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Morning journal and courier. [volume] (New Haven [Conn.]) 1848-1894, November 17, 1884, Image 1

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THE IiARCrEST DULY NEWSPAPER IX THE CITY.
OFFICE, 400:STATE STREET.
TDE CARBISGTODr PUBLISH IXC. CO.
NEW HAVEN, CONN. MONDAY MOltSnNGK NOVEMBER 1 7 1884.
NO. 300
VOL. MI.
I UUP
No . firm can
have all the Bargains.
We are all "pegging
away at it" all the
time and now one
man gets the lead on
one thing, and then
another has the best of
it on something else.
When any dealer says
he sells everything
cheaper than all the
rest, it may safely be
set down as mere talk.
Now, if there is one
thing more than anoth
er we want to ayoid, it
is having teotle regard
our advertisements as
"mere talk!' Many of
our advertisements at e
only announcements of
the arrival or new,
goods, or reminders ot
regular lines in which
we usually excel, and
which we wish to
keep under public
notice. But when we
say that anything we
offer is a "special bar
gain" or is lower than
it can be got for else
where, we are very
careful to' be well in
formed thdt it is so.
Anyone who has com
pared our promises
with our performances
lately in the matter of
jflannels, jfine Twill
Dress Goods,. Venetian
Cloths, Cloaks, etc., will
admit that we do not
tool the public. This
week we desire to di
rect attention to a large
line of
Linen HandkeRchieFS
just opened. They are
a very choice collection
ot the newest and pret
tiest styles and we are
quite justified, we be
lieve, in saying that the
prices are on the whole
lower than any similar
goods are offered qt in
New Haven to-day.
In children's
Knitted Mittens
we have something good
di d price not to be
found on the same qual
ity elsewhere. In
Silk Draperies and
Curtains
we have a few very de-
- -
cided bargains. The
ladies1
Ribbed Wool Hose
in -black and colors that
we offer this week at
45. are better goods
than hitherto sold at
that price.
IMPORTANT EVENT
IN THE
CMMi TMe !
GREAT BREAK IN PRICES !
The Boldest Step We Ever Took !
Aggrav ated by the Distress In all
Business Interests.
Determined Efforts for
Business in
OAK HALL.
FORCED SALE
Of the Great Clothing Lead
ers' Stock of Men's and
Boys' Ready-made
Clothing.
Wrecking Prices as they were
Never Wrecked Before.
Profits Abandoned and Cost Not
Considered.
The Country is Overstocked I
Manufacturers, warehouses and retail
stores are overflowing with goods. The low
price for labor and the unemployed thou
sands have retarded the natural consump'-
tion of all commodities. The hopes and de
sires of clothing dealers throughout America
have been checked and crushed by wholesale
overproduction and retail competition.
' ' "T'i a trn a utkI nilir 'tin fmfl "
- L J
THERE ARE BREAKERS AHEAD!
And thousands of business men will be
swamped in the mercantile flood. Live and
substantial concerns must meet and stand
disaster. We have gone through fire, water,
strikes, panics, removals, political turmoils
ana omer uasixuns iiupKuiuiuuia, tuiu iu
everv instance we have stemmed the tide and
pulled ourselves triumphantly into the open
sea of success.
The present Master Stroke will be no ex
ception to the rule.
To effectually carry out our plans for the
battle, we shall suspend business from
Thursday evening, November 13, 1884,
To Mark Down and Arrange
Stock for this Brilliant Sale
and Slaughter.
Satrtay lining, Not. 15,
We open fire, and blaze away until we have
closed out sufficient Btock to make up for the
loss of trade during the past three months of
unparalleled stagnation.
The spirit of determination at this time is
so strong that it must result in the execution
of a colossal boom never before attempted in
JNew Haven.
Every Department Represented.
HERE GOES FOR A STARTER!
108 Mem's and Youths' Chinchilla Over
coats, cut single and double breasted, forced '
down from $7.50, $8 and $8.50 to $4.00.
73 Men's Winter Suits, three-quarters
wool, made to sell for $9. Our forced price
is Five Dollars.
235 Men's and Youths' all-wool Pantaloons,
nine styles to choose from; former prices
$3.50, $3 and $3.50. Forced price $1.90.
Vests to match, reduced to fcl.ws.
KEEP ON READING.
160 Men's and Young Men's Overcoats,
blue and brown beaver, black brown and ox
ford mixed Whipcords, and grey magonal,
all splendidly made and trimmed. Have
been considered cheap at $14, $15 and $16.
The forced price is Ten Dollars.
318 Men's and Youths' Sack and Frock
Suits, made from fine all-wool Cassimeres;
regular prices have been $14, $15, $16, $17.
The Forced Price is Ten Dollars.
DON'T STOP ! -
The End is Not Yet !
143 All Wool Business Suits,
made from some of the best grades of Chevi
ots and Cassimeres. Same goods have been
sold by our neighbors for $15, and consid
ered a great bargain ot this price. We shall
sell for SETEN DOLLARS. Remem
ber $7 for a suit of clothes worth $18.
Aider Generous Offer !
200 Men's and Youths'
Washington Mills Cork
screw Suits,
Elegant Iv made and trimmed, cut in Sacks,
Frocks and Four Button Cutaways, all the
prevailing colors, marked down from $16,
$17 and $18 to
TEN DOLLARS.
Tis the Greatest Bargain on Earth. Ask
to see them, if you don't buy.
Boys' and Children's De
partment.
183 Overcoats, sizes 3 to 10 vears. marked
down trom ?, ana iu to
FIVE DOLLARS.
Come quick before they fly.
247 Suits, 4 to 12 years: former prices
ranged from $7.50 to $10. We have re
duced in price to 1 ve voiiarg. .Every
suit made from nne ail-wool material.
Don't Miss Seeing Them.
Here We Go Again !
130 Children's School Suits for which we
paid $2, $2.25 and $2.50 by the quantity, we
have slaughtered to the ridiculous price of
One Dollar.
You Cannot Afford to Bay Ele-
. where. ;
Honey Saved is Money Earned.
More Sledgehammer Bargains!
Knee Pants for 50 cents.
Boys' Overcoats $3, formerly $4.
Boys' School Pants 75 cents, formerly $1.
. Beefing Jackets, Cardigans, Ulsters, Work
ing Pants, etc., at less prices than was ever
beard of in this or any other section of the
universe.
Implicitly believing that no such opportu
nity as this will ever occur again, we re
spectfully request that you will favor us with
an unprejudiced examination of the unap
proachable inducements presented at mis
FORGED SALE!
NORTON & CO.
OAK HALL,
Jo. 85 Ctorcl. Street.
SAVE YOUR HOriEY.
No Need of New Clothing
This Fall.
Send your Coats, Pants and Tests
Cloaks, Shawls and Jerseys,
Dresses, Sacqucs and Robes,
Ribbons, Trimmings and Gloves,
Feathers, Laces, Crapes, etc.,
and have them Cleaned or Redyed
In most cases they will look
Nearly as well as new.
Lnce Curtains & Window Shades
Done up equal to new.
Carpets Cleaned by Steam Scouring
LAUNDRYING
Of Every Description.
All of my work guaranteed.
OFFICES:
tadJ&2&,ebapeL Street,
THOMAS FORSYTH,
Fire
Marine
Plate Glass
Steam Boiler
Life
e
Accident
WE REPRESENT THE
Oldest and Strongest Companies,
AND THOSE HAVING THE BEST FINANCIAL
STANDING,
Both Home and Foreign, of any agency in this city.
Parties who intend to insure will do well to con
sider the above lactH before placing their business
elsewhere. We solicit an impartial examination of
the merits of the companies that we represent.
Losses satisfactorily adjusted and promptly paid.
CHAS. WILSON & CO.,
721 (old No. 213) CHlPEIi STREET,
oc28 Rooms 1. 8 and 5.
Clairvoyant.
3IRS. JT. J. CLARK,
The great business test and healing medium, 228
Crown street, continue to astonish hundreds in this
city by her Clairvoyant powers. Mrs Clark locates
diseases without asking questions, and indicates the
appropriate remedy, fehe compounds vegetable
medicines from roots, barks and herbs, which have
a surprising curative effect. Hours from 9 to 12 a.
m., and 2 to 4 p. m. and evenings. ocl8
ACCORDION PLEATER I
The pi eater with which Mme. fiallade established
her business, and the sole device used by her for the
first five years ami still used on all kindsof box, ac
cordion and fancy pleat-ings is now offered for sale.
Send for circular. No. 8 East 18th St., N. Y.
ocSdawSm
BROADWAY CASH STORE.
Prinw Spring Lamb Reduced.;
Hindquarter Lamb, 14c a pound.
Forequarter Lamb, 11c a pound.
Lee ot Lamb, 16c a pound.
Loin Lamb 14c a pound,
Shoulder Lamb, 14c a pound.
Lamb breast, to stew, 6c pound.
Fresh Pork and Sausages, 11c a pound.
Lard and Salt Pork 11c pound. .
Celery, in large bunches, each 15c
15 lbs Standard Granulated Sugar for $1.00.
Finest Ponce PortoTOco Molasses 50c gallon.
Old Government Java Coffee 25u pound.
Spring Chickens, 18c a pound.
Best New Process Flour reduced to 85c a bag.
Call early.
PAUL. JESTK &. BROS.,
101 AND 107 BROADWAY.
n6
THE EDDY REFRIGERATOR
FOR FAMILY USE.
The place to find the best Refrigerator is to know
where the Eddy is sold. That is lust perfect
every respect. Sold by
SILAS OAIiPIN,
us 36 State Street.
TROY
Thfl Trov Steam Laundrv at 80 Center street is a
different kind of an institution from the so-called
"Troy Laundries" which abound in this and other
cities.
STEAM
This lftundrv is more than a mere "wash house.
It was established about a year ago, and now em-
gloys about fifteen hands. It is carefully conducted
y men of long experience on a very systematic
plan, which never fails to produce the best work.
LAUNDRY,
This laundrv is in no wav connected with any
other that has ever been in this city, but is connect
ed with two of the largest and best In New England '
80 CENTER STREET.
Goods called for and delivered promptly without
extra charge. Send by postal or telephone.
A. J. CRAWFORD & CO.,
seStf
For Ladies, Gents and Children better value
than ever.
Hosiery, Gloves and Mittens.
SPECIAL,
TJrka Neck Ruffle, the finest assortment ever
shown in New Haven, at from 33 to 50 per cent less
than real value, being less than cost to manufac
ture. These low prices for a short time only while
this lot lasts.
' Centemeri Kid Gloves, Mine, ifemorest s ac-
terns.
Special attention given to btampuig.
C. F. BECKLEY.
634 Chapel Street.
NEW GOODS.
Tomatoes in glass.
nnnHn rviTnmiiniiw AKnar&eus and other vegeta
bles; also a full line of preserves, packed by the
same company. .
rue Joest wew rrocess r iour ior oo wwrei.
5 gallons best Kerosene Oil 65c.
Hand picked Apples $2 per barrel. '
Cider 10c gallon by the barrel for this week only.
HARRY LEIGH,
GROCER,
670 Chapel Street.
Telephone. n4
AMftEW GOODHAIT,
NOS. 160, 162 CROWN ST.
Fine Assortment of Faner and Staple
Clroeerles.
FLOIIB! FIOCH I
At reduced prices.
Old Government J ava Coffee 25c per lb.
Fine Butter 25c per lb, 4 1-8 lbs SI.
Splendid Cream Cheese 15c per lb.
8 boxes sardines 35c
8-lb cans broiled Mackerel 45c
S-lb cans Brook Trout 45c.
Large assortment of Canned Meate.
Great variety of fruits received every day.
FINE WINES, CLABETS, SHERRIES AND BRAN
DIES. -
Call and see us. Goods delivered to any part of the
city.
ANDREW GOODMAN,
gos. 160 and 163 Crown Street
GOODMAN'S BUILDING, FOUR DOORS FROM
- Era house.
aula Union Copy.
Pillsbury's Best and other brands of Minneapolis
The Best Family Flour $?J95a barrel: 75c a bag.
15 pounds Standard Granulated Sugar SL
18 pounds Yellow O Sugar $1.
16 pounds C Sugar St.
A good P. R. Molasses 40c gallon.
New Marrow, Medium and Pea Beans.
Fresh Eggs 30c dozen.
Best Creamery and Dairy Butter 33c pound.
Best Old Government Java Coffee 28c a pound.
Try our 500 Teas and you will use no other.
' ErTelephone- ....
Goods delivered to any part of the city.
Insuranc
WlBrMerwear
S. S. ADAMS,
y-3S C3r-xgngxc3. Street.
n LTI Zi- r enlc pcrnt enrw. Book fra
Nervous D&uiiityiu.Ac.icrwriui.,ii.i
The PeoDle's Dry Goofls Store !
Great Reduction in Prices
Silks, Velvets, Dress Goods.
Oar stock being too large we take thU means of reducing It now.
Below we mention a few Items, vtz :
25 pieces 24-inch BLACK BROCADE SILKS (warranted all silk) a 86c per yard recently
sold by lis at $1.39. s
25 pieces BROCADE SILK VELVETS, in all desirable shades, at $1.50 per yard just re
duced from $2. :
15 pieces 23-inch COLORED BROCADE VELVETEENS at SOCjpor yard just reduced
from " ' " - . - "
17 pieces 20-injh BROCADE PLUSHES, in black and colors, at tj2.00 per yard just re
duced from $2.50.
30 pieces 54-inch ALL-WOOL LADIES' CLOTH, in all shades, at 75c per yard just re
duced from $1. '
We Iiave made other large redactions In Silks and Dress Goods,
and respectfully inTite the ladles of Sew Haven and vicinity to ex
amine 1 his stock frcfore purchasing elsewhere.
PROCTOR, MAGTJIRE& CO.
837 CHAPEL STREET,
NEW HAVEN.
ij'n tJfOHRISOEvI (SSL
LEADERS IN
109 CHURCH STREET.
Money refunded -wuereGoods prove unsatisfactory.
THE AMERICAN
Automatic Low-Jressure
Steam Heater.
Tho most nerfect Healer ever built.
Seir-Regulatlns, Scientific Conxtruc
ll -m.
Can lie applied to all iiainsst, large or small. The
aeents for the above Htater for New Havenand vi
cinity trive their careful attention to Steam Heating
in all its branches. Are also manufacturers and
dealers in Engineers', Steam, Gas and Plumbers
RubW and Cotton Hose and Packing a specialty.
J. P. GILBERT & CO.,
Qtato Streets
E. L WASHBURN,
OPTICIAN
And Dealer in
DRAWING INSTRUMENTS,
AND MATERIAL OF ALL KINDS.
The best line of
Opra anOMi Glasses
IN THE CITY.
With special facilities for the
manufacture of Spectacles and
Eye Classes to order, and repair;
jng in all Its branches, we are
able to guarantee satisfaction
both in quality and price,
AND '
61 0333?3"MX"JLiJH. ST.,
se20 ;
THE "ENTIRE WHEAT,"
riTfclK most nutritious and healthful Flour in the
I world. Used and endorsed by the leading
physicians of this country. It Is the COMING
KOCB. A boon to dyspeptics and all jrho work at
sedentary occupations. For sale by
JV.W. MEStWIPC & CO.,
Sole Agents, and dealers in Flour, Grain. Heal
IaaH laJs
1,8 ' and 180 State auad 1, 3
George Street.
and
el5 3m
R. G. RUSSELL,
ARCHITECT,
No. 8B3 Chapel Street. New " Haven Conn
WINDOW GLASS,
PAINTS, OILS
AND-
VABNISK
THOMPSON & BELDEN,
896 fxmc3. OD8
se25 ' -
Antique, Modern and Inlaid Fur
niture Repaired.
near Broadway, New Haven, Conn. e831y
OF-
OVERCOATINGS.
We have this Winter made a
specialty of Cvcrcoatings, and
have lit stock an immense line of
Kerseys, Meltons and Chinchillas
which we will make up at a low
figtire.
L. II. FREEDM AN & SON,
92 CHURCH STREET.
.Hay Fever
Is a type of catarrh
having peculiar s y m p
toms. It is attended
by an inflamed c o n d
tion of the lining mem
brane of the nostrils,
tear ducts and throat
affecting the lungs. An
acrid mucus is secret
ed, the discharge is ac
companied with a pain
ful burning sensation.
There are severe
spasms of sneezing, fre
quent attacks of blind
ing headache, a watery
and inflamed state of
the eves. Ely's
Cream Balm is a
Bal AYmEVE remedy founded on
correct diagnosis of this
disease, and can be depended upon. 50 cents at
druggists, 60 cents by mail. Sample bottle by mail,
IOC JlOiX JSKUXi.IiJttS,
Druggists, Owego, New
Tort
mh8eodwly
Advertising Cbeats! ! !
"It has become so common to begin an
article, in an elegant, interesting style,
"Then run it into some advertisement that
we avoid all such,
"And simply call attention to the merits
of Hop Bitters in as plain, honest terms as
possible,
"To indnce people
"To give them one trial, which so proves
their value that they will never use anything
else."
THE REMEDY so favorably noticed in all the
papers.
KAliriniis and secular, is
"Having- a large sale, and is supplanting all other
medicines.
'"Thnra in no ilAnvin7 the vlrtuAA of the Honnlant
and the proprietors of Hop Bitters have shown
great shrewdness and ability
"In compounding a medicine whose virtues are
so paipaoie 10 everyone s oDeervatiou.
Did She JNef
"Nol
"She lingered and suffered along, pining
away all the time for years,"
"The doctors doing her no good :"
"And at last was cured by this Hop Bit-
ters the papers say so mucn about.
! "Indeed 1 Indeed I"
' "How thankful we should be for that
medicine."
J A Daughter's Misery.
' "Eleven years our daughter suffered on
, a bed or misery
! . "From a complication of kidney, liver,
rheumatic trouble ana JNervous aeDiiity,
i "Under the care of the best physicians,
"Who gave her disease various names,
"But no relief .
"And now she is restored to us in good
health bv as simple a remedy as Hop UitterB,
that we had shunned for years before using
it", Tra Parents.
Father I Getting Well.
"Mv daughters say:
"How much better father is since he used
Hon Bitters."
"He is getting well after his long suffering
from a disease declared incurable."
And we are so glad that he used your Bit
ters." A .Lady of utica, in. y.
None genuine without a bunch of green Hops
on the white label. Shun all the vile, poisonous stuff
with "flop" or "Hops" in their name, nlveodgw
GOLD MEDAL, PARIS, 87b,
BAKER'S
Brettt Cocoa.-
Warranted ubsotutcly pure
Cocoa, from which the excess of
Oil has been removed. It has three
time (as ttnngth of Cocoa mixed
with Btareh, Arrowroot or Sugar,
and Is therefore tar mora economi
cal. It to delicious, nourishing,
strengthening, easily digested, and
admirably adapted for Invalids at
well mm for person in health.
Sold by firoeen vwywltera.
f. BAKER & CO., Dorchester, Mass.
New" Baekwheat Flour, :
THIRST of the season. The genuine Piatt's pa
ri tent, for which we are sole agents.
"Cl4 EDWARD E. HALL & SON.
bill
The Oldest Daily Paper Published
In Connecticnt. 4
THE C AEEINGTON PUBLISHING CO.
SINGLE COPIES TWO CENTS.
Dkltteked bt CtnnrnRW nr id Crrr, 13
cents a Wise, 43 cents a Hostx, $3.0 a
Teas. The Same Tebms Bt Hail.
Rates of Advertising.
SITUATIONS WANTED, one insertion 88c; each
subsequent insertion SSe.
. WANTS, RENTS, and other small adTa,-tisements
occupying not more than six lines, ens insertion
75c; each subsequent insertion SSe.
One square (one inch) one InsertJen, $1.20: each
subsequent insertion, 40 cents; one week, $8.30; one
month, $10.00.
Yearly advertisements at the following; raves:
One square, one year, $40; two squares, one year,
$70; three squares one' year, $100.
Obituary notices, in press or verse, U cents per
lire. Notices of Births, Karriages and Deaths, SO
cents each. Local Notices 20c per line.
Advertisements en second page ene price and a
half. ' ; -
Yearly advertisers axe limited to their own imme
diate business, and their contract do not Include
Wants, To Let, For Sale, etc - . i-
Special rates furnished on application for contracts
covering considerable length of time, or a large
space.
THE WEEKLY JOURNAL
w published
Evert Thubsbay Mornino.
Single Copies 5 cents - - $2.00 a year
Strictly in advance, - 1.60 a year
All letters and inquiries in regard to subscriptions
or matters of business should be addressed
THE JOTJRNAI. AND COURIER,
New navel, Conn.
Notice.
We cannot accept anonymous or return rejected
communications. In all eases the name of the
writer will be required, not for publication, but as a
guarantee of good faith.
Monday, Norember 17, 1884.
. BUSINESS IN ENGLAND.
This is not the only country in which busi
ness is in an unsatisfactory condition. In
England much the finie state of affairs pre
vails as exists here, and it may not be un
profitable to notice what is thought of the
situation there by the London Spectator.
No such situation, it says, has been seen in
our time. There have been distresses in par
ticular trades, the body of the people have
been sorely pinched before, and there have
been prognostications of a general liquida
tion, but the phenomenon of. to-day is new,
and the economists do not explain it. There
has been a bounteous harvest, there is no
war on hand, all tho workingmen outside the
shipbuilders are fairly comfortable, the total
of pauperism is unusually small, distributors
are doing well, the somewhat diminished sav
ings of the country are still bo large that the
price of securities is at a normal average and
long investments have declined one-half per
cent. But notwithstanding all this, says the
Spectator:. Commercial men of all descrip
tions declare that times were never so bad.
They are using their capital, they say, with
out profit,or at a loss which in some trades
such as the enormous trade in sugar, now
half as great as the wheat trade rises to
ruinous figures. "We are carrying goods for
the whole world, yot shipbuilders declare
they are losing huge sums; and the condition
of Sunderland appears to place the allegation
beyond dispute. We are using every metal with
new profusion, iron not excepted; but not
one of the mine-owning trades will allow itself
to be in a healthy condition; and it is certain
that the profits on the ont-trn of lead, tin,
copper and coal are so low that only wealthy
or exceptionally well situated mines can be
kept coiner without loss. The world was
never so well fed, or so eager for full food,
yet the growers and dealers in wheat, the
largest of all the trades, assert that the prices
do not pay wages, let alone rent, and that
every quarter of wheat sold costs some one a
I'irect draft upon his capital. Mincing lane
is in ui ber despair. It is currently asserted
that linseed is the solitary article upon which
profit remains to be obtained, though we sup
pose that, in spite of the position of the cin
chona trade which is only kept " from ruin
by the exertions of those who have lent mon
oy on the costly necessity there must be
profit on some drugs and dyes. Tho con
sumption of sugar has reached unheard-of
figures, and sugar is wasted almost like salt;
yet the dealers in sugar plead ruin, and their
staplo has fallen one-half, and is purchasable
at about nine-fifteenths of the cost of produc
tion under old conditions. Bice has followed
wheat. The taste for -tea increase syearly,and
may now be said to have reached the whole
population; yet the dealers are constantly
failing, and it is alleged that" every pound
sold wholesale fetches, apart from the duty,
a penny a pound less than was given for it at
the port of shipment. The losses on India
produce are so great that old firms are sus
pending transactions rather than sacrifice
more money; and the bankers through whose
advance business is conducted look on in a
sort of bewilderment, and examine every
warrant offered them as if it had been doc
tored. A very little more ' and trade would
stop, the most experienced buyers being ut
terly unable to decide where or when the
"shrinkage of values," to use a most useful
Americanism, will come to an end.
The Spectator cannot tell what the matter
is any more than the wise men of this coun
try can. It says, however, that the econ
omists have misconceived in two respects.
They underrate the reluctance of mankind,
especially of agriculturists, to abandon pro
ductions in which they alone have experience,
in which they have invested much, and about
which they entertain a conditional hope; and
they do not fully perceive the distinction be
tween the peremptory and the artificial wants
of men. Now wants are slow to grow into
new necessities, and men will only buy food
and clothes till they are satisfied.
EDITORIAL NOTES.
Settled at last. Now Ufa go to work.
Mr. Cleveland wears a'7J hat, which in
dicates a big head for a Democrat.
Domestic servants In this country earn
$216,000,000 annually. And in addition
they have the blessed satisfaction of having
their own way. . .-
The Rev. J. B. Hawley,of Stafford Springs,
is named as a candidate for the speakership
of the next house. The New London Day
acknowledges that he is a good man and an
excellent Republican, but warns him that
this Is a bad year for the clergymen in poli
tics. The question whether drunkenness should
be cured or punished is to be considered
soon by the board of health, lunacy and
charity of Massachusetts, and the next legis
lature will be called upon to deeide whether
or not the State shall go on punishing
drunkards by repeated fines and imprison
ments, or establish an institution in which
it shall try to cure them of their intemper
ate habits.
The Michigan prohibitionists eem to be
about as sensible as the prohibitionists of
other States, Connecticut, for instance. They
put up legislative candidates -of their own
instead of trying to accomplish something
practical by voting, with one of the great
parties, and the result is that the f usionists
have a majority of two in the senate, while
the house is tied, or Republican by two, and
temperance legislating of. any sort quite but
of the question.
The director general of Italian prisons in
his last report says that a comparison of the
number of crimes committed and of prisoners
in confinement in Italy with those of any
other nation shows that Italy is, unhappily,
supreme in this respeot. . Italy has 825 pris
ons, with a constant average population of
40,000 offenders and 82,000 convicts. Among
the latter are more than 5,000 condemned to
hard labor fer life, which means 5,000 mur
derers, and 1,800 to more than twenty years,
the far larger number of whom are murderers
also.
The introduction in the Vermont legisla
ture of a bill providing that the citizen of
that State shall hereafter only vote in the
town where he lives, and not there unless a
resident for at least three months before
election, brings out the curious conditions of
political privilege which have thus far exist
ed with the people of Vermont. It has here
tofore been, and is now, allowable for the
Vermont votor to cast his ballot in any town
of the State where he might happen to be on
election day. It is stated, for instance, that
in the recnt election about one hundred and
fifty votes were cast in Rutland by persons
who lived in at least forty-two other towns
of the State.
The constitutional amendment adopted by
the people of- New York- sfrihefTeeeHt elec
tion prohibits all cities in that Stat9 having
more than one hundred thousand inhabitants
from contracting debts in excess of ten per
cent, of the assessed value of the real estate
in the city. New' York city's real estate is
assessed at $111,926,159. The total bonded
debt, exclusive of revenue bonds, will
amount to $125,819,570, or exceeding by
many millions the sum allowed by the re
cent constitutional amendment. But of
these bonds $85,479,579 will belong to the
sinking fund. Now the question comes, are
these $35,000,000 in the- sinking fund to be
regarded as paid? If so then they can be de
ducted from the gross amount, reduce it to
lew than ten per cent, on the assessed valua
tion of the real estate in the city and they
can then increase their debt; but if these
sinking fund bonds are not considered as
paid, the authorities will be prohibited from
enlarging the debt.
The dangers attending the photographic in
dustry are pointed out by Mr. Napias, who
states that in the preparation of the plates by
means of the gelatine bromide of silver pro
cess, every ray of sunlight should be exclud
ed, and the operator pursue his work by the
aid of a feeble illumination afforded by the
red-ray lantern. Besides the foul air thus
caused, the narrow and gloomy apartment is
filled with the vapor of ether. Unless great
care in the ventilation is practised, the neces
sary detention in the dark room may prove
very hurtful. Again, there may occur pois
oning bythe vapor of hydroceanic acid,
which is formed by the decomposition of cy
anide of potassium by bichromate of potas
sium. Nervous phenomena may result from
the breathing of an atmosphere in a dark
room without oxygen, this necessary element
being taken up by pyrogallio acid when in
contact with the alkali ammonia. If to this
loss of oxygen bo added the vapor of ammo
nia, it necessarily follows that the atmos
phere under these circumstances must, if
long or continuously breathed, prove damag
ing to the blood, causing a more or less pro
nounced anemia, with its attendant symp
toms.
RECENT PUBLICATIONS.
"Misa Fooaey's Mission" and "Loddie" are
two charming little stories that will interest
all classes of readers. They are published
in a neatly bound book by Roberts Brothers,
Boston, and for sale in this city by Judd the
bookseller.
The process of "going West," which count
less thousands have experienced, is not in
all respects agreeable. Especially is this
true of forty years ago. In "Old Caravan
Days," a novel by Mary Hartwell Cather-
wood, is a good description of tbs trials of
emigrants. From beginning to end the book
is interesting. Published by D. Lothrop &
Co., Boston, and for sale in this city by Judd
the bookseller.
A lively sketch of life among the Orientals
is "Ten Days in the Jungle" by J. E. L. In
cidents of stirring interest, hairbreadth es
capes are told in the best of language as well
as stories of the ways of the inhabitants of
the countries passed through, making a nar
rative of interest. The book is in the form
of a series of letters. Published by Cupples,
Upham & Co., Boston, and for sals in this
city by Judd the bookseller.
Taintor's guide to the seaside resorts from
the St. Lawrence river to the Gulf of Mexico
is out. It is complete and correct. The
shore resorts of Connecticut are given a good
share of attention. Published by Taintor
Brothers, Merrill & Co., New York, and for
sale in this city by Judd the bookseller.
"Achor," the last of the Yensie Walton
series, is a tale of the devotion of a daughter
to the reclamation of a depraved father. It
is unfortunately told in such an exaggerated,
sentimental fashion as to spoil it. The hero
ine is not a girl of sufficient stamina to com
mand the sympathy of the reader. The aim
of the author has been to show the strength
ening and brightening influence of true
Christianity in the world, and how earnest
faith is at last rewarded. It is bound in uni
form style and size with the preceding vol
umes of the Yensie Walton series, and is
handsomely illustrated. Published by D.
Lothrop & Co., Boston, and for sale in this
city by Judd the bookseller.
Henry James is always delightful. He is
especially so in his "Little Tour in France.''
Mr. James writes so well about what he sees
that although the same ground has been trav
eled before many times, we feel a new inter
est in looking at things as he does. Many of
the passages of the book are among the finest
specimens of Mr. James' writings. The book
will command a wide circle of readers. Pub
lished by J. R. Osgood & Co., Boston, and
for sale in this city by Judd the bookseller.
Every boy has a natural and inborn desire
to make something; a knife, a hammer or a
gimlet is to him a source of untold happi
ness, and one often finds occasion to regret
while looking over work accomplished by ju
venile fingers that so many born mechanics
should degenerate into dry goods clerks or
second class professional men. Most of these
boys exercise their ingenuity without any in
struction. Few parents think it worth while
to show them how to drive a nail straight,
how to construct their toys, or how to make
these little repairs which would not only de
light them to accomplish, but would be a
genuine domestio service. "A Boy's Work
shop," by H. R. Waite, tells the boys how to
make use of their ingenuity. The contents
of the book include among other things in- !
gtructions about furnishing the workshop, j
how to use the different tools, how to make
various useful and ornamental articles, how !
to make a wooden tent, how to photograph,
how to tie the different knots in ropes and
much other useful information- Published
by D. Lothrop & Co., Boston, and for sale in
this city by Judd the bookseller.
Uriel H. Crocker has been writing upon
economic subjects in the newspapers and he
has also published a book in which he at
tempts to controvert, with little snccess,
some generally accepted principles of politi
cal economy. Published by W.B.Clarke
and Carruth, Boston, and for sale in this
city by Judd the bookseller.
The value of a knowledge of the laws of
perspective drawing from actual objects is
generally admitted, and their study forms a
part of tho curriculum of Art schools. The
usual method of teaching the subject has
long been considered impractical by many,
most of whom will hail with delight a
book by George Trowbridge, head master of
the government Art school in Belfast, on the
"Principles of Perspective as Applied to
Model Drawing and Sketching from Nature."
The work is illustrated by plates and draw
ings. Published by Cassell & Co., London,
Paris and New York, and for sale in this
city by Judd the bookseller.
'Protection and Free Trade To-day, at
Home and Abroad, in Field and Workshop,"
by Robert P. Porter, has been recently pub
lished. This little pamphfet contains the
address of Mr. Porter to the Arkwright club
of New England. He presents what . voters
in both political parties . wish to know, the
facts showing how free trade and- protection
work everywhere. Published by James R.
Osgood & Co., Boston, and for sale in this
city by Judd the bookseller. .
Pendleton King's life of Governor Cleve
land will tell all who wish to know about the
life of the New York Governor and the
President-elect. Published by G. P. Put
nam's Sons, New York, and for sale in this
city by Judd the bookseller.
Tennyson's " Princess," edited by William
J. Rolfe, is at hand. Although the notes in
the volume were originally made for a class of
girls in school, and although tho book is admir
ably adapted to the needs of high schools, so
thoroughly and judiciously is the work done
that this, with the other volumes in The Stu
dent series, should find its way into the li
brary of every lover of English literature.
Mr. Rolfe is an admirable editor. He does
not fall into the fault so common with many
of his kind of covering Over the beauties of
his author with a mass of useless notes. The
notes in this volume are always useful and
suggestive.
"Little Arthur's History of England," by
Lady Callcott, is a new edition of a book
which has already become a favorite with
children. The author writes as she would
speak to her children. It is wonderful how
much popular information she has embodied
in the book, and how clearly she puts in
volved questions of history. Published by
Thomas Y. Crowell & Co., New York, and
for sale in this city by Judd the bookseller.
Iu the "History of the American People,"
the author, Arthur Oilman, has told in con
cise fashion the story of the American peo
ple. The book opens with a condensed and
accurate account of the early voyages of dis
covery and explarotion, beginning with that
of Columbus; and among the subjects pre
sented with a reasonable degree of fullness
may be enumerated the efforts towards
union from 1C37 to the adoption
of the Constitution, and the nature
and influence of the Virginia and Ken
tucky resolutions of 1798 and 1799. The book
is accurate and is valuable as a work of refer
ence. The author notes the progress of the
arts of life, of literature, education and so
cial life, and in discussing political affairs
brings them up to the high standard of inde
pendent liberalism. Published by D. Lothrop
& Co., Boston, and for sale in this city by
Judd the bookseller.
'The French Teacher," by Prof. E. C. Du
bois, is intended for teachera. The system
will be generally acceptable. Published by
Lee & Shepard, Boston, aud for sale in this
city by H. H. Peck.
A new text book of American history has
been issued. It is by Horaoe E. Scudder.
The book contains maps and illustrations.
It is free from confusing details and each
chapter is preceded by tables of definition
and pronunciation. The logic of events is
kept sight of. The book will commend itself
to teachers and pupils alike. Published by
J. H. Butter, Philadelphia, and William
Ware & Co., Boston, and for sale in this city
by Judd the bookseller.
That la All.
A little dreaming such as mothers know;
A little lingering over dainty things;
A bappv heart, wherein hope is all aglow,
Stirs tike a bird at dawn that wakes and sings
And that is all.
A little clasping to her yearning breast;
A litt.ln miiaini? over future vears:
A heart that prays, "Dear Lord, Thou knowest
heat.
But spare my 'flower life's bitterest rain of
tears"
And that is all.
A little spirit speeding through the night;
A little home grown lonely, dark and chill;
A sad heart groping blindly for the light.
A little grave beneath the hill
And that is all.
A little gathering of life's broken thread;
A little patience keeping back the tears;
A heart that sings, "Thy darling is not dead;
God keers him safe through His eternal years"
And that is all.
Macmillan's Magazine.
CORNERED.
"What is the big corner in pork I hear
about? asked Laura across the cheery tea ta
ble. "The big corner in pork," replied Tom,
"is the ham."
St. John says he is happy as a clam. By
the way, all a clam wants is plenty of water,
so we are not disposed to doubt the truth of
St. John's statement. Boston Post.
Little Dick "Pa, what race do we belong
to, civiliEed or half civilized?" Pa "Well,we
are civilized, but our next door neighbors
are only half civilized." Philadelphia Call.
This is the season of the year when the
man who sat down on a saucer of cooling
preserves impulsively remarked, "Jam the
jam stuff to jell!" or words to that effect.
Danbury News.
When a Chinese boy is one month old his
head is shaven and a bladder drawn over it,
and as his head grows the bladder bursts and
the queue spurts forth. It would prove fatal
to try this plan on an embryo American dude.
His head would burst before the bladder.
Norristown Herald.
The man who got drunk because he was
blue and felt so bad last week also got drunk
this week over the election news because he
was jolly and 'felt so good. ' There are no
circumstances or conditions under which a
good drunkard cannot get drunk if good liq
uor is at hand. New Orleans Picayune.
A scandalous association of ideas: A
wealthy brewer furnished all the money re
quired to build a church in Montreal and had
a verse from the New Testament engraved
upon the frieze. What the verse was or is I
have at the moment forgotton, but it was
from Hebrews XX he brows X. Every
Other Saturday.
At a franchise demonstration at Gala
shiels, Scot., a few days ago, a man was ob
served in the procession staggering along
with a huge banner, on which was inscribed,
"Down with the peers." On being asked
why he was so much opposed to the peers
who never harmed him, he replied: "I dinna
ken what y're sayin'; but I wish peers was
doon to the same price as apples."
The report going the rounds of the State
press to the effect that a number of public
spirited citizens of Norristown have applied
for an injunction asking the court to restrain
the Reading and Pennsylvania railroad com
panies from running their trains into this
town and to compel them to substitute old
fashioned coaches is not true; though after
what has happened such a move would sur
prise no one. Norristown Herald.
A tramp applied to an Elizabeth woman
for food one day last week, and she scolded
him, saying: "Why don't you come at a
decent time right after dinner or breakfast
not in the middle of the morning?" He
said: "I haint got no watch" in such a pit
eous manner that she relented and went to
the kitchen to get him something. Mean
while her reproof sunk deep into his heart
and to guara against ih.imu buw t uubu&
in the future he walked into the parlor and
carried off the handsome mantle clock.
Newark Call. '
ELECTRICITY IS LIFE.
Wliv will iraonle clinir to the absurhidea t ot tin
must take medicine? Electricity will reach where
meoiciue has failed, as 15 years' experience has
proved. ir you are trotiDiea with uatarrh, or Neural
gia, or Rheumatism, Throat or Lung Troubles, Gen
aral Debility, Headache, Kidney Disease, try
ELEC3TRIOITY.
Go and see Dr. Cummings. ilia method differs
from ail others. His success is wonderful.
Ladies treated successfully. Ladies can consult
with the Doctor's wife afternoons. Consultation
free.
0B. J. W. CUMMINGS,
IVo 4 Church Street.
m., . , ' ' WOOD'S BLOCK.
VARICOCELE ST.SS.a.SJ,
Coat
s
Cloaiip.
jVow is the time to pur
chase your Fall or Winter
Cloak. Our assortment at
present is very large, and
includes the very latest
styles found in the market.
We can show you a tine
line ot Cloakinss. Heal
EIush Cioakings, a good
fac-similc of Sealskin of
fered at verv Itv I'rices.
JVew goods ies every de-
partnacnt.
WILCOX & CO.,
767 a.3SJ-I 771
CHAPEL STREET.
OC25
THOMAS PHILLIPS & SON,
DESIGNERS AND SCULPTORS
GRANITE,MARBI&STffNE-
OFFICE AND STEAM WORKS,
143 HIGH STREET,
Near the Grove Street Cemetery
B KAN CI I Opposite the entrance of the Evergreen
Cemetery, New Haven, Conn,
The Jji.-ert and most varied assortment of Mono
ments4 Tablet, Headstones, etc., to be found in the
State will bt kept finished at both establishments.
Aentw ror tne westerly, ymncy, tttti iseacn ana
Scot oil liramlo vuarries.
oc4tf
AFLOAT.
Brig Hairy Stewart, now discharging at Long
Wharf, a superior cargo of Coaisc Salt.
Low prices and custom house measure from vessel
J. D. DEWELL & CO.,
Wholesale Grocer
AND
nol3 2B3 TO 239 STATE STREET.
"REMOVAL.
THE-
HEW VORK BRANCH
LOAN OFFICE
NOW PERMANENTLY LOCATED AT .
42 Church Street.
M 0 ?BT LOAMD.
Liberal advances made on all kinds of personal
property.
Unredeemed Pledges
For sale at. low prkf s.
Square DcalitSK Willi All.
SOLOMON FilY.
57, 59 & 61 ORAMEST.,
FUKNITURE DEALEK8 '
AND
UNDERTAKE HS,
Have the flnent Painted lVdioom Knits in the cit
New Parlor Suits, Walnut lied room Suits.
The best Spring Bed ?or the money.
Splint, Kattan, Cane and Hush Sect Chairs in
jjreafc variety, as low as can be bought.
UNDERTAKING
promptly attended to, iiiffht or day with cam.
Kodies preserrc-d without ice in the best manner
Also Sole Agents for Washburn's DwxloriMR and
Disinfect injt Fluid.
A new lot of Folding Chairs and Stools to rrr.t for
parties or funeral. .i.vfl
THE USUAL VERIJICX.
"EIGKMlE PATENT SHFBT "
"Is the best fitting aud most comfort
nble Shirt I ever had."
Furnished in this city only ly
T. I 32KUWSX,
SOLE AGENT FOR NEW HAVEN.
OrEce ( at Residence). No. 2S Oollepre street.
Mail
n8
orders to show or deliver promptly filled
CALL AT
R. B. Bralley & Go.'s
AND EXAMINE THE .NEW
Blanchard
ASH SIFTER
Simple,
Effective,
Durable,
IVoiselesa and
Entirely Free From Dust. .
For sale only by
ft. B. Bradley & Co.,
No. 406 State Street,
77, 79 and 81 Court Street.
no 102awaw
THE "ANDREWS," -
KEELGR & CO., Eastern Agcuts.
SEND FOK'CIRCULAR.
83 TO 91 WASHINGTON ' STREET. CORNER ELM
a3mws6mnr BOSTON.
I & J. M. Blair,
illllll
14 Ml If
v.

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