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Morning journal and courier. [volume] (New Haven [Conn.]) 1848-1894, February 19, 1887, Image 4

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015483/1887-02-19/ed-1/seq-4/

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February It). 187
VOL. LV.
mm
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THE AMERICAS BOARD.
Its Action In the Hume and Morse
Case. A Letter from Rer. Dr. Smyth
Of Center Church The Board's Posi
tion Sharply O vera anted In Boston.
Yesterday's Boston Advertiser has the fol
lowing letter from EeT. Dr. Newman Smyth,
of this city, and in a half column of edito
rial comment the same paper strongly en
dorses Dr. Smyth's position and criticisms as
set forth in the letter:
The prudential committee within the same
week have voted that under instructions
from the board given at Des Moines they
could allow Mr. Hume to return to India,
but under the same instructions they could
not appoint as a missionary Mr. E. C. Morse,
a student who had bee strongly reconV
mended by members of the Yale theological
faeulty. The theological statement upon
which the committee acted in the case of
Mr. Morse falls well within even the state
ment which the committee gave to the pub
lic of Mr. Hume's theological views, air.
Morse holds that the Bible does not teach
that all are lost who do not receive the gos
pel in this life, and says: "All I mean with
reference to tne nypotnesis or a luiure pro
bation is that I do not know." In his letters
to the committee he had said that he should
expect the same liberty as is granted to min
isters at home.
What, then, were these instructions nnder
whish the committee say "they are not war
ranted in authorizing" the appointment of
Mr. Morse "anon the statement" which he
had made?
At Des Moines, Dr. Noble introduced a
theological resolution by which he sought to
commit the board te a disavowal of the doc
trine of future probation, but under which
he simply would instruct the committee to
exercise great care in selecting missionaries
for tne foreign neld. n,ven tnat resolution,
had it passed, would have left large option
to the committee. Bnt Dr. Chapin substi
tuted for it a modified and very general reso
lution, which he said was not "so objection
able." Dr. Chapin's resolution disavowed no
doctrine and set up no doctrinal standard; it
was aimed against "certain tendencies" and
what "seamed" to some to be their appear
ance, and admonished the committee to care
fully guard the board "from any commit
tal to the approval or that doctrine." To
send out a missionary who holds the
hypothesis of future probation is not a com
mittal of the board to the approval of it, any
more than to appoint Dr. Gtoodwin would be
an approval of Second Adventism. Presi
dent Hopkins, in putting the motion, de
clared that it was not a theological resolu
tion, and upon that declaration and under
standing the vote was taken. It was not
theological" in tne sense tnat it put the
board, to quote from President Hopkins'
language, "in an attitude of producing an
ex-cathedra judgment on a theologica 1
question." Had it been understood as im
posing a new doctrinal test, the yeas and
nays would nave Deen insisted upon.
The committee, moreover, seem to have
overlooked the fact that at the time, on the
platform of the board, their attention was
expressively called to the point that the res
olution did not cover the case of the student
from New Haven. In speaking
upon President Chapin's motion I
asked for an explicit declaration of what in
structions the board intended to give to the
committee, and insisted that if they meant to
authorize the rejection of the young men
whose cases had been reported they should
say so in plain, unambiguous words. (See
The great debate," p. oa.) xn. Doard were
aaked to make their meaning plain, if such
were the intention, by using the language of
the home secretary concerning the decisive
ness of this life in all cases.
The board did not use that language. This
is just what the board by its resolution did
not say. And no gentleman of the pruden
tial committee in response to the request
rose to Bay that the resolution meant to con
vey such instructions. No member of the
board said so. it was not said at Des Moines.
Yet now Secretary Alden, writing as clerk
of the prudential committee, in his official
communication respecting Mr. Morse
nses this expression, which neither he
nor anyone else embodied in the res
olution, or used in interpretation of the reso
lution at Pes Moines. What right have they
now, in a letter to a oandidate, to put an in
terpretation upon a resolution which they
did not, then challenged to do so, openly put
upon it at Des Moines? an interpretation
which I do not believe the board, even in the
excitement of that hour, would have so far
lost its self-possession as te put into explicit
resolutions and instrnctions. Such a con
struction is unhistorical; it is as nnhistorical
toward Des Moines as it is unprophetic
toward Springfield next October.
The prudential committee may be proper
ly thanked for one service which they have
rendered, even at the expense of historical
truth and at the cost of their own consist
ency. They have drawn a definite and dis
tinct line. They have, as they understand
it, instructions which permit them to
send Mr. Hume back untram
melled, but which forbid them to appoint a
man who simply says, with regard to proba
tion, "I do not know." The issue is thus
plainly put at last before the board and our
churches. Must all missionary candidates
accept Secretary Alden's dogma of the abso
lnte decisiveness of the present earthly life in
all cases? Dr. Alden supposed this dogma to
be so ancient and so commonly received that
without offense, under cover of the authority
of the board, he could quietly interpolate it
into the Apostles' creed. He failed to put
this divisive dogma into the creed of the
creed commission, he failed to secure its
adoption at Des Moines; but he has succeed
ed, to the great hurt of missions, in inducing
a majority of the present prudential com
mittee to accept it as a test of missionary
appointment. This presents a definite
issue. And there is but one possible end
to the whole controversy. It cannot end
in schism, for our conservative brethren,
even should they wish to do so, cannot put
us out, and we certainly do not want to put
them out. It must end in toleration. The
sooner it is settled upon the principle of
evangelical toleration in things doubtful and
unessential the less will be the expense to the
board both in money and of men. The agi
tation will certainly be continued and in
creased until all obstacles are removed which
prevent Chiistian comprehension in mission
ary work in che administration of our board.
Then when the principle of Christian unity
is fairly granted the discussion of the hy
pothesis of future probation will drop out of
the forced and nnnatural prominence which
resistance to its free and scholarly discussion
has given it and it will serve whatever pur
pose it may serve in the progress and con
servatism of our faith.
Yours truly, Newman Smyth.
Last evening's Boston Herald commenting
at length on the Hume and Morse cases ar
raigns the American board which it charges
with "moral perversity" and with being
"prostituted to party measures in a religions
controversy." Mr. Hume is allowed to go
back to India "owing to the pressure of pub
lic opinion," aad "on the same terms which
he named, which are in no sense a back down
from his well known views as to the future
probation of the heathen world." The Herald
article says further: "The prudential com
mittee have seen fit to publish a garbled
statement of what those terms were, and
have compelled Mr. Hume to expose their
disingenuous conduct by publishing what he
actually'stated his terms to be. This is a part
of the iniquity. The other part is their in
consistency in refusing to allow Mr. Morse,
of the Yale seminary, to go out as a mission
ary on the same terms on whioh Mr. Hume
is allowed to return to the Marathi mission.
This is hedging of the worst sort. It is the
establishing of a precedent, and then
refusing to be governed by it in cases
which are similar. It is uaderstood that Mr.
Morse does not propose to teach the dogma
of a f uturs probation, but refuses to commit
himself absolutely to the assertion that there
is no future probation, and that he is as cer
tain of the fact as he is of the existence of
God. This was Dr. Alden's point of faith in
one case and it is presumed that it has served
in other cases. There are perhaps from ten
to twenty persons now waiting in the Con
gregational body to enter into the mission
field and thousands of heathen, accord
ing to the creed of the prudential
committee, are entering the other world as
doomed sinners every day. Mr. Hume can
return to save a few from their awful fate,
bnt the committee draw a line of distinction
and are willing to suspend the salvation of
the heathen so far as they can, unless these
candidates for the foreign work are willing to
assert that they are as sure of the damnation
of unconverted heathen as they are of the
great verities of the Christian belief. The
moral situation of the prudential committee
at this juncture is one not to be envied, and
their moral obliquity is a puzzle to those
who believe in acting squarely in all things.
The Connecticut Bible Society.
The financial year of the Connecticut Bi
ble society closes with the month of Febru
ary. All treasurers of auxiliaries and
churches and all other individuals who may
have in hand money for the treasury of the
society, or which may be so appointed, are
desired to forward it at once to Henry W.
Taylor, treasurer, Hartford, Conn.
The peculiar purifying and building up
powers of Hood's Sarsaparilla make it the
very best medicine to take at this season.
AT TALB.
Opening of the V. M. c. A. Conven
tion Last Bnalac Addresses Mr
President Dwight a nd Mr. Monroe
To-Day's Programme other Tale
Matters.
The delegates to the Y. M. C. A. conven
tion have all arrived and have been quarter
ed by the committee. The convention was
opened last evening by prayer by Dr. Barbour
and addresses of welcome by President
Dwight and Dr. W. C. Huntington. The ad
dress of the evening was by Mr. Albert B.
Monroe. There was a large attendance de
spite the pouring rain. This morning ser
vices will begin at quarter-past nine and will
last all day. Meetings will be held during
the whole day for the disenssion ef various
subjects by the delegrates. Addresses will
also be given by the following noted men
At 10 a.m., "How to reach unconverted stu
dents," by L. D. Wishard; at 11 a.m., "The
use of the word with the unconverted," by
A. F. Behrends. D.D.. of Brooklyn: at 2:45,
"The study of the Bible by col
lege students," by Professor Harper
of Yale; at 8:30, "The college graduate in
the Y. M. C. A.." bv J. T. Swift, general
secretary of the Y. M. C. A." On Sunday
the morning sermon in the chapel will be
preached by Eev. M. R. Vincent, D. D., of
New York, and at 8 an address will be given
by Rev. A. F. Schauther, u. XJ., .r jxew
York.
There will be no contest in the high jump
inf to-dav.
The Sheff. freshmen have decided to meet
at Traeger's on Tuesday evening and march
in a body from tnere tne JNew naven -p-era
House.
The anniversarv of Washineton will be cel-
brated by Yale by the suspension of all
recitations during the day and the omission
of chanel in the morning.
Prof. Brewer will talk this morning in
North Sheffield hall on volcanoes.
The banauet in honor of "Bob" Cook will
be given to-night. A large number of the
students will attend, as will also a double
quartette from the Glee olub and the Banjo
club. Tickets are $o.
President Archibald has appointed Messrs.
Stewart, Dann and Sheffield to oonfer with
graduates in reference to the proposed new
league.
BUILT A HOUSE,
Mere
New
Haven Men
Down in
Florida.
Mr. John Cox, owner and proprietor of the
Surf House just below Savin Rock, his wife
and child are at St. Lucie, Florida. Mr. Cox
went for his health, whioh was quits poor
last fall, but is now nearly restored. Mr.
Maine, the Church street restauratenr, ac
companied Mr. Cox and family to St. Lucie,
and likes the place so well that he has bought
a piece of ground there and built himself a
summer residence upon it. St. Lucie is near
the coast on the St. John's river, and is
where Messrs. Brown and Bradley, of Fair
Haven, are engaged in the oyster business.
Mr. Cox and family and Mr. Maine return in
the spring.
An Explanation.
The faction of a council, whioh meets in
the Courier building and call themselves
Olive Branch No. 7, seem to borrow a great
deal of trouble about the couneil Olive
Branch No. 7 that meets in the Insurance
building. The council which meets in the
Insurance building admits no male members,
except those who are members of the O. U.
A. M., and they wish it distinctly under
stood that they are not of the same order as
the ones that meet in the Courier building,
and they have a charter hanging on their
wall in room 14 Insurance building, with
the incorporated seal upon it, and they need
borrow no further trouble on our account, as
we are fully responsible for all we do.
A Member of Olive Branch No. 7,
Insurance Building.
Praise Service At College Street
church.
Following is the programme 'or the praise
service to take place at College street churoh
to-morrow evening:
Organ prelude.
Responsive Reading.
Hymn 832 Tune Lenox.
Anthem Gloria In Excelsis: in E flat Schilling
Quartette and Chorus.
Prayer.
Hymn 848 Tune Bovlston.
Male Quartette St. Bernard's Hymn Phelps
Reading of Scriptures.
Offertory. .
Hymn 751 Tune Ariel.
Address by the Pastor.
Contralto Solo Jesus, Lover of My 8oul Andre
Miss Sophie L. Northrop.
Hymn 760 Tune Bayley.
Prayer.
Anthem The Lord Is My Rock Hopkins
Full Chorus.
Hymn Anthem All Power Is Given Unto Thee,
and Coronation Choir and Congregation.
Benediction.
Postlude.
W. C. X. V.
Rev. Phebe A. Hanaford will address the
Woman's Christian Temperance union meet
ing at English Hall on Sunday at 3 p. m.
All are cordially invited to attend.
THK HOtllT KECOKO.
Superior Court Civil Side-Judge Tor
ranee.
Judge Torrance yesterday afternoon ad
journed court nntil next Friday, when Judge
Stoddard will oocupy the benoh for the as
signment of cases. The trial of Heller vs.
Mceller, whioh was begun on Thursday after
noon, was concluded yesterday afternoon.
A decree of divorce from Martha M. Perrin
of Mamaroneck, N. Y. , from Frederick M,
Perrin, of this city, was issued yesterday by
Judge Torrance on the ground of adultery
and desertion. Two minor children were
given to the petitioner. The couple were
married January 24, 1874. Perrin has been
the proprietor of a place which bears a bad
reputation and which was recently raided.
Walter Wentworth, of this city, was di
vorced from Blanche Wentworth on the
ground of adultery.
Harriet L. Lovett was granted a divorce
from Wm. J. Lovett on the ground of de
sertion. Judge Torrance yesterday afternoon made
a decision in the case of Osborne MacDaniel
vs. Jared B. Flagg, which was tried two
weeks ago. The decision was in favor of the
plaintiff to recover $1,238.99.
Court of Common Pleas Judge Btmd-
ler.
The case of Margaret Bennett, of Derby,
vs. Thomas Curry was non-suited yesterday
in this court and the plaintiff will have to
pay $14.60 costs. The suit was .roHght to
recover $3.
At the bar meeting yesterday afternoon
the following assignments for next week were
made:
Tuesday Alexander E. Hamiltos vs. Georee A.
uenoison et ux ; Charles Cook ts. Alfred Good
year. Thursday Jefferson D. BlaVeales vs. Henry Tr-
ier, aeienaaui s appeal ; J.nerson u. JD1&KC1M va.
Marearet Tvler. defendant's anoeal.
Friday Wallace, Elliott & Co. vs. David M. Sli-
ney, plea ana Jurisdiction.
City Court Criminal Side Judge
Plekett.
Henry Meyers, embezzlement, 15 days in
lail; W . L. Matier, interfering with omoer.
$10, appealed; Ellen Evans, selling liquor
without license, continued to Feb. 21; James
Flynn and William Fickett, breach of the
peace, continued to Feb. 21: Matthew Shea.
breaking windows, $1; Ellen Nugent, same,
judgment suspended; Thomas Wynn, 1st',
ana i nomas wynn, za, breach ef tne peaoe,
$15 and $1; James Dunn, theft, nolled on
payment of costs; Christopher Dunn. Wil
liam Dunn, Frank Green, Richard Fitzpatriok
and ueremian Sullivan, tneft, discharged,
court Notes.
In the Probate court yesterday the hearing
on the matter of admitting the will of the
late A.Tuttle to probate was commenced and
adjourned for one week.
FINALLY SETTLED.
The cases of Charles H. Bartholomew vs.
J. J. Bartholomew, and George C. Webber,
trustee for Mary Bartholomew, vs. J. J.
Bartholomew, were finally settled yesterday
by the defendant paying the judgment and
costs, amounting to $100, which was given
last week by Justice John C. Gallagher. The
defendant changed his intention of appeal
ing. TWO COUSINS FIGHT.
Judge Pickett yesterday fined Thomas
Wynn of 48 Franklin street $15 end Thomas
Wynn of 86 West street $1 for fighting. The
two Wynns are cousins.
ELLEN NUGENT AGAIN.
Ellen Nugent, of unsavory reputation,
threatened to stab her landlady, Mrs. Mans
field of 26 Castle street,Thursday night while
drunk. She couldn't find Mrs. Mansfield
and so demolished the windows in revenge
and was sent to jail yesterday for 10 days.
New York Physician.
Many of the leading physicians of New York are
discussing the propriety of admitting the Moxie
Nerve Food Into their regular practice, as it is a
harmless food and found to be able to prevent re
lapses on chronic cases helped by medicine. It has
lately been put to the test and found to have stopped
a number of cases of paralysis and Bright's disease
in the first stages, and it is well known that these
oirlguiaAe from depleted net v forge. Stawaw ,
PAIR HAVEN.
A New Schooner Xo Be Built Per
sonal Mention Items or General In
terest. J. P. DeForest of Atwater street, who has
been quite seriously ill for some time past
with inflammation of the bowels is now able
to sit up a short time each day.
Mr. J. Stevens, of Brooklyn, N. Y., has
been visiting Mr. and Mrs. J. W.Howland on
Atwater street.
: The stock of oonfeotionary of Giles W.
Clark has been purchased by Fred A. Foots.
Mr. Clark has gone out of business.
Sev. Erastus Blakeslee of the Second
church, who was a general of oavalry during
the war has been invited to deliver his lecture
entitled, "The five phases of the
war" before Admiral 5?ote post G. A. R.
next Saturday evening, February 26.
The Sunday afternoon temperanoe meet
ing at Quinnipiao rink will be addressed by
Mr. Frederick Richards, of Wallingford.
Henry Hughes has been visiting friends in
East River.
Carpenters are now busily at work in East
River getting out timber for a twelve hun
dred ton three-masted schooner that is to be
built at H. H. Hansoom's shipyard during
the coming summer.
Miss Alice Pratt of Brooklyn, N. Y., for
merly of Fair Haven, has been spending a
few days with friends on Atwater street.
St. Francis' parish is said to have become
so large that three priests will hereafter be
engaged in its ministrations. Rev. Father
Flemming, who has been assisting during
Rev. Fatter Mulholland's illness, is expected
to remain some time yet.
- Mr. Justin B. Rowe is intending to remove
with his family to southern California next
month for the benefit of his wife's health,
and will sell out his household effects at
onoe.
President Kendall of the Quinnipiao Brew
ing company has gone to Detroit on busi
ness. STILL GKOWINU.
The Building Fund or the Slxwell
Avenue Church.
To the Editor of the Journal and Courier:
Collected this week, $187.91. Yet to be
raised, $533.83. m
I am encouraged from the report of this
week that next week will bring me this bal
anoe which I have striven so hard for the last
four months. I cannot believe that friends
of this enterprise will stand by and see me
fall through in my efforts to raise this sum.
If there is anything like failure in realizing
this sum this week I am sure I shall not feel
blameworthy, for I think I can justly claim
having done my level best and I have already
as best I oould laid the matter before friends
in this community. In my next report, the
last for February and I trust the last in the
history of this enterprise, I hope that by a
hearty response from friends who can help
us this whole sum may be realized.
My report this week is as follows: Whit
neyville Congregational church and Sunday
school, $77; Mrs. James G. Hotchkiss, West
ville, $5; a friend, $5; Mrs. W. D. Whitney,
$2; Second Congregational church, Fair Ha
ven, $29.91; Dr. E. H. Bishop, $10; Joseph
Parker, $25; Joseph Parker. jr.,
$10; a friend, $1; Miss Nellie H.
Benedict, $2; cash, $10 additional; President
H. M. Welch, $5 additional; G. W. L. Bene
dict, $5; a friend, $1.
Trusting that pastors will not forget me in
my struggles in their respective churches and
that friends will send their mites to me,
however small, or hand them to their pas
tors so that our next report may bring me
the $533.83 now due the builders, yours
for the Master,
Albert P. Miller, 480 Elm street.
XHE ORBIT IRISH STKSSSLK.
A Graphic Work In Which the Patrt
otic Services of Xown A gent Reynold.
Are Recorded.
In "Gladstone, Parnell, and the Great
Irish Struggle," a work written jointly by
T. P. O'Connor, IT. P., and Robert M. Mo
Wade of Philadelphia and just published,
appears a biographical sketch accompanied
by a portrait of Town Agent Reynolds of
this city. The other great leaders of the
Irish movement in America,such as Alexander
Sullivan, Patrick Egan, John Boyle O'Reilly
and others whose names are familiarly con
nected with the struggle for Ireland's rights,
ngure similarly in the American portion ot
the book which is gotten np by Mr. MoWade,
city editor of the Public Ledger of Philadel
phia. Considerable space is given to the
story of Mr. Reynolds' patriotism, and his
connection with the daring Catalpa move
ment by which a number of Irish pris
oners ware carried off from Australia nnder
the very nose of the British men-of-war re
ceives particular mention as a specially pa
triotic effort. Mr. Reynolds, as is well
known, was one of the leading spirits in the
Land league and later in the Irish National
league of America, and, as the book well
says, any history of the Irish movement in
America would be incomplete without special
reference to his practical activities and patri
otic endeavor in the cause. In the Irish por
tion of the work, which is the work of Hon.
T. P. O'Connor, the history of the Parnell
movement is told from its birth with absorb
ing interest, and the portraits of prominent
persons identified with the movement give
additional interest to the faots and incidents
related. Ireland's struggle for liberty has
engaged the attention of the world for centu
ries, and the modern constitntional methods
of agitation which have been so fruitful nn
der the leadership of Parnell must ever
awaken responsive support in America when
studied by the graphio light that is diffused
through the pages of "Gladstone, rarnen,
ana the Great Irish Struggle."
Donations.
Donations received by the Young Wo
men's Christian association in January:
Stereoscope, from a friend; books and mis
sionary magazines, from Miss Townsend;
copies of "The Churchman," from Mrs. Low;
1 1-2 dozen tea plates, 1 dozen cups and
saucers, 1 1-2 dozen butters, from Mrs. J. A
Dickerman; $1, from Mrs. Barney; $25, an
nual subscription from Mrs. Thomas Wells,
Mrs. E. M. Jerome, cor. secy.
STATE CORRESPONDENCE.
Birmingham.
Birmingham, Feb. 18. A literary and
musical entertainment will be given by Bir
mingham division, S. of T., on Wednesday
evening, February 23d, at Odd Fellows' hall.
Besides local talent, Mrs. E. P. Bellows, a
fine vocaliBt from Brooklyn, and Miss Gracie
Bronson, of Bridgeport, a gifted elocution
ist, will take part; also three Milford gentle
men will give some musical selections. Ad
mission twenty cents. The proceeds will be
used for the benent of tne division.
Mrs. G. L. Thompson, of New Britain, is
visiting in town, tne guest of Mrs. m. W.
feck.
John W. Osborne, who has been quite ill
for the past two weeks, is able to be out
again.
Charles Kneen, formerly a clerk for Binke
the grocer, has taken a position with the
Shelton Bolt company.
Mr. Merritt Clark, who went south for his
health, is improving and gaining strength
every day.
North Haven
AN INTERESTING CHAPTER A
CLASS.
NOTED BIBLE
North Haven, Feb. 17. The feed build
ing on the premises of Miss E. A. Linsley
has been purchased by Mr. Drinkwine, and
is now on the way to some land recently
bought of Mr. J. B. Smith, where it is to be
made into a dwelling house. The work is
nnder the supervision of Mr. s. F. Lmsley.
but accidents on account of the mud occur
each day and cause delays, so the proeession
does not move very fast.
An oyster supper by the young people of
St. John's parish is to be given in the oonrt
room Monday evening, February 21,
Mr. Frank Stiles, who has been absent in
Vermont and vicinity for several days in
pursuit of horses for use in their brick work
next summer, was expected home last eve
ning. F. C. Bradley, who has been absent for
seven weeks in California, returned in good
health yesterday morning.
Thirty-five years ago a lady inthis place, a
member of the Congregational church, or
ganized a Sunday school class mostly of mar
ried ladies who were not members ot the
school or who had been teachers and thought
a change would be beneficial. The lady was
chosen teacher, which position she occupied
until a few years since an accident caused
her to be unable to attend church. During
those years the church was for some time
without a settled pastor, and ministers sup
plying the pulpit would remain during the
intermission and many times would take a
seat in that class, as it was near
the pnlpit where an elderly lady, Mrs.
Marks, one of the mothers in the
church, always sat. The teacher being a
clergyman's wife and the daughter of an ed
ucated physician had been favored with su
perior advantages and was well able to in
struct, even reverend gentlemen. On such
occasions the members of the class thought
they enjoyed some rare opportunities of
hearing Bible matters discussed and of tak
ing part in the discussion. The teacher is
still living, bnt the last member of the origi
nal class, Mrs. Willis Tnltle, died eight years
aero. The class is still well known as Mrs.
Cowles' class, although now taught by Mr.
B, T. Shelley. j
"ONLY AFTER DEATH"
WHAT WONDERS THE MICROSCOPE
BIAS DONE FOR VS.
No Longer abltged to Die to Find Out
" What's Killing" Be."
One of the leading scientific) publications
states that many leading people arc now
using the microscope to discover the real
cause of disease in the system, and to deteot
adulterations of food and medicines.
This wonderful instrument has saved
many a life. A microscopical test shows for
instance the presenoe of albumen or the life
of the blood in certain derangements of the
kidneys, but medicine does not tell us how
far advanced the derangement is or whether
it shall prove fatal.
The microscope, however, gives ns this
knowledge:
Bright's disease, which so many people
dread, was not fully known nntil the micro
scope revealed its characteristics. It greatly
aids the physician skilled in its use in deter
mining how far disease has advanced, and
gives a fuller idea of the true structure of
the kidney.
A noted German seholar recently discov
ered that by the aid of the microscope the
physician can tell if there is a tumor form
ing in. the system, and if certain appearances
are seen in the fluids passed it is proof posi
tive that the tumor is to be a malignant one.
If any derangement of the kidneys is de
tected by the microscope the physioian looks
for the development of almost any disease
the system is heir to, and any indication of
Bright's disease, which has no symptoms of
its own and cannot be fully recognized except
by the microscope, he looks upon with
alarm.
This disease has existed for more than two
thousand years. ' It is only until recently
tnat tne microscope has revealed to ns its un
iversal prevalence and fatal character. Per
sons who formerly died of what was called
general debility, nervous break-down, drop
sy, paralysis, heart disease, rheumatism,
apoplexy, etc. , are now known to have really
died of kidney disease, because had there
been no disorder of the kidneys the chances
are that the effects from which they died
would never have existed.
As the world becomes better acquainted
with the importance of the kidneys in the
human economy by the aid of the microscope
there is greater alarm spread through the
communities concerning it, and this accounts
for the erroneous belief that it is on the
increase.
As yet neither homeopathist nor allopathist
is prepared with a eure for deranged kidneys,
but the world has long since recognized, and
many medical gentlemen also recognize and
prescribe Warner's safe cure for these de
rangements, and admit that it is the only
specific for the common and advanced forms
of kidney disorders.
Formerly the true cause of death was dis
covered only after death. To-day the mi
croscope shows us in the water we pass the
dangerous condition of any organ in the
body, thus enabling us to treat it promptly
and escape premature death.
As the microscope in the hands of laymen
has revealed many diseases that the medical
men were not aware of, so that preparation,
like many other discoveries in medicine and
science, was found out by laymen outside
the naedioal code; consequently it comes very
hard for medical men to indorse and pre
scribe it. Nevertheless Warner's safe cure
continues to grow in popularity and the evi
dences of its effectiveness are seen on every
hand.
Some persons claim that the proprietors
should give the medical profession the
formula of this remedy, if it is such a "God
send to humanity," and let the physicians
and public judge whether or not it be so
recognized.
We, however, do not blame them for not
publishing the formula even to get the recog
nition of the medical profession. The stand
ing of the men who manufacture this great
remedy is equal to that of the majority of
physicians, and the reason that some doctors
give for not adopting and prescribing it
viz. : that they do not know what its ingre
dients are is absurd.
Mr. Warner's statement that many of the
ingredients are expensive, and that the desire
of the unscrupulous dealer or prescriber to
realize a large pront from its manufacture by
using cheap or injurious substances for
those ingredients would jeopardize its quality
and reputation; and that Warner's safe cure
cannot be made in small quantities on
aecount of the expensive apparatus necessary
in compounding these ingredients seems to
ns to be a reasonable and sumoient one.
The universal testimony of our friends
and neighbors, and the indisputable evidence
that it and it alone has complete mastery
over all diseases of the kidneys, is sufficient
explanation of its extraordinary reputation,
and conclusive proof that it is perhaps the
most beneficent discovery known to scientific
medicine since the microscope revealed to
us the all-important nature of the organs it
is designed to reach and benefit.
Pearl's White Glycerine
Has a wonderful affinity for the skin. It eradi
cates all the spots, freckles and many faults of the
complexion and gives it a beautiful appearance It
does not injure the skin but benefits it. Drugeists
keep it. f 15 eod3t
Dr. S. E. "Whitman says: "Have found 'Digesty
lin' beneficial in severe cases of dyspepsia "
Sold by all druggists, $1 per bottle, or W. F. Kid
der & Co., Manufacturing Chemists, 83 John St.,
N. Y.
Advice to Mothers.
Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup for chil
dren teething is the prescription of one of
tht, best female nurses and physicians in the
United States, and has been used for forty
years with never failing success by millions
of mothers for their children. During the
process ot teething its value is incalculable.
It relieves tne child from pain, cures dysen
tery and diarrhoea, griping in the bowels and
wind colic. By giving health to the child it
rests f-ne mother, nice zoo a bottle.
a9mws&wly
When Baby was sick, we gave her CASTOBIA,
When she was a Child, sue cried for C ASTORIA,
When she became Miss, she clung to CASTOBIA,
When she bad Children, she gave them CASTOBIA.
SECURITY INSURANCE CO.,
OF NEW HAVEN.
NO. 2 LYON BUILDING, 769 CHAPEL STREET
CASH CAPITAL. $300,000
DIRECTORS:
Chas. S. Leete, Thos. R.Trowbridge, J. A. Bishop
v it m i : a irrii -av "i
J as. D Deweu, Cornelius Fiorpom, Wm. XL Tyler.
CHAS. S. LEETE. President.
JAMES D. DEWELL VicePreaiden
H. MAHON, Secretary.
H. C. FULLER, Attestant Secretary
oclOeod
NEW YORK
LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY
ORGANIZED 1815.
PURELY MUTUAL.
Cash Assets $86,864,321 32
Divisible Surplus Co.'s Standard 7,064.-478 13
Tontine Surplus Co 's Standard 3,123,743 77
Total Surplus Co.'s Standard 10,188.215 90
Surplus. State Nw York 13,415,046 94
Policies in force ". 86,418
Insurance in force 2S9.674.500 00
Annual income lt.121.172 74
Annual premiums in force 13.517.426 03
New business written in 1885 08,521,452 00
All approved forms of policies written. Good
agents wanted.
For full information and rates apply to office,
811 CHAPEL STREET.
NEW HAVEN, CONN.
A. L. GURNEY,
GENERAL. AGENT.
Perfection in Butter.
Few neorjle In Htfo Vm thn flavor of strictlv
fresh made Pure Cream Butter.
Granulated Cream Butler
as taken from the churn may be seen every day at
the Creamerv. Wn make all the Butter we sell.
and we sell all we make. Call and see our methods
at the Creamery,
1,098 CHAPEL STREET,
A Higher Market All Around Local
Dealer. Doing Most or the Business
No Heavy Dealings But Closing Prices
Near the Best of the Say.
New You, Feb. 18.
The market opened 14 to H higher for all
stocks and gradually advanced a little throughout
the forenoon, though the volume of business was
very small.beiBg only 87,000 shares up to li o'clock,
against 111,000 in the same hours yesterday. There
was no news or other special causa for an advance
except that prices declined yesterday without any
special cause in the general news or the business
sltuatiou. The general public outside of the city
are doing almost nothing In stocks. London, and
even Chicago, were not doing enough this forenoon
to have an influence on prices. T he dealings in the
stock market have scarcely ever been more strictly
local in their character than they are at present.
The great bulk of the business is done by brokers
and professional speculators whs are In the board,
room and do their trading there almost exclusively
upon the principle of "following the crowd." In
such a situation it requires only a slight demon
stration by some larger operator to send the mar'
ket a point or se one way or the other, until it
meets with some stubborn resistance which resis
tance has been developed in every ease In the las
montn. xne crop in Kicnmona Teratuui yier
day is now known to have been entirely the result
of manipulation, aided by unfonnded rumors.
though thelobject in depressing the stock by this
means is not yet clear, as there is no considerable
short interest in it to be covered. There was a
great deal of talk yesterday to the effect that the
decline in St. Paul from 92 on Wednesday to 0a
yesterday was the effect of the pool which was
formed two weeks ago having sold out. If this were
true, it would prove one of two things, viz : Either
there was a pretty strong substratum to the mar
ket to take all the pool stock at once without a
greater decline, or else that the holdings of the
pool had never been very large, and therefore that
the strength of the stock was not due to the pool
support. But whether it was true or not that the
pool sold any of their stock, it is pretty certain that
on the belief that they were selling the bears pul
out a very considerable line of new short stock,
which makes that more chance of its getting an
upward reaction. The market continued very quiet
after 13:30, and during the hour and a half to 9
o'clock there was a decline of 48,, with an ex
ceptional decline of 1 per cent, on East Tennessee
first preferred to 76j. Cincinnati, Indianapolis,
St. Louis and Chicago (Big Four) was a feature,
having declined 2 per cent, to 101 and subsequently
advanced to 103;. In the final dealings the market
was stronger, with the majority of stocks sear the
best prices of the day. The total sales were 182,000
shares.
Governments closed firm.
Closing price, reported over the private wires of
BUNNELL SCRANTON. Bankers and Brokers-
Bid Asked
Alton and Terre Haute 32
33
Alton and'Terre Haute Dfd
Boston & N. Y. Air Line pfd 101
Burlington and Quincy Jty4
C. C, C. 1 62
Cameron Coal 44
Canada Southern 5S9
Canadian Pacific OOg
Central rracinc 36
Chicago and Alton 144
Chesapeake and Ohio 8
80
102
140
63
45
68
37
146
8X
If
18
39
6
9)s
SO
84)
136i
102J4
26
14
77)4
28)2
SSH
71)4
64
111
131
42
20
130
27K
94)2
61)4
156)4
69
69
70
100
19
g
17)4
61
13
86)4
3
21
47
S7?4
6M
114)2
141
Sr
48)4
108)4
18
103)4
32)2
66)4
35)2
Chesapeake and Ohio, 1st pfd 15
tjnesaueaae ana uoio, 4a pxa...
Chic, St, Louis & Pitts
Chic, St. Louis & Pitts. P'f 'd. . .
Cin. W. & B
Cin. W. & B. P'f'd
Columbus &Hocking Valley
Consolidated Gas
10
- 17H
38
. 5
35J4
BH
1355s
1026
84
Del., Lack. Western..
Dei. and HudsonCanal
Denver S: Rio Grande .
East Tenn., Va. & Ga
East Tenn., Va. & Ga. 1st pfd
... 13
... 79Vfi
xa pia 2
Erie 396
Erie pfd , 71
Erie .seconds 98
Express Adams 142
Express United States 62
Express American . .- 100
Wells, Fargo 129
Houston & Texas
Ind., Blom. AW 18J6
Illinois Central 129
Kansas & Texas 27
Lake Shore 94j
Louisville A Nashville 60?g
Manhattan Elevated 166U
Memnhis A Chaleston 58
Michigan ICentral 88
Mil.. L. Shore & Western 70
Mil., L. Shore & W. pfd 99&
Minn. & 8 1. Louis i8Vj
Minn. & St.. Louis pfd 414
Missouri Fae 107
Nashville & Chattanooga 84
New Central Coal 16
New Jersey Central 70J
New York Central 312?J
New York & New Eng 60JS
N. Y.. Suso. &. West 12t
N.Y Suso. & West pfd 304
N. Y.. C. & St. Louis 7
N. Y., C. k St. Louis pfd 18
Norfolk & Western 20U
Norfolk fe West pfd 47)2
Northern Pacific 27J4
Northern Pacific pfd 59
Northwest 114)6
Norlhwesc pfd ' to
Oil Certificates 60$
Ohio & Mississippi sau
Omana 48U
Omaha pfd ion
Ontario & Western 17
Oregon Navigation 102
Oregon Transcontinental 32
Pacino Mail -86
Peoria. D. and Evansvilie 35M
Reading S73
Rlehmond & West Point. 44 44U
Rock Island 126 127
San Francisco siw sg
San Francisco pfd 64 65)4
San Francisco 1st pfd 112V4 113
Bt. Paul got.
St. Paul pfd i ui
St. Paul and M 117 118
St. Paul & Duluth 5AU 60
St. Paul & Duluth pfd 108)J - 109X
Union Pacific 56)6 56)4
Wabash J6
Wabash pfd 27 271
Western Union Tel 7J 78)2
West Shore Bonds 102 10S
Pacific railroad bonds closed as follows:
Firsts.'. H4)jall4Sj
Grants 102K
Funds 119 a 120
Centrals i14 all4H
Government bonds closed as follows:
U. SJNew 3's
4)4s, '91 reg
4)4s, '91 coup
4s, 1907, reg
100
108J4a509i
no aiioi
128V6A12&
4S, 19WY, COUp
328)al28ii
Currency 6s. '95 . . .
Currency 6s, '96
Currency 6s. '97
Currency 6s, '98
Currency 6s. '99.
:37)i
Chicago Grain and Provleion Market,
Closing quotations Reported over Private Wires
to Edwin Howt dc Co.. Commission Mer
chants, 403 New York Produce Exchange, New
York.
The following shows the quotations at 1 P. M
(Chicago time) for the past three days:
Feb. 16.
fFeb 72
Wheat i Mar 7274
(May 78J
fFeb S3W
.-:29)4
..131
84
Feb. 17. Feb. 18.
73)f 74)d
79& 80
34 34)4
34)4 34)4
394 39H
14.37)4 14.42)4
14.37H 14.47)4
14.52)4 14.58)4
6.90 6.90
6.92)4 8.92)4
7.05 7.07)4
Corn
i Mar 84
tMay 3914
(Feb. 12.47)4
Mar 12.47)4
I May 14-45
i Feb. 6.97)4
Pork
Lard
J Mar
I May
7.00
7.12X
Bonus ail SIMS for Sale
10 shares Southington Water Company.
50 shares Norwich National Bank.
40 shares Norwalk Gas Light Company.
$10,000 Northwest RR. 1st 7 per cent cf 1,911.
50 shares Danbury & Norwalk RR. tmaraitteed
50 shares Detroit, Hillsdale & Southwestern RR,
10 shares N. Y., N. H. & Hartford RR.
20 shares New Haven Water Co.
t 5,000 Housatonic R. R. 5 per cent. 1889.
-2,000 Northampton R. R. 1st 5 per cent.
50 shares Peck, Stow & Wilcox Co.
$4,000 Northern Pacific Terminal 1st 8 per cent.
$10,000 West Shore Railroad 1st 4 par cent.
Western Farm Loam, principal and
inireai guaranteea
W.T. HATCH & SONS,
RANKERS.
JVow The Time To Sneculate.
A CTIVE FLUCTUATIONS in the market offer
1 V opportuntties to speculators to make money
in Gram, Stocks, Bonds and Petroleum. Prompt
personal attention given to orders received by wire
or mail. Correspondence solicited. Full informa
tion about tne markets in our book, which will be
lorwaraea iree on application.
H. D. KTLK. Banker and Broker.
38 Broad and 34 New Streets, New Yosfc City
uooxiuwiy
Western Investment Securities.
Interest 7 to 8 Per Cent.
A Foil Supply on Hand for Immediate
Delivery.
The lindniibf wtmirtf. nf 1im InlMMt nf.
fered make these very popular with careful lnvest-
ura, tu, ig snown oy my large ana constantly in
creasing trade.
Mortgage Bonds a Specialty-.
JOHN KERLET,
Office, 614 George Street,
New Haven, Conn.
TICKETS
FOR
FLORIDA
-AND
ALL POINTS SOUTH
FOR SALE BY
II. C. WARREN & -CO.,
87 Orange Street.
$50,000 FOR SALE,
DEBENTURE BONDS.
The American InnwbnAnt rv. .mi rarm
Mortgage Co. are institutions of established repu
tation and teeir bonds am wall araiirari Full In.
formation by
ALFRED WALKER,
85 Orange Street, Second Floor.
Also a full line of western farm mortgages from
to 8 per cent, t - st, fell lmddtwt
I0tttiti0.
IMPORTANT
CLOTHING
WE OFFER OUR
Overcoats,
Reefers,
Suits and Pants,
Al Ruinously Low Prices !
To Make Room for Spring Goods.
C. E. LONGLEY & CO.
101, 103, 105
NEW HAVEN, CONN.
financial.
STOCKS FOR SALE I
100 shares C. Cowles & Co.'s stock.
100 shares Danbury & Norwalk Railroad Co.'s
stock.
45 shares New Haven County Bank.
40 shares Morris & Essex Railroad Co.'s stock.
30 snares New York, New Haven & Hartford
Railroad Co.'b stock. ,
BUNNELL & SCRANTON,
Bankers and Brokers,
T88 AND T34 CHAPEL STREET,
MORTGAGE CDMEANY,
PITAL, - - $600,000
Keprmented by
PRESTON & BARTLETT,
737 Chapel Street, NEW HAVEN, CONN.
DEBENTURES
Guaranteed Farm Mortgages
OFFICK8. I REFERENCES.
KTW YORK, MS BmM, I Tint H.I Bwk, NEW TORE,
BOSTOH, MCtout StnM. 1 Bod.. If M. BuiV BOSTON.
PHILADELPHIA, 11 S. 4Ui St. I ft. Mat. Bk., PHILADELPHIA.
KAHSAS CITY, ftaelM.SU. 1 Am.XmL. Buk,kAKSASCITY
Cor rates of Interests sad full Information
SEND FOR PAMPHLET.
INVESTORS
Can be Supplied with Mortgages
From $200 to $3,000 each.
DEBENTURE BONDS
From ftlOO to 01,000 each.
BuauNoTon, Vt., Sept. 7, 1886.
Charles N. Fowler, Esq., Vice President Equitable
Mortgage Co.:
Dear Sir I beg to state that the Burlington Trust
Co., located at Burlington, Vt.. has done quite a
arge business with the Equitable Mortgage Com
pany of Kansas City, Mo., in the past three years.
and that all their transactions have been very satis
factory to us. I also have done quite a large
amount of business with them personally, with en
tire satisfaction. I think the company has axcep
rional facilities for making good loans in Missonr
and Kansas, and I consider their endorsement or
guarantee A No. 1. Very truly yours.
(Signed) B. B. SMALLEY,
jalOdaw Vice President Burlington Trust Co.
VERMILYE & CO.,
BANKERS AND BROKERS.
Dealer ln:in vestment Securities.
IVos. 16 and 18 Nassau St.,
new tore crrr.
TO ARRIVE, .
Monday, February 14,
AT
Smedley Bros. & Co's Stables,
171 and 173 Brewery St.
ONE CARLOAD OF HORSES.
Gentlemen's Double and Single Driving Horses
sou Arrtuc norsee.
Shew Cases. Shelving. 81eu?ha. Exnreaa' Wagons.
Also Fine Spindle Wagons. -
Smedley Bros. & Co.
The Crane and . Franklin Store
Company,..
833 Chapel Street,
NEXT- DOOR TO M'TNTYRR. If AarfTRK A rrt '
FURNACES. RANGES, STOVES AND KITCHEN
FURNISHING GOODS. -Sol.
A cents for the IQagee Mange and
, . - m urasw. '
Ranees and Furnaces renaimd. Tin ibwflnff
aad repairiug. - . sefrv
IxrtMtxg.
TO
BUYERS!
ENTIRE STOCK
OF
CHURCH STREET,
MUSIC BOOKS
FOR
male and Mixed Quartets, for
Quartet Choirs and
Social Sings.
FOR ItlALE VOICES.
AiriDhion (5 books) 84: Ariou (5 books) S4: Har-
mouia (5 books) $2,50; Apollo $2; Boy Is ton Club
(jouectiOD. $1.50; cross' r"art songs tuc; Ji.merson s
Quartets and Choruses (0c: Hale Voice Glee Book
tl ; Mendelssohn Four Part Songs 60c; Sanger-Fest
1.38; Dow'a Sacred Quartets $1.75; Male Voice
Choir 50c, and American Male Choir 80c.
These coniain a great variety of the best of Male
v oice music.
FOR ItllX KB VOICES.
Baumbach's Qnartets $1.75, and his New Collec
tion i.7o; buck a mo tei. uouection ana nis sec
ond Motet Collection $2; Emerson's Concert Selec
Thomas Sacred Quartets $1.75; merson's Sacred
Quartets $1.75; Hhepard Church Collection $1;
Srachauer's Cbarch Music $2; Church Offering
$1.38: Dressler's Sacred Selections $1.50. Sterling
good books, widely used.
Ssnd for descriptions. Any book mailed for price
OLIVER DITSON & CO. .Boston
A.MAE B ETH
W-. ir"". r"it" r.in.
3ITTSBUH6H' PA
FDRSAI
EALEKS
WHERE.
WEAKIUNDEVELOPED
Parts of the Body Enlarged, DevelODedand
StranstliMiM. Simplojiarmfow, tot. Self-Traatment
Fall xwrtioalaxs, tMttmoiiaUu.t6, mailed seald, fr.
Addrau, B&tB JPLDIOAXiOO.. BUFFALO. jt.Y.
1-3 iJ S J it. 2 il
T 39 IA . IX-. I. tj Jftj sill lia II
LADIES
Enamel yeaw Rang twic; a y, top. on" ;
a week and you hare the ftaert-polWied stove m tee
world. For sale by all urooer. ww pw ummm
t...a T..nM'w'a r?n . 140 Commercial street.
t?,. . v-n iA RruAnL Xr Co.. New Haven. Ct. ; Geo.
8. Smith & Co., Norwich, Conn., Jobbing Agents.
jam
JOHN E. EARLE,
No. 868 Chapel Street,
New Haven, Conn
Sives h is personal attention to procuring
Patents for Inventors.
I TTTR
UNITED STATES AND FOREIGN COUNTRIES'
. nMnriM of more than thirty years, and fre-
? cent visits to the Patent Office has given him a
amiiiarity with every department of, and mode of
Dreceeding at, the Patent Office-which, together
.irh the fact that he now visits Washington semi
monthly to give his personal attention to the inter
ests of his clients, warrants him in the assertion that
no offloe in this country is able to offer the same
facilities to Inventors in securing their Inventions
bv Letter Patent and particularly to those whose
8ich he will make free of charge.
Duiimtniiv OT-amtnation. nnor te ammcation tar
oaten) made at Patent Office, at a amalf charge.
Hia facilities for procuring Patents in Foreign
Countries are unequalod.
naram to more than one thousand clients for whom
Mbes procured Letters Patent - lyl&Utw
ff M SEE THAT THB
fix BCA0T LAB-Z 18 ON . i
t C th EACH OHIMHEV AS $ 1
5 SHOWN ,N P0TURG V I
" if mOL ); rf- a jz e
iitLlir "
GEO. A.MAE BETH & CO.
4
l
1
4,
m
NEW HAVEN STEAMBOAT CO.
Dally for New York-Fare $1, lnelnd
lniberth-EzenrslonTlckeU $l.SO.
Steamer CONTINENTAL, Capt. F.J. Peck, leaves
New Haven 13 o'clock p.m., Sunday excepted. State
ruvius sum W, n n. ol . l, b, anil at, juucK B LTUg
Store. Steamer ELM CITY, Captain Stevens?
leaves New Haven at 10:15 a. m. Sundays excepted
From New York The CONTINENTAL leaves
Feck Slip at 3 p. m., and the ELM CITY at 11
p. m., Sundays excepted, Saturday 18 o'clock mid
night. Sunday Boat for N.York Steamer NEW HAVEN
at 10:30 p. m. Staterooms sold ai the Elliot'. House.
Free stage from Ins. Building al 9 p. m. Tickets
sold and baggage checked thro to Philadelphia
(via both routes), Baltimore t,n" Washineteii
Starln'a Mew Haven Transporta
tion Line.
Every Day Except Saturday. -.
- ll " fc Leave New Haven, from Sta-'a's
Eiai.fi'nV"-"'- " 10:15 o'clock p. m The
JOHN H. STARIN, Captain McAlister, every Sun
day, Tuesday and Thursday. The ERASTUS
CORNING. Captain Spoor, every Monday, Wednes
day and Friday. Returning, leave New York
from Pier 18, foot of Courtland street, at 9pm
the Starin every Monday, Wednesday and Fr-'dav
the Corning every Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday
The only Sunday night boat from New York
Fare, with berth in cabin, Jl ; stateroom 81. Ex
cursion tickets 81.50.
Free Stage leaves the depot on arrival of Hart
ford tram, and from corner Church and ChapH
streets every half hour, commencing at 8:30 o'clock
T,','lriif a a ,w1 C , , , , . .
'-' - purcnasea or the
Downes News Co., 869 Chapel street, Peck Sl Bishop
702 ChaDel street, and at the Tontine n.i v
C. M. CONKLIN, Agent,
jyis
isew iaven,x;o
REDUCTION IN RATES.
ALLAN ROYAL IV1AIL STEAMSHIPS.
?frtf Koy! Mail Steamships sail every week
jTliil'i-If f"m Glasgow to Boston via Londonderry
Tne only direct route from Scotland and North o
Ireland to the New Enjrland States. Intermediate,
f25:steerage $14. Fortnightly sailings between
Portland and Liverpool, via Halifax and London
derr3.C5.bm' 850 to "'; intermediate, $30; steer
age, 815. Passengers leave Boston 8:30 a. m. train on
day of sailing. Apply to H. & A. ALLAN. Agents.
Boston; or to BUNNELL & SCRANTON, TifcJ and
724 Chapel st.
de2eori3m
Railroads.
New York, New Haven & Hart
lord C. Mi., Aiov. !2. 1886.
?4XN HAVEN AS FOLLOWS !
roani-J Starn
milk tram with pass, accommodation wav to
SfnVS 7.00 (7:30wayto Bridgeport)
8:38, 10:15 p m., Sundays. 3:58 440 fl-00 al
m 3:40. 5:00, 6:30. '7:00 7:!b7is-38 p m
WASHINGTON NiOHT EXPRESS VIA HARLEM
KERr"f"saatn:50 P- m- daily, stops at
Milford, Bridgeport. 8out Noi-walkand Stam
ford. FOR BOSTON VIA SPRINGFIELD 102 night.
:52 8:00, ll:05 a. m 1:16, 6?26 pf r
Sundays, 1:03 night, 6:26 p. m
FOR BOSTON VIA NEW LONDON AND PROVI-
DENCE-l:30 a. m., .10:30 a. m.ffast express
4.00 p. m. Fast Express, Sundays l:30a. nt.
W-1?. 5n- Newport Express trains 10:30 a.
m., t4:00p. m.
ViSl3oREiTD AND N. Y AN.
FOR BOSTON Via Air Line and N. Y. & N E B. R.
8.05 a. m 1 35 p. m., 5.05 p. m. fast 'expreS
Sundays 5:05 p. m.
FOiiSRIFORr)' SPRINGFIELD AND MERIDEN.
ETC.-13:lb nig.t, '1:08 night, C2:3oTm to
Hartford,) 6:53, 8:00, tl0:28, n :05. 12-5
.?S?' T.?i16'o Ir X' 5:07 o(5:S; - Jlartfora.:
nl'a:. Sunday, .1:0 night,
F,n1SiT. LONDON, ETC-1:30 night, 8:08,
10:30, 11:05 a. m., 4:00, 4:20, 6:18, (9:35 p. m
J 10 Gu,1;?rd. 8es no farther.) Sundays
13:35 noon, 1:30 night. ouuuojs
VIA B. & NY AIR LINE DIVISION for Middie
t?,wn' J'UUnaht'c. Etc. Leave New Haven for
all stations at 8:05 a.m., 1:25,5:05, 6:15 p. m Sun
days, S:05 p. m. Connect at Middletown with
SotmV,V?iler A.E - and at Willimantic with N.
li? o N- b N- B- R- Tamerviile
with Colchester Branch. Trains arrive la
New Haven at 9:15 a m., 1 :32, .0:55, 8:55 p. m.
O. M. SHEPARD, General Superintendent.
.Express trains.
tLocal Express.
Mew fiiavcn and Derby Itailroati.
Train Arrangement commencing June 14. 186.
LEAVE NEW HAVEN
At 7:00 and 9:52 a. m.. 1:30. 3:20, 5:45, 7:05 p. m.
Saturdays at 11:00 p. m. ' v
. . LEAVE 4JJSONIA
At 6:35. 9:05 and 11:40 a. .n., 1 :00. 3:20 and 6:45 p. m.
Connections are made at Ansonia with passenger
trains of the Naugatuek railroad, and at New Havra
with the principal trains of other roads centering
theIre- T E. S. QUINTARD, Sup't.
New Haven, June 14. 18S6. w
Xnngatuck Raiireaa.
COMMENCING DEC. 30th, 18S6, trains leave
New Havon via N H. & D. R. R., connecting vith
this road at
7:09 a. m. Connecting at Ansonia with passenger
train for Waterbury, Litchfield and Win.
sted.
9:52 a. m. Through car for Waterbury, Watertown.
Litchfield, Winsted.
3:15 p. m. Connecting at Ansonia with passenger
train for Waterbury and Watertown.
5:45 p.m. Through car for Waterbury, Watertown.
Litchfield, Winsted.
7:05 p. m. Connecting at Ansonia for Waterbury.
FOR NEW HAV EN Trains leave Winsted: 7:13
".?;'. V2?,- m-vwitn through car, and at 4:38 p. m
TRAINS LEAVE WATERBYRY At 5:30 sfrn.
8:26 a. m., through car, 10:50 a. m. 8:42 p. m.
through car, 5:52 p. m.
, , GEORGE W. BEACH Bnpt.
Bridgeport. Dec. 18. 1886. v
A CARD.
To all who are suffering from the errors and in
discretions of youth, nervous weakness, early de
cay, loss of manhood, c, I will send a recipe that
will cure you, FREE OF CHARGE. This great
remedy was discovered by a missionary in South
America. Send a self-addressed envelope to the
Bev. Joseph T. Inuan, Station D, New York City.
se21eodawiy.
YOUNG
fi i-... . . .i .. . . ,. .
,i inijo un: ijiiiiiirrec,.
DeatS2, Lunaey, or Par
alyeiM, of your Vital Pow
ers threaten you. Fanse in
your course of secret abuse and
excess. Pause and see in the
A !astm- enre of ail vonr Weakness. Drains, Ear
ly Dec:iy oiid Future Mierv. Itten of all Ages
res:orod to perfect Bankood, aud lasting
power. Our spendid Medical Work sent free
(sca,ed,) Endorsed by London Doctors.
Crafele 1W edical Clinic, (Am. Branch)
w -,"ai,suu fctrcc-t. Nuw York
ERRORS OF YOUTH!
The Wofnl Cnrae of Life,
the common cause of Weak
ness and Early Decay ot
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lysis, Wasting and Smallnesfll
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Perfect. Lasting Cure & Full Vigor.
Full Strength, Potency and Development of Parts,
with new Brain aud Nerve Power, or we forfeit
4M.OOO. We use only the wonderful
pfraigie Medicated Pearls-ma
No Hnmbug, Gaess-woriTrlSxeiTmenta
POSITIVE PROOFS, Doc-tors Evidence, Hist
ory of the Discovery, Lis of Cases, References,
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Strictest Secrecy. Consultation Free. Address 1
CRAlGiE MED. CLUUC 35 Jfassaa SL Aew York,
Whose VITALITY Is failing. Brain DRAINED and
EXHAUSTED or Power PREM ATURELY WAST.
ED may find a perft-ct and reliable cure in the
FRENCH HOSPBTAL REMEDIES
originated by Vrot. J LAJV CIA 1AI.E, of Paris, Franco.
Adopted by all French Physicians and being rapidly and
euccessfully introduced here. All weakening losses and
drains promptly checked. TliEATlSE giving news
paper and medical endorsements, fcc, FKEE. Consulta
tion (office or by mail) with six eminent doctors FREE.
CIVIALE AGENCY. No. 1 74 Fulton Street. New York
VSeftR ,ost error or hm&
M lUWlly practu-es, may be perfectly
retrained by the new OiUjrte Sect!
Pearl. Send for ocr new lllustrmtt&
"Guide t Health." AWhils s-.
edleal Clinic. 33 n" Sm Y.
NEW GOODS !
AT
HENRY GOODMAN & SON'S,
iuvidx iruwii sireeii
Old Monongahela Rye Whisky,
Old Malt Whiskies,
Pine Jamaica Rum
8herry Wines, French Clarets,
Angelica Wine. Rhine Winp
Muscatel Wrine, Moselle Wines,
Port Wine, Sauternes.
Catawba Wine, Hock Wines,
Hungarian Wines, California Clarets.
CHAMPAGNES Piper Heidsieck, G. H. Mumm'i.
-cuit.uiuic vuauiijaKuc. oiJieuuiu lur ULUie US.
Bass1 Ale. Outness' Ktnnt and Rnrton Ala Hraam
from the wood. Esoeciallv kenfc on hand fW me
dicinal use. We also have them in glass. Import
ed Ginger Ale, German Seltzer ana Appollinaris
Waters in jugs and glass. Finest new Sweet Cider.
KEY WEST CIGARS a specialty. A genuine
Key West Havana Cigar for five cents.
Goods Delivered to Any Part op the City.
HENRY GOODMAN & SON,
loO-lb2 Crown St.,
KEIV HAVEN, COKN.
' 81 Bawlef SL, Boston, lass.'
UPHOLSTERY GOODS,
Turcoman and Slltc Curtains,
Window Shades, Curtain Fixtures,
ASD
UPHOLSTERY HARDWARE.
VCX MAKE TUB ONLY
GENUINE
and onr Stop Roller Is Standard.
lM Ask your Healer for them, take no others
tWgQTiOTsTifJ
tr a.db Mask.
al Pearls
Adorae the Cmlr-le Al
CI B..l.Bt B.i,,- i

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