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Morning journal and courier. [volume] (New Haven [Conn.]) 1848-1894, October 14, 1884, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015483/1884-10-14/ed-1/seq-3/

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October 14, 1884.
Mm
VOL. LII.
gpzcinl Notices.
M f i
(TVUborrV
Ladies', Gentlemen's and
Large siockof Blankets. Prices guaranteed lower
than auction. Flannels, Embroidered Flannels, Shaker
Flannels, Embroidered Flannel skirts, Handsome line
of Cloakings, seal Plushes.
French fitting Outside Garments for Ladies and
Children. We invite your attention to this department.
Complete assortment of Fall and Winter Dress
Goods now open.
Feather Marabout Tor trimming:, or superior quali
ty, not to be found elsewhere. Chenille Fringes, Fancy
Plushes.
Twenty pieces more of
Prices, .33, $ 1 .50, $ 1 .62, $ 1 .75 and $2. Do
not miss having a dress pattern from this lot.
New assortment of Raw Silk Table Covers.
K
W.P.GILBERT,
O
65'CHURCH
I 79 to 89
For Decorations and Illuminations a large stock
of Flags and Chinese Lanterns constantly on
hand. Also a full line of Writing Materials at
wholesale and retail
AT
G. J. MOFFATT'S
40S, 407, 400 ..
BRIG IT
U
ly
reward at the
II i , --- -
Li i .- ;Tr;.:
l i
mi r.
t - f
TEMPLE OF MUSIC.
C. 2M. LOOMIS.
MONEY ISLAND ROUSE,
STONY CREEK, COSS.
This house has been refurnished and
lis now open for the season. A large.
Scool diniiig room is one of the features
Bof the house.
No mosquitoes ! Kxcellent View
FINE BATHING BEACH.
The steam yacht BEATRICE will connect at thf
Main Land every hour and for every train.
Also with the Philadelphia at
Pot Island.
Billiard Tables and a fine Bar.
Postofflce address
STONY CREEK, CONN. ,
II. D. KILLAM, Proprietor.
miTtf
neul Estate
Cheap Homes.
A RAltE OPPORTUNITY
TWD TUP KPYT QA nVS f
Payments Made Very Easy.
Tb all in Want of a Permanent
Home.
MI HAVE to offer for the next thirty days a
large number of houses and building lots in
all sections of the city. Property of savings
banks and individuals at prices far below their pres
ent value, and on such easy terms of payment that
any one paying an ordinary rent can soon own
their own homestead. Apply early to
SVMlEt HAtLIWELL,
80 CHUKCH STREET, Benedict's Coal Office,
Office hours in the evening, frm 8 to 10 o'clock,
Mondays. "Wednesdays and Saturdays. se90tf
house andsTgnTainting,
GRAINING AND PAPERING.
Fine Selection of Wall Papers.
Elegant and Attractive Gilt Pa
pers, Borders to Match.
Contracts for Decorating.
PAINTS, OILS.. VARNISH, WINDOW GLASS,
BRUSHES,
And all materials pertaining to the business.
RANSOM HILLS,
402 State Street, Todd's Block.
seSttf .
Mjs. E. Jones Young,
DENTIST,
230 Cliapel,cor.State,Strcet B'd'g
Over Brooks & Co's Hat and Fur Store.
. AH work warranted.
r Office hours from 9 a. m. to
5 p. m.
Ja6.
THE GENUINE
FOR 1884.
Manufactured by the
BOYNTON FURNACE CO.
For sale by the
FRANKLIN STOVE CO.,
833 CHAPEL STREET,
Sole Agents for New Haven, Conn.
CALL AND EXAMINE.
. oclleodtf3pp
Kotice to Contractors.
COURT STREET PAVEMENT.
Citv Ekoikbeb's Office, 17 City Hall, i
New Havkh. Conn., Oct. 8, 1884. 1
SEALED PROPOSALS will be received at this
office until 7:80o'clock Wednesday evening.Oct.
15 1884
For constructing a Telford pavement on Court
mftt. from Orange street to Church street.
nk7o of proposals, and any information
concerning plans, specifications, bonds, etc., will be
'roivedaftejthe time speci
fled MdaUproposalsnotas the blanks funded,
orbot propeHy iSUed out wiU be reject
Ttonght to reject any b'dsis reserved.
By nfer of the Board" of ""hILL,
ocfl 11 18 1415 City Engineer.
ftntfi Wood.
13 EST quality furnished in iany quantity. Coal
per bbl-tfbbls for $1. Large barrels. ln I get
..tt-T "bflyn
riT8 by mail promptly attended to.
B FLYNN, 4
seT3m
ACCORDION PLEATER!
Bopfl
Furnace
The pl.!Oter with which Mme. Ballade established
her tiMU-H, and the sole device used by her fortne
flrat Ave years and still used on all kinds of box, ac
cordion aiid fancy pleatings is now offered for sale.
gij4 for circular. No. fi ast ltith St.. N. x .
wMlawm '
Jctal grottoes.
Children's Underwear.
Astrachans, etc., etc.
those Black Rhadainest
STREET, opposite P. O.
RAILROAD AVENUE.
Paper Warehouse,
501 State Stroot,
BACK !
JLIIill U1 uuhi; S OU lUUk
FBI . J. W V B .4 n
from my carriage Thursday
evening: just at dusk, and I
will give you five dollars. I
don't mind the whips that you
have taken, but this robe I
paid six shilling's for last June
in London, and I prizefit high
on that account. And again
you can buy a pretty good pair
of blankets for Ave dollars. Ho
please call and get the above
SUCCESS
Staring; is ii tie Face.
IV Lack or Public Support
for
NORTON & CO.
THE CLOTHIERS,
Who are grasping for busi
ness with a determ
ined grip.
Prosperity Cannot be Argued Down.
Never before have we open
ed a Fall Season with
such a flattering out
look. It is a fixed fact that our Low
Prices Is lifting our busi
ness inountainward.
We have touched the chord that
vibrates the public heart
in our behalf.
We have thrust ourselves into de
serving popularity by offer
ing only the best Clothing
; for Men, lfoung Men '
and Boys. x
The power of Square Dealing,
Low Prices and the One
Price system adds strength
to our reputation.
Last week we caught a great
trade by offering bargains In
Suits and Overcoats for all
ages, sizes and classes
never before heard
of In this section
of Sew Eng
land. The good work continues with dispatch.
Bargain Counters in every department.
Don't you buy until you have compared
goods and learned our Low Prices. Study
your own interests and be prompt.
OAK HALL,
No. 85
1.
OClO
CLAIRVOYANT
MItS. J. J. CLARK,
The business test and healing medium can be
consulted at her residence, 228 Crown street. Mrs.
Clark can be consulted on business, health, mar
riage or other events of life. She has convinced
thousands by her wonderful powers. Hours from
y to 1 a. ni., ana x so 4 p. m. ana evenings,
ocl '
MANICURE.
FINGER NAILS BEAUTIFIED.
MRS. DANIELS has returned from her vaca
tion, and her ofilce is now open for business,
at 61)5 Chapel street. Biting of the nails, brittle
nailBT OBOg iuuib WW 111 uianiK. win i.ii 10 mucu.
Office hours from 0 to 12 and from 2 to 4.
ocioet
U Estate.
FOR SALE OR REST.
fSb IF you want to buy or rent a first-lass house
I i!;; within Ave minutes walk of depot and post
X office.. Address P. O. BOX 78.
oct 13 at.
FOR REST,
?iilf rent low; possession at once.
IUH W. C. WARREN.
OC13 31 EXCHANGE BUILDING.
FARMS FOR SALE.
Farms Tor City Property.
Money in exchange for city property.
Citv oroDertT in exchange for monev.
$3,500 will secure a bargain. Full particulars at
Koom i, uencrai ruoc, k (jnapei street.
GEORGE A. ISBELL.
oil
FOR SALE.
l(4y OR EXCHANGE, a Farm of 100. acres: will
jr;;;; Keep fifteen head of cattle; good buildings.
Aaaress bua i,
ocll 6t Pelham, Mass.
A Cheap Home.
fMi. HOUSE and lot centrally located, within
five minutes' walk of the postofflce and depot;
,modern improvements; fruit, &c For sale
very low. Inquire of S. B. O VIATT,
ocll St 87 Church Street.
SUBJECT.
TOPIC.
I Shall Sell.
363 Dixwell avenue.
02 Sylvan avenue.
103 Kimberly avenue.
284 Munson street.
Lot for Skatine Rink.
olden Text.
If house and location are sat-
isfactorv. Drice sail be also.
elBassett, 818 Chapel Street.
FOR RENT.
l A PRIVATE family wish to let two or three
L separate rooms ail pleasant, inquire at
SclO 6t 55 YORK SQUARE.
FOR RENT.
f!fS. A SUITE of rooms having every modern
lijji convenience, including steam heat. For par-
jb2Lticuiars inquire 01 i . J'c our,
oclOtf Apothecaries, 13f Congress Avenue.
FOR RENT,
MTN CENTRAL LOCATION The large
I ware room, 74x24 feet. No. 76 Orange
street, second floor. Also a room of the
same dimensions on the third floor; also a room 48x
20 feet over No. 72 Orange street, third floor.
Office hours 9 to 12 a. m.
E. B. BOWDITCH,
oc8 6t 74 Orange SXreet.
Building Lots For Sale.
WE have several valuable Building Lots for
Msaie on &tate street, xney are uwuuuie iur
KtnreK. dwelling's or a block of tenements. Be
ing central, they will always rent to good tenants at
prices that will pay a good percentage. Parties
seeking an investment for their money will do well
to investigate. For particulars call at
MjjJtWlJN S KtAL, tSl AlE UK1U1S,
759 Chapel Street.
REALTY EXCHAKE!
" Houses, Lots, Rents, Loans.
WANTED,
Mfgk $12,000, first mortgage, on property worth
ji double the amount; money to be invested in
IMalLimproving same.
$4,000 on property worth $7,000.
$400 on house and lot worth $2,500.
F. M. DENISON,
Room 4, corner Church and Chanel streets.
o4 OPEN EVENINGS.
FOR RENT,
5 rooms on Chapel street. $15 per month. 3 rooms
on George street, near Church.
Brick house. 12 rooms, all modern improvements.
$4,000, on Hamilton street. Brick house on Artisan
street, $4,000. Frame house and grocery store on
Putnam street, $2,800. Frame house on Oak street,
$3,000; rents for $384. Frame house on Hallock
street, $2,700. Nice lot on Martin street very cheap.
Lot on Jackson street 50x120 for $850. Lot on Ward
street 50x127 will be sold low. Valuable property
on George street, near Church, at a bargain. Money
to loan in sums to suit.
THOMAS O'BRIEN & CO
800 CHAPEL STREET.
FOR SALE,
HOUSE. Barn and about 3 acres of land
yjj; with fruit trees, some five minutes' walk
LaMIL from horse cars: can be bought for $3,000;
terms of payment easy.
LOTS on Nicoll street. Elm street. Orchard street.
and others. Prices low.
FOR RENT,
A number of houses and tenements.
Money to loan on Real Estate. Inquire at
NO. 70 CHURCH STREET. ROOM 2.
fc-Omce open evenings from 7 to 8.
L. F. COMSTOCK.
WILLIAM H. WHEELER,
REAL ESTATE AND LOANS.
Money Loaned on Chattel Mortgages and other
securities at snort notice.
FIRE AND LIFE INSURANCE.
BENTS AND BILLS COLLECTED.
818 Cliapol Street
Centrally Located.
tA GENTLEMAN and his wife, or a few sin
gle glentlemen will find a plea-jant home,
with first-lass board, by addressing Postofflce
Drawer 25. Best of references given and required.
sel2tf
FOR RENT.
THE store No. 755 State St., cor. Bradley,
with the fixtures; also 3 rooms in rear 119
HLBradlev St.. and first floor of 757 State St.. 4
rooms; and first floor of 454 Orchard St., $10 a
month, and first floor of No. 108 Portsea street.
Inquire at 146 Crown street.
sez3 wijvjo' - r i -v i.i j.
FOR SALE,
& No. 300 Dixwel! avenue, west side and next
to the corner of Henry street, a new two fam
HLilv house with 12 rooms, conveniently ar
ranged and desirable in all respects for a pleasant
bomP! The lot has a frontage of thirtv-three feet.
and is about one hundred and twenty -five feet deep.
Price $3,500. Easy terms if desired.
Money to loan on first mortgage in sums to suit.
'Eleven houses and thirty-one tenements to rent in
different parts of the city.
HORACE P. HOADLEY,
2 HOADLEY BUILDING.
Open evenings. oc6
FOR RENT.
tFIVE Rooms within five minutes' walk of
the City Market. Water closet, water and
iras. Five rooms No. 24 Sorine street, near
the New York, New Haven and Hartford railroad
shops. Small house of Ave rooms. No. 10 Louis
street, Fair Haven; city water. Apply to
.1 . ii r.i . i .1'.
au28 792 Chapel street or 98 Olive street.
FOR RENT.
l FIVE new tenements on Winter street at $10
and $11 per month.
IIL One new tenement on Bright street for $11
per month.
A larcre number of one and two-family cottages
from $1,650 to $2,500 on easy installments.
16 Exchange Building,
aul4 Corner Clmrcli and Cnapel Stg.
"N VIEW of the opening of the new railroad to
t West Haven there will be some call for
Building Eots.
1 have a tract of land, flnelv situated, close bv
West Haven Green, on Church street, 400 feet front
and 200 feet deep, w inert i will sen at $5 per I rout
foot, or will take less for the whole of it. There is
nothing else so favorably located that can be bought
nearly as low. EDWARD A. RAY.
aaitt
FOR SALE,
tTWO family house on Sylvan avenue, $900
cash required. Two family house on Jackson
street, $400 cash required.
m8tf GEO. A. ROOT, 808 Chapel St.
A. M. HOLMES,
HOUSE MOVER.
HAS for rent the 2d floor of house No. 83
Houston St., $10 per month. Half of house
,No. 4. Lewis St. 190 Clinton Ave.. 1st floor.
10 per month. Half of House 177 Meadow St.. $15
per month. 2d floor No. 12 Newhall St., $8 per month.
ana two rents on ivy i., l or $s per monui eacn.
Also lor sale nouses vo w ooisey St., lao Ulinton Ave.
29 Auburn St., and Atwater St., on easy terms.
w anted xmrty more nouses to rent.
nuvt ur r lUfii ost CMUKCil bTKEET.
HIN MAN'S REAL ESTATE
AND LOAN AGENCY.
Monev to loan at 5 per cent.
Prouerty in all parts of the citv for sale. Seashore
residences and lots at Savin Rock Shore and West
Haven. The beautiful Savin Rock, including sev
eral acres of natural grove. This is the finest loca
tion for a hotel or residence in the State and will be
sold at a bargain. L. B. HINMAN
mi' - txi unurcn ci.
FOR RENT,
WHOLE or HALF of corner office, includ
GEORGE H. FORD.
816 tf
West Haven and Savin Rock
Real Estate.
FOR SALE,
PLEASANT locations for building houses
By ;; on the principal streets ai very low prices.
L t i o ust'S zor sale on easy wnns.
FOR RENT.
Ten good houses fer rent in different parte of the
vmage. uui on or aauress
WALTER A. MAIN,
au23 West Haven Conn.
FOR SALE OR RENT,
JIl THE house, No. 387 Crown street, lot 50x
! .".' 140. Good fruit. House can be rented fur-
ft-ii'll nished or unfurnished. Possession immedi
ately.
T. O. Sloan & Son,
Koom 3, Benedict Building.
-OPEN EVENINGS.
FOR SALE 1, SOO.
THE cheapest farm in Connecticut. Twen-
t iliy 3r"Bix acres of land; two-story frame house
a.. TLA" large narn. ismiamgs nearly new.
This property must be sold, and $1,800 will buy it.
A good portion of the purchase price can remain
on mortgage n aewrea. jau a&
R. E. BALDWIN'S
REAL ESTATE AGENCY, 818 CHAPEL STREET.
oc4daw . ,
FOR SALE.
ON account of ill-health I offer for sale my en
tire stock of Yankee notions, sewing silk, tail
ors' trimmings, horses, wagons, together with
routewmch nas been established twenty -ipur years.
A stilendid ODoortunitv for an active voun? man.
Anyone wishing to purchase will please call on or
aaaress i.. r- r i i i r. r.,
oclOtSt West Haven, Conn.
IiOCI "Weatber Record.
. . FOB OCT. 18. 1884.
7:16 11:18 8:16 7:16
A. H. A. K. P. K. P.M
Barometer 29.94 29.91 29.89 80.04
11:16
P.M.
80.18
Thermometer... 62 73 72
fit
65
Humidity 94
52
40
57
wind, in direction
and velocity in
miles ner hour.. S W5 W17 NW14 NW8 N5
Weather Clear Clear .Clear Clear Clear
Mean bar., 29.989; mean temp., 61.5; mean humid
itv. 66.8.
Max. temp., 75; min. temp., 50; rainfall .00
mcnes. '
Max. velocity of wind, 18 miles.
FOR OCT. 13. 1883.
Mean bar.. 30.073; mean temp., C1.7; mean humid
ity, W4.
Max temp., 67; min. temp., 52.
J. H. SHERMAN, Sergt S. C. U. S. A.
A minus sign prefixed to thermometer read
ings indicates temperature below zero,
t A dash r 1 m-efixed to rainfall figures indicates
precipitation too small to measure.
MINIATURE ALMANAC.
OCTOBER 14.
Sun Rises, 6:07 1 Moon Rises,
Sun Sets, 5:16 1 1:36
Hiqh Water,
7:53
DEATHS.
THOMPSON At South End, October 13th, Edward
B. Thompson, aged t)7 years.
lriinernl sCTviras will be held from his late resi
dence Wednesday, October 15th, at 2 o'clock. Rel
atives and friends are respectfully invited to attend
without further notice.
MARINE LIST.
PORT OF NEW HAVEN.
ARBIVED, OCTOBEK 43.
Sen James Ives, coal, Baltimore.
Sh George Arey, coal, Baltimore.
Sch H. J. Bently, coal, Baltimore.
Sch R. H. Rathborne, coal, Baltimore.
Sch Mary Freeland, coal, Philadelphia.
In Baltimore the 12th, schr J. D. Dewell, Hotx
ken.
SAILED.
Sch Mary E. Bay less, Perth Amboy.
Sch Margaret, New York.
FOR RENT,
FURNISHED ROOMS to gentlemen, at
MiTT 111 ORANGE STREET.
jkiUJL ocl4tf
New Buckwheat Flour,
IRST of the season. The genuine Piatt's pa
tent, for which we are sole agents.
ocl4 EDWARD E. HALL & SON,
LOST,
TN this city, Sunday evening, a lady's hunting
rauvL st -windiner cold watch, marked with the
owner's name. A suitable reward will be paid for
the return of the same to
ocMlt 338 (new number) C'KUWJN bikw.
LOST,
A LADY'S black Jersey on Monday afternoon,
13Lh inst., on George street. Congress avenue,
Wnshinsnn street. TToward or Kimberlv avenues.
Binder will be rewarded by returning the same to
OCl It- PiV.y WLiLt&Kilb aiKT.
LOST,
ON Monday, October 13, a pocketbook containing
hptorppn ft4n and ft.V) in monev. a few bills and
a note of no value except to the owner. A liberal
lUKul U TY 111 UC LKUU 1W Il lUIU W fj
KX. XI. 1 J ' .1 IU 1 , 1CI1LWI-,
OC14 2t TS7 CHAPEL STREET.
HORSE FOR SALE.
V-- MAHOGANY BAY MARE. Weighs 1,050
JjrJ nonnds. a irood roadster, -verv stvlish. very
gentle and not afraid of anything. Suitable for
most any work and offered low because owner has
no further use for the animal. Apply at
BOTSF JKU S LIV JKY STABLE,
ocl4 3t Crown Street.
MISS R. R. HARRIS,
111 Orange Street,
Invites the attention of the ladies of this city to
a full assortment of
Fall Millinery,
I'liLT II ATS and BONNETS
(in new shades and shaoes)
Fancy Feathers and. Ostrich Tips.
Notice of opening hereafter. oc!4 3t
MIADE TO ORDER
E. MERWIN'S SON,
3S3 STATE STREET
Established 1857.
STILL FALLING !
My Best Java Coffee. 28 Cts.
Those who have teed it know that it cannot be beat
A Fine Tea for 45 Cts.
Austin It Nichols' Cereal Flakes 8c. larere boxes 25c.
Burnham's Cooked Oat Meal 9c, 3 cans for 25c.
Shumaker's Boiled Avena, two for 25c.
The Finest P. R. Molasses in the market, 50c per gai.
CI nilDv Wa3hburn, urosoy ie jo. s, me nnesc in
rl IISIn.N. the world. . Brieht Lieht and other fine
brands. I am selline flour cheaper than it has been
sold for the past twenty-five years.
Vfl H bars or llginson s uerraan jjaunary,saj
oUAr. of Excelsior, 20 of White Star, 20 of B. T.
Babbit's.
Meats of all Kinds Very Low and of the
best quality. A nice piece ot cornea neer, oc a in.
P. S. I close at 8 p. m. except Friday and Satur
day evenings.
J. E. NORTHROP,
955 Grand Street.
Palladium copy. .
EIGHMIE PATENT SHIRT"
Is the BEST In the World.
Only to be had to this city of
T. r. MEUWIS,
SOLE AGENT FOR NEW HAVEN.
Office ( at Residence). No. 28C'olleee street. Postal
orders promptly filled. s27
GROCERIES.
TEA. COFFEE. SPICES.
All kinds of Fruit, fresh and nice.
Cheshire Creamery Butter. Crackers. Best Flour.
Lighthouse Oysters opened to order in the flsli mar-
Telephone. Orders taken and delivered.
EDWARD F. DORAND,
ocl3 S 60 State Street, cor. Clark.
FINE
CIGARS.
I am selling Cigars at 5 c apiece which I will
guarantee to be made entirely from imported to
bacco. I claim that the Cigars which I am offering
at 5c are finer quality than any brand of Cigars
sold for 10c by any other merchant in this city.
Any person who will buy my 5 c Cigars, and after
giving them a fair trial will dispute the correctness
of my statement, will have his money refunded
upon application.
HUGH J. REYNOLDS,
THE WINE DEALER,
Nos. 152 & 154 Crown St.
' New Haven, Conn.
A few doors from Church Street.
1,000 LBS. CHICKENS
At 18 Cents a Pound. .
Round Steak 14c lb. Loin Steak 18c, Porterhouse
Steak 20c Corned Beef 6c. Lamb 12c.
L. SCHONBERGER'S,
cil 1, a, 3 Central Market.
BUlOfEIili'S MUSEUM.
OBSERVE THE DATE.
OCTOBER aotn.
COMIC
OPERA
TROUPE.
New Stage and Scenle Effects,
New Wonders In museum.
ADMISSION 10 CENTS,
JfOXDAV, OCTOBER 20th.
CARLE'S OPERA HOUSE!
Grand Event of the Season.
Engagement Extraordinary of the Celebrated
Tuesday, October 14th.
RHEA!
In the New and Powerful Five Act Drama,
YVONNE !
Written expressly for EJiea by Francois Hons at a
jtrov
SYNOPSIS OF VYONNE:
Act3-Courtship. Act 4 The Masked Ball. Act 6
The jatai ijecier.
chasing a reserved seat will receive an elegant sou
venir, consisting of a book of Kheap Poems.
Seats now on sale at Loomis'. Admission 25 and
SO cents. Keservea seam toy wj
A Training Class for KIntergart
ners.
TOotaNwHaven Com uMy
circulars ouun J1 .
Home nace, jsbw nais., w.-.
jyS ataw, thamSm
News by Telegraph
FROM ALL QUARTERS.
THE EVE OF BATTLE,
Ohio Ready To Give
Yerdict.
THE COUNTRY LOOKING ON.
"Unprecedented Interest
In The Result.
A SURVEY OF THE FIELD.
Both Sides- Confident Of
Victory.
THE STRIIOCLE IN OHIO.
Everything Beady for tbe Ballot A
Large Vote and a Close One Expect
edBoth Parties Confident of Carry
ing the State The Excitement Bun
nlnz High and Some Fears or
X rouble -Deputy marshals and Spe
cial Police In Abundance.
Columbus, Oct. 13. The headquarters of
both parties had rather a deserted appearance
to-day as far as the leading men are concern
ed, they having gone home to vote. Both
headquarters were thronged with persons
asking orders for cheap transportation to
their homes to vote. Never in the history of
Ohio has a political contest been as active
and thorough as the present one, neither
party leaving anything undone to secure
victory for its side. Money has been plenty
on both sides and used by both, each putting
it "where it would do the most good."
Committees from both parties have been
formed as "joint committees" to protect the
purity of the ballot boxes. It is safe to pre
dict that the vote of Ohio to-morrow will be
the largest ever cast. Chairman Barger of
the . Democratic committee and Chairman
Ogilvie of the Republican committee both
claim the State by 10,000 to 25,000. Hon.
Chauncey I. Filley, of St. Louis, who has
been travelling over the State, said this
morning that he felt absolutely certain the
State would go 10,000 Republican
and the reports coming in this
morning might increase it to 25,000,
though this would depend on whether it was
a fair day or not. He farther said that he
understood that the Democrats were going to
have Colonel Dudley and himself arrested
to-day. He courted and longed for just such
an opportunity to show up the Democratic
frauds. He said there was enough evidence
at hand and pointing to a pile of letters and
telegrams said, "That pile of papers would
make mighty interesting reading, but I do
not think the Democratic committee want it
published."
Mr. Blaine arrived in his special ear from
Lancaster and was met by Chairman Ogilvie,
Colonel Dudley and other prominent politi
cians now in the city. Mr. Blaine refused to
come uptown and held a close conference
with his visitors in his ear lasting over an
hour. Mr. Blaine expressed himself as con
fident that the Republicans will carry the
State to-morrow. He goes direct to Detroit
without stopping and remains there until
Wednesday morning and will receive the
Ohio and West Virginia election news to
niorro w night.
Hon. T. A. Hendricks left for Hocking
Valley this morning and will speak at vari
ous points, aiming to offset Mr. Blaine's
speech in that vicinity.
Cleveland, Oct. 13. The result of the
election in Ohio to-morrow is regarded as ex
ceedingly doubtful, both the Republican and
Democratic parties being equally confident
of success. Members of either party, how
ever, do not seem inclined to make any very
large wagers on tbe general result. Foran,
the Democratic nominee for Congress in this
district, is pretty Bure to be re-elected. TheJ
county and State ticket will probably go Re
publican by a small majority. Great enthu
siasm prevails on both sides and a large vote
will be polled.
Cincinnati, uct. l$. ine evening -ost
(Independent, with a Democratic tendency
and free trade proclivities,) contains the fol
lowing giving the situation here to-day:
"Never in ths history ot Cincinnati nas po
litical excitement been so intense, nor parti
san bitterness so dangerous to peace as now.
Combustible material, figuratively speaking,
walks the streets and needs but the touch of
a lighted match to ignite aflame which would
defy any effort to control. Large gangs of
strangers, many with ill-looking faces, crowd
the custom house steps and it is reasonably
certain that commissions are being issued to
them as deputy United States marshals. 1 here
are few men congregating in the vicinity of
the Republican headquarters, the same seem
ing to have been removed to the office of the
United states marsnai. ine crowas raouna.
the Democratic headquarters are numbered
by hundreds. Here special policemen are
being sworn in to tne numDer or ou, xnac at
least ten may be stationed at each voting
precinct. The chief of police and his lieu-
leuauu were uii mgiiii uuu xuuimiig u. wu
ference as to the best means of preserving
the peace."
The Times-star, claiming title to independ
ence and impartiality, prints the following
this evening:
Kvervbodv wants to know the situation as it is.
There is nothing to tell that has not already been
told. The State may go Republican; it may go
Democratic. It is a clear case of "head or tail."
Allen's election in 1873 and Bishop's in 1877 showed
that the vote was liable to waver. Haves only re
deemed it in 1875 by 5,800 majority and the contest
was watched all over the country as closely as the
contest of this year. The superior manage
ment of succeeding years and the absence of
any party strife kept the State in line
until the liquor trouble and general dissatisfaction
with the Republican Congress upset the entire pro
gramme. But this year the same old management
that was in charge of the successful campaign is in
charge. They have worked up hill all summer and
have reason to think that they have not worked in
vain. They have figured the result as certainly Re
publican. They count on 13,000 majority if Hamil
ton county does not go ahead of her Democratic
majority of last year. And the chances are that
ilanulton coumy win oe rtepuoiican.
It is rumored that acting deputy United
States marshals are making wholesale arrests
and locking up the prisoners in the vaults
beneath the new custom house. There is
considerable excitement. Another report is
that United States Marshal Dustin has dis
tributed seven hundred revolvers to the
deputies swom in to-day.
Bogus Bank Notes In Circulation.
Ottawa, Ont., Oct. 13. In North Sydney,
C. B., a few days ago, a gentleman in pur
chasing a ticket passed a bogus 5 note of
the Commercial bank of Newfoundland. He
was arrested, bus as he redeemed the note
and told where he obtained it was allowed to
go. It appears that several years ago a 10,
000 package of notes for the Commercial
bank were struck off in England and sent to
Newfoundland by a steamer which was
wrecked on the island of St. Pierre. The
notes, numbering from six thousand to eight
thousand, were recovered by some unknown
param tuiu puu m ...... ..... t'iBli',LLi L
beine forced so cleverly that experts could
detect them only by the numbers.
An Old man's Shall Fractured.
Concobd, N. H-, Oct. 13. Moses Minor,
aged sixty, of Penacook, left home early last
evening and not returning an unsuccessful
search was instituted. He was found early
this morning unconscious with his skull
fractured. He has been in a comatose con
dition since, so that it has been impossible to
ascertain the circumstances under which the
injuries were received. It is thought that he
will not survive.
THE FRENCH DEFEATED.
Xerrlbly Beaten By the Chinese at
Xamsul.
Amot, Oct. 13. The French defeat at
Tamsui is confirmed. Their force was out
flanked. The troops landed at 10 o'clock on
Wednesday morning and were obliged to re
tire to the ships at 3 p. m. after being terri
bly handled. Their loss was seventy killed
and wounded. They also lost one gun. The
Chinese beheaded the dead and wounded.
The Chinese lost two hundred men.
Death or a Noted Lawyer.
New York, Oct. 13. William F. Kintz
ing, the well known criminal lawyer who
has practiced at the bar of this State for the
past twenty-five years, died this afternoon.
He was taken sick on Friday last . and was
attacked with a hemorrhage to-day and died
Part I of the court of sessions was at once
adjourned out of respect to the favorite law
yer. BIOTOUS BRITISHERS
Break Up apolitical Catherine at Bir
mingham.
London, Oct. 13. Sir Stafford Northcote
and Lord Randolph Churchill were announ
ced to speak to-night at a large Conservative
meeting in the Aston grounds at Birming
ham. A counter demonstration gotten up
by the Liberals was held in the same vicin
ity. After some pretty radical speeches had
been made at the latter meeting denouncing
the peers and the House of Lords,, the
crowd became boisterous and breaking down
the walls around the Aston grounds, they set
off the fireworks prepared for the Conserva
tive meeting. They then invaded the small
er hall in which Hon. Edward Gibson, M.
P. for Dublin university, was speaking. The
mob stormed the platform and a fierce hand-to-hand
fight ensued between the intruders
and the Conservatives, during which chairs
and benches were used as weapons. Finally
the platform collapsed, precipitating the
combatants in a mass to the floor, several
being injured. The mob then turned its at
tention to the larger hall where similar scenes
were enacted. Sir Stafford Northcote and
Lord Churchill were howled down, and find
ing it impossible to restore order they hastily
quitted the hall. Many Conservatives and
Liberals were injured in the numerous brawls
.that took place before the police could suc
ceed in clearing the premises.
XHJ2 GAKIPAIGH.
Beecher to Address tho Independents.
New York, Oct. 13. Rev. Henry Ward
Beecher has definitely promised to speak at a
mass meeting of Independent Republicans in
Brooklyn next week. To a United Press re
porter to-day he affirmed the truth of the
statement made by himiwlf that Mr. Joy had
declared at a dinner that Blaine had made an
offer to appoint a certain congressional com
mittee provided Joy would take certain de
preciated bonds off Blaine's hands. "I do
not see," added Mr. Beecher, "how Mr. Joy
dares to presume to deny his language. If he
does he is not only a liar, but a lunatic."
CASHED IN THE WHIST.
mysterious Assault On a Young
Lady.
Concord, N. H., Oct. 13. Sunday even
ing a young lady about twenty years of age
started on foot to go from the Pinacook
mountain house to the house of Jeremiah
Stevens, three-quarters of a mile distant. At
6:30 she arrived at her destination with her
clothing covered with blood which flowed
from gashes on both wrists. All she could
say was that she remembered passing a cer
tain large oak tree beside the road and the
next she remembered she was sitting beside
the road with gashes in the wrists copiously
bleeding. She appeared greatly frightened
and could give no explanation of her wounds.
There was no evidence that any indecent as
sault had been attempted. Upon the left
wrist there were seven gashes, two of which
were made through the dress sleeve, and up
on the right wrist there were eleven. The
gashes were parallel about a . quarter of an
inch apart and so deep as to bleed freely.
There were also long scratches on each side
of the girl's throat. She has no recollection
of seeing or hearing anyone passing and the
whole affair is shrouded in mystery. The
young lady bears an excellent reputation.
An Important Decision.
St. Louis, Oct. 13. An opinion was re
ceived to-day in the United States court from
Judge Brewer in the case of Vickery against
the State Savings association which is of im
portance. Plaintiff had given a draft with
unrestricted indorsement. This passed into
the possession of the Bank of Indiana, which
forwarded it to the defendant for collection,
the two institutions having corresponded for
more than twenty years. They did not remit
collections, but struck balances to each other
to be adjusted from time to time in process
of further collections. The judge holds that
under such circumstances balances were
fairly permitted to remain upon credit or an
ticipation of remittances. The fact that he
lost money owing to the failure of the Indi
ana bank, into which his paper had passed,
appears to Judge Brewer to be the fault of
the plaintiff alone, for by a restricted ' in
dorsement he would have given notice of his
title to every one who touched his paper. As
he chose to give an unrestricted indorsement,
thus permitting his paper to pass into an or
dinary channel of trade, he accepted in blind
faith the stability of the Indiana bank and
must abide the result of his confidence. His
indorsement for collection is immaterial, the
simple question being whether a collecting
has the right to look on a transmitting bank
as- the owner of draft paper. It having done
so in this case, judgment is entered for the
defendant.
A 8IN&IILAR THAUEDl.
A Negro Induced To Kill a Phy
sician and Xhen mortally Wound
ed Xo Keep Him From Veiling
Tales.
New Oreeans, Oct. 13. A double trage
dy original in its nature occurred at FJds
ville, Miss., forty miles from here, to-day.
Deputy Sheriff Snipps, Jacob George, a tele
grapher, and two or three others broke into
the county jail and offered a negro prisoner
his liberty on condition that he would kill
Dr. Schumacher, a druggist. The negro
agreed to the terms and calling the doctor
out shot him, inflicting a desperate wound.
The citizens were very indignant and the in
stigators of the crime in order to remove the
witness and work upon the feelings of the
people organized a mob who fired a volley
into the negro and fatally wounded him.
Before death he made a full confession. Sus
pecting that this might happen the criminals
slipped from the crowd and boarded a train
for this city. 1 ne police nave been furnished
with a description of the men and may ef
fect their capture.
MiCAFFHEY THE WINNER
In His Four Round Boxing match
With mitcheU.
New York, Oct. 13. There was an audi
ence in Madison Square Garden to-night of
fully seven thousand people to witness the
much talked of sparring match between
Charles Mitchell, of England, and Dominick
McCaffrey, of Pittsburg. The match was
for the entire gate money, four rounds Mar
quis of Queensbury rules', Mitchell to receive
$1,000 win or lose. After some boxing ex
hibitions by some well known pugilists who
showed excellent training, the stars of the
evening came upon the platform. McCaffrey
was dressed in salmon colored tights and
wore a green belt. He was attended by
Billy O'Brien and Billy Edwards. Charley
Mitchell was dressed in white and had for
his attendants Billy Madden and James
Campbell. J. H. McCormick was appointed
referee, while Ed. Plummer acted as time
keeper. The gloves used were very small
and by no means soft. As soon as they
squared off McCaffrey got well home on the
face, Mitchell countering on the chest. These
blows were hard ones and made the con
testants go back to long range work. Mitch
ell next attempted a visitation to McCaffrey's
ribs and McCaffrey swung his right on to
Mitchell's ear with force enough to make
him see stars. ' When they returned to their
corners they were flushed and panting.
Round 3 -Mitchell became very aggressive,
putting in some sounding hits On McCaffrey's
face, eye and stomach, but McCaffrey kept
cool, countered his antagonist on the ear and
straightened him by one on the nose. Then
they got into short range and Mitchell
showed to the best advantage. The latter
drove McCaffrey before him onto the ropes,
knocking his head back with a left bander.
This was a terrific lounge, but McCaffrey had
his revenge by making a neat straight coun
ter on Mitchell's forehead.
Round 3 McCaffrey tried to make his
lead, but was short, and the pair came to a
clinch, Mitchell getting home on the chest
and mouth, McCaffrey catching Mitchell on
the ear. The latter countered in his face,
and then using both hands on body and
mouth. The half-armed work was fine in
this round, which ended by Mitchell getting
home with both hands in face and neck.
When they retired to their corners MitcheU
was bleeding from a cut over the left eye.
Round 4 McCaffrey tried to lead off with
his left, but fell short again, while Mitchell
landed a straight counter full in his antagon
ist's face, following it up with another in the
mouth. This seemed to rile McCaffrey and
they rushed to short range, McCaffrey send
ing in his right like a rifle shot. In an instant
MitcheU was covered with blood, his left eye
having a gash an inch long, but he fought
like a demon. McCaffrey, however, met him
half way, and, tired as he was, used his
right with precision and effect, while Mitch
eU kept sending in his left. The closing
scenes were so exciting that everyone seemed
to lose his head and it was not for some
time that the referee's voice could be heard.
McCaffrey was declared the J winner. What
the judgment was based on is hard to say,
as the match was as even a one as ever was
fought and if another round had been eon
tested one pugilist or the other must have
dropped.
A CYCLONE IN 2KAINE.
Trees, Uprooted, Houses Blown Over
and a Ceneral Destruction or Prop
erty. Lewiston, Me., Oct. 13. This forenoon
about 11 o'clock "a hurricane swept over the
Baker MiU district, Auburn, lasting about
, three minutes. It oame froja the northwest
and struck a pine grove, overthrowing about
fifty trees. Some of the trees have then
tops broken off, while others are twisted off
and the trunks split to the ground. The tin
covering of the cloth room of the mUl was
torn off and rolled into a ball with a fright
ful noise and was rolled several rods away
into the bushes. The tin on the roof of the
main building was also raised, but
not carried away, making a terrible
noise and alarming the operatives so
that most of them rushed from the mill.
Much minor damage was done, many chim
neys being blown down, the roofs of several
residences being carried away and individual
trees leveled. A little boy on the iron bridge
which crosses the Little Androscoggin had
his cart blown into the river and only saved
himself by hanging to the stringers. The
lattice on the bridge was laid flat. The tin
roof of the N. C. Ester house was inflated
Uke a balloon and ripped to pieces. The
windows were blown out of many
houses. George Mallon and John
Cheltham both had their grocery teams
capsized and their goods scattered
while a load of furniture was treated in the
same manner. From Auburn the wind
swept across the river and would have car
ried several people from the Broad street
bridge but for the high raUway. Lewiston
escaped without serious damage, a heavy
shower falling aU the time. At Bleaching
HiU, fences, biU boards, small trees
and chimneys feU before the gale.
At Sabbatus the roof blown from the
woolen miU feU on A. S. H. EUis' grist miU,
nearly crushing it. Numerous chimneys,
trees and barns were blown down in the
cyclone's path, which was circuitous, vary
ing in width from a few rods to a quarter of
a mile. The damage will amount to several
thousand dollars. No loss of life has been
reported.
TELEGRAPHIC JOTTINGS.
The prime meridian conference at Wash
ington yesterday adopted Greenwich as the
standard meridian, twenty-one nations favor
it, one (St. Domingo) voting against it and
France and Brazil refraining from voting.
Sunday afternoon lightning struck a tree
near the house of Jesse King at Raynham,
Mass. , and ran to the house some distance
away, knocking Mrs. King and daughter in
sensible, leaving an imprint of the tree on
the daughter's shoulder. She will recover.
Two freight trains on the Kentucky Cen
tral railroad collided yesterday morning near
Decoursey station. The two trains were al
most completely wrecked. Engineer Gray
was seriously and possibly fatally injured
and two others sUehtlv. The coUision was
caused by a mistake of the train despatcher
in giving orders.
Base ball yesterday: At Detroit, New
Yorks 4, Detroits 3; at Buffalo, Bostons 2,
Buffalos 2; at Pittsburg, Providence 9, Alle
ghanys 0; at New York, Metropolitans 3, In
dianapolis 1; at Baltimore, St. Louis 5, Bal
timores 4; at Philadelphia, Columbus 3, Ath
letics 2; at Brooklyn, Cincinnatis 5, Brook
lyns 2; at Richmond, Toledos 6, Virginias 3.
LOCAL NEWS.
A TERRIBLE STRAIN.
What Ten Enthusiastic Cleveland
men Did.
It will probably be reported in the Demo
cratic papers to-day that the Yale Kent club
has passed resolutions endorsing Cleveland.
The truth of the matter is this: A political
question was drawn for debate last night, and
aU tho Democratic members turned out en
masse to the number of eight men, while
the Republicans were joining in the parade
of the Woolsey battalion of the coUege.
It is necessary that at least ten men be
present at a meeting of the Kent club in or
der to form a quorum. So these enthusias
tic Democrats sent men into the byways and
hedges, and after hunting all around at last
got two men and their grand Democratic
representation was complete. No debate
on the question was held, but they proceeded
to pass resolutions endorsing Cleveland. A
motion was made that these resolutions be
published in the New York and New Haven
papers, which was ruled out of order by the
chair. While by great labor these ten men
were assembled to vote the Democratic tick
et, and twenty Republicans from the Kent
club were marching in the Woolsey battalion,
and others were not there represented, it is
hard to see how the voice of the club is for
Cleveland. , .
Police Notes.
The arrests at the police stations last night
up to twelve o'clock were only for simple
drunks. The disposition of the cases wiU
be decided in the City court according to the
number of times the arrested parties have
been in the lockup.
An Old Dodge.
A couple of extremely genteel young men
are or were yesterday "working" the change
racket on susceptible merchants. The plan
is the same old one of making a small pur
chase and giving a bank note in payment
and then endeavoring to befuddle the one
who gives the change.
Not So Well.
The condition of William Bennis, of Hart
ford, who was shot by Frank Hal t at Union
Hall Hotel, in that city, is not as favorable
as was anticipated. He has suffered a re
lapse and the wound has again troubled him
The prospects of his recovery are not as
bright as a week ago. Hart has left Hart
ford. St. Aloyslus Fair.
Quite a large number attended the fair of
the St. Aloysius society at tho Atheneum
last evening, and a very pleasant evening was
spent. There are many useful and costly
articles at the fair, and it is being weU con
ducted and promises to be very successful.
This evening the St. Aloysius society, num
bering over 300 members, wiU attend the
fair in a body.
Enthusiasm In the Fourth Ward.
The Fourth ward Blaine and Logan club
held a meeting in its rooms near the Woolsey
House last evening which was attended by
aU who could possibly get into the hall and
marked by great enthusiasm. The first
speaker was George H. Buttricks. Hon. N.
D. Sperry made the leading address, speak
ing on protection in convincing terms. W.
P. NUes, of Fair Haven, made a short ad
dress, touching upon the tariff and speaking
of the candidates. John H. Porter was the
last speaker.
Four members of Professor Chandler's
Glee club sang acceptably.
Prohibition State Conference.
To-morrow afternoon, October 15th, a
State conference wiU be held in McDonough
Hall, Middletown, to discuss the following
question: "How ought temperance men to
vote on Tuesday, November 4th?" In addi
tion to several Connecticut speakers, the
meeting will be addressed by the Hon. John
P. St. John, of Kansas, and George R. Scott,
of New York, who have agreed to be present.
It is probable that John N. Stearns, of the
National Temperance society, and Mrs. Caro
line B. BueU, of the National Women's
Christian Temperance union, will also deliver
addresses. Professor Franklin and John W.
Smith, "Continental vocalists," will sing
several songs, and it is expected that Mr. and
Mrs. Dr. Barker, of Meriden, wiU also sing
temperance melodies. A collection wiU be
taken to defray expenses. All opponents of
the liquor traffic are invited to attend.
Personal.
Robert P. Yorketon, pressman of the Staf
ford Printing company in this city ten or
fifteen years ago, is finely situated in St.
Louis and growing to be one of the solid
men.
Harvey Nicholson has resigned the position
of stage manager of the New Haven Opera
House after four years' service there.
Charles Gidney, a North Branf ord milk
man, lost $40 yesterday in a pocketbook
while on Church street. He reported the
loss at the poUce office.
Frederick Oviatt, formerly of Milford, who
died in Derby last week, was buried in Mil
ford Saturday. His age was twenty-eight.
Mrs. Abbie Plumb, the oldest person in
Milford, sustained a stroke of paralysis a few
days since from which she is quite ill.
Miss Marion May, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
William H. May, of Bridgeport, died yester
day morning.
I thank God that you ever invented such a
medicine for catarrh. I have suffered for
five years so I could not He down for weeks
at a time. Since I have been using Ely's
Cream Balm I can rest. Frank P. Burleigh,
Farrnington, N. H.
Catarrh. For twenty years I was a snf
ferer from catarrh of the head and throat.
By a few applications of Ely's Cream Balm I
received decided benefit was cured by one
bottle. Charlotte Parker, Waverly, N. Y-.'
ol3eod&w2w
BOARD OF COTJNCILMEN.
Petitions Read and Referred The
Need of a New Cemetery Reports of
Committees Encroachments of
Churches On' the Green to he Con
sidered. A regular meeting of the Board of Coun
cilmen was held last evening, President Gal
lagher in the chair. Petitions were read and
referred as follows: Of Frederick F. Potter
for compensation for injury to horse; of C.H.
Redfield f ot change of order de concrete walk
on the south side of Fine street; of William
SandaUe for a brick sidewalk on both sides
of Redfield street; of Yale coUege observa
tory for a sewer in Canner street from Whit
ney avenue to the proposed extension of
HilUiouse''avenue; of E. R. Whiting for a
sewer in Henry street between Canal and
Orchard streets; of Mrs. M. A. Yale for com
pensation for injury to person; pf George R.
Chamberlain for damages caused, by overflow
from the George street sewers; of W. H.
Wheeler for a sewer in Palmer street; of
Edward Dillon et als. for the extension of
Lombard street westward to Laurel street.
The question of unexpended balances and
their transfer to different items in the same
department came up on petition of Fire and
Board of PubUc Works departments. Coun
cilmen Graves, Dailey and others advocated
the transfer of aU these petitions to the
Board of Finance, and it was so ordered.
Communication from WUliam Luby asking
that he may be permitted to purchase two
feet of land on Nash street at the rear of No.
8 engine house, and signed by President
Mullen of the Board of Fire Commissioners.
was referred to the Board of Finance.
Order rescinding the order for a sidewalk
on First street was adopted in concurrence.
Resolution of inquiry regarding encroach
ments at the foot of Chestnut street was
adopted. -
Estimates of the fire department for 1885
amounting to $86,150 were referred to the
Board of Finance.
Remonstrance of John P. Phillips against
the acceptance of the sewer built in St. Ro
nan street was referred.
Report of the Board of Compensation' in
correction cf assessment for Meadow street
widening was accepted and ordered on file.
Favorable reports of the Street committee
were read and accepted as follows: Relay of
sidewalk on tbe south side of Congress ave
nue, between Meadow and Lafayette streets;
relay of sidewalk on the north side of
Whalley avenue, from Howe street to No.
205 WhaUey avenue; cobbling of the road
way of Gregson street, between Chapel and
Center streets; relay of sidewalk on the
north side of Center street, between
Temple and Gregson streets; cobble gutter on
the east side of View street; curb and con
crete walk on the north side of South Water
street between Sea street and Howard ave
nue; relay of sidewalk on the south side of
Grove street and cobble gutters; concreto
walk on the south side of Lamberton street
between Kimberly and Clark avenues. The
same committee reported adversely to a con
crete walk on the east side of Burtonia Place;
to concrete walk on both sides of Lynwood
street; to grading and curbing both sides of
Winthrop avenue between Sylvan and Dav
enport avennes.
Report of the clerk of the City court for
August was ordered on file.
Report of the sealer of weights and meas
ures for the two months ending September
30 was ordered on file.
Report of the city auditor de indebtedness
of the New Haven and Derby railroad to tho
city of New Haven was ordered on filo.
Order that the Board of Public Works
cause the band stand and liberty pole on the
Green to be removed before January 1, 1885,
was referred to the Committee on Squares.
The foUowing resplution was introduced
by Councilman DaUey.
Whereas: It appears that the time is not
distant when the interests of humanity re
quire that provision shall be made for addi
tional cemetery accommodations for the in
terment of New Haven's dead; therefore,
Resolved, That a special committee of two
aldermen and three couneilinen be appointed
to make fuU enquiry into the subject and re
port to the Common Council as to the expedi
ency and propriety of having the city gov
ernment take action toward the ownership
and management of a pubUc cemetery, with
in reasonable distance from the center of the
city.
The resolution was referred to a Bpecial
committee consisting, on the part of this
Board, of Councilmen Dailey, Merrick and
Goebel.
Report of the Board of Public Works de
expenses for August, 1884, was ordered on
file.
The Committee on Sewers reported in fa
vor of a sewer in St. Ronan street and ad
versely to sewers in Bishop street, Nicoll
street, WaUace street and Palmer street.
The Committee on Claims reported in fa
vor of paying John Burns $300 for damages
for injury to person and adversely to claims
of Gloson Hall, Patrick Noonrn and Mrs.D.L.
Ogden. The reports were adopted.
The petition of T. D. Woolsey and others
for the granting of the extension to North
church and the remonstrance against the
same signed by Eli W. Blake and four hun
dred and fifty others were referred to the
Committee on Squares.
Councilman Thomas R. Trowbridge, jr..
opposed any encroachments on the Green by
any of the churches and said that the peti
tion of the United society or any other
church society should be seriously considered
before it was granted.
DEMOCRATIC RALLY
At Carll's Opera House Addresses by
Hon. W. W. Eaton and Hon. nr.
Kennard.
CarU's Opera House was filled last evening,
the occasion being another Democratic raUy.
The speakers were ex-Senator W. W. Eaton
and Hon. John H. Kennard. Hon. Colin M.
IngersoU presided and gracefully introduced
Mr. Eaton, who arraigned the Republican
party as having committed numerous and
grievous errors and misbehaved itself alarm
ingly. Mr. Eaton was as dignified, impres
sive and oracular as ever, even more so than
in the days 20 years ago when he so stub
bornly adhered to his extreme opinions and
convictions, erroneous and misguided though
they were, as to render him quite famous
and a central figure in Connecticut Democra
cy. His hair is silvered now, but he retains
much of the old fire and is emphatic in his
assertion of opinions as ever. After assail
ing the Republican party he pitched
into the tariff question, that knotty
question of which his brother WaUer on
the same stage a few evenings ago averred he
knew nothing. Mr. Eaton gave no unoertain
sound and denied that the Democratic party
were unquahfiedly for free trade. It took
many nuUions to run this government and
protection was an essential element in good
government. He then launched out into an
array of figures and went into details to an
extent that seemed laborious to tho speaker
and depressing to the audience. The au
dience seemed to feel that the ex-Senator was
sound and profound and was totaUy demol
ishing Senator Piatt, but it was rather dull
music for the average Democratic heart
which no doubt ached for the
wily and magnetic Waller. However, the
Senator was frequently applauded when he
made his points. Mr. Kennard, who fol
lowed the Senator, is a good speaker. Upon
the stage were Mayor Lewis, ex-Mayor Rob
ertson, Prof. W. P. Trowbridge, William H.
Law, Alexander Troup, Richard Peck, J. W.
Bradley, Charles W. Allen, Charles M.
Grant of Chatfield & Grant, A. A. Upson,
Eli Mix, W. B. Catlin, Charles Lichtenstein,
Charles L. Chaplin, P. B. O'Brien, ex-Coun-cUman
Thomas and about twenty others.
Christian Endeavor Society Social.
The first social of the Christian Endeavor
society connected with the Humphrey street
church wiU be held to-morrow evening at the
church. All friends-of the society, . as well
as members of the church and congregation,
are cordiaUy invited to attend. A . literary
rjroerramme arranged by the social committee
wiU be the principal feature of the evening.
Ladies' Underwear.
T li ci fA tt verv evtravfuyant advertis
ing statements on the part of some of our
competitors, we again affirm, having taken
pains to be sure of our ground, that we have
aT,0,lntalv illO riAflt VftlllA ltl lullP' white
merino and wool underwear in New Haven.
Prices 35, 45, 50c. and so on up.
J. JN. ADAM cc yjU.
Eider Down Sacking.
Good line and very low prices
J. N. Adam & Co.
Children's Wool Hose.
liAT-Tftins in children's solid
JJAli (at ..... ,7 ct . .
colored fine French Wool Hose. You must
see
these if you have any cnuureu o tmc.-
T "V A mv At CV
ings
to Duy. '
Foster Cloves.,
The genuine Foster Gloves are for sale in
. in "NT aw TTftvpn Vnn in RV lie
OBJ HlUio umij ... . . .
offered them in other stores, but if you. ex-
amine me wxul uwiuo u.o j " "
LU UlttU 1U 1 -u uu-v. -w
patent," which simply means that the maker
r . l i : J r x? TlA-rirt
Or importer uzu paiu xu.eooJx' m?,A. nuivw.
a royalty xor peniiuwiuu wj u- !,, wo,
.1 XT -U nlAiraa cx moflrarl
aoes nui intHui iii iuc do ov .-
T7 A mn-i T'Vi a rrAnnfnn ffwrai1
-"II n1 in 1rriTAA CrrftJlAH AXiH ATA
iuvcs air; iju.- ' e
stamped as shown in our advertisement on
the:
first page ot inis paper.
POLITICAL.
Attention! HarrUon Zouave.
Regular drill and meeting of the Zouaves at the
witfwam this (Tuesday) evening at 7 o'clock prepar
atory to the parade Thursday night; also to take
nM.inn rm invitations to Stamford. Milford and Wal-
lingford for Friday night. A full attendance de
Sterols.
WANTED.
A SITUATION as a flrstxslass cook. No wash
ing or ironing. Good city reference. Inquire
035 STATE STREET.
OC14 It
AW ANTE I,
SITUATION by a Swedish girl to do general
. ."O'jsework in a private family. Inquire at
ocU u SOS EAST STREET.
W y ' 'J- J J)
AE,FY?msHED ROOM by a young
, "?7i,t,,?d; must be within fire min
utes walk of the postofflce. Address
00,4 21 "W. M" P. O. BOX 701.
WASTED,
A SITUATION by a young man to take care of
horses end make himself generally useful.
Can give the best of reference. Inquire at
, QCl41t 1H9 FRANKLIN STREET
WASTED,
A SITUATION for two girls, one for cook and
one for second work. Good city references
Call at
QC14 lt 7 DOW STREET.
WANTED,
AN American or German woman as working
housekeeper for a small family. A Rood .cook
required; also references. Good wages paid and a
good home provided. Address
ocl4 2t BOX 530, PLANTS VTLLE. CONN.
WANTED,
A SITUATION by a capable girl to do general
housework or cook, wash and iron in a private
family. Good city reference. Inquire at
cl U 129 DAY STREET.
WANTED,
A SITUATION as coachman by a young Eng
lishman; has long experience in the manage
ment. Of hnniM- ho. tha Haq t i .
i A ' . i inn nu t: 111 ami out
of town. Call at
"C" u 197 GEORGE STREET.
WANTED.
A SITUATION by a girl to do general housework
or laundress. Good reference if required, at
t 16 ROSE STREET.
WANTED,
A YOUNG MAN to take care of horses and
make himself generally useful. To a good
man a good home is offered. Apply to
ocl4 3t F. B. ANDREW & CO., City Market.
'WANTED,
A SITUATION by a respectable girLto do gen
eral housework; is a good cook, washer and
ironer. Good reference. Inquire for two davs at
ocl l It 178 TEMPI. E STREET.
WANTED.
A SITUATION by a capable woman as cook or
a laundress. First-class reference. Inquire at
ocl4Jt 178 FRANKLIN STREET, upstairs.
WANTED,
YOUNG LADY for office work; must be over
A
f a ' s000 writer, quick and ,ac-
curate at figures. Apply at
oci4 it TR(
OY STEAM LAUNDRY.
WANTED,
A SITUATION by a competent young girl to do
general housework in a small private family.
Good city reference if required. Can be seen for
two days at
ocll It 935 GRAND STREET.
WANTED,
A PLEASANT upper tenement of four rooms for
gentleman and wife only, with modem im
provements, within six minutes of the postomce.
Rent must be moderate. Address M. L., this of-fl?'-
oct 13 3t.
WANTED.
DRUG CLERK with two or three years' experi
ence; first-class references required.
Address DRUGGIST, New Haven postofflce.
octl3 tf.
WANTED.
A YOUNG MAN as night clerk in a hotel office.
Must be a good penman and give good refer
ence. Address in own handwriting.
.5t'5i2t-. P. O. BOX 45. New Haven.
WANTED,
A SITUATION by a respectable girl ;o do gener
al housework or secood work. Good refer
ence. Inquire for two days at
ocl3 St 5 DAGGETT RTREFT
.
WANTED.
BOOKKEEPERS, clerks, salesmen, waiters,
cooks, porters, packers, printers, painters, car
penters, machine hands, and aU kinds of male help.
Also 4 salesladies, assistant bookkeeper, clerks,
laundresses, cooks, waitresses, table girls. All such
help furnished. Call and inspect the best system
ever presented at Shepard's hsadquarters, 11!) Or
ange street. Help wanted for the West. ocfl
WANTED.
WOMAN to cook and do general housework. A
Swede preferred.
A
oc8 tf 67 MANSFIELD STREET.
Wanted, "
To BUY lot of Second-hand Furniture and Car
pets. Highest cosh price paid. Orders by mail
promptly attended to at
Jal'i 28 CHURCH S'. REET.
iitcllisciicc Otticc.
EMPLOYMENT office for males and females.
Help of different nationalities can be supplied to
private families, boarding houses, hotels and res
taurants. The proprietor of this establishment pays
great attention in the choice of girls and women be
fore sending them to iill situations. Calls from the
country at any distance are promptly attended to.
Invalid and wet nurses at short notice. Male help
for families and farm hands always ready.
MRS. T. MULLIGAN,
aaotf 1!)7 George, corner Temple street.
To Whom it may Concern !
MONEY liberally advanced in sums
to suit on all kinds of merchan
dise and persoual property of ev
ery description at
EDWARD ICXiKI.'S
Old and Reliable Money Loan Office,
341 and 343 STATE STREET, New Haven, Conn.
AU legal transactions strictly Confidential. ja5
IRS. DR. J. A. WRIGHT,
Psychometrist and Clairvoyant.
Consultation on Business, Minerals, Health and al
Tersonal Matters.
Readings of Character by Handw riting, Photograph
or Hair.
Price Gentlemen, $g; Ladies. $1.
Mi's. Wright can be consulted at her office, 08 Or
ange street, daily, 9 a. m. to 8 p. m. m28tf
35ntevtaitiwjeuts.
CARLL'S OPERA HOUSE.
Wednesday and Thursday, Octo
Iter I5tli and I6II1.
An unmistakable success." N. Y. Herald.
Ruth's Devotion !
Or Blue and Grey.
Under the auspices of Messrs. Shook & Collier,
OF THE
UNION SQUARE THEATER, N. Y.
With a Notable and Especially Chosen
Cast.
All the Original Scenery and Appointments.
Seats now on sale at Loomis Admission 25 and
50 cents. Reserved seats 73c and $1. oc!0 6t
PECK'S GRAND OPERA HOUSE.
NEW HAVEN.
ONE WEEK,
9 PERFORMANCES, COMMENCING
MONDAY, OCT. 13.
Positively Farewell Tour ! !
Manager John D. Mishler has the honor to present
Prof. Ceo. Bartholomew's
EQUINE PARADOX,
20 EDUCATED HORSES. 20
Re-arranged Programme.
New, Original and Attractive Features.
Do Everything but Talk.
EVERY EVENING AT 8 O'CLOCK,
it MATIXEES ! 3
Wednesday, Friday, Saturday, 3:30.
SPECIAL PRICES.
Gallery, 25. Admission, first floor, 35. All re
served seats, 50 cento. For sale at Loomis'.
oc9 9t
One week, commencing Monday, Oct. 13.
33 Consecutive Performances at the Union Square
Theater, New York.
PROF. CROffiCWELL
ART ENTERTAINMENTS!
They consist of magnificent illustrations of Tours
in Many Lands, the Artistic Gems of Europe and
America, and the Natural Wonders of the World,
accompanied with a descriptive Chat by the Way
side. Monday, Germany; Tuesday, Switzerland;
Wednesday and Matinee, London; Thursday, the
Holv Land; Friday, Paris; Saturday Matinee,
Homes of England; Saturday, Rome. General ad
mission, 25c; reserved seats, 25c extra. Seats se
cured at Edward Dowries & Co.'s, 829 Chapel street
(next to Cutler's) and at Box Office, Opera House.
oclltf
The New HavenDivjng Association,
HAMILTON PARK,
NEW HAVEN, CONN..
October 21, 32 and 23, 1 884.
Premiums - - $2,000.
First Day, Tuesday, October 2 1 .
1- Pura : Class. 185, $62, $38, $25.
2. Purse $400. 2:30 Class. $iiOO, $10o;$B0r$4O.
Second Day, Wednesday, October 22.
3. Purse $300. 8:45 Class $100, $30, $30, $20.
4. Purse $400. . 2:84 Class. $300, $100, $80, 40.
5. Purse $50, Road wagon race, $S5, $15, $10.
Xlilrd Day, Thursday, October 23.
6. Purse $300. 8.87 Class. $150, $75. $45, $80.
7. Purse $400. Free to all. $200, 100, $00, $40.
Entrance fee. ten per cent, of nurse, nhmilri on.
company the nomination, and will in all cases be
required before noon of the day of starting. Four
entries required to fill and three to start.
Rules and regulations of the National Trottine
Association, as amended to February 13, 1884, will
Kovern. Any horse distancing the Held will recei ve
Entries close Tuesday, Oct. 14. 1884. Address R
L. BRADLEY, 440 State street. New Haven, Conn
Officers: D. C. Waterhocbs, Prest. ; H. L. Bd
ixr, Sec'y; F. D. Butricks, Treas.
oco ot
DA NC ING.
Instruction in the above art, either private or in
classes, given by
miss MAITIIK C. GILL,
daughter of the late Prof. Gill. Circulars obtained
at music and book stores. Call on or address HISS
MAMTE C. GILL. 815 Crown street. soSSm
x?JedicaLTreatme,t Free.
fN Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, at her
iV So0 1W Can5"L 8fr8' between th?hoursrf
10 and 1 a. m., Dr. Adelaide Lambert will treat tha
men and children,

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