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Morning journal and courier. [volume] (New Haven [Conn.]) 1848-1894, December 03, 1886, Image 1

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015483/1886-12-03/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE LARGEST DAILY NEWSPAPER TS THE CITY.
THE CARRENGTON PUBUSniNO CO.
OFFICE 40 VTATE STREET.
NEW HAVEN, COM., FRIDAY MORNING. DECEMBER 3, 1886.
VOL. LIV.
NO. 286.
m i
r
i
&
INSURANCE BUILDING.
ANOTHER MARKDOWN
-IN-
Dress Goods.
Nine pieces all-wool Heavy
Sersres, in fashionable mixtures,
et" soc a yard. The wholesale
price was 70c.
Hair-line Stripe Dress Goods
for 2KC a yard, reduced from
37rAc
Elegant styles Fancy French
Flannels marked down to 75c,
former price 08c.
Pattern Dress Goods all
marked down to closing-out
prices:
Prices Now $ 7.50, Formerly $12.50
Price Now 10.00, Formerly 15.00
Price Now 15.00, Formerly 20.00
. As there are only 20 dress
patterns in this lot, an early ex
amination is advised in order to
secure the best styles.
Fine Wool Dress Goods for
75c a yard, reduced from $1.
All-wool - Dress Goods for
37c, formerly 50c.
Black Silk Rhadames for $i,
have never been sold for less
than $1.25 to be found in our
Annex.
Fancy Velvets marked down.
Also great bargains in plain
Velvets and Plushes, in our
Annex.
Cloak Department.
One lot Ladies' Cloth Jack
ets for $3.68 each, marked
down from $4.75. These Jack
ets are perfect in shape and
style; are retailed everywhere
for $5.
One lot Ladies' Heavy Bou
cle Jackets for $4.98 each, for
mer price $6.50, Nothing more
desirable. -
One lot Ladies' Fancy Check
Jackets for $5, former price $8.
One lot Ladies' Black New
markets for $5, reduced from
$7.50.
, Children's .Garments Marked
Down. Please examine the
bargains in this department
from $2.50 to $11 each.
Ladies' Seal Plush Cloaks
and Wraps, also Astrachan
Cloaks, Wraps, Fur-lined Cir
culars, etc., etc., all at the same
low prices.
Immense bargains in Seal
Plush Cloakings, bought from
J. N. Adam & Co, last summer
at a great reduction from cost.
Our price is $6. J. N. Adam
& Co.'s prices were $ 1 2, $ 1 5 and
$16.
Special bargains in Furs, Fur
Trimmings, Plush, Ball, and
Spike Trimmings, Dress Trim
mings, Buttons, Soaps, Perfum
ery, Stationery, etc.
Comfortables.
Though our stock has been
depleted and replenished several
times this season, notwithstand
ing the mild weather, we still
have the quick selling numbers
at 79c, 95c, $1.25, 1.38, 1.50,
1.65, 1.75 up to $4.62 eace.
Blankets.
We have cut prices upon sev
eral makes of desirable Blankets
to stimulate sales, as follows :
The 1 1-4 Hero Blanket from
$3 to $2,50; the Santa Anna
Jacquard Border from 4 to $3.47
Champion 1 1-4 from 5 to $4-5
and Willowdale 12-4 from 7 to
$6.50. These, with several oth
er brands equally cheap, are rare
bargains for buyers.
Hosiery.
One case 60 dozen of Ladies' Wool
Eose, fall regular finished feet, extra Ions
tope, plain solid colors each as Nary, Seal,
Garnet, etc., at a special price of 25o pair.
Usual price is 87o. This quality will seU
rnnn aitrhfc.
We also offer the latest make of Hosiery
for ladies and children called the Saxolaine.
This stocking meets with faror wherever
tried, and has become one of our leading
makes from its actual intrinsic worth.
Ladies' Wrappers.
Extra value in Ladies' White vests, war
ranted 20 oer cent. wool, at 60 cento each.
This vest has no superior for the money.
Also just receired a new line of Ladies'
Vffota and Pants at 69c and 98o each.
We else continue our lines at 75 cents 'and
.1.35.
Our finest grade and handsomest color of
Scarlet Tests and Panto for ladies' wear is
V.nt 11.29. and will bear a close scrutiny.
Onr Ladies' Camel's Hair Vests and Pants
ttl .lSO are the beat we hare vet seen.
Ladies' foil regular finish Vesta and Pants
of the famous Norfolk and New Brunswick
make at $1 per garment.
&
8UCCKS30E3 TO
i.JJ.ADAH&CO
886 and 888 CHAPEL STREET
Howe
won
Sen
Ml
THE STANDARD
LAUNDRY AND DYE WORKS
STATE OF CONNECTICUT.
DYEING, CLEANING,
CARPET BEATING
LAUMDRYIN0
OF EVERY DESCRIPTION.
ELM CITY DYE WORKS
'. . . -AW-
THOMAS FORSYTH,
PROPRIETOR.
Offices: 878 and 4 Cbapei vu
Werkai State, litwnaci anal Mecli am
is Streets.
Orders receired by telephone.
BEST WORK
BEST ACCOMODATIONS
LEAST DAMAGE
Only te be bad at -
TROY STEAL! LAUNDRY
SO Center Street.
A. J. CRAWFORD & CO.
rW-Free collection and delivery,
at -
Telephone.
gr0xrisi0tis, Htc.
FINE FRESH POULTRY
Received This Morning.
Fresh Country Turkeys, full dressed, 16o pound.
Fresh Country Chickens, lull dressed, 14c pound.
An elegant bunch of Celery for 13c.
Fine Dark Cranberries at 9c quart, S for 25.
Fresh Eggs at 23c do.
Elegant Creamery Butter 28c and 82c pound.
Good Table Butter at 28c pound.
Finest Full Cream Cheese t 15 pound.
Elegant Juicy Lemons, large, :3c dosen.
Finest Large Sweet Oranges 25c per doz.
Finest New Figs 10c pound.
A job lot of
Fin) Haple Syrup,
in full gallon cans, at only 00e gallon.
A pure Sugar rjyrup at wc gauou.
Me-crop New Orleans Molasses, finest you erer
iw, only fee gallon.
Good New Orleans Molasses at S5c gallon.
w nm liin. tons of our Old Government Java
Coffe at too pound, and it pleases everybody.
jrurc jaoney m cue cowo at i-tv pvuuu.
XO pounds White Extra C Sugar $1.
IT pounds Granulated Sugar JL
Erery thin g Low for Cask.
D M. WELCH & SON,
as and 30 Congress Ave.
Branch No. 8 Grand St.
PFAIF'S.
TURKEYS,
CHICKENS
DUCKS
GAME.
, G. PFAFF & SON
7 AND 9 CHURCH STREET.
GO TO THOMAS KELLY'S,
Cor Bier of State and. JPearl Streets,
For meats, Yegetanles, Provis
ion and Groceries Gt nerally.
New Stock anal Store asid the Lowest
rnt iat
Native Oystera
opened and in the shell. Beef,
. Poultry, Flour, Eggs. Sugar, etc.
juraon. rora.
Try some of our
vaiiiTe urease! now.
SHAKER APPLE SAUCE.
arllnvtnnWbeat Meal. Washburn's BuoerlatlTe
and PMsbury's Best New Process Flours. Cerea-
Une for breakfast.
Fresli Fruits, New Persian Dates.
COOPER & NICHOLS,
2S 378 State Street.
Turk's Island Salt Afloat,
Bark Loreno, now discharging at
Long Wharf, a cargo of Superior
Quality Coarse Salt from Grand
Turk. We offer the same from
vessel at the
Market Value.
J.D. DEWELL & CO.,
IMPORTERS,
233 to 239 State Street.
THANKSGIVING SUPPLIES
AT
A. M. FOOTE'S.
8 cents buys 1 pound New Raisins.
XS cants buys 4 pounds new Prunes.
85 cents buys S quarts Cranberries.
10 cents buys 1 pound Fine New Figs.
70 oents buys 10-pound basket Catawba Grapes.
$5.M buys 1 barrel WIN FAVOR FLOUR.
Onsna. Apples, malaga Crapes, Dates
NUTS OF ALL KINDS.
458 STATE STREET,
Between Court and Elm Street,
n0
BARGAINS. BARGAINS.
E. II. SMITH,
815 CHAPEL STREET
Offers hi entire stock of nun
nery Good.
Ribbons, Laces,
Telveta. - - Bats,
Silks, .Feathers, Ace.,
At Cost to Close Out.
Furnace, Desk,
Safe. mirrors,
Tables, Chairs, Vc,
AT A BARGAIN.
Store rented to Leigh A. Prlndle.
B
SCOLLOPS! S LLOPS
First ot the u&mon.
T71RE8H SALMON. Blueflsh, Sea Bass, Spanish
n Mackerel, Halibut, Eels. Hard and Soft Crabs,
Clams, Lobsters, Oysters, Etc., Etc
Reed's Market, SO Church Street
OPPOSITE TUB POTOPFICB.
a B. W. SMITH. Manacer.
LONG ISLAND CAULIFLOWERS
FRESH DRESSED
TURKEYS.
The above are choice stock, Jnat
received for to-day's trade.
C. B. HART,
35 O and 352 State St.
SHBIFFELE'S.
Coalings, -
Turkeys,
Chickens,
Ducks,
Game.
PRIME BEEF.
Celery, Lettuce, Cranberries.
Telephone.
JACOB F. SHEIFFELE,
409 State Street, near Court.
ONE PRICE THF. CASH STORE
We Oner for Thanh SKtrlngt
Prime Turkey, full dressed, 18c lb.
Prime Chickens, full dsessed, 15c lb.
Prime Geese, full dressed, 16c lb. .
Extra fine Celery 13c buncb, 2 for 25c.
ftanuine Cane Cod Cranberries 9c Quart, S for 25c
Sparerib and Sausage 10c pound.
Splendid Milk Crackers 7c pound, 4 for 25c.
W. shall also have our usual stock of Litchfield
County Turkeys.
Also a
fine lot of Grapes
and
Oranges.
B. F.-BANKS, - No. I Broadway.
PERFECTION
FLOUR.
Genuine California Flour.
Hakes the Best Pastry.
Try One Bag.
T. E. SMITH,
783 Chapel Street.
TELEPHONE. .
Litchfield County Poultry.
TURKEY S,
DUCKS,
CHICKENS.
ALSO
LITCHFIELD COUNTY
fresh Pork , and Sausages,
HTJBLBTJRT BROTHERS,
1,74 Chapel Street.
CORNER HIGH.
DON'T FAIL TO COME !
For Thanksgiving Connecticut
Dressed Poultry.
A Large Sapply at Reasonable Prices.
Fine Cranberries 8c quart.
Native Celery 15c per bunch.
Malaga Grapes 13c lb, 2 lbs for 25c
Bananas 25c per dozen.
Sweet Oranges 25c per dozen.
Mixed Nuts, Hickory Nuts.
Fine table Apples and eating; Pears.
New Bsisins 9c lb, 8 lbs for 25c.
Finest Leghorn Citron 25c per lb.
4 quarts new Beans 25c.
Eggs, warranted fresh, 25c dozen.
Lard 8c per pound.
Smoked Shoulder 9c
Rib and Sausages 10c per pound.
Best New Process Flour $5.50 per barrel.
Still Psttlsc Oar Sag-ars Risen Down
to Bottom Prices.
17 pounds Standard Granulated Sugar SI.
20 pounds White C Sugar $1.
J. 0. KEABET,
ELM CITY CASH GROCERY,
74 and 76 Congress Avenue, Cor
ner Hill Street.
FINEST COUNTRY CHICKENS,
Full Dressed, 14c Found.
Turkeys 16c Pound.
I.. sCHONBEBGGR,
1, g, 8. Central Market. Congress ave.
nJOtf
FOR THAJTKS&rra&l
ROCKAWAY OYSTERS,
Guilford Outers.
STODTir CREEK OYSTERS,
Oullford Olams,
Salmon, Bass, Lobster,
Prawn, Little Neck Clams, &c.
A. POOTE & CO.'S,
8B3 QTATEl
Litchfield County Poultry!
Turkeys, Chickens, Ducks.
Prim Beef. Mutton. Lamb. Veal. Fresh Fork
Pork Tenderloins. Full Dressed Chickens 15c per
pound. Nice Full Dressed Turkeys 18c per pound.
f ine wmte iiery lac per Duncn, iwu ouncues
for 2&e. Spinnach, Lettuce, Cauliflower.
Bananas, Oranges. Lemons, Cranberries, Malaga
OmnML Catawba Oraoes.
Stony Creek, Bockoway and Lighthouse oysters
openea to oraer.
W. D. JUDSON,
505 AND 507 STATE STREET
IT IS NO HUMBUG!
But a
POSITIVE FACT!
Known to erery school hoy In the country that
DtvwBOD At 814 State street keep the largest stock
or.
TEAS AND COFFEES
to be found In New England. And that In the stock
can be found about 100 boxes of Choice Oolong
Teas, from 10 to 80 pounds each, that will suit the
most lasucuous.
A.
844
E. DAWSON,
STATE
I SELL BUTTER.
Cream Butter,
Better Batter,
Cheaper Batter,
Finer Batter,
Reliable Batter,
' Wholesome Batter,
And more Batter, at Lowest
Prices to salt all.
4)4 pounds $1. Call and see me.
GEO. W. H.HUGHES,
EsietopesMSesvS mI Dealer,
34 CHVRCB STREET.
B3B
McINTYRE, MAGUIRE & CO.
BEVARE OF
THEY ABE MANY.
THEY NEVER LEAD BUT ALWAYS FOLLOW.
. . . . - - .
TiAWTK! If you wish to procure a good
JL av .a. Sav. ana Duy rrom
HI A nmQ If you wish to buy Silks and Velvets at lees money than you can procure in other
J? &AJ ID. places, buy from . . . . . . n - n rx
IYICIN I
m a nmfl If tou wish to buy a uooa uarment, a weu-nttmg vunnsuh uu . uinsr rnra
X Jt.J XJ. than elsewhere. Save money and
Tfl A rfTOJ - If you are interested in moves
J? AVXO. prices, buy from
IY1CI N I
PACTS.
If you wish to look at the Best
' McINTYRE, MAGUIRE. & CO.
ljrm wish to save money, buy your BlatAeta and giannels from '
McINTYRE, MAGUIRE & CO.
If you wish to look at the best line of Damasks, Linens and Towels, be sure and go to
McINTYRE, MAGUIRE & CO
If you wish to procure Curtains Lace and Turcoman, Holland Shades, Poles and
Chains; the cheapest place on earth.
McINTYRE, MAGUIRE & CO.
' If you need Cottons, Batis, Comfortables and Ginghams, Cloakings of all kinds, the
placetobuyi. JyJgJjqrpYRE, MAGUIRE & CO.
If you need Buttons, Notions, Gimps or Furs, call at
McINTYRE, MAGUIRE 8c CO.
FACTS.
PACTS.
PACTS.
PACTS.
FACTS.
PACTS.
ir you are looking for fancy goods in Brass, Tooth and Hair Brushes, PocketBoota
and Baes. Lubin's Extracts, Colgate's Soaps and Perfumes, Jewelry, Combs and
School Fads, etc.; the cheapest place.
FACTS.
on wish to trade at the Best Lighted, Best Ventilated, Best Regulated, and the
AJN STORE OF NEW HAVEN, go to
BABI
McINTYRE, MAGUIRE & CO.
If you wish to procure Bargains in Misses', Ladies' and Gents1 Handkerchiefs, go to
McINTYRE. MAGUIRE & CO.
FACTS.
If you are Interested in the greatest values ever shown in Cotton Underwear and
Corsets, Second Floor is the place at
FACTS.
McINTYRE,MAGTJIRE & CO.
CROSBY'S COLD AND
fa the mvacriDtion of a physician who lor over au years dm own iui suixmuiu u.
CatirrSfoSd" the HeacLay Fever, Bronchitis, etc Though active in its curative effects, it may be
SedUh rSm( ort on TthVmosi Ttender infant. P. CBOSB VCO.,56 West 25th St., New York. When
not keot by drnggit cnbesent by mail 50c. jroenii
ART WALL PAPER STORE,
86O CHAPEL STREET,
m n. JBFPOOTT cs CO.,
W .re offerina some verv good Bargains In Wall Papers for the next 30 days, in all grades. Any
oae in want of Wall Paper will do well to make their
BRANCH STORE ELM, CORNEB IWKR.
TBtKPHOKK rONKErTlOW.
REASONS WHY
Tou should consnlt Dr. Brown if
you are suffering
chronic disease:
BECAUSE he has had orer 20 years practical experience in treating this class of ailments.
BECAUSE he has studied and is thoroughly familiar with all systems of medicine.
BECAUSE he is an independent, tcientifio practitioner, and is bound by no code of ethics.
BECAUSE his medicines are all pure and unadulterated and are prepared under his imme-
- diate supervision. ' '
BECAUSE he uses no mineral medicines or poisonous drugs.
BECAUSE his charges are always moderate and within the reach of every one.
BECAUSE he is accurate in his diagnosis, aud always gives a frank candid opinion.
BECAUSE he fulfills all his promises and effeots cures or gives relief exactly as represented.
BECAUSE he gives to all FREE- CONSULTATION.
TRUTH seeks tue llgnt or open uay.
PREJUDICE efcoses the darkness of night. "t
TRUTH asks for and demands investigation.. - - -... . -PREJUDICE
will neither submit to or apply the tesfc.
' " TRUTH needs no cloak to cover up her ignorance or mistakes.
PREJUDICE robs her victims of many golden opportunities.
H. N. BROWN, M. D., 93 OLIVE STREET.
XBW HAVEN",
Hours 10 to 12 a. m. , 2 to 4 and 7 to 8 p. m. OFFICE CLOSED ON SUNDAYS. -
LEVI C. GILBERT,
COM...
COAL
COAL.
89 Church St. 2B East Water St.
91A8AiE and SWEDISH
MRS o. B. PECK, formerly at S96 York street
can now be found at
aelvam sua unisK. ",n.
Annual Town Meeting.
T
HE Annual Town Meeting of the Town of
New
7tta
Haven wilt Da neia on aesaajy u
"of
nri kv H-M,ram,Bfc to iKtmis1 Hall, corner
J J . ,. . ... .-.. . k. s
tta day of Oeeenaber, 1886, at i o'clock p.
l., lor tne iouowing purpuseo, ui w,.
Tn aliwtt. Town OftToers. as Drovided by law, and
to fill all vacancies occurring by expiration of term
of office of such officers as were elected at the last
Annual Town Meeting. .
To lay a tax upon the polls and rateable estate in
the Town of New Haven upon the Grand List of
To auuxorize tne selectmen w uviiuff iimutij uju
give the note or notes of the town for such sum or
sums as may be necessary to pay the present float
ing indebtedness and the current expenses of the
town lor the year 1887.
To vote rrom me treasury w we &uwn wruuu
sum of money for the salary of the Town Agent,
the lown Clerk and the Town Treasurer for the
.' .nnw,wAMAn fMm Ha .loairv fit
the town to the New Haven Disnensary for medi
cat assistance to the poor of the town for the ensu
ing year.
To vote an appropriation from the treasury of
the town to the New Haven Orphan Asylum and
the St. Francis Orphan Asylum, each, for aid in
supporting the poor children of the town for the
ensuing year. . .
"lo vote upon wie uueeuun; dumiwi; twwuw
lioensed to sell spirituous and Intoxicating liquors
in the Town of New Haven, for .the term of one
year from the first Monday in January, 1887;" a pe
tition for a vote of the legal voters of the town up
on the question having been made to tht selectmen
in accordance with the statute law. Chapter CVI1,
Part II, Section 1, passed at the January Session
of the General Assembly, 1882, approved April 28,
To vote upon the question of "compensating
Ellas P. Merriman. ex-assessor of the town, for his
expenditures for legal services and other expenses
in testing the constitutionality of the law as to the
termor omee or tne w rmnmum w me ivu w "
ttb.h ntitinn fnr & vote of the leeal voters of
t.h town noon the Question having been made to
tne selectmen py twemjm.
To act upon tne report w uw oij.i
appointed at tne last annual x own luociiujs j
nnlre u tn the advisability of the erection of new
treasnry of the town to purchase in conjunction
with the City or New naven, lonunwo xjxiugo,
m.i.A ik. . rr.ja a fnw bridfire.
vole bv ballot in the-respective wards where they
rr. lumi .iit.n nr inn -i-nwn ox now iia.tu w
are registered on the '-Revised Registry Lists" last
completed, for such officei s as are required, and for
the decision of the above stated license question.
Thnu in favor of Deraons being licensed to sell
r:. tntndMtln. linimni will vote a Li
cee" ballot. Those opposed wiU vote a "No Li-
a tr t.iin rennntion of ballots will be opened
An T.MSST. IMCBDIMr . .w. aoov, v
mti &nd remain orjen until 5 o clock p. m
of the same day, at the following places, to wit:
Ward Firt-er Conter street, Benedict's Building
wars oeconu raj m. w mv, . " f
w.ai rktMi irn nnnvmi avenue.
Ward Fourth N. E. corner of Columbus avenue
and West Water street.
Ward Fifth 71 Chestnut street.
Ward Sixth 48 St. John street.
Ward Seventh 1 7 Hamilton street.
Ward Eighth 740 State street.
Want Ninth M8 Dixwell avenue.
Ward Tenth STB Elm street.
Ward Eleventh 10 Ferry street.
Ward Twelfth 184 Poplar street.
Ward Thirteenth Franklin Hall, Westvllle,
w,m) vmirtaentliFnaiue House. Annex.
Ward Fifteenth Premises of John N. Bowe,
Forbes avenue, near Four corners.
Dated New Haven, November 23, 1888.
JAMES REYNOLDS.
ER.4EST KI.ENKE,
" " ISAAC E. BROWN,
Board of
Selectmen.
WM. a KEKUrlKK,
JULIUS TYLER,
JOHS L TREA1
IrJAT.
LOUIS FELDMAN.
diet
FHILIP HUOO Town Clerk.
HanradeZ sjlffarcttes.
RICE PAPER, pure long-cut Havana tobacco.
Waaatsper packageof . ejder. ggjplied.
TN UOSpal sHreat,
IMITATORS.
Woolen Drees, Black or uoioreo, consult your interests
.
MCINTYRE, rV.Aq.UIKt. UU.
Tnt, lYlAUUIKC UU,
Duyirom
McINTYRE, MAGUIRE & CO.
or superior mane, ana at ui. uu auvBautgeoua
O o
Tnt, lYIHUUint OC vsl.
Underwear and Hosiery, and at the most reasonable
McINTYRE, MAGUIRE & CO.
CATARRH CURE
selection soon, wnne ine stock is compute.
-with any obscure, long standing,
Clairvoyance.
MRS. J. 1. CLARK
The well known business, test and healing medium,
is not only maintaining her reputation as a reliable
Clairvoyant, but is convincing new visitors each
day by her astonishing gifts. She can be consulted
at tier residence. 828 Crown street, on all matters
pertaining to business, social affairs, health, etc.,
and always renders satisfaction. She compounds
choice vegetable remedies, which have great po
tency in curing diseases. Hours from 10 a. m. to 1
and 2 to & p. m. and evenings. n3
jfljs. E. Jones Young
DENTIST,
746 Chapel,cor.State,Street B'd'g
Over Brooks & Co's Hat and Fur Store.
All work warrantea.
Offlce hurs boss a. no. to
6 p. m.
a
$1. THE HOME PHYSICIAN.
For sale by E. P. JTJDD. Send to Q. P. Put
nam's Sons, New York, for full catalogue, ocatf
CONSUMPTION.
I have a po.lt!.. ram.dy for tbe abov. Kmh ; by It. na
tfaonundi of niu of the worst kin ud of lonir aiandlDg
b.vb n.qfwl. Indd. o trongl.-mT f.ltn la ttsofllcmey
thwA I will lend TWO BOTT1.ES FKER, tor.thAr with a Val
V ABLS TBBATI8B on this dlsMH, to any snff.rer. Glv. x
fM tf.O. HtocM. Pa.x.A.BIiOCPM.ItPMrlSt.M.r
DYNAMITE
Explodes Rats, Mice, Weasel, Wood
chuck. Skunk, Roaches, Bed Bugr, Wa
ter Bugs, Potato Bugs. Flies, Insects,
Vermin, etc. It baa no esj aal.
Grand results surely follow its use. It drives out
Rats and Mice; they do not die on the premises.
One trial will convince you of its merits. 15 and
35c. Sold by all druggists in this city. WELLS &
CALHOUN, Wholesale Druggists, 815 State street,
Sole wnoiesaie agents. sew om
ROOT'S
GOLDEN HOOF OINTMENT.
Everybody praises Root's Golden Hoof Ointment.
This is not to be wondered at, as it not only ooks
UL THAT IB CUIHKD BOB IT, but it is the ONLY 1N-
rALUBLB remedy known to science which has stood
all tests. Bead the following:
KKNT, Feb. 9, 1886.
Ma. F. B. Root:
Dear Sir Your last lot of Ointment received,
and already I have disposed of several boxes. I
will let you kflow how I was able to recommend It.
Last April my norse was attacxea witn pneumonia.
Wo all thought he could not live. Being a pet
horse, we did evervthins? Dossible to save It. The
disease soon assumed atyphoid form and the doc
tor aavi&ea us to Kill mm. xne xever nnauy se
tied in his feet and he could not stand upon them.
we triea several preparations to neip tne noors.
Hearing of your Ointment I purchased a box, and
assure you it worked wonders in tniB case. All of
mv neighbors are surmised at the result. It is in
deed the best Ointment in the world.
Yours respectfully,
H. I. WILDM4.N.
Boot's Ointment Is for sale by all Drag
Kista.
Wholesale Manufactory and Depot
8(9 OKtNII WREST.
WEAKIUIIDEVELOPED
Parteof thaJBody Enlarged, Develooed and
BtranstnaaM. Simpl,hrmuMaj sura Selz-Trsatm.nt
Full particulars, taitlmonials.eta, mailad saalad. fraa
Addrasm. BJJ IsaJIOAl. 6cC BO JTAJU?T JT.
The
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eoy lor weak us
cles.
mickiy cures pain in tne
:lv cures pain in tne hack, chest cide
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52 cents: 5 for SI.
quininn rLAHlKU
CO.. Saratoga Sprtnga. W
loVieod
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CREAM BALM
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Cold In Bead.
HAYFEVtR
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HAT FEVER.
Not a Liquid, Snuff
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A particle is applied Into each nostril and Is
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,03., druggists.
terea, ouc. tjirouiars iree, JU. s xJt
VSwego,, x.
i eod&w
nam
MI
ie ouvTVX atixl (ouvicx
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CITIZENS TICKET.
FOR CITY OFFICERS.
lTor Mayor.
THOMAS E. TROWBRIDGE, JR.
For City Clerk.
CHARLES W. WILLETT.
For Andltor.
JOHN W. LAKE.
For Xreaanrer.
HARM ANUS M. WELCH.
For City Sheriff.
THOMAS C. HOLLIS.
FOR TOWN OFFICERS.
For Selectmen.
WILLIAM S. BEECHER.
JOHN L. TREAT.
LOUIS FELDMAN.
GEORGE M. WHITE.
For Board or Relief.
ROBERT E. BALDWIN.
C. W. HEMINGWAY.
LUCIUS B. HINMAN.
For Town Clerk.
PHILIP HUGO.
For Treasurer.
HARMANUS M. WELCH.
For Collector of Taxes.
THEODORE A. TUTTLE.
For Auditor.
JAMES M. MASON.
For Registrar of Vetera.
EDWARD F. MERRILLS.
Friday, December 3, 1886.
THE CITIZENS' TICKETS.
The Republican city convention last even
ing did its work skillfully and judiciously.
Since Mr. Trowbridge's letter in which he
declined to enter into a scramble for the
nomination was published the feeling that he
should be nominated has steadily grown un
til it found its fall expression in the con
vention. The primaries in many of the
wards revealed that there was a strong and
general desire that he should head the ticket,
and during the. last few days the opinion
that he would make a good Mayor has been
heard wherever the matter has been talked
about. Mr. Trowbridge needs no Introduc
tion to the people of Near Haven. He is
prominent representative of one of the old
est and worthiest families of tbe town. He
is a well educated, clear headed man. He is
a thorough and successful business man, and
the people of New Haven have reason to be
satisfied with their action in choosing busi
ness men for Mayor. In addition to his
other qualifications for the office for which
he is named, Mr. Trowbridge possesses the
important one of a thorough knowledge of
the way the city business is done and of the
city's needs. This knowledge has been gain
ed by active participation in the work of the
council and the board of aldermen;
he being now the respected and efficient
president of the latter body. He has through
out his term of service in the Court of Com
mon Council shown ability, integrity, good
judgment and a thorough regard for the
eity's interests in dealing with the various
questions that have come up for action. He
has been successful in whatever public duties
he has undertaken. In private life he is
friendly and courteous to all, and has the re
spect of all who know him. If he should
be elected he would take pride in
doing all he could for the oity, and every
duty would be faithfully and fittingly per
formed. Any citiaen can cast his vote for
him with the knowledge that he is making
good use of his power to vote.
Mr. Willett, the nominee for City Clerk,
has the best of recommendations in the fact
that he has served one term to the satisfac
tion of all who hare business with thetity.
He is prompt, polite and efficient. Nothing
is to be gained by making a change.
For City Treasurer the convention wisely
nominated the present incumbent, Mr.
Welob, and took the same course in- relation
to Auditor. Mi. Lake has made as good an
Auditor as the city has ever had. For City
Sheriff the venerable Mr. Hollia was renomi
nated. A city ticket without his name on
would seem strange.
The town convention was not a very excit
ing affair, most of the present town officers
being renominated without opposition.
Colonel George M. White was nominated for
fourth Selectman, and Lucius B. Hinman
for a member of the Board of Relief in addi
tion to the two old Republican members.
These are both good nominations.
KDITORIAL NOTES.
Politicians who "get
left" xealize that
these are cold days.
It looks as if the famous "Doc" Wilson
had nearly reached the end of his rope. y It
wont do him any good to tell tales unless he
can prove their truth.
A bill has been introduced in the Alabama
legislature to establish and maintain an in
dustrial college for women. Fifty thousand
dollars is asked for the establishment and
$25,000 for maintaining it.
Ex-Governor Bullook of Georgia says that
Atlanta has not suffered from depression in
business because of prohibition, but - he
thinks the jug business will drive the people
back to the high liseuae system. An express
train, called the "jug express," comes in
every afternoon from one of the "wet"
counties with several hundred jogs filled with
whisky consigned to citizens. The law does
not prevent their being conveyed to private
residences.
An encouraging crusade against hats and
bonnets has begun in the German, theaters.
Of late theater goers have complained bit
terly that the elaborate head gear worn by
the ladles has interfered with their views of
the stage, and consequently the manager of
the Wiesbaden theater has led the way with
an official circular, politely requesting ladies
in the better class seats to take off their hats
and bonneta. Since then three of the chief
Berlin theaters have also issued a similar
edict. The advertisement of the Olympio
theater. London, announces. "Dress circle
(bonnets allowed), 8s., front row."
How to get good government in cities is
one of the most important and pressing prob
lems of the time. - The Vicksburg (Missis
sippi) Herald says: Vicksburg needs a simple
busiuess government of a few representative
honest men. Her citizens are entitled to it,
and they can get it when they unite. To get
it they must abandon the system of munici
pal elections root and branch. They must
secure the repeal of all portions of their
charter requiring elections. The simplest
plan is the best. Let the governor be em
powered to appoint five commissioners and
let them be clothed with the power to attend
to the municipal affairs. The whole thing
can be easily arranged and then the cause
will be permanently removed, but not until
then. - It will be hard on the bummers and
strikers, the thieves and thugs, but it will be
a great relief to all good citizens.
The consequences of the attempt to estab
lish the eight-hour system in Wisconsin are
forcibly set forth in the report of the State
commissioner of labor and industrial statis
tics. This movement, which extended
through the winter and the early spring,
culminating in the Milwaukee riots of May
last, was terribly costly. Even to this day,
says the report, "houses remain unpainted
and fences unrepaired; the sewing machine
bought on the installment plan is taken
away; pawnshops have been doing a thriving
business; interest payments have lapsed; in
surance policies have been forfeited; wife
and children are without new dresses; furni
ture has gone to the second-hand store; lot
sales to workingmen 'ceased for weeks and
months; chattel mortgages increased to an
unusual number and domestic hard times
that the public can never see or
know prevailed in many quarters with pain
ful severity." The commissioner places the
number of men deprived of employment at
13,000, and the cost to the State is estimated
at $2,000,000.
The Boston Herald puts it about right
when it says concerning the present condi
tion of the Andover controversy: The claim
of Professor Smyth that the prosecutors have
not made out a proper and sufficient state
ment for his conviction or for the carrying
on of the suit seems to be made on good
grounds. His answer to the board of visit
ors, who are not unwilling to dismiss the
suit on account of insufficient evidence, is a
stroDg and detailed statement of the points
which have been made for his conviction,
and it would seem to be difficult to make
out a case against him or his associates upon
the allegations which have been presented.
Dr. Smyth argues his case like a man, and
affirms his readiness to put everything that
he can in the way of the proper forwarding
of a judgment; but he writes with the con
viction of one who has nothing to affirm or
deny beyond what is already known. It is
yet too early to predict which way this case
will be decided, but it is not hard to see that
there is considerable feeling on the part of
the prosecutors and that the moat will be
made of everything that is not favorable to
Dr. Smyth and fellow professors. The sym
pathies of the outside public are unquestion
ably with the men who are nnder prosecu
tion. RECENT PUBLICATIONS.
"The Message of the Bluebird Told to
Me to Tell to Others," by Irene E. Jerome,
is one of the most attractive of the holiday
Volumes. The bluebird sings to the reader
from all the phases of his life; songs of joy
and gladness, of sorrow and tears, of sun
shine and of rain. Accompanying each song
is an elegant illustration showing the bird iu
the element corresponding to the tenor of
the song. The binding is one of the most
tasty of the season. Lee ot Shepard, pub
lishers. Boston. For sale in this city by
Judd the bookseller.
The well known poem "Curfew Must Not
Ring To-night," by Rosa Hartwick Thorpe,
has been published in a neat little volume
with illustrations by F. T. Merrill and E. H.
Garrett, drawn and engraved under the su
pervision of George T. Andrew. The poem
is a beautiful song of love and bravery made
more attractive by the beauty of its holiday
dress. Lee & Shepard, publishers, Boston.
For sale in this city by Judd the bookseller.
The hymns "Nearer My God to Thee," by
Sarah Flower Adams; "My Faith Looks Up
to Thee," by Ray Palmer: "Home, Sweet
Home," by John Howard Payne; "Rock of
Ages," by Augustus Montague Toplady, and
"Abide With Me," by Henry Francis Lyte,
have been published in new and separate edi
tions by Lee & Shepard, of Boston. They
are bound in neat little volumes with gilt
covers and appropriate designs and admira
bly illustrated, some by Miss L. B. Hum
phrey and others by Lisbeth B. Comins.
The hymns are too familiar to all to need
mention. We can praise only tne neat ana
attractive binding and the illustrations. For
sale in this city by Judd the bookseller.
''Modern Idols Studies in Biography and
Criticism," by William Henry Thorne, is- a
little volume containing studies and criti
cisms on Matthew Arnold, Robert Browning,
Ole Bull, Robert Burns, Thomas Carlyle,
George Eliot and George Sand. Several of
the papers were prepared originally for the
Philadelphia Times as special articles during
the four years in which the author was a
member of its editorial staff. These pa
irs have been revised and the others have
len prepared especially for this work. The
aim of the book is to examine, not to de
stroy, the idols which it has nnder review.
The sketches do not go into detail, but give
discriminations of character and genius in
little space and new thoughts and sugges
tions concerning these " idols." it is a very
interesting and profitable volume. J. B. Lip
pincott & Co., publishers, Philadelphia.
For sale in this city by Jadd the bookseller.
COLD.
The statue of liberty is that of a perfect
woman, even to the cold feet. Blizzard.
Strange as it may seem, when money is
close it is difficult to "get very near it. Bos
ton Post.
"Hullo, Mike, I hear yer on a strike."
"So I am. I struck for fewer hours."
"Did you succeed?"
"Indeed, I did. I'm not working at all
now." Philadelphia Call.
"The darkest hour is just before thedswn."
Tes, we believe that is about the time you
eome in contact with the rooking chair left
in the middle of the room "and eager for the
fray.'" Yonkers Statesman.
A yonng woman in Eastern Maine cries by
the hour because she is tall. Ex. This is a
rather peculiar case, but we have often heard
of a man committing suicide because he was
"short." Norristown Herald.
Young housekeeper in hardware store
"Have you a small hand-bellows for blowing
the firel" Clerk "Something like that,
madam?" Y. H. "Yes, that will do. If
you will fill it with wind and put a cork in
the end I'll take it with me." "
There are in Massachusetts - sixty-five
thousand more women than men. That is
why the women have to stand in the horse
ears. The men cannot make np their minds,
where there are so many women, to which
one to give a seat. Boston Transcript. -
Mistress -"Why, Mary, where have" you
been all the forenoon! I told you you might
go out for a walk for an hour, and you have
been away three hours at least." Domestic
"Yis, marram; but then I'm an awfully
ahlow walker, ye know." Boston Tran
script. "Why, I am told, my dear friends," said a
temperance orator in a low earnest tone,
"that 16,000 liquor saloons are in sight of
Trinity church steepie. Now, what do you
think of that!" A voice from near the en
trance replied: "It'awuth elimbin' (hie) up
the stairs to see." Pnck.
Rules must be obeyed. Irish Policeman
(calling attention to sign, "Leave your cane
or umbrella before entering the art gallery"
"Here, you I Don't yez see the soignf
Countryman "But I ain't got no cane or
umbrella." Irish policeman "Well, git
one thin." Chicago Rambler.
The news editor prepared an artiole in
which he said: "Mr. Dash is hopelessly ill."
Before going to press, Mr. Dash died, and a
hasty alteration was made in the centence to
meet the new condition of affairs. When
Mr. Dash'a friends read in their paper that
"Mr. Dash is (hopelessly dead," they were
naturally shocked. Boston Transcript.
A Great Man. "Does your wife ever pay
you any compliments!" asked Frederick Jim-
son of his friend Benderly. "Never," re
plied Benderly. "Well, mine does. She
flatters me." "Often!" "O, yes, frequently;
particularly in winter," replied Frederick.
"Why does she taffy you so much in win
ter?" "Whenever the coal fire needs re
plenishing she points to the fireplace and
says, 'Frederick, the grate.' " Texas Sittings.
Fnr Seals Learning- to Swim.
From All the Year Bound.
When the young seal is about a month old
its education- begins. One may wonder
wherein this consists, and this feeling will
be intensified when we learn that it consists
in teaching the young to swim. It seems
paradoxical one can hardly believe it that
the finest swimmer of all amphibious crea
tures, which spends half its existence at sea,
has no more ides of swimming at first than
one of our own babies. But it is the fact.
Take a pup and put it out of its depth', and
straightway its bullet head sinks, its hind
parts flop about impotently and its death by
suffocation is the question of a few minutes
only, the little creature not having the least
idea ef lifting up its head and getting the
air.
Such being the case, its education is a
question of some little time and is thus ef
fected: At about six weeks old his instinct
takes him down to tbe water's edge, where
he paddles about all day long, now washed
by the surf and now left high and dry, in
another moment perhaps to be rolled" over
and over by the water. After a few minutes
of this he gets tired, curls himself round
like a oat or dog on the hearth-rug and goes
to sleep, Dut only tor a snort time, for the
seal at all ages is the most restless of living
creatures, men again to tne suit, paddling
about just like onr own little boys and girls.
every day expanding his ideas and proving
to mmseir. tnat water is not such a dreadful
thing after all. By repeated efforts then he
learns to keep himself afloat, to recognize
his own powers and become thoroughly mas
ter of the element in which he has to spend
the greater portion of his life.
President Cleveland's Dally Routine
How He Eats, Sleeps mud Works.
From Lippincott's Magazine.
President Cleveland rises at half-past sev
en o'clock, dresses and shaves himself, and
is ready for breakfast at eight. He break
fasts en famille and finishes his morning re
past in less than thirty minutes. His break
fast usually consists of oatmeal, beefsteak,
coffee, hot cakes and eggs. He is very fond
of fruit and eats freely of it. He leaves the
breakfast table and goes directly to his office
and begins work without any exercise what
ever, writing letters and looking over papers
until ten o'clock, when the callers begin to
arrive. He then has a siege of a couple of
hours with the statesmen and office seekers,
which lasts until half -past one o'clock, when
he is ready for his luncheon. He eats this
in less than fifteen minutes, and, like his
every day breakfasts and dinners, it is eaten
in the private dining room and the whole
family sit down together. ILV Ident Cleve
land's lunch consists of breaU and butter,
cold meats, a little fruit and a cup of tea.
After he has eaten it he go9s directly back
to his office and works steadily until four.
At this time he goes out o drive in compa
ny with his private secretary, Colonel La
mont. He returns in time for dinner, which
is ready at seven o'clock. He dots not dress
for dinner in the conventional st le except
when he has guests who will appear in even
ing dress. His private dinners are plain.
Wine is served only when there are guests
present who are accustomed to drinking
wine with their meals. He is not so fond of
heer as has been reported by the newspapers,
the total White House consumption of this
article during the past year being not more
than two dozen bottles. Tbe President's
daily dinner consists ot five or six courses;
first there is soup, then fish, then a roast,
followed by game, dessert, frnit and after
dinner coffee. He does not sit long at table,
and immediately on leaving it -he goes np
into the corridors of the second story of the
White Honaa and amokea a cigmr, after
which he goes back to his work. President
Cleveland never Bmokes in his office, and the
only smoking he does is this post-prandial
cigar. He goes to bed abont midnight and
falls asleep as soon as his head touches the
pillow. His system is such that six or seven
hours' sleep is sufficient for him.
The Smallest Paper in the World.
IFrom the Pall Mall Gazette.
If a prize were offered for the smallest pa
per in the world the latest addition to the
Parisian press would stand a good chance.
It is called Le Quartier Latin and its super
ficial area is less than a leaf of the Pall Mall
Gazette. This Insignificant structure, taking
for its title the name of the great literary
and artistic quarter of Paris, announces its
collaboratenrs as "all the students." Though
small, it is excessively bright and full of the
genuine esprit of the quartier.
Its strong feature is mots. Each mot is
signed by the author and preceded with a
little pictorial canard. There are also echoes
from the Boub Miche (Boulevard St. Michel),
sketches of types of the district and letters
addressed to the professors. The editor has
already got into trouble with his staff. The
collaborateurs protest against having their
contributions compressed into so little space,
or, what is worse, crushed out altogether.
They threaten to start opposition, but the
conciliatory editor announces fortnightly
supplements of forty pages made up of over
flow matter. The Quartier Latin sells at one
sou, for it employs the old nomenclature for
the currency.
Cox and Campbell In the Same Car
IFrom the Washington Post.1
S. S. Cox and Tim Campbell traveled to
gether to New York in the parlor car oEhe
train which left the Baltimore and Potomac
depot at four o'clock Thursday. Since Cox
was appointed United States minister to
Turkey and Campbell was elected to succeed
him in the Forty-ninth Congress these two
honorable gentlemen have not been as much
together. Waggish people have spent the
summer in trying to raise enmities between
them. They were continually telling Camp
bell that Cox threatened to come home
from Turkey and push him ont of the
Eighth congressional district of New York,
and on the other hand they kept Cox en
rapport with Tim's defiance. It was by
chance and not design that the two states
men struck the same train for New York
yesterday.
When they met and saw what was be
fore them Cox looked very unhappy, but
Campbell sat "mown "with his heavy over
coat on, just sufficiently open to reveal his
nsusl white necktie, an unusual roll of
white flannel around his throat and the
usual large diamond stud in the white shirt
bosom, and seemed supremely indifferent to
or unconscious of Mr. Cox's presence there.
Campbell chatted and laughed with some
friends whom he met in the ear, but Cox,
not knowing any of his fellow passengers,
stood outside on the platform in the cold ap
parently musing on his nnhappy lot and
wondering if he should not wait for the next
train. He was still standing on the platform
with his hands in his trousers pocket, and
was faintly whistling a doleful tune when
the train moved out of the depot. Specta
tors wondered how the two would get along
together in that parlor car on the six or sev
en hours' journey to New York with only
two or three travelers to relieve them of each
other.
Charlemasne'a Hall.
From the 8U James Gazette.
A historic spot, noteworthy in the early
life of mediaeval Germany, is doomed to dis
appear beyond recognition. Ingelheim was
a favorite residence of Charlemagne, where
he built a great palace and monastery, and
laid ont pleasure grounds. From the hill
where he had fixed his own dwelling he re
marked the early disappearance of the win
ter snow from the Johannisberg and the
alopea of Rudesheim, and he had Tines
brought from Italy and planted in these plac
es which instinct told him would produce
good wine. This was the first introduction
of the vine into Germany.
Few remains of the buildings now exist.
What their extent must have been may be
inferred from the fact that from Ingelheim
hill to the Rhine is fully two miles, and yet
the river is said, in all accounts, to have
washed the palace walls.' It is this hill and
immediate neighborhood which is known
among tbe people by the name "Charle
magne's Hall." Some pillars were standing
in the last century; hat they bat been long
since scattered, TJne of them is preserved at
Mayence. A great champagne grower, M. de
Barry, pu -chased the property - me years
since. But he died; and it has passe 1 into
the hands of a limited liability company who
have had the place surveyed and purpose
letting it in small pea-ant holdings.
I?rij (Sooxls.
ARTISTIC NOVELTIES
IN
Hand Painted Goods !
The Handsomest tine We Save
Ever Shown.
ALL NEW GOODS.
NO OLD STOCK.
Me to Selections Now!
As Ton Will Have a Larg
er Stock to Select From.
Wilcox & Oo.
767 V3NTI 771
CHAPEL STREET,
NEW HAVEN. CONN.
WCiscellnnzovcs.
H. J. AUGUR'S
ART ROOMS,
78 Orange Street.
Putting on their Holiday Attire.
GOODS ARRIVING DAILY.
The most elegant goods in the Art Line ever of
fered to the public.
Choice Etchings and Photo
graphs Framed to Order.
Porcelain Wares from all the
known Potteries.
Antique Brass Tables, Easel, Pedesta'g, Lamps.
Artists' materials Full and Com
plete Assortment. Prices Low.
JUST RECEIVED
AT
SMEDLEY'S STOREHOUSE
0"5E CARLOAD GENTS'
Driving and Business Horses
ALSO
1 Square Piano,
a Parlor Suits,
1 Chamber Salt,
I Marhle Top Center Table,
Counters,
Show Cases, etc.
HOTEL DEVONSHIRE.
42D STREET, NEW YORK.
Opposite Grand Central Depot
ADJOINING LINCOLN BANK.
Rooms from 50 cents upwards. Elegant
I my suits for families. Restaurant first class at
fa if moderate prices. Baeeatre to and from de
pot free. 8. I.. HASEr.
J. H. PiiATT. C. P. Thompson.
PLATT & THOMPSON,
INTERIOR DECORATION)
PAINTING AND FRESCOING,
64 and 66 Orange Street,
: N"ew Etaven, Ot.
for.
Pits, Oils, Class,
THOMPSON & BELDEN,
896 and 898
nl
COURIER BUILDING.
PAINTS, OILS, ETC
u II anillUF In white and all other de
KALSQMINC. sirable tints.
BRUSHES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION.
SPERM WHALE LARD AND
ALL KINDS OP LUBRICATING OILS.
Artists' Materials, Etc.,
AT VERY LOW PRICES.
D. S. GLEOTET &WB,
Bfos. 37 and 379 State SU
wwtS
1762 Wisbin6&i? Of.
r BOSTON, MASS.
3yCanufaclurc from, the 3Tor
mulas of the (Celebrated
Br. Re C, Flower
s number of Specific ent
e&ies of known action and
power, the jDytcrits and Uses
of wKicK will be- Here made
known in future issues.
NOTE. Sand for the standard for
mula book, which will bo
mailed FREE on appli
cation to the
F.JYia&o

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