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Morning journal and courier. [volume] (New Haven [Conn.]) 1848-1894, October 23, 1884, Image 1

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015483/1884-10-23/ed-1/seq-1/

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$5 per Year.
THE LARGEST DiILYJEWgPAPER IW THE CITY.
THE CARRINCTON PBBLISHISe CO.l
OI-FICE, 4O0 STATE STREET.
NEW HAYEK, CONST. THURSDAY .MORNING, OCTOBER 23, 1884.
NO. 271
VOL. LII.
-1
VI l it I I - I! I ..: . a. - - mJ JK. , !k.X M". ;'V
mm nnniin .o
' " r. ,i , .. ,
In September, and
early iart of October
we had no Cloaks to
speak of. All, our com
petitors were ' showing
large stocks. We some
times missed sales. Cus
tomers grumbled a lit
tle, and we fottnd it
hard w holdout, but we
knew we were righty
and refused to buy any
quantify. - r-'":f ? ;; '
Now OUR TI ME
HAS COME. We
have bought, and bought
largely, and those ladies
who now need to buy
outer garments will
find by a comparison oj
our prices with any
others on this Season's
Goods thai our "hold
off" policy was a wise
one.
We never saw, ana
we are sure our custom
ers will admit that they
never saw New ana
Fasmonable Goods sola
at any such figures as
we have been able to put
on our recent purchases
of cloaks.
There are
tJMETS,
Medium and h e a v y
weights, plain ana
trimmed, in a variety
oj styles.
There are
SACQUES,
COATS,
NEWMARKETS,
RUSSIAN
CIRCULARS,
VICTORIAS,
DOLMANS,
in all materials, in new
styles, tioth of cut and
trimming, at all prices.
at astonishingly low
prices.
CHILDREN'S
CLOAKS
of all kinds, from, the
Plainest school jacket.
Very neat and. elegant.
MISSES'
NEWMARKETS.
In this department
we can offer at present
also two great bargains
in GOSSAMER
WATERPROOFS
and a job lot of
HA ND KNI TTED
SHAWLS, .
bought from a 'manu
facturer, who is going
out ot the business.
PIANOFORTE.
HARMONY AND COMPOSITION
'-, MRS. BRAND
Has recommenced her lessons for the season, and
has vacancies for a few pupils. Terms moderate.
121 TOBK STREET,
-.- s2 mo " ?o doors from Crown.
Miss FanRie C. Howe.
CULTIVATION OF THE VOICE (Italian method)
and PIANO INSTRUCTION.
Charles T. Howe,
FLUTE AND PIANO INSTRUCTION,
103 CROWN STREET. NEAR TEMPLE STREET.
el8f .
No. 847 Chapel street. Thorough commercial train
ing for young men and ladies. Evening sessions.
Apply for circular giving full information. s!3
CONSERVATORY 0F4 MUSIC.
MUSIC. Vocal and Instrumental mud Toning.
'ART. nrawiiig, Vaintin. .Modeling and poiuallure.
ORATORY. XJteratiure and xrasiiaes.
HOMGt BlecMtaceommodationsfor 600 lady students
ItU TEBH begma fcpllth Seantlf nllrlU 4,
7.ln fa lKM .ITR JT3TR. T)fT(iCtfir. f . -
yKAiyJLLpr MfrUABE, BOSTOMi MASS
LEARN SOMETHING USEFUL!
Don't Waste Yonr Evenings!
Less than a year ago a young man who was em
ployed in an office during the day attended our
Evening School for a while, and is now private sec
retary to General F. D. Sloat of this city. Another
young man, learned while working in a shop, took
a position last November, and is now getting $1,000
a year with a large manufacturing company.
Young men who have the capacity to see beyond
their noses will attend the Phonographic School of
P. H. COGSWELL,
811 Chapel Street.
S3
A Training Class for Kintergart
ners. .
Will open in New Haven, Conn.,-6eptember 23. For
circulars address MISS ANGELINE BROOKS, 15
Home Place, New Haven, Conn.
3y 2 taw, taamam.
YALE BUSINESS COLLEGE.
- BANKING DEPARTMENT.
NIGHT SCHOOL.
Terms 1 for Three Months. .
Apply at
No. 37 Insurance Bntldliijr,
se15 It. C. LOVEB1BGE.
SAVE YOUR OOflEY.
No Need of New Clothing
This Fall.
Send yonr Coats, Pants and Vests
Cloaks, Shawls and Jerseys,
Dresses, Socques and Robes,
Ribbons, Trimmings and Gloves,
Feathers, Laces, Crapes, etc.,
and have them Cleaned or Rcdyed
iLinojtt canes they will 1ook
Bfcarly as well as new..
Lnce Curtains &. Window Shades
Done up equal to new.
Carpets Cleaned by Steam Scouring
LAUNDRYING
Of Every Description.
Ali of my work guaranteed.
OFFICES:
645 and 878 Chapel Street,
THOMAS EORSYTH,
Flows from the Maximum Mineral Fountain of Sara
toga Springs, apd is in the opinion of the most emi
nent medical men K attire's Sovereign Cure for Con
stipation. Dyspepsia, Torpid Liver, Inactive Condl
tioiiB of the Kidneys, and a most salutary alterative
in scrofulous affections. With ladies, gentlemen
and bon vivants everywhere it has become the
standard of dietary expedients, fortifying the diges
tive functions and enabling free livers to indulge
with impunity at the table. The world of wealth,
intelligence and refinement testifies to its sparkling,
naturally pure and delightful qualities as the bev
erage incomparable, and accredit it with being the
surest and pediest source of their clear Complex
ly i-.- y. i v, tt a mnAnT
1UIIB, III CUlll CAUircIOUb opinio.
SPRING WATER is sold only In glass bottles; four
dozen pints are packed in a case. It may be ob
tained at all hotels, and of druggists, wine mer
cnants ana grocers everywnere. myz
FLOUR.
Just a word on this subject. I keep the
best. And no other will make more bread
to the barrel.
I extend an invitation to those who are
dissatisfied to come and trade with me.
: Best of goods and a good assortment at the
very lowest rates. Orders palled for in any
part of the Jity, and goods delivered prompt-
ly HARRY LEIGH,
GROCER,
670 Chapel Street.
R. G. RUSSELL,
No. 852 Chapel Street. New Haven. Conn
HIGH WINDS BLOW OJV HIGH
, HILLS.
Where the expenses are high the prices must be
high.
A bootblack being asked what were regular rates
for a "shine," said it was 10 cents on Chapel street
and 5 cents on Grand street. There is food for re
flection in this little incident to the economically in
clined. There mav not be so much stvle. but von can eet
more real value for your money on Grand street
man eisewnere.
EgDeciallv will this be found to be so If vrvn .re In
need of Bedsteads, Bedding, Parlor Suits, Bedroom
Suits, Carpets. Oil Cloths, etc., etc.
P.J. Kelly Sc. Co.,Koi 831 and S33
Will furnish you out complete for housekeeping at
the lowest prices and on the most accommodating
terms. The reason they can do so is quite plain.
Their expenses are from 25 to 50 per cent, less than
other nouses and they sell more Furniture,Bed8,etc
than any single establishment from New York to
Ttnoton with but one exception, and that is not in
New Haven. Therefore ye that are sick and weary
of high prices come to Grand street and be made
nappy, uraoa Hnx, me uium. uusiuuputiuui siree
In flonnncticut. where representatives of nearlv nl
the nations of the earth five in peace and unison
under the broad jEgiB of liberty. Equality. Fra
ternity, uome one. come an.
Y. J. KELLY & CO.,
JSTos. 821 and 828
GRAND STREET.
ocl
CREAMERY BUTTERED
Martha Washington Brand.
Fifty Cases Just Received
The trade supplied at factory prices by
J. D. DEW ELL & CO.,
Wholesale Grocers, "
833 TO 239 STATE STREfiT.
jyU - ;
VI IUUOHl'U"lJ U
in iri Ms. ,i i"'wr-'--aw)Vftt iiii mm A
Isczllmxeous.
. Registrars' Notice. '..
THE Registrars of the several voting districts of
the Town of New Haven will be in session on
Wednesday, the Sid day of October,
1884, and on Friday, a S4tl day of Oc
tober, 1884, from 9 a. m. until 2 p.m., on each
of said days, for the purpose of revising and cor
recting the Registry Lists. Place of meeting as fop
lows, via: - -
1st Ward Piatt's Cigar Store, No. 74 Church
street. " ' ... , ,
GEoSJSLeB. jKegistrars.
3d Ward At 18 Park street.
JOHN J. BRENNAN,
JAKES BISHOP,
Registrars.
3d Ward Office of W. F. French, corner of Con
. gress avenue and George street.
GEORGE R. BILL. I Registrars.
JAMES McDERMOTT, f
4th Ward Barber Shop, No. 278 Water street.
Cth "Ward John Tuttie's Grocery Store, No. 131
Wooster street.
MicHAELMcGOVERN,
6tlt Ward At Ernest Klenke's, No. 48 St. Jolm
THOMAS F. CARROLL, t Reeistrare
JOHN BROMHAM, f ls'-
7tb. Ward Carriage Shop. No. 781 Grand street.
. WILLIAM O'KEEFE, I Tjjnatrora
ROBERT E. BALDWIN, f Kegistrars.
8 til Ward Grocery Store, No. 858 State street,
- corner of Clark street.
E, F. MERRILL, I Registrars.'
, . William gkary, f Kop
9th Ward Feed Store, No. 25 Broadway.
MICHAEL F. SNIGG, fS118-
1 OtU Ward Engine House, corner of Park and
Elm streets.
ROLLIN J. BUNCE, t Reiristrars
HENRYS. COOPER, ) negistrare.
1 1 til Ward At 91 Ferry street.
WTTSRTi'.T.T. T. ELLIS.
t Ttflenstrarp.
RICHARD SCHAPPA, 1
0
1 2 th Ward At S7 Clay street.
. LUZERNE F. BARNES, l Reeistrarg.
FRANCIS FOLEY. f Itegistrars.
1 3th Ward Office of the Diamond Match Co.
DAVID C. MONSON, l Rristrars.
lniOEWR O. BE ARDSLEY f !glstrar8'
14 th Ward Store of C. W. Hemingway, East
FREDERICK R. TUTTLE, I T?iHstr.1.
GEORGE A. LINDSLEY, f KeglStrara-
iVard Jonathan N. Howe s store at water
side. WILLIAM A WOODWARD, (. Rristrars.
JONATHAN N. HOWE, ) K"g
JIILE A. RID A,
Artit and Sign Painter,
787 CHAPEL STREET. .
Parties in the country ordering work by mail or
otherwise are given special discounts. Nothing but
first-class work done here. Telephone.
jy!2 6m ' .
THE PEOPLE LIKE IT
What more refreshing and satisfying than a cup of
COFFEE OR TEA
when the goods - come from
Dawson's Popular . Store,
Yale Bank Bulletins.
They sell at low prices
AT DAWSON'S,
And Give A Good Article.
COFFEES BOASTED DAILY. .
lyse
TRUNKS. TRUNKS, TRUNKS,
BAGS! BAGS! BAGS!
A complete stock of Tourists'
Articles. The only exclusive trunk
store in the city. Trunks, Rags
and Sample Cases made to order.
Repairing a specialty. Old trunks
taken in exchange. Good Goods
at Low prices at
CROPTJT & CO.'S,
210 Oliapel Street
BELOW THE BRIDGE.
SCOLLOPS.
New Salt Mackerel, Spanish Mackerel, Hard and
Soft Shell Crabs, Halibut, Eels, Mackerel, Round
and Long Clams, Lobsters, Oysters, etc., etc.. the
begthrthe market. " -r - ' -.
Reed's Market, 59 CJiurcli Street
' OPPOSITE THE POSTOFFICE.
se H. W. SMITH. Manager.
GENTLEMEN fi-k 1a i,'isiiok,
With Glove Call Top (in Congress, Button or Lace),
should ask their dealer for the
W. L,. DOUGLAS $3 SHOE,
which for excellence, ease and economy
equals any $5 shoe in the market. 3.970 pairs sold
last month. All goods warranted. Make no mis
take; see that his name and the price is stamped on
the bottom of each shoe. WINCH BROS.,
ocaeodlm Wholesale Agents, Boston, Mass.
WINDOW GLASS,
PAINTS, OILS
AND
VARNISH.
THOMPSON & BELDEN,
896 &rrx.3L 3QQ
ST-A-TIIS STHEE5T.
Large Invoice
-OF-
GOSSAEER CLOAKS
TO BE SOLD
For the Next Thirty Days,
EACH AT 95 CENTS.
AT THE N,
GOODYEAR RUBBER STORE,
73 Church Street,
CORNER CENTER, .
Opposite the Postoffice.
P. C. TUTTLE,
Proprietor.
AMREW GOODIAU,
NOS. 160, 162 CROWN ST.
Fine Assortment of Fancy and Staple
drocerle.
FLOUR !
FLOUR !
At reduced prices.
Old Government Java Coffee 25c per lb.
Fine Butter 25c per lb, 4 1-2 lbs $1.
Splendid Cream Cheese 15c per lb.
3 boxes sardines 25c.
8-lb cans broiled Mackerel 45c
Mb cans Brook Trout 45c
Large assortment of Canned Meats. I
Great variety of fruits received every day.
FINE WINES, CLARETS, SHERRIES AND BRAN
DIES.
Call and see us. Goods delivered to any part of the
ANDREW GOODMAN,
No. 160 and 162 Crown Street
GOODMAN'S BUILDING, FOUR DOORS FROM
CHURCH STREET, NEAR GRAND OP
" ERA HOUSE.
anlg ; Union Copy.
Claret and Sauterne Wines.
WE have received this day 100 cases of Esche
nauer Cos Wines, our own direct importa
tion from Bordeaux. Having handled these Wines
for the past twenty-two years we can confidently
recommend them for punty and general excellence
to all of our customers desiring reliable and
"straight" Wines. EDW. E. HiT.T. & SON,
ly21 770 Chapel Street..
GEORGE W. BUTTON, .
ARCHITECT.
Fruit, Forcipn and Domestic
axjijsaALtBi ana KH'AXU,
L07S Chapel Street.
3
ii r, . Winn
LEADERS IM
Fill IS
109 GHUE1CH STREET.
Money refunded whereGoods prove unsatisfactory.
LIEBIG COMPANY'S
AiraTJAL SAXE 8,000,000 JAES.
An inralnabla tomo hi an eases of weak digestion and
. I a anooosa and a boon for which Nations should feel
Soe Medical Press, Lancet. British Medical Journal,
To be had of all Storekeepers, Grocers, and Chamista.
Hpla Agents for the United States (wholesale onlj) CDavM & Co., able to offer the article with Baron Ideblg'a
vf m! wuuuuu atniwi whwj iwigiwiu. . tuuwM .s
Clairvoyant.
I
MRS. J. JT. CLARK, I
The srreat business test and healing: medium. 228
Crown street, continues to astonish hundreds in this
city by her Clairvoyant powers. Mrs Clark locates
diseases without asking questions, and indicates the
appropriate remedy. She compounds vegetable
medicines from roots, barks and herbs, which have
a surprising curative effect. Hours from 9 to 12 a.
m- and2 to 4 p. m. and evenings. , . , ... ocl8
Potatoes.
Potatoes.
Nice Early Rose Potatoes 65c bushel.
Daovers Yellow Onions 60c bushel.
Now is the time to nut in vour Winter's suthIy of
Potatoes and Onions. Don't wait until they are SI
a bushel.
Paisbury's Best Flour SG.50 a barrel; 90c a bag.
This Flour is too well known to need comment.
The Best Family Flour $o.50a barrel; 7oc a ti&g.
18 pounds C Sugar $1.
22 bars Iligrgins' Soup $1.
Still selling Old Government Java Coffee for S8c
a pound.
tTelephone.
S. S. ADAMS,
745 Grrnncl Street.
HOUSE AND SIGN PAINTING,
GRAINING AND PAPERING. -
Fine Selection of Wall Papers. .
l.lcgaiit and Attractive Cilt Pa
pers, Rorders to Match.
Contracts for Decorating.
I'AINTS, OILS, VARNISH, WINDOW GLASS
BRUSHES,
And all materials pertainii "ie business.
RANSOM r. .5,
192 State Street, Tortus Rloek.
se34tf
VAULTS ASI) CESSPOOL.S.
Re sure vour Vaults and Cess
pools are in good condition be
fore not tvcaiuer srcis nere. seau
yonr address to
A. JV. FARWHAM,
P. O. BOX 275 CITY, OR MAY BE LEFT AT R
B. BRADDEY & CO.'S, 408 State street, ROBT
VEITCH & SON'S. 974 Chapel street. ml5
New White Clover Honey
(IN THE COMB.)
ISew RncKwheat Flour, Maple
Syrup, jape uoo uranoernes.
It lock Island Codfish,
Smoked Halibut.
Just received.
3Z. S. COOPER,
378 State Street. oc!5
JOHNSTON'S
PREPARED KALSOMiNE
In wlAte and all other desirable
tints.
The Best and Cheapest in the
Market.
A Large Assortment of
WHITEWASH BRUSHES,
Varying in price from SOc up-
wards.
MASURT'S CELEBRATED
RAILROAD COLORS
AND
AVEBILL CHEMICAL PAINT
D. s. &LErar & sou",-
Nos. 370 and 273 State St.
mlO
REMOVAL.
' . ff " ' THE
CONEW YORK BRANCH
LOAN OFFICE
NOW PERMANENTLY LOCATED AT -
42 Church Street.
M 0 OT LOAITED.
Liberal advances made -on all kinds of personal
property.
Unredeemed Pledges
J For sale at low prices.
Square Dealing With All.
SlOLOMOIf FRY
Jyio
SihaIia
TTALt'S ROSAS, our Sew 5 CENT CTG AR, rape-
Ouaiteed all Havana filler, and warranted the
best agar for the money & SON,
ms mil
We are now showing the
finest line ol'Suitiiigs, Cork
screws, Overeoatiisgs and
Trowsering s ever shown in
Wew Haven. Perfect lit and
first-class work guaran
teed. Pants made to order
at 6 hours' notice.
L. H. FREEDMAN & SON,
92 CHURCH STREET.
EXTRACT
OF MEAT
FINEST AND CHEAPEST MEAT
FLAVOURING STOCK FOR SOUPS,
MADE DISHES & SAUCES.
CAUTION. Genuine ONLY wiia
fc-fcimila of Baron LiebiR'a signature la
Bine Ink across Label. The title " Baron.
Liebig" and his photograph having beep
ability. lately largely nsedby dealers having no
erateful." to. t.iw i nnbllo)
connection with Baron Liebig, the pnbUo
are hereby informed that the Liebig Com
pany are the only manufacturers who ars
etc.
. guarantee of geninneneas.
ITISASPECIFIC
IT IS RELIABLE
POB
In curing;
Brights IMs
ease. Pains in
Kidney it Liver
Troubles,
thBSack, Loins
or Sides, Beten-
'Bladder. Urinary
and Xiivex Diseases.
or TSTon-r
Dropsy,' Gravel and.
Botention of
;TJrine. '
Diabetes.
HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.
It oozes BilioustteBB. Seadache, Jaundice, Scrap
Stomach IyBpep, Conatipatloii and Plea.'
"it 'works promptly" .
BHdeuzea Intempeoranoo, Worvtraa Disease,
General Ztehility-, Excesses and. "
- female Weakness.
USE IT AT ONCE.
It restores the XXDNX7B, LI V Kit and BOW
ELS, to a healthy action and CUBJBS when all
ether medicines fail. Hundreds have been saved
who have been given up to die by friends and
physician..
Prise 91.25. Send ttor JUnstrated Pamphlet to
HUNT'S REMEDY CO., ProvideDce, K. I.
5 SOIiO BY DRUGGISTS.
A happ7 (ftirprise it was to Mr. A. E.
Norton, of Bristol, Conn., wnen Atbxophobos
put Mm on his feet, and sent him cheerfully
about his business. Let Urn tell his own story :
"About three weeks ago I was taken
wita a severe crick in the back. For four days
X was unable to turn in bed without help, and
when lifted npoonld not stand on my feet I was
induced to try At&xophobos, after all the usual
remedies failed. In 30 minntes after taking the
first doss I could bear my weight upon my feet.
In two days I was able to get about and attend
to business. In two other cases which have
come to my knowledge its use has been attended
with the same results."
A poor man is Philadelphia had to bor
row a dollar to hoy a bottle oC Atbxofhokos.
On account ot his poverty his name shall remain
a secret. He had suffered terribly from Rheu
matism. He gratefully writes:
I took my first dose Tuesday afternoon,
and on Wednesday, after but seven doses, I had
not a sharp or severe ache left. Then I reduced
the dose one-half and took the remainder off the
bottle. I was able to be steady at work tUl Sat-
urday.when? took a severe cold and was un
able to use my left hand. I purchased another
bottle and by bed-thne I found relief. The
medicine is all you claim for it"
Investigate Atetlophohos all you pleaset
Find all the fault yon choose with it ! and
yet the fact remains, that it is doing what
no other medicine ever could do for Rheu
matism and Neuralgia.
If you cannot get Athiofhoros of your drug
gist, we will send It express paid, on receipt of
reg-ular price one dollar per bottle. We prefer
that you buy It from your druggist, but tt he.
haant It, do not be persuaded to try something
else, but order at once from us aa directed.
ATHLOPHOROS CO., 112 WALL ST., NEW YORK.
ri.ri...,!t ff, B, npiiiiii..i...m
" A well-known bank president " has
written for a Chicago weekly an article
entitled" w nere nw uteiaoaey uoner
If he is a married man, with large family
of active children, we advise him to look
over the bills for shoos Evening CaUfPMla
A. narent in Philadelphia mtn-
stvers the above thus: "I found
that a GOOD Shoe was cJieapest
and that the SOLAR TIP was
Beet, and have SAVED FIFTY
I'EIi CENT, on Children's
shoe bills by buying them only."
CAtTTiOTT Be not deceived as there
are hundreds of ' imitations of the
SOXjAS TIP, such aa "Bole Leather
Tip," etc Every genuine pair has trade
mark on sole on which is maker's name
" JOHN MTJNDELI, &.CO."
W. B. TREWHELLA,
Manufacturer of. Mattresses.
Hair. Cotton, Husk, Excelsior; also Feather Beds.
Pillows, Bolsters, etc. Renovating Mattresses a
specialty, win can ana deliver at residence in city
Prices the Lowest.
81 EAST WATER STREET,
aplTdftm ' New Haven, Conn-
Irs. E. Jones Young,
23 ChapeI,eor.State,Street B'd'g
- Ail wotk warrantea. .
Office hours from 9 a. m. to
5 p.m.
19
She anictml mx& (Soxuciev.
The Oldest Dally Paper Published
in Connectlcnt.
THE OARRINGTON PUBLISHING CO.
SINGLE COPIES TWO CENTS. .
Delivered bt Carriers is thk Crrr, 12
cents a "Week, 43 cbrts a Month, $5.00 a
Year. Thk Samb Terms Bt Mail.
Rates of Advertising.
SITUATIONS WANTED, one insertion 50c; each
subsequent Insertion 2Sov . . .
WANTS, RENTS, and other small advertisements
occupying not more than six lines, one insertion
75c: each subsequent I nsertlon 35c.
One square (one Inch) one insertion, $1.80: each
subsequent Insertion, 40 .cents; one week, $3.20; one
month, $10.00. . . '
Yearly advertisements at the following raes:
One square, one year, $40; two squares, one year,
$70; three squares one year, $100.
Obituary notices, in prose or verse, 15 cents per
be. Notices of Births, Marriages and Deaths, 50
ceutaeach. Local Notices 90 per line.
Advertisements on second page one price and a
half. - -
Yearly advertisers are limited to their own Imme
diate business, and their contracts do not include
Wants, To Let, For Sale, etc. . .
Special ratesfurnished on application for contracts
covering a considerable length of time, or a large
space. .. -V S. - v -
THE WEEKLY JOURNAL
is published
Every Thursday Mounino.
Single Copies 5 cents - - - $3.00 a year
Strictly In advance, - - . ' -. 1.50 a year
All letters and Inquiries in regard to subscriptions
or matters of business should be addressed
MB JOURNAL AND COIRIRR,
New Haven) Conn. .
Notice.
We cannot accept anonymous or return rejected
communications. In all cases the name of the
writer will be required, not for publication, but as a
guarantee of good faith.
Thursday, October 23, 1884.
REPUBLICAN NOMINATIONS.
FOB PRESIDENT,
J AITIES a. BLAINE, or Maine.
FOR VICE PRESIDENT,
JOHN A.. LOGAN, ofllllnolH.
State Electoral Ticket.
ELECTORS-AT-LAROE,
Theodore D. Woolsey, of New Haven.
Charles A, Williams, of New London.
DISTRICT ELECTORS,
1st District I. Ltjther Spencer, of Suffield..
2d District Joseph E. Siluman, of Chester.
3d District James S. Atwood, of Plainfield.
4thDistrict Frederick Miles, of Salisbury.
For State Officers.
FOB GOVERNOR,
HENRY B. HARRISON, of New Haven.
FOR LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR,
LORRIN A. COOKE, of Barkhamsted.
FOR SECRETARY. OF STATE,
CHARLES A. BTJSSELL, of Killingly.
FOR TREASURER, "
V. B. CHAMBERLAIN, of New Britain.
FOR COMPTROLLER, :
LUZERNE I. MUNSON, of Waterbury.
THE ST. JOHN FOLLT.
The St. John folly is getting a good many
hard knocks nowadays. Many prominent
and sensible prohibitionists see very plainly
thnt the cause which they have so much at
heart is not likely to gain anything by it, and
may lose a great deal. Therefore they are
doing what they can to restrain prohibition
ists from, helping their worst enemies the
Democrats into power.
One of the latest to come ont against the
St. John movement is the Rev. J. E. C. Saw
yer, of the Troy Methodist conference, and a
prominent and consistent advocate of tem
perance reform, Tt - having Iieen reported
that he had been offered a considerable sum
of money by an agent of the Democratic
State committee to help the St. John move
ment, the reverend gentleman takes occasion
to say that the report is not correct; but he
adds, "that the Democratic managers are
encouraging the St. John movement, for the
sake of the damage they hope it may do the
Republican party, we all know," and "that
they, would give money for the purpose I
cannot doubt." He considers the third part;.
in this campaign simply a tender to the
Democratic party.' "Every vote' for that
party is virtually a vote for Grover Cleve
land, who not only stands on an anti-prohibition
platform, but also chose to make his
commendation of that feature of the plat
form of the Democratic party the only sig
nificant part of his letter of acceptance.
From the opening of the campaign I have
been compelled by my convictions as a radi
cal and lifelong temperance man- to frankly
oppose the third party movement as injudi"
cious, reckless, inconsistent and calculated
to do much harm to the temperance cause."
These are plain words and well worth heed'
ing by the really sincere friends of prohibi
tion. It is astonishing that the St. John
movement should have received such sup
port as it has. Those who vote the prohibi
tion ticket this year will simply be' serving
as assistant Democrats. "
EDITORIAL NOTES.
A pretty line legal point has been decided
in Charlesfon, South Carolina. A colored
man was before the police court for keeping
an unlicensed dog and put in a plea that the
dog was not a dog, but a puppy. The judge
discharged him, basing his decision on his
knowledge as a dog fancier that a puppy is a
puppy and does not become a dog till it is a
year old.
They have some remarkable thieves in
Philadelphia. One of them not long ago
stole the zinc roof off the almshouse. Now
it has just leaked out that four brass cannon,
relics of the rebellion, weighing over 900
pounds apiece, were stolen over a year ago
from the cellar of the Second Regiment ar
mory in Philadelphia. They were so heavy
that a derrick must have been used to lift
them from the cellar. By and by somebody
will be stealing the city hall .if the police are
not more careful.
The cultivation of flax is becoming an im
portant feature of agriculture in the North
west. It is only within recent years that the
mills for the manufacture of linseed oil in
this country could secure the necessary raw
material except by importation, bnt last
year's yield in the United States aggregated
about 7,000,000 bushels, and the total this
year promises to reach from 8,000,000 to
9,000,000 bushels, fully one-half of which is
raised in Minnesota and Dakota. The plant
produces on-the average as many bushels to
the acre as wheat, and as the price ranges
from $1 to $1.15 per bushel the crop is a de
cidedly profitable one. As an element in
that diversification of our agriculture which
is so desirable, the growing attention that is
paid to flax culture is a healthy sign.
The Civil Service commissioners of Massa
chusetts have made considerable progress in
their work during the past month. In the
latter part of August a circular was issued to
the heads of the several State departments
and the mayors of cities asking for certain
information in regard to the offices and em
ployments to which the provisions of the
Civil Service act apply.. Most of the officers
to whom the circular was addressed have-fur.
nished the desired information; a partial
classification of the service has been made
and the rules are now being drafted. The
commissioners will probably be able to sub
mit their work for the approval of the gov
ernor and council by the middle of Novem
ber. After the rules are approved they must
be advertised at least two months before they
go into operation; so that there are not like
ly to be any examinations for some time to
come. "
Dr. Emil Holub, whose large collections in
the natural history and ethnography ot Af-
rica have enriched the museums of Austria,
, is now carrying ont a very large scheme of
exploration. He left Cape Colony recently;
intending to cross the country from south to
north." He expects to be gone three years.
He hopes to cross the neater parting between
the Congo and Zambesi rivers, a region of
which little is known, to trace the sources of
theJCOngo river in the country that Living
stone alone has" visited, to solve the problem
of the destination of the river Welle, in
which, however, Ih Junker may anticipate
hinvand to pnsh north either through Dar-
fur or Wadai. In 1872 Dr. Holub vainly ap
plied to several scientific bodies to send him i
to Africa. He finally started on his own ac
count, reached Port Elizabeth with $15 in
his pocket, practised medicine in the dia- ,
mond fields, and spent his earnings and two
years and a half" of time in explorations
which were so remarkably fruitful that the
Vienna Geographical society and other bodies
raised, last winter, $25,000 to enable him to
carry out his present enterprise.
The suicide tables prepared by the insur
ance boards are quite complete for the cur
rent year.During the six months ending with
t806 snicides occurred in the ITnited.
StatesTheusual annual -averace is about.
1,700, or about 32 per million of population.
The youngest suicide was thirteen years of
age and the eldest eighty-nine. Distributed
by principal causes, 72 were traced to insani
ty, 54 to family troubles, 44 to sickness, 33
to business troubles, 20 to love troubles and
28 to dissipation. Distributed by conditions,
129 were husbands, 33 wives, 67 bachelors,
33 maids, 21 widowers, 9 widows and 7 di
vorced persons: Distributed by means
employed, 110 shot themselves, 76 swallowed
poison, 61 hanged themselves, 38 cut their
throats, 34 chose drowning and the remain
der preferred other methods. Of the whole
number, 284 were males and 99 females
about the usual ratio of three males to one
female. Distributed by States, snicides were
most numerous in Illinois, in New York next,
in Indiana next and Ohio and Pennsylvania
tie for fourth place with 28 each. Daylight
was chosen by 269 and the night by 114.
The Independents do not think as highly
of Mr. Theodore Roosevelt as they did when
tney were expecting him to join them. At a
Republican meeting in Maiden, Massachu
setts, the other evening, Mr. Roosevelt told
wEy he was not an Independent. Mr.
Blaine, he said, was not his choice. He
tried to prevent his nomination. But Mr.
Blaine was the choice of the bone and sinew
of the Republican party, Abraham Lincoln's
"plain people;" he was fairly and honorably
nominated; "I, for one," said Roosevelt, "am
quite content to abide by the decision of the
plain people." . Later iu his speech the New
York reformer told the Massachusetts folks
what he knew about Mr. Grover Cleveland.
His own public career had been short, he
l-eaid, but Mr. Grover Cleveland's had been
still shorter and circumstances had thrown
them a good deal together. Mr. Grover
Cleveland was not a demagogue, but he was
a Democratic politician. He had signed
some of the reform bills laid before him
"those that did not bear too harshly on the
Democratic organizations." He had not
signed the bill that would have ousted Mr.
Hubert O. Thompson. "There has been
nothing whatever in his past career," said
Mr. Roosevelt, "to warrant its in saying that
he will be able to resist the pressure of his
party that he will have the power to resist
the almost incalculable pressure that will be
brought to bear upon him if he is elected."
RECENT PUBLICATIONS.
Lippineott's Magazine for November op
ens with a well illustrated article, by Ed
mund Kirke, giving the narrative of a
journey up the French Broad when the roads
had been rendered impassable by a flood,
"A Holiday in Scotland," by Norman Pear
son, an English barrister, is a breezy account
of shooting and fishing in the highlands and
the borderland during the "long vacation."
The author of "Study and Stimulants" dis
cusses the position of John Bright in relation
to the temperance movement. Catharine
Hopley, author of "Snakes," has a pleasant
article on "Domestic Pets." Eugene Didier
gives a gossipy account of "American Auth
ors and Artists in Rome," and Theodore
Child describes the great bazaars of Paris,
under the title of "The . Women's Paradise."
The serials by Miss Tincker and the
"Duchess," some interesting short stories,
poems, and short papers and sketches, make
np a number of varied interest and attrac
tiveness. Among the articles of special interest in
the November number of the Popular Science
Monthly is a paper by S. W. Powell, entitled
Drowning the Torrent in Vegetation."
Apropos of the disastrous floods of 1883-84 in
the Ohio river, the writer urges the impor
tance of forest preservation on the steep hill
sides in the areas drained by streams. He
shows what the experience of other countries
teaches with regard to the treatment of for
ests, giving in particular an account of the
ravages of floods in the south of France,
their origin and the success of efforts to tame
those torrents . ty reforesting the Dasins
which they drain. Other articles are "Chil
ian Volcanoes, Active and Extinct," by Dr.
Karl Ochsenius, translated from Die Natur;
"The Future of the Negro in the South," by
J. B. Craighead; "German Testimony on the
Classics Question," by F. A. Fernald; and
Dr. William A. Hammond's paper on "The
Relations Between the Mind and the JNervous
System."
Edward Everett Hale in the November
number of the North American Review makes
a plea for "Half-Time in Schools" which
ought to receive serious consideration. Prof.
Gilliam discusses "The African Problem."
The facts that he gives as to the increase of
the negroes in the United States, their pecul
iar situation and disposition, and the problem
they will force upon us in the near future
call for the gravest consideration. The other
articles in this number are: "Woman as a
Political Factor," by Judge Robert C. Pit
man; "Progress in Naval Armament," by
Hobart Pasha, who thinks the United States
trovernment has been wise in not construct-
ine a costly navy; "Friendship in Ancient'
Poetry," by Principal J. C. Shairp;","Herbert
Spencer's Latest Critic," by Prof. E. L. You
mans; "Over-Illustration," by Charles T.
Congdon; and "Restrictions of the Suffrage,"
by William u. Scruggs.
Harper's for November opens with a very
full illustrated account of Columbia college.
Joseph Hatton describes a day at Kew Gar
den; and the illustrated article on the great
hall of William Rufus is continued. An
drew Lang writes of Sydney Smith. Nor
man Fisher-Folk are described by Mary Gay
Humphreys. Francis Parkman, the histo
rian, whose papers are more enjoyed than
those of any other writer of history of these
days, tells the story of the Acadian Tragedy.
Mr. Re's papers on Nature run on and Mr.
Black's Judith Shakespeare ends. The edito
rial tables are readable and there is abund
ance of other entertaining matter.
The first number of the new volume of St.
Nicholas is full of good things. ; It opens
with a handsome frontispiece in colors from
a painting .by A. M. Furner. J. T. Trow
bridge contributes the opening chapters of
"His One Fault," in which the hero, through
"his one fault" of heedlessness sets in motion
the train of consequences which will follow
him and interest the reader through the en
tire volume; and in another serial, "Among
the Lawmakers," the author, Edmund Alton,
relates his often amusing experiences while a
page in the United States Senate, tells many
new anecdotes of publio men, and gives a
graphic and easily understood account of the
organization of the national govern
ment. - Frank - R. Stockton, in the
first of his "Personally Conducted"
papers, takes his party of four hundred thou
sand girls and boys to some of the monu
ments of Roman greatness found in other
countries. To boys who are "Ready for Bus
iness," George J. Manson proposes to give,
nnder this title, the results of his interview.
with representative men in various branches
of trade; the first paper treats of "A Retail
Drug Store." Other attractions peculiar to
this number are a capital girl story by Loui
sa M. Alcott, the first half of a boy story by
H. H. Boyesen and much more that is thor
oughly enjoyable. :
The November Century marks the begin
ning of the fifteenth year of the magazine
(the fourth under the present name) and also
the beginning of the most extensive enter
prise yet undertaken by its conductors,
the recently announced series of papers on
"The Civil War," by Generals Grant, Mc-
Clellan, Rosecrans and others in high rank.
The first paper, on "The Battle of Bull Run,"
is contributed by General Beauregard, who
dd to his decaription of the cagagemeinV a
postscript on the . subsequent conduct
of the war on' the Confederate side,
and his own relations with Jefferson
Davis. The illustrations, some twenty-five in
number, are largely from photographs made
during the war, or from recent sketches of
the battle held, and are by Fenn, Taber,
Thulstrup, Redwood and others. The first
part of the "Recollections of a Private" be
gins with the enlistment-of the soldier, and
continues the description of his life down to
and including Bull Run, thns supplementing
Uen. Beauregard's account of that battle.
That the variety of the magazine is not like
ly to be sacrificed to the War Series is evi
dent from the other contents of the issue.
The : "frontispiece is one of Mr. Elihu
Vedder's illustrations of the Rubaivat of Omar
Khawam, the Persian poet, five others of
which are reproduced, with text by Mr.
Horace E. Scudder; "The Chinese Theater,"
by Henry Burden McDowell, is an entertain
ing paper, with striking drawings by T.
Wores and Kenyon Cox, the latter of whom
writes and illustrates a paper on "The
Sculptors of the Renaissance;" Austin Dob
son contributes a poem, "The Old Sedan
Chair," which has illustrations by Reginald
Birch. Mr. Joel Chandler Harris (of ''Uncle
Renins" fame) is the author of a new story of
ante-bellum days in the South, entitled' Free
Joe and the Rest of the World," which
Mr. A. B. Frost has illustrated to Mr. Harris'
entire satisfaction. Mrs. Mary Hallock
Foote has drawn a full-page picture to ac
company a story of Colorado, by Mr. T. A.
Janvier, entitled "The Lost Mine." The fic
tion comprises also "A Tale of Negative
Gravity," by FrankTl. Stockton, and the be
ginning of a new novel by Mr. W. D. How-
ells, dealing with the life of an American
business man, and called "The Rise of Silas
Lapham." There are other articles too nu
merous to mention, and all good.
ISEFIIL,
If the type-writer could spell it would be a
highly useful machine. Its orthography is
abominable. Courier-Journal.
In four mountains of Lower California
there are 100.000.000 tons of alum. A vast
deal of alum-money is paid out in that sec
tion. Boston Post. .
It is a pretty healthy man who can read a
patent medicine .almanac without suaaemy
discovering that he is afflicted with about
one hundred and fifty of the two hundred
diseases described therein. Norristown Her
ald. An exchange says: "A pear or apple at 6
in the morning will make the sky iook
brighter and fill the world with sunshine."
But we suspect that this is only a trick to
fool people into getting up early. Philadel
phia Call.
"Doctor, do vou think my leg is any bet
ter off " asked the man who had tried to
keep two freight cars from coming together.
"Yes," replied the physician, "a good deal
better off." , And he proceeded to get out
his saw. Boston Post.
Somebody comes forward with the damag
ing assertion that candidate Belva Lockwood
threw a stone at a neighbor's hen once and
killed it. If this is true Belva is no common
woman. She ought to be elected by an over
whelming majority. Burlington Hawkeye.
We do not now remember where we heard
it, but it is so good we repeat it without au
thority. It was in an Illinois court. "Have
you," asked the judge of a recently convicted
man. "anything to offer the court before sen
tence is passed!" "No, your honor," replied
the prisoner. "My lawyer took my last cent."
Bloommgton hye.
Subscriber "So the cable is broken
again?" Newspaper proprietor "Yes; un
fortunate, isn't it!" Subscriber "But y.'ra
have your cable news as usual, I notice." N.
P. "Yes; mighty lucky, wasn't it? Our dis
patches had just passed the place where the
cable broke, right in mid-ocean. A second
later and they would have been cut off."
Boston Transcript.
A prosy minister in a country church, when
he had reached his "twelfthly," became
thirsty, and not finding any water on the
shelf under the pulpit, called on a deacon
"Brother Brown, there's no water here."
"Do yon want some?" inquired the deacon.
"Yes, I'm 'mighty" dry." A glass was
brought and the preacher proceeded to
gulp it down. "Mr. Goodlove," whispered
the deacon, waiting for the glass. "Well,
what is it?" asked the preacher, stopping his
libation. "Uon't you think you'd better of
fer a little to your sermon?" The discourse
was knocked out in the next round.. Mer
chant Traveller.
BELVA AND HER TRICYCLE.
Serene between the wheels I sit,
I tuck my drapery in a bit,
I pump the treadles up and down,
And circle my wa ythrough Washington.
There never has been a President
Who 'round the town on a tricycle went.
And there'll never be one, the Fates have said,
Who puts his clothes on over his head.
Burlington Hawkeye.
COMMUNICATION S.
A Cruel Driver.
To the Editor of the Journal and Courier:
This morning I witnessed a piece of what,
seemed great and unnecessary cruelty to a
balky horse which was attached to a grocer's
or butcher's wagon and was driven by a
young, red-faced fellow, who refused to give
the owner's name to those who asked for it.
He tied pieces of twine to the horse's legs
and then tightened the cords with a stick,
which undoubtedly gave the poor creature
great pain, and he also filled its ears and
mouth with gravel. There was no name or
number on the team. Who are the proper
officers to complain to and where are they to
be found? Some who saw the affair thought
the team camfrom the City market. It was
going up Chapel above Howe street. Will
you not publish this in your paper? Perhaps
it will assist in causing the man's punish
ment. A Lady Who Witnessed the Affair.
A Story of English Ignorance.
From the London Spectator.
' To Americans who all resent the stigma
of miscegenation, and know its incompati
bility wtth the pride Creoles take in their
race, this is rather startling. English mis
takes concerning class distinctions in Ameri
ca are often egregious. Just such a mistake
caused to be enacted a little bit of comedy in
an English castle some years ago, wherein
three well-born American maidens and the
daughters of their English host were the
chief actors. The American girls were
cousins. One was Ellen Lewis Herndon, the
late wife of President Arthur; another, Ellen.
Mercer Herndon (by their middle names they
were always distinguished), now . Mrs. Seth
French of New York, and the third was
Nannie Maury, daughter of Capt. Matthew
Maury, the scientist. The two accompanied
Capt. Maury as far as England, where they
were to remain while he went on to attend a
reunion of savants in Berlin, the young ladies,
all school-girls ,in their younger teens, being
permitted to accept an invitation to visit
the home of a titled Englishman, who had
often been entertained when at Washington
by Capt. Maury. One day, after luncheon,
the girls English and American, being all
left to their own desires, began conversation
about life in America. Just then Miss Maury,
who was a dark brunette with crisp black
locks, closely curled about the face, left the
room, and one of the English girls took oc
casion to ask her cousins with all the inno
cence of ignorance a very startling question:
"Is your cousin's mother a negress?" If one
of the turrets of the English castle had fallen
at their feet the two American girls could
not have been more astonished and discon
certed. With the southern blood tingling in
their vans and surging in their cheeks, they
asked with freezing dignity. "What do you
mean?" The English girl with all her sang
froid quietly replied: "From Miss Maury's
dark complexion and eyes and black curly
hair, we supposed she was a Creole, knowing
that you are from the Southern States, and
aa we know her father is not a negro, we
thought her mother must be." "Her mother
is sister to our father," cried the Herndon
cousins at once, "and you insult us all." and
the indignant girls hurried away to their
andbe?an Tracking their trunks to
leave, f ef using to listen to the apologies or
regrets of the English maidens, who hastened
with the story of their faux pas to the lord
of the manor. His promot explanation had
the effect of soothing his guests' ire and har
mony was restored. The naivete of the
question only goes to show, what I before re
marked upon, the. absence of a prejudice
against the negro in Europe which is every
where seen in this country.
EVENING SHADES
OF - "
SATINS, SILKS
-AND
VELVETS
FOR
Balls. Parties and lleceptioiis.
We are showing a larger line than evf r before in
nur ui uie
Most Effectirt Sliaile and Com
binations.
Black Silks !
At prices that -wilL astonish yon, they are so low.
COLORED SILKS and VELVETS,
ZD ross G-o ods !
Inspect our goodgand yon will be
convinced that we carry tlic
best stock In the city.
WILCOX & CO.,
767 -A-HNTID 771
CHAPEL STREET.
oc!5
Given Up To Die.
Buffalo. N. Y.,'Oct. 2, 1883.
I had for 2 years been troubled with terrible sick
headaches and a horrible cough. My skin turned to
a yellowish hue. I suffered the most excruciating
pain of the bowels; small, dry, irritating humors
broke out over my face; my stomach would not re
tain the simplest food ; vomited great quantities of
offensive, greenish mucus.
The Doctor Said I Could Not Live.
JIn April I commenced taking Burdock Blood Bit
ters, and in July was cured by this medicine alone.
The stomach and bowels seemed the first acted up-
on, after which I rapidly improved. My appetite
returned, the terrible sick headache left me, the
hacking cough gradually abated, and from the first
bottle I could sleep well at night.
I do not think there is a case of sick headache
Burdock's Blood Bitters will not cure, (they cured
my sister, Mrs. Thos. J. Halej', of this city). Those
who saw me six months ago consider my recovery
a miracle. I was no less astonished, and shall le
pleased to reply to all letters of inquiry concerning
my case.
Mrs. Adelaide O'Brien,
bc-iO lwk 372 Exchange St.. Buffalo, N. Y.
TREES AND TURFING.
THE undersigned having had forty years' experi
ence in grading and turfing are prepared to do
jobs at short uotice and
At Reasonable Priced.
Full line of Shade and Ornamental Trees at our
Nursery. Call or address.
LEVI DOR MAP? & SON, 710 Dixwell Ave
OC7 18t
E. L. WASH
OPTICIAN
And Healer in
DRAWING INSTRUMENTS
AND MATERIAL OF ALL KINDS.
The best line or
. Opera imi! I'lelil (lliisses
IN THE CITY.
With special facilities for the
manufacture of Spectacles and
Eye Glasses to order, and repair ;
ing in all its brandies, we are
able to guarantee satisfaction,
both in quality and price,
Q4L OS:i7Xt.OS
AND
61 OmiNrTIIIXTL ST.,
se20
VIGO!, for VEAI1 1.1EI J
Sufferers from l'rmatare Deray, Nervoa
nubility or any of Che results ot InliMrftioii
or ExceiiM, will find in the Iff anion Bolus a
radical cure without Stomach IHedlcaUoii.
Effective and cheap. Sealed treatise free,
KARBTOH REMEDY CO. 46 W. 14th St. New York.
266th EDITION. PRICE ONLY $ I.
BY ItlAIIi POST PAID.
Mm THYSElFiZLl7
A Great Medical Work on.
Manhood,
Exhausted Vitality, Nervous and Physical Debili
ty, Premature Decline In Man, Errors of Youth ann
the untold miseries resultina; from indiscretion or
excesses. A book for every man, young, middle
aged and old. It contains 125 prescriptions for all
acute and chronic diseases, each one of which is
Invaluable. 80 found by the author, whose exper
ience for 23 years in such as probably never before
fell to the lot of any physician. 30Q pages, bound in
beautiful French muslin, embossed covers, full gilt,
guaranteed to be a finer work in every sense me
chanical, literary and professional than any other
work sold in this country for $2.50, or the money
will be refunded in every instance. Price only 81 by
mail, post paid. Illustrative sample 6 cents, bend
now. Gold medal awarded.the author by the Na
tional Medical Association, to the officers of which
The Science of Life should be read by the young
for instruction, and by the afflicted for relief. It win
benefit all. nondon Lancet. .
There is no member of society to whom Tbe sci
ence of Life will not be useful, whether youth, par--ent,
guardian, instructor or clergyman. Argonaut.
Address the Peabody Medical Institute, or Dr. W.
tt xav a R,uflnh Boston. Mass.. who mav
be' consulted on all diseases requiring skill and ex-,
perience. Chronic and obstinate diseases that have
fj,m,l the'skill of all other phy si LI L A T ciansa
specialty. Such treated successJ-a-A-JJl I Ifuiiy
without an Instance of failurSil l . W
maSeodawly
THOMAS. PHILLIPS & SON,
DESIGNERS AND SCULPTORS
GRANITE,'MARBLE&STONE
OFFICE AND STEAM WORKS,
143 HIGH STREET, '
Near the Grove Street Cemetery.
BRANCH Opposite the entrance of the Evergreen
Cemetery, New Haven, Conn.
The largest and most varied assortment of Monu
ments. Tablets, Headstones, etc., to be found in the
State will be kept finished at both establishments.
Agents for the Westerly, Quinoy, Red Beach and
Scotch Granite Quarries. ooltf
PLUSH , FRAMES.
A fine assortment at low prices
AT
NORTHROP'S,
697 CHAPEL STREET.
o21 Just below the Bridge.
Antique, Modern and Inlaid Fur
niture Repaired.
fRENCH polishing done. Second-hand furnt
JJ ture bought and sold. 304 ELM STREET
near Broadway, New Haven, Conn. Be28 ly
THE "ANDREWS,"
KEELER & CO., Eastern Agents.
. ' SEND FORICTRCTJLAU.
SS TO 91 WASHINGTON STREET, CORNER ELM
2mws0mnr . BOSTON, .
m3

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