In wlilte and all oilier desirable
tints.
The Best and Cheapest in the
Market.
A Earge Assortment of
WHITEWASH BRUSHES
Varying In price from SOc up
wards.
MASURY'S CELEBRATED
RAILROAD COLORS
' -AND
AYEBILL CHEMICAL PAIHT
D. S. &LJIOTY & SOff,
Not. 37 and 373 State St.
rolO
Nervous Debilrty
. C. A. DOUGLASS,
TEACHER OF PIANO,
295 Columbus Avenue.
s32 lmo
IWIas I.. A. miller's
School of IVSLxxsio
Reopens Sept. 15, 1884.
Vocal ind Instrumental in nate Taneht.
ri-H inHtmctinn e-iven at moderate orices. Office
hours from 2 to 7 p. m.
778 Cnapel Street,
Koora a.
Bel oiu
A Training Class for Kintergart
. ners.
win ravm in Wrw Tf.-iven Conn.. September 23. For
circulars address MISS ANGELINE BROOKS, 15
Home Place. New Haven, Conn.
jy3 ataw, thamam
PIANOFORTE.
HARMONY AND COMPOSITION
HI KS. BRAND
Has recommenced her lessons for the season, and
has vacancies for a few pupils. Terms moderate.
. ial XOBK STREET,
82 3mo Two doors from crown.
Miss Fannie CJ. Howe.
CULTIVATION OF THE VOICE (Italian method)
- and PIANO INSTRUCTION.'
Charlc T; Howey
FLUTE AND PIANO INSTRUCTION,
103 CIIOWN STREET. NEAR TEMPLE STREET
selStf
No..847 Chapel street. Thorough commercial train-
Apply for circular giving full information. sll
CONSERVATORY 0F MUSIC.
MVS1C. Vocal and Instrumental and Tuning.
AKT. Drawing. PftlntinK. Modeling and PortraHwe.
OB1TOBY. literature Mid lAilOTases.
HOIIGi Elejiant accommodations lor 500 lady student
FAJCXf TEfiM begins Sept. 11th. Beautifully 111 d
Calendar free. Address B. TOURJEE, Director. i
LEABN S0WTH1H3 USEFUL!
Don't Waste Your Evenings!
Less than a year ago a young man who was em
ployed in an office during tha day attended our
Evening School for a while, and is now private sec
retary to General F. D. Sloat of this city. Another
young man, learned while working in a shop, took
a nosit.ion lust November, and is now erettinc: $1,000
a year with a largo manufacturing company.
Young men who nave uie capacity to sew uejuuu
their noses will attend the Phonographic School of
F. H. COGSWELL,
811 Chapel Street.
85
YALE BUSINESS COLLEGE.
n .iw a
HANKING DEPARTMENT.
NIGHT SCHOOL.
Terms $10 for Tlirco Months.
Apply at
No. 37 Insurance BuIldlnC)
(wis it. c. i.o v t-.t i i;r:.
STONY CREEK AND LIGHTHOUSE
OPENED TO OBDEB.
Lake Trout, Halibut, Bluefish. Sea Bass, Blackllsh,
Flatfish, Mackerel.
Spring Chickens and Fowls- PRICE REDUCED.
rrirae Heer, glutton, i.amo, veuianu r i-vau rvin..
Choice Sugar Cured Hams, Shoulders, Breakfast
tsacon, smOKec ana uriea J5eer, r wwa mar
ket Smoked and Pickleil Beef Tonerues.
Sweet Potatoes, Cabbages, red and white. Green
Tomatoes, sweet i-eppers, sc.
JUDSOX BROTHERS,
PACKING AND PKOVISION CO.,
505 and 507 STATE STREET.
oc3
DECORATIVE PAPER HANGINGS
PAINTS, OILS, GLASS, ETC.
PLATT & THOMPSON,
64 and GO Orange St. and 5 Center St.
3V'-'a
Salmon,
STHIPBD BASS,
Large Mackerel, Eels,
Sea Bass, Halibut,
Hard and Soft Cralts,
Butter Fish, Scollops, &c, &c.
at
A. FOOTE & CQ.'S,
853 &0?.Z?S3 ST.
FISTULA
Cured without tlio nseo
the Knife.
Wm. KEED.(M. 1., Harvard, 1R42)
and ROBERT M. KEED,)M. D., Har
vard 18T6, Evans House, 175
Tremont St., Boston, treat
FISTULA, PILES and ALL
DISEASES OF THE KEO
TIIH, without detention from
business. Reference given. Send
for pamphlets. Office hours 11 a.
AND
PILES,
m to 4 o'clock p. m. (except Sunday). a28eodlT
Flows from the Maximum Mineral Fountain of Sara
toga Springs, and is in the opinion of the most emi
nent medical men Nature's bovereign Cure for Con
stipation, Dyspepsia, Torpid Liver, Inactive Condi
tions of the Kidneys, and a most salutary alterative
in scrofulous affections. With ladies, gentlemen
and bon viv&nts everywhere it has become the
standard of dietary expedients, fortifying the diges
tive functions ana enabling free livers to indulge
with impunity at the table. The world of wealth,
intelligence and refinement testifies to its sparkling,
naturally pure and delightful qualities as the bev
erage incomparable, and accredit it with being the
surest and sped i est source of their clear complex
ions, high and exuberant spirits. HATHOllN
SPRING WATER is sold only in glass bottles; four
dozen pints are packed in a case. It may be ob
tained at all hotels, and of druggists, wine mer
chants and grocers everywhere. myg
I :fffi .Kniyti-eraxi. -; j 5: sV-
r
L & J. M. Blair,
57, 59 & 61 0RAME;ST.,
FURNITURE DEALERS
AND
UNDERTAKERS,
Have the finest Painted Bedroom Suits in the city.
New Parlor Suits, Walnut Bedroom Suits.
The best Spring Bed for the money.
Splint, Rattan, Cane and Bush Seat Chairs in
great variety, as low as can be bought.
UNDERTAKING
promptly attended to, night or day, with care.
Bodies preserved without ice in the best manner
Also Sole Agents for Washburn's Deodoring and
Disinfecting Fluid.
A new lot of Folding Chairs and Stools to rent for
parties or funeral. y6
Antique, Modern and Inlaid Fur
niture Repaired.
FRENCH polishing done. Second-hand furni
ture bought and sold. 304 ELM STREET,
near Broadway, New Haven, Conn. se23 ly
SAVE YGUft UQI1EY.
No Need of New Clothing
This Fall.
Send your Coats, Pants and "Vests
Cloaks, Shawls and Jerseys,
Dresses, Sacques and Robes,
Ribbons, Trimmings and Gloves,
Featncrs, L,aces, Crapes, etc.,
and bave Hi cm Cleaned or Rcdyed
In most cases Incy will look
Nearly as well as new.
Lneo Curtains & Window Sbades
Done up eqnal to new.
Carpets Cleaned by Steam Scouring
LAUNDRYJNG.
OfEvcry Description.
All of my work guaranteed.
OrFICES:
645 and 878 Chapel Street,
THOMAS FOESYTH,
WINDOW GLASS,
PAINTS, OILS
-AND
VARNISH.
THOMPSON & BELDEN,
896 txxcL 398
STATE
mrcoHT
SAFE DEPOSIT COMPANY
AND
STORAGE WAREHOUSE,
33 To 38 EAST 42d STREET
(Opposite drond Central Depot.)
J(cw York.
a RTTTT.nrvra FTREPROOl1 THROUGHOUT
Now ready for the transaction of business. Boxes
rented at from iu u) jw jwr . umc, A.
and packagesstored under guarantee.
Private entrauce. Reception aud Toilet Rooms for
Vailit, t;OUlKIl, AvtlCI.-iJL.wil .mvi ii.u iwv.... .
-i. crr..Twl ilnor mitl directlv accessible to tiie
.. ... -. a nn!lat 7..i.,e rn
street. Rooms or space in the
FIREPROOF WAKEHUUSli,,,
m , I F AW- ami ATr.rl, .'1T,1
ror rurntLure, uucm -
rented by the month or year. Trunk stosrge a
SpeclaiXSPECTIOIS ISYITED.
THOS. L- JAMES, A. VAN SANTVOORD,
President. Vice President.
J. H" B. EDGAR, J. R. VAN WORMER,
Secretary, ouperiuicuucuu
-THE-
NEW YORK BRANCH
LOAN OFFICE
NOW PERMAFENTLY LOCATED AT
42 Church Street.
IE 0 OY LOADED.
Liberal advances made on all kinds of personal
property.
Unredeemed Pledges
For sale at low prices.
Square Dealing Willi All.
JKQL03I0N FRY.
jyto
Ci. II. Gldnejr
Dentist
78 7 CJiapel st.
op. Aruistro'-j
Carpet
Koomf.
Fine Work at Moderate Frlces.
A Large Stock or Artificial Teeth.
Teeth Extracted, 25 Cents. With Gai
or Ether SO Cents.
37" Particular attention paid to the preparation
of Natural Teeth. Office hours from 8 a. m. to U p.m.
selfl ALL WORK J,VARRANTED.
CEEAIERY OTTTERED
Martha Washington Brand.
Fifty Cases Just Keceivetl.
The trade supplied at factory prices by "
J. D. DBWELL & CO.,
Wltoicsale Grocers,
23 TO 239 STATE STREET.
jyl4
Large Invoice
-OF
T.A DIES'
GOSSAMER CLOAKS
TO BE SOLI)
For the Next Thirty Days,
EACH AT 95 CENTS.
AT THE
GOODYEAR BUBBEB STORE,
73 Church Street,
CORNER CENTER,
Opposite the Postofflce.
F. C. TUTTLE,
Proprietor.
IvlO
E. D. HENDEE,
-SUCCESSOR TO
W. D. BRYAN,
IJ S T M TA1LO BJ,
NO. 127 CHURCH ST.
BROWN,
J OAK HALL,
Philadelphia.
A full line of card samples of'
we grcsx piece gooas SIOCJC
Will be found with
J. P. BARKER, Jr.,
SALES AGENT,
R? Mai -New Haven,Ct
'iii-t and Sauterne Wines.
TTV"e bin roraivd this dftV 100 CSSeS of Esche
V .. iv rA a Wimw nnr own direct imnorta.
tion from Bordeaux. Having handled these Wines
for the past twenty-two years we can confidently
recommend them for punty and general excellence
to ail or our customers ntn
"straight" Wines, EDW. nflau. st y",
iy 770 Chapel Street.
Smoke
HALL'S ROSAS, our new 5 CENT CIGAR, espe
cially manufactured for our retail trade.
Guaranteed all Havana filler, and warranted the
best cigar for the money ever soio.
s2 EDW. E. HALL & SON.
SffRpWThe Largest J
Merchant Tailoring
and Clothing House ATM
C in America. vr
) WANAMAKER R
km
w uio great piece gooas sxocjc VTl
1
Tie
Peojl
e's Dry
SPECIAL
LADIES' HOSIERY.
300 dozen Ladies' Full Regular Ingrain Cotton Hose,
French Feet, in Seal Browns, KTavy Bines, Wines
and Cardinals, at t lie ridiculously low price of
lO CESfTS PER PAIR.
Wonld be considered good value at 38 cents. .
50 dozen Ladies' Spun Silk Hose, in Black, at
- : 08 CEXTS TERPAIIt.
Regular price $1.50 per pair.
PROCTOR, MAErUIRE & CO.,
837 CHAPEL STREET,
NEW HAVEN.
LEADERS IN
09 CHURC
Money refunded whereGoods prove unsatisfactory.
UNEIPE FRUIT, Impure Water, Unhealthy Cli
mate, Unwholesome Food, Malaria, Epidemic
and Contagious Diseases, Cholera Morbus, Cramps,
Pains, Indigestion, Diarrhoea, Colds, Chills, Simple
Fevers, Exhaustion, Nervousness, or loss of Sleep
that beset the traveller or household at this season,
are nothing to those protected by a timely use of
SANFOKD'S GINGER, tho Delicious Summer
Medicine.
AS A BEVERAGE, with hot or cold water,
sweetened, or hot or cold milk, or added to
ice water, lemonade, effervescent draughts and min
eral waters, it forms a refreshing and invigorating
beverage, unequalled In simplicity and purity by
any tonic medicine, while free from alcoholic reac
tion. Avoid mercenary dealers, who for a few cents'
extra profit try to force upon you their own or
others when you call for SANFORD'S GINGER.
Sold by wholesale and retail druggists, grocers,
etc., everywhere. ' -
Potter Prog and Cbemlcal Co., jjostoh.
HEADQUARTERS
For the best quality of goods at the lowest caph
prices.
FLOUR. FLOUR.
itirnerstom:" NEW PROCESS is made
from the best Minnesota wheat. We have the ex
elusive sale of this brand ; try it and you will say i
is the best. Price lower than ever.
New Marrow and new Fea Keans just receiveu.
New aiediirai Beans fic per qt.
Good Medium Beans 4 qts for S5c.
Large Southern Sweet Potatoes 30c per pk.
Solt ndid Early Rose Potatoes 73c perbu.
Larse Yellow Onions 20c pk.
titandard Sugar sold at cost.
We olfer a lot of Mountain Sweet W atermelons to
day only 10c each.
Utipice f. 1C moiasses w pei
Fresh roasted Java Coffee, ground to order 2V
per lh.
Old Gov. Java 2Sc per lb.
Choice selection of Teas.
Concord Grapes 6c per lb by basket.
llipe Tomatoes 35c per basket.
PRICES OF FRESH MEATS REDUCED
Fresh Poultry received Friday and Saturday.
STOKE CLOSES at 8 o'clock p. m., commencins
Oct. 1st. excepting Monday and Saturday;
J. H. KBABJSET,
rim nir kill H -.b2.ii-i
74 AND 76 CONGRESS AVE., CORNER HILL ST
R. G. RUSSELL,
ARCHITECT,
852 Cnapel Street, New Haven. Conn
fiWriwisDs blow on nioii
IlILLS,
Where the expenses are high the prices must be
hitrn.
A bootblack being asked what wore regulnr rates
for a "shine," said it was 10 cents on Chapel street
and 5 cents on Grand street. There is food for re
flection in this little incident to the economically m-
There may not be so much style, but you can get
more real value for your money on Grand street
than elsewhere. ..
Especially will this be found to be so If you are in
need of Bedsteads, Bedding, Parlor Suits, Bedroom
Suits, Carpets, Oil oiotns, etc., etc.
jr ii ,iiv A.. .. IV o 821 and 823
Will furnish you out complete for housekeeping at
the lowest prices and on the most accommodating
terms. The reason they can do so is quite plain.
Their expenses are from 25 to 50 per cent, less than
other houses and they sell more Fin-niture,Beds,etc,
than any single establishment from New York to
Boston with but one exception, and that Is no ; In
v .. i : rniofore ve that are sick and wearv
of high prices come to Grand street and be made
. ' ' . . . - . ,. ... ivMmnnntitAn etna
nappy, urana strecu --i--- , -
: , . . . ' renrRflentatives of nearlv al
the nations of the earth live in peace and unisoa
under the broaa i.gis oi "H"!!
ternity. Come oneicome all.
P. J. KELLY & CO.,
Noa. 821 and. 828
GRAND STREET.
THE EDDY REFRIGERATOR
FOR FAMILY USE.
The place to find tbe best Refrigerator is to know
where the Eddy is sold. That is lust Perfect n
every respect. Sold by
S1XAS GAIiPIST,
mo 360 State Street.
8
BARGAINS
in-
Goods
ore
H STREET
We are now showing the
finest line olSuitings,ork
screws, Overcoatings and
Trowserings ever shown in
NewDarcii. Perfect tit and
tsrst-class work guaran
teed. Pants made to order
at 6 hours' notice.
L. IE. FREEDMAN & SON,
, 92 CHURCH STREET.
AND PAS
PREPARED with the utmost skill from IMPOR
TED GIHGER, CHOICE AROMATICS and
tho purest and best of MEDICINAL FRENCH
BRANDY, from the world-renowned vintners,
Messrs. OTARD, DUPUY St CO., COGNAC, ren
dering it vastly superior to all other Gingers," all
of which are made with common alcohol, largely
impregnated with poisonous fosil oil, and strength
ened with cayenne pepper.
AS A PURE FRUIT STIMULANT, for the
aged, mentally and physically exhausted, care
worn , or overworked , for delicate females, especially
mothers, for those recovering from debilitating dis
eases, and as a means of reforming those addicted
to an excessive use of alcoholic stimulants, it is
unequalled in the whole ran go of medicines. Be
ware of imitations. SANFORD'S Is the finest
ginger in the world, and, notwithstanding the high
cost of its ingredients, is the cheapest family medi .
cine. Sold everywhere.
Potter Drug and Chemical Co., Bos torn.
-.Mn
.WONDERFUL
CURES OF
SC1PNEY DISEASES
AMD CJ
LIVER COMPLAINTS, 3
Because It sets on tho LIVES, BOWELS and
KIDSEIS at the same time.
Because It cleanses tho system or the poison
ous hnmors that develops m Kidney and Tzi
nazy Diseases, Biliousness, Jaundice. Constlpa.
Uon. Piles, or in Hneumstism, Neuralgia, Ker
voua Sasordani and all Female Complaints,
PROOF Of THIS.
TV WILL BUSEIiT CUBB
CON8TIPATIOH, PILES,
and RHEUMATISM,
By causing I71EB ACTIOli of all tbe oreaas
and functions, thorely .
CLEANSING the BLOOD
rwtorliLg tiie normal power to ttotwr off disease.
THOUSANDS OF CASES
of tha worst forma of tho30 terrible dlseaeea
hv9 been, quickly reiieveGl, and. in a auort tune
FUGS, 1. LlTJI OB DRY, SOLD BY DKTJCCISTS,
WELLS, HICHjLBJJSOK A Co., Burlington, Vt.
8 Send strap tor Diary Alnunac for 18S4.
21
A FRIEND IN NEED.
DR. SWEET'S
INFALLIBLE LINIMENT.
Prepared from the recipe of Dr. Stephen Sweet
of Connecticut, the great natural Bone-setter. Has
been used for more than fifty years and is the best
known remedy for Rheumatism, Neuralgia, Sprains,
Bruises. Burns, Cuts, Wounds, and all external in
juries. DODD'S NERVINE AND INVIGOBATOR.
Standard and reliable, and never fails to comfort
the aged and help everybody who uses it
SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS TRY IT.
nl3eod&wtf
JVLE A. RID A,
Artist and Sign Painter,"
787 CHAPEL STREET.
Parties in the country ordering work by mall or
otherwise are given special discounts. Nothing but
first-class work done nere. Telephone.
Jyl2 em j
She llomrtrat atixl (onxisx.
The Oldest Daily Paper Published
In Connecticut.
THE C AEETNGTON PUBLISHING CO.
SINGLE COPIES TWO CENTS.
Delivered bt Cabbxjebs in this Cttt, 12
cents a "Week, 43 crarrs a Month, $5.00 a
Tear. The Same Terms Bt Hail. -
Rates C Advertising.
SITUATIONS WANTED, one Insertion 60c; each
subsequent insertion 25c.
WANTS, RENTS, and other small advertisements
occupying not more than six lines, one insertion
75c; each subsequent i nsertion 25c
One square (one inch) one Insertion, $1.20: each
subsequent insertion, 40 cents; one week, $3.20; one
month, $10.00. '
Yearly advertisements at the following rates:
One square, one year, $40; two squares, one year.
$70; three squares one year, $100.
Obituary notices. In prose or verse, 15 cents per
line. Notices of Births, Marriages and Deaths, 50
cents each. - Local Notices 20o per line.
Advertisements on second page one price and a
half.
Yearly advertisers are limited to their own imme
diate business, and their contracts de not include
Wants, To Let, For Sale, etc.
Special rates furnished on application for contracts
covering a considerable length of time, or a large
space.
THE WEEKLY JOURNAL
IS PUBLISHED
Every Thxtbsday Horning.
Single Copies 5 cents - - - $3.00 a year
Strictly in advance, - - - - 1.50 a year
All letters and inquiries in regard to snbscriptions
or matters of business should be addressed
THE JOIHNAI, AND COURIER,
New Haven, Conn.
Notice.
We cannot accept anonymous or return rejected
communications. In all cases the name of the
writer will be required, not for publication, but as a
guarantee 01 gooa I aim. .
Monday, October 13, 18S4.
REPUBLICAN NOMINATIONS.
FOR PRESIDENT,
JAMES Ci. BLAINE, of malne.
FOR VICE PRESIDENT,
JOHN A. LOGAN, of Illinois.
State Electoral Ticket.
EI-KCTOR8-AT-LARGK,
Theodore D. Woolsey, of New Haven.
Charles A. Williams, of New London.
DISTBICT ELKCTORS,
1st District I. Luther Spencer, of Suffield.
2d District Joseph E. Sillim an, of Chester.
3d District James S. Atwood, of Plainfield.
4thDistrict Frederick Miles, of Salisbury.
For State Officers.
FOR GOVERNOR,
HENRY B. HAERISON, of New HaTen.
FOR 1 .1 KITTEN ANT GOVERNOR,
LORRLN A. COOKE, of Barkhamsted.
FOR SECRETARY OF STATE,
CHARLES A. RUSSELL, of Killingly.
FOR TREASURES,
V. B. CHAMBERLAIN, of New Britain.
FOR COMPTROLLER,
LUZERNE I. MUNSON. 'of -Wnterbury.
THE ALL-IMPORTANT ISSUE.
After all, the main thing for the voter to
consider this year is the tariff issue. The
personal merits and demerits of the candi
dates are perhaps important, bat the policies
they represent are much more important. A
vote for Blaine and Logan means a vote for
protection. Why votes should be cast for
Blaine and Logan and protection is well set
forth by the Springfield Union, as follows:
Because under protection wages are sixty
per cent, higher here than in Great Britain,
while the cost of living, article for article.
and quality for quality, is less.
Because under protection the number of
workmen in manufacturing establishments
has increased 108 per cent, since 1860, there
by more than doubling the farmer's home
market for his grain, meat and vegetables.
Because under protection the wealth of the
United States which, exclusive of slaves, was
only $14,500,000,000 in 18C0, had mounted
to 43,600,000,000 in 1880.
Because under protection, which encour"
ages every branch of internal activity with
out diminishing foreign commerce, we have
sold to Europe within ten years $5,518,000,
000 worth of agricultural products.
Because under protection, according to a
free trade English statistician, Mr. Mulhall,
the fifty millions of people in the United
States are able to save every year $875,000,
000, while the 117 millions of Great Britain,
France and Germany put together save only
$900,000,000.
Because with protection we are paying off
an enormous national debt at the rate of
$100,000,000 a year, while the debt of free
trade Great Britain increases.
Because under free trade 1,000,000 acres of
good land have gone out of cultivation in
England.
Becanso as Free Trader John Bright him
self admits, the English farmers have lost
$100,000,000 under free trade in recent
years.
Because, according to the figures of the
British registrar general, one in seven of the
British free trade population ends his days
as a pauper.
Because in free trade England 65,000 wo
men are engaged in such heavy tasks as coal
mining, clay working and the manufacture
of iron and steel.
These are good and sufficient reasons for
voting the Republican ticket this year. This
country is not yet in a position to abandon
the policy of protection which has done so
much for it.
EDITORIAL NOTES.'
To-morrow will "tell the story" in Ohio.
It is not often that the result of an election
is awaited with as much interest as this.
A German newspaper prints the following
advertisement: Wanted, by a lady of qual
ity, for adequate remuneration, a few well
behaved and respectably dressed children to
amuse a cat in delicate health two or three
hours a day.
A Parliamentary paper just published
shows that during the existence of the pres
ent Honse of Commons it has been counted
but ninety times, eight of these having been
in 1880, nineteen in 1881, twenty in 1882,
seventeen in 1883 and twenty-six in 1884.
Daring tho some period the House held ono
hundred and twelve morning sittings, name
ly, twenty-six in 1880, twenty in '81, twenty
two in '82, twenty-one in '83 and twenty
three in '84, thirty-seven of which were
counted out. Mr. Warton and Mr. Biggar
divide the palm in causing dismissals of the
House.
The cholera is making a great scare in Eu
ropean cities, but Sir Edmund Carrie re
minds the people of London that there are
now annually in that city 55,000 cases of
scarlet fever, with more than 2,500 deaths.
This annual scourge, which, he says, is in
some respects worse than cholera, is perfect
ly within control of sanitary science and
could be stamped out if science would prop
erly apply its knowledge of the disease, how
it is generated and especially bow it is spread.
The London apathy on this subject is largely
due to the fact that this terrible disease finds
its victims among children.
Pennsylvania Is mildly stirred up by the
question whether .or not her Supreme court
judges shall wear gowns. The Philadelphia
Law association favored the plan, and its
committee on robes has just submitted this
minute: To suoh a high public trust most
appropriately belongs a symbolism which
marks its character. This will not give those
requirements that are essential, but- it may
stimulate their acquirement. That the high
est judicial tribunal of our commonwealth
Ihould be clothed in the insigna appertaining
to its character is not open to more cursory
objection. Civil power exercised with dig
nity is less likely to be arbitrary when its re
sponsibility and accountability are manifest
ed in the performance of duty. '
The London Music-Trade Review mourns
over the defeat of the Morrison bill, which
it describes as "the American bill for the re
duction of the - tariff with a view to the
eventual adoption of free trade." The Re
view remarks: "Had the tariff been re
duced, more than one of the great European
makers was prepared to at once open an
agency in New York. This to our American
friends would, of course, have been a verit
able calamity." And the Review adds: "At
present the wages to journeymen piano
makers in the United States are higher than
in any other quarter of the globe."
Larger soles of real estate are expected in
NewSork during the present month than for
any October since 1872, when the boom was
at its height. This is due. to the postpone
ment of sales from September, when owners
were unwilling to accept the current low
range of prices. '"The September sales did
not equal by nearly $3,000,000 the value of
conveyances during September, 1883. The
improved demand .for large apartment
houses is regarded as a favorable sign. High
rents and leases prevail in the fashionable
up-town quarter, but in the annexed district
above One Hundred and Thirty-eighth street
excellent houses are obtainable for $50 a
month, and the extension of the elevated
railway system and the completion of Van
Cortlandt Park has benefited Mott Haven
and Morrisania.
In a recent opinion the English Court of
Appeal diseusses and sustains a novel reme
dy for a common grievance in business. The
defendant, having been dismissed from the
employment of the plaintiff, went about mak
ing false representations to the latter's cus
tomers designed to injure his business.
Thereupon the employer moved for an in
junction to put a stop to .the slanderous
statements. This was granted by the trial
judge, and his ruling has been affirmed by
the Court of Appeal. "The Court," said
Lord Justice Cotton, "has of late granted
injunctions in cases of libel, and why should
it not also do so in cases of slander? No
doubt the tongue is an unruly member to
govern; nevertheless the defendant must take
care that he keeps his tongue in order aud
does not allow it to rep et thoso statements
which he is by the injunction restricted
from uttering."
The working classes of England and the
Continent have a great many holidays. Thus,
in England, besides 52 Sundays, there are 4
bank holidays, aC days of rest resulting from
the regular Saturday half-holidays; and if
half of St. Monday, which is often granted,
be added, the number rises from 82 as high
as 108. In France tho days of exemption
from labor, including Sundays and fete days,
number 100 a year. Greece has so many
church festivals kept as holidays that only
265 working days are left during the twelve
months. In Russia there are 21 holidays
which, with Sundays, make 70 non-working
days. . Austria varies in the number of holi
days, which are not less than 76, while in the
provinces they range considerably higher.
In Brussels, including St. Monday, the aver
age number of working days is estimated at
236, though there are only 65 official holi
days. " Switzerland has "numerous religous
festivals to lessen the number of working
days, but the working classes have to take a
certain number of days for military exercise
until they are 28, and in some cases 84, years
of. age.
PROBABLY.
-An insane man walks about the streets of
New Orleans with a cornet in his hand. He
probably blew out his brains while learning
to play. N. Y. Journal.
"So you want to be my coachman?" "Yes,
sir." "Are you a married man?" "Well,
y-y-yes, sir. Bat then, that's all right. I
can get a divorce." Chicago Herald.
The man who said, "Three removes are as
bad as a fire," did not know much about
moving. Experienced families put it, "Three
fires are as bad as a remove." Philadelphia
Call.
A paper in the oil regions contains an arti
cle headed ''Johnson's Well." We had not
heard that Johnson was sick. His friends in
this town will be pleased to learn that he has
recovered. Norristown Herald.
"I don't know about your religions nov
els," said Deacon Brownsmith; "the Bible's
good enough for mo." "Yes," replied Broth
er .bread, "Out are you gootl enougu tor the
Bible, deacon!" Boston Transcript.
"I don't believe it," said Farmer Furrow
when he saw in a paper the expression,
Tamo flies." Hut when ne found that a
typographical error had turned "time" into
tame he acknowledged the corn. JV. Y.
Journal.
American Journalism A San Francisco
morning paper having announced the tragi
cal death of a deaf and dumb woman, every
evening paper of the city that day published
the last words or the unfortunate creature.
Le Figaro.
"There are two ways of looking at this
question," said a bank president at a temper
ance meeting; "which is the safe side!"
" Canada," shouted a small boy intne gallery,
and the audience became lost in reflection.
Peabody Press.
It is vouched for that a Michigan editor on
discovering a fire rushed out into the street
shouting,-"Conflagration ! Conflagration! !
Conflagration 1 ! ! Approximate nitner with
the implements of deluge and extinguish this
combination." Boston Globe.
Wife (anxiously) "What's wrang wi' ye
the night, Jack?" Jack (shortly) "I'm (hie)
seek!" Wife (coaxincly). "Try yer finger
doon yer throat an' pit it up." Jack (angri
ly) ' 'No, 1 11 not pit it up (hie). It s whus-
ky." Glasgow (Scotland) Herald.
"How beautiful those two old people look,
sitting together at the fireside!" exclaimed a
sentimental young lady; "I wonder what
they are talking about?" "Probably fighting
their battles o'er again," replied her matter-of-fact
companion. Burlington Free Press.
Masonic customs. "So tho Arabians go to
lodges and come home late just as you do,"
said Mrs. Mannerly to her husband, who was
of a convivial turn'of mind. "I don t know,
he stammered. "But I know they do, for I
read in a paper that when an Arabian enters
his house he removes his shoes and keeps on
his hat. That's what you do when you come
home late from the lodge." Texas Sittings.
:'Ma, is it wicked to play marbles for
keeps?" "Yes, my son; it is very wicked."
"Willie Grim wanted me to play, but 1
wouldn't." "That's right. I am proud that
you had the courage to refuse." "I told
him it was wicked and led to gambling, and
he called me a booby." "Well never mind. '
Oh, I don't. I matched pennies with, him
and came out seven cents ahead." Detroit
Free Press.
At tbe Orave.
This is the end of him, herf he lies;
The dust in his throat, the worm in his eyes.
The mould in his mouth, the turf on his breast;
This is the end of him, this is best.
He will never lie on his couch awake.
Wide-eyed, tearless, till dim daybreak.
Never again will he smile and smile
When his heart is breaking all the while;
He never will stretch out his hands in vain.
Groping and groping never again.
Never ask for bread, get a stono instead.
Never pretend that the stone is bread.
Never sway and sway twixt the false and true.
Weighing and notingihe long hours through.
Never ache and ache with the choked-up sighs;
This is the end of him, here he lies. v
Amy Levy.
- Alflerl.
The National Review.
Alfieri passed much of his time in Rome
from 1767 to the opening of 1783, and, as
everywhere else, amazed the fashionable
world by his eccentricities. He was often to
be seen, early in the morning, seated on the
balustrade of the Trevi fountain, engaged in
munching bread and cheese, and meditating
on his work. . His horses were the admira
tion of the town. But although his fine
contemptuous face was sometimes to be seen
in fashionable houses, he did not mix much
with the gay world. His days were given to
the study and the composition of his trage-
7
dies, several of which were written in Rome,
and most of his evenings were spent with the
Countess of Albany, or in the literary and
artistio salon of the learned lady Maria Piz
zelli. It was here that onr Abate first met
the poet and heard him read his "Virginia."
Benec'e'.ii records the sensation it produced
on hearers unaccustomed to the placid Metas
tasian drama. The vigorous lines and dar
ing sentiments of this new tragedy shook
them as by an earthquake, and the Abate
confesses that the impression made on him
self was one of terrified stupefaction. "This
Alfieri," he says, "seemed Cola di Rienzi
redivivus." No wonder Cola di Renzi redi
vivus." No wonder that the poet of free
dom should have been barely tolerated in
Papal Rome ! Pius VI. had refused to allow
the tragedy of "Saol" to be dedicated to him,
notwithstanding its Bib?cal subject and the
precedent of the dedication of Voltaire'
"Mohammed n." to Benedict XIV. But
even more than his political opinions, it was
his liaibon with the Countess of Albany that
brought the poet into disfavor. The lady's
hasband, Charles Edward, had meanwhile
consented to a separation and withdrawn to
Florence, but his brother-in-law, Cardinal
York, was a determined enemy, and in 1783
succeeded in having her lover expelled from
Rome. This was a cruel blow to Alfieri, and
followed close on the brilliant success of his
"Antigone," which had been brought out
the previous month on the stage of the Span
ish embassy. Alfieri himself had then per
formed the part of Creonte, and had managed
to drill his amateur players to a high degree
of efficiency. Benedetti gives a detailed ac
count of this mejEorable performance, pre
luded by an overture expressly composed for
it by Cimarosa. After describing the splen
dors of the Roman Princesses, and how the
beautiful Rezzonico was given the first place,
he goes on to say: "But when the wife of the
claimant to the English throne came into the
hall every eye was fixed upon her, and it was
understood that this fete had been arranged
in her honor. Slightly bending her head
to the assembled ladiee, the Countess of Al
bany passed on to the seat reserved for her
to the orchestra, and conversed. with no one
excepting a few of the principal personages
and the foreign ambassadors, who crowded
around her to offer their homage. Alfieri is
baid to have rendered his part with wonder
ful dramatic force, and was, of course, over
whelmed with applause. Cardinal York was
not among the audience, and a month later
the poet was expelled from Rome. "
Cricket Week.
.The Spectator.
In the country now it is almost becoming a
point of honor for every big house to have its
cricket ground. Cricket weeks are every
year becoming more and more recognized in
stitutions of country life, and ever owner of
a park has either laid, is hiyiug, or is think
ing or talking of laying, down a cricket
ground. The cricket week has social uses
and advantages not a few, but it is not the
ordinary "cricket-week "cricket that is social
ly useful so much as the common or village
green cricket. This is tho kmd of cricket
which the owners of parks do well for them
selves and their social equals, as well as their
social inferiors, to encourage. A country
cricket match is the one social institution of
a Democratic character which now exists.
On the cricket field all classes meet on equal
terms, without any sense of patronage on one
side or bowing the knee on the other. The
squire's and farmer's son, the parson and the
village grocer, (probably a dissenter.) the
butler aud the doctor, aro thrown together
on the simple footing of joint assailants of
the defenders of five pieces of wood with
another piece of wood against a round of
leather. Mutual respect and good feeling
are engendered between them, and a good
deal of ill-feeling and delusion possibly got
rid of. The dissenting grocer may satisfy
his animosity against the person by bowling
him out, thongh it is pernaps more liKely
that his respect for the parson will bo in
creased by finding he can make a good score
and bowl him. The butler can find solace
in hitting the squire for four, and making his
young master "hunt the leather" through a
long inning; while the village generally takes
a kindly interest in their young gentlemen,
and watches with avidity to see if they dis
tinguish themselves in theie school or univer
sity eleven. livery country matcn inns oe
coines a lightning conductor against revolu
tion. If the French nobles had played
cricket in their parks with the villagers,
instead of playing tennis among themselves
in their castle yards, tho Fronch chateaux
would not have gone up in flames, and they
themselves wou!d not have needed guillotin
ing. Every paik owner who opens his gates
to villago crickets acquires a new lease from
public opinion and a new title iu public
sanction. Mr. Henry Georgo would have
small chance of persuading the members of
the village cricket club that ail land should
be parceled out for cultivation, especially and
to begin with land not cultivated already.
Tbe Coldstream.
London Society.
Tho coldstreams were raised in the year
1650, in the little town near Berwich-on-
Tweed from whence the regiment takes its
name. The first colonel was the renowned
George Monk, (afterwards Duke of Albe
marle,) a general in the Parliamentary Army
and an admiral of the fleet. It is owing to
this latter fact that a small union jack is
permitted to be borne on tho queen's color of
the regiment, a proud distinction enjoyed
by no other corps in the service. In the year
1660 brave Monk and his gallant Coldstream
ers materially assisted in the hapy restora
tion of the English monarchy,and to perform
this patriotic and eminently loyal act, they
marched from Berwick-on-Tweed to London,
meeting with a warm and enthusiastic greet
ing from the inhabitants of the towns and
villages through which they passed. After
the restoration was accomplished the troops
were paraded on Tower Hill for the purpose
of taking tho oath of allegiance to the king,
and among those present were the three
noble regiments that form tho subject of this
brief history. Having grounded their arms
in token of submission to tho -new regime,
they were at once commanded to take them
up again as the First, Second, and Third
regiments of the Foot Guards. Tho First
and Third regiments obeyed, but the Cold
streamers stood firm, and their muskets re
mained on the ground. "Why does your
regiment hesitate?" inquired the king of
Gen. Monk. "May it please your majesty,"
said the stern old soldier, "my Coldstreamers
are your majesty's devoted soldiers, but after
the important service they have rendered
your highness they declined to take up arms
as second to any other regiment in your
majesty's service!" "They are right," said
the king, "and they shall bo 'second to
none. ' Let them take up their arms as my
Coldstream regiment of Foot Guards."
Monk rode back to his regiment and com
municated to it the King's decision. It had
a majical effect. The arms were instantly
raised amid frantic crios of "Long live the
King!" Since this event the motto of the
regiment has been Nulli Secnndus, which is
borne in gold letters upon its colors
the names of "Lincelles," "Egypt" (with the
Sphinx,) "Talavera," "Barrosa" "Penin
sula," "Waterloo," "Alma," "Inkorman,"
and "Sevastopol." In the year 1850 this
regiment held its jubilee banquet to com
memorate the two hundredth anniversary of
its birth.
Tbe Tarns In tbe Bobemlain . Forest.
From the Cornhill Magazine
One great feature of interest possessed by
these mountains is the number of lakes found
among teem. These lakes are, however,
propeoly tarns, and are situated high up the
sides, near the summits. Indeed, they oc
cupy crater-like depressions under the moun
tain tops. This gives them a certain amount
of sameness. At the npper end is a wall of
granite precipice rising to the "mountain's
crown, forming a segment of a circle; the
rest of the lake is enfolded in- the pine-clad
arms of the mountain. They are all sombre,
solitary, and wild. These tarns are of great
depth; some are, of course, supposed to be j
unfathomable. Thess are the Schwarz See,
and -the Devil's Lake, near rJysenstem.
Under the brow of the Rahel lies another.
very wild and lonely, but .perhaps the most
beautiful is the Plochsteiner See. The
gloomy Teufels See in one excursion. It lies
far below the foot of the traveler in a basin
of rock and somber forest, and the waters
from a height look like ink. Popular
superstition says that if a stone be cast in
the lake is agitated, boils, and a tampest
rises out of it. As I saw it on a rainy day
the effect was singular and such as to give
color to the superstition. Vapor condensed
over the cold water and rose from it in "spi
ral columns of gauzy wreathes, much like
steam from a caldron. I stood some time on
a rock high above it and watched the cloud
lets ascend, steal from pine to pine, onvelope
me ior a momemt in mist, ana men rise uai-loon-like
to the granite crests high overhead,
where they lost themselves in one nebulous
gray canopy. The appearance was quite
that of a hot caldon discharging jets of
steam. A path has been cut and the chasm
bridged, so that the lake, at one time unap
proachable, can now be visited without in
convenience. The Sehawarz See is a much
larger sheet of water. At the north end the
precipices of granite, in the "interstices of
which a few pines have rooted themselves,
rise to the summit of the mountain, a thou
sand feet perpendicularly. The citizens of
Eysenstein have erected a lurge and pictur
esque pavilion by the water's side of fir logs,
very tasteful, where occasionally dances are
given. What a fairy scene when the full
moon is out streaming down the mountain
side, making the gray sides luminous, turn
ing the Black Lake into a sheet of silver, and
lights and colors sparkle in the dancing shed
by the water and are reflected in a thousand
brilliants in its wavelets !
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IANDFAGTDMG STOCK.
20 PER CENT. INVESTMENT.
Books are now open for subscriptions to
the issue .of the balance of 3,000 shares
of Inferred Stock of the "Footk
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Subscribers to this preferred stock will receive a
boRus of shares of the Common Stock of the com
pany, drawing 8 per cent, yearly, making this a 20
per cent, investment.
"Foote's Fin Patents."which are operated by this
Company, are issued in England, France, Germany.
Belgium and United States, beariug date January,
Ifcifci and urtt nneratari there under rovaltv tn t.hia
company by Messrs. Kirby, Beard & Co-, Raven
hurdt Works (the largest makers of Pins in the
world), and in France, Germany and Belpluin by
Katlisseau Freres, factories at Orleans and Paris.
The Kale of our goods manufactured under royalty
to this company has enormously increased each
season all ever the world, and this comnanv now
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The proceeds derived from sale of this preferred
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PROVIDIICK. Callender, McAuslan &
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The duty on these goods is 45 percent, ad valorem,
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Offices 8 3, IKS Broadway, M.Y,
" jySltf,
I- (TRADE MAKE.)
f

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