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Morning journal and courier. [volume] (New Haven [Conn.]) 1848-1894, February 21, 1887, Image 1

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015483/1887-02-21/ed-1/seq-1/

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. . NT
11 r
LiYrmitiY
Semper,. Copy.
$ 6 per Year.
CP
THE LARGEST DAILY NEWSPAPER Off THE CITY,
OFFICE 4LOO STATE STREET.
THE CARRDfGTON PVBLI8HINO CO.
EW HAVEN, COM., MONDAY MORNING. FEBRUARY 21, 1887.
i
NO. 44
VOL. LV.
Dr
'S3
V
i
grg (goods.
How k wm
February is the month we of
fer Bargains in Ladies' Cotton
Underwear, Corsets,
Unlaundried Shirts and
Gents'
House-
keeping Goods.
We have just received from
the best manufacturers in the
country several cases Cotton
Underwear, made to our order
from superior quality Cotton
and Trimmings, which we shall
sell at a very small margin of
profit purposely to keep the de
partment lively during trie
month of February. Many of
the styles are our "own ideas and
cannot be found elsewhere.
Corset Covers for 124, 9
25. 37tf' 45- 50c and upwards.
These covers are perfect shape
and are sure to fit.
Night Robes for 35, 50,
75, 92, 98c, $1,-1.13, r-25 1
69,
.29,
1.34, $1.50 and upward.
Chemises for 19, 25, 38, 50,
63, 75c, $ 1 and upward.
Drawers for 19, 25, 29, 39, 50,
63, 75, 79c a pair and upward.
Walking Skirts for 25, 50,
75, 88c, $1, $1.25 and upward.
Misses' Night Robes, Che
mises and Drawers, in full as
sortment, at the same low prices.
Infants' short and long Dress
es, Slips, Bands, Shirts, Flannel
Skirts and Embroidered Shawls
at our popular prices.
Unlaundried Shirts for 35, 50,
75c and $1. Each, of these
numbers are GREAT VALUE
Purchasers of Shirts will save
. money by examining these four
grades before buying elsewhere.
Hamburg and Lace Department.
Great sale of Hamburg Edges
Just received two special drives
at 5c and 120.
Bargains in Linen Torchon,
Medici, Swiss, Machine Tor
chon, Everlasting, Oriental Ma
line, Maltese and Fedora Laces.
We have just received an im
mense stock of these laces at
right prices.
Corset Department.
We have the entire sale for
the city of the "Splendid" Sa
teen Corset, in white, drab.blue
and cardinal at 50c per pair.
Great value for the money.
Extra value in French Wov
en Corsets, in all sizes, at 75 and
98c per pair.
Best value in Corded Corsets,
at 75c a pair.
The popular Dr. Ball's Cor
sets, in all colors, viz., white,
drab, cream, blue, pink, red, &c.
Thompson's well known
makes of Corsets, viz., abdomi
nal, GB, E, G, RH short,young
ladies' and misses'.
Elegant French Woven Cor
sets, 625 bones to a pair,
at
lowest current rate.
Children's Waists 50 and 75c
a pair.
Also agent for the city for
the well known Equipoise
Waists, in all qualities, both
closed and laced backs.
We also keep Madame Foy's
Corsets in white and drab.
The elegant fitting Cutaway
Corsets, both in regular length
and short hip styles.
SPECIAL BARGAINS.
Fringed Turkey Red Covers,
2 yards long:, at $1 each.
All Linen Bleached Damask
Cloths, red borders, 2 yards
long, $1.50 each.-
Large Huck Towels, tied
.frinares, at 20c each.
SuDerior quality of Ladies'
Fleeced Cotton Hose, in black,
modes, brown, navy, &c, at 37
and azc a. pair : much under
price.
If you wish a Child's Under-
. vest be sure and buy one of our
iob lot of white, finished seam,
reorular-made sroods, at the ri
diculous price of 25c each. We
have vests in sizes 16, i, 20,
22, 24 and 26. Boys' Drawers
16. 18, 20, 24 and 26,
Special Bargains in fancy
mixed Dress Goods at 25 and
-18c. These are new sroods and
desirable.
Just a few pieces lett ot our
Mtraordinarv bargains in black
Silk Rhadames at 69, 87,
$1. $i.25 $1-35 and $i.5oa
irard.
Great Sale of Black Dress
Goods at 45, 5Q 62 69 and '
75c a yard.
Goods delivered free in West
Westville and Fair
JL -
Haven.
INSURANCE BUILDING.
Mi k Stetson.
atmdries.
WE ARE NOW READY
TO FILL ALL YOUR ORDERS
-IN-
LAUNDRYING,
DYEING AND CLEANING,
Carpet Beating
-AND
SOOTJH.IKTG,
The Forsyth Dyeing, Laundrying
. and Bleaching Co.
Worku State, Lawrence and ineeli an
te Streets.
Offices: 878 and 645 Cbapel St.
BEST WORK
BEST ACCOMMODATIONS
LEAST DAMAGE
Only te be had at
TROY STEAM LAUNDRY
SO Center Street.
A. J. CRAWFORD & CO.
arFree collection and delivery. Telephone.
nS
Extra ruro salt
It Is a well known fact
f ht Tmnui-a Salt is very injurious to health. Or
dinary Salt contains more or less lime, magnesia
and other impurities which occasion stone in the
bladder and other painful diseases. Now as Salt
enters into the makeup of almost everything we eat
it becomes essential that a perfectly pure article
should be used. I . M. Welch & Son have experi
mented on a great many kinds of Salt, and have at
last found one on which they can place their name
and guarantee as a perfectly pure Salt. This Salt
is put up by them under the Star Brand, (Trade
Mark patented). In linen bags, at 5c, 10c and 15c per
bag, and in paper boxes at 5c each. The 15c bags
contain nearly a peck. It will be seen that this Salt
costs no more than ordinary Bait, and after once
using you will have no other. Be sure and call for
and see thatyou get the Star Brand. Put up only by
D. M. WELCH & SON,
New Haven, Fair Haven and Birmingham, Conn.
febl7 Smoa
ONE PRICE THE CASH STORE
OFFER THIS WEEK:
Prime Turkeys 18c pound.
Prime Chickens 17c pound.
Back Roast 10c pound.
Rack Steak 10c pound.
Rib Roast 10 a 11 12c pound.
Bobs' Milk Biscuit 9c pound, S pounds for 25c.
Daisy Brand Condensed Milk 10c can.
Fine French Prunes 10c pound, S pounds for 25c.
Fine Pitted Plums 18c pound, 8 pounds for 25c.
Conn. State Eggs, warranted, 25c dozen.
Splendid Oranges 10c dozen, S dozen for 25c.
Sugaas at Cost.
B. F. BANKS. No. 1 Broadway.
WATER.
WATER.
One hundred boxe Launory
Soap, full sized cakes, sllglilly
demaged by
water, for a 3-4
cents per cake.
A. M. FOOTE,
458 STATE STREET,
Between Court and Elm Streets.
PFAFF k SON.
CAPONS.
L.
C. PFAFF & SON,
7 AND 9 CHURCH STREET.
NEW STOCK AND STORE.
THOMAS KELLY'S,
Corner ( State and Pearl Mreels,
i.nwnat l.ivlnsr Prices.
Ponltrv. Meats and Veeetables, and a Keneral
supply of flr-t-class Family Gi ooaries. Buy a bird
oi me ana De nappy.
r y oar native vreneo new ...
(jranoernes, jetues ana in. uuw. wxi
By buying of me you can save money.
Guilford Clams.
Guilford Clams.
THE ONLY GENUINE
AT
A. FOOTE & CO.'S,
8Q8 STATO T1V
"STERLING"
P1AY10S AND ORGANS.
Xbe "Sterling" Piano in acknowledged
to be the nearest to absolute perfection
ir wat- nhtjimed in pianos. Artiscs. dealers and pur-
etiasersall acres that it is outrivalled by none. Ma
terial, construction, ana ail tnac ses 10 maae up a
first class ins rnment is foun 1 in this Piano.
"Hf-Ariin.7" Orsans. These instruments are un
rivalled (or volume and richness of tone, and have
scored a verdict fur desirable qualities unsurpassed
v.- . nv m.lrA or oraran in the world. Have stood
the test for over twenty years. Saleroom, 648
Chapel street, Elliott House Blocs, ""MWUt,
I H91 Ra Lt lilTI,II,.
KIAVAflA CIGARS.
tw.li imnortations of new brands, including both
rfUKIniin ana lauay ifrauw. wv
JCX ,v. s. Uaxo. s BUS
7T0 Chapel Street.
Litchfield County Poultry.
TURKEY'S,
SUCKS,
CHICKENS.
ALSO
LITCHFIELD COUNTY
Fresh Pork and Sausages,
HURL BURT BROTHERS,
l,OT4 Cbapel Street.
CORNER HIGH.
SCOLLOPS! SCOLLOPS!
First of tno Season.
FRESH SALMON, Blueflsh, Sea Bass, Spanish
Mackerel, Halibut, Eels. Hard and Soft Crabs.
Clams, Lobsters, Oysters, Etc., Etc.
Reed's Market, 59 Church Street
OPPOSITE THE POSTOFFICE.
2 ff. w SMITH. Manager.
Litchfield County Poultry I
Turkeys, Chickens, Ducks.
Primf Beef. Mutton. IJamb, Veal. Fresh Pork
Pork Tenderloins. Full Dressed Chickens 15c per
pound. Nice Full Dressed Turkeys 18c per pound.
Fine White Celery 18c per bunch, two bunches
for 25c. Spinnach. Lettuce, Cauliflower.
Bananas. Oranges, Lemons, Cranberries, Malaga
Orapes, Catawba Grapes.
Stony Creek, Rockoway and Lighthouse oysters
opened to order.
W. D. JUDS0N,
505 AND 507 STATE STREET.
IT IS NO HUMBUG!
But a
POSITIVE FACT !
Known to every school boy in the country that
Dawson at 844 State street seeps the largest stock
of
TEAS AND COFFEES
to be found in New England. And that in thestock
can be found about 100 boxes of Choice Oolong
Teas, from 10 to 80 pounds each, that will suit the
most fastidious.
DAWSON'S,
844.
Another Carload of Fine Poul
try at Tcry Cheap Price
"Will be Sold To-day.
L. SCHOMBERGER'S,
Nos. 1, , 3 Central Market. Congress are.
Smoked Halibut and Bloater Herring, Boneless
Herring in boxes, No. 1 1 Mackerel, Choice BlocK
Island Codfish.
: : BUTTER : :
Durham Creamery in 20 and S3 pound tubs, and
In 1 pound prints, and in cold, fresh every Tuesday
: : : MAPLE SYRUP : : :
Choice Maple Syrup in 1 gallon tins,
COOPER NICHOLS,
3T8 STATE STREET.
New Crop Porto llico Mo
lasses. We offer In hogsheads and bar
rels choice quality new Ponce
Molasses,
JUST LANDED,
ex. st. Elcano.
J.D. DEVVELL & CO,,
IMPORTERS,
233 to 239 State Street.
C. E. HART,
350 and 352 State St.
Received Fresh To-Day
Turkeys, CliIcKens, Ducks.
VENISON,
Grouse, Rabbits,
Celery, Lettuce, &c.
FRUIT CHEAP
Sweet Oranees 15c to 25c per dozen.
Cutting up Oranges loc ana upward per uozeu.
New Lemons 10c and upward per dozen.
Choice Ripe Bananas 85c per dozen.
New Dates. FiKS, Prunelles and White Grapes.
Clarified 8weet Cider 25c per gallon.
New good c joking Kaisins c per pouna.
New Prunes. 4 pounds for 25c.
4 quarts New Beans for 25c is a bargain.
Trv Quaker Rolled Oats. 2 packages for 25c.
Perfection Self raising Buckwheat is the best: 15c
and 30c per package.
we a so sen ine i err ecu on unprepared duck
vhfwt in bulk, which rives the best satisfaction.
Evaporated Apples, jsvaporaiea jreacnes, u.vap-
irated Hasebemes. rated cnernes. uriea vvnort-
tleberries, 12c per pound.
Fine New Orleans Molasses, 40c gallon.
Fancy New Orleans Molasses uc gallon.
Table Syrup 85c per gallon.
Finest Potatoes 65c bushel.
The bet-t Yellow Turnips we have ever put in for
winter only 40c per bushel.
We have splendid bargains in Flour, Sugar, Tea
and Coffee, and in our meat department. Fresh
Poultry Friday and batuiaay.
J. II. KEARNEY,
ELM CITY CASH GROCERY,
74 and 76 Congress Avenue, Cor
ner Hill Street.
Pnion and Register copy-
SHEIFFELE'S.
PHILADELPHIA CAPONS.
Singed Wiltshire
Ham and Bacon.
PRIME BEEF.
Telephone.
JACOB F. SHEIFFELE,
400 State Street, near Court.
D. M. WELCH & SON
OFFER
A Small Lot of Fine
Poultry.
Turkeys, full dressed, 17c pound.
Chickens 15c
pouna.
pouna (jranoernes st iuc quart.
Elegant kiln dried Sweet Potatoes 30c peck.
Job Lot of Comb Honey.
Flftv cases of nure new Honev in the comb, with
out glass, at rnly 10 - lb. In one-pound caps, with
out giaes, ana only iuc pouna. tfig Bargain.
We sell IT 1-2 lbs. Standard
Granulated fl.OO.
Our Coffee trade is slmnly immense. Blood will
tell. Oar finest Java Coffee at 95o pound. Cannot
I be matched.
Still selling those fine Oranges 10c dozen.
Still selling Faacy Floridas at 25 and 30c dozen.
Still sailing fancy Lemons at 12c dozen.
Job Lot of Brash Broom..
We shall close them out at only 10a each, worth
25c
A Job lot or good sundried apples at only Be lb.
Elegant evaporated apples 14c lb.
Nice new evaporated reaches 18c lb.
If you want the best Salt vou ever used buv our
Star brand, an absolutely pure salt, at 5, 10 and 16c
nag. Alter once using you wiu nave no otner.
Many Otner Grand Bargains.
D M. WELCH & SON,
38 and SO Congress Ato.
Branch No. S Grand St,
MfiTNTYKE. MAGUIRE & CO.
to Ojprtiitf
- i
Fcmr week8 ago we i parcnasea iot : casu pw
Four weeM ago r' "57 ' iehna
of Real Laoe ttanaaer i ,
63 "rr Tr, than
Have'n 'wTbSSht" of thta enormous
lies we Dougu. ; F ""ALr"" "
And now for the hrst time pi
th.t fh. valnea offered are Devona anyimug ever buuwu m ... .j.
th8tNhOTIn o7d to distribute these goods among our patrons as much as possible it
will bVneceX for us to reserve the right of limiting the quantity to each customer,
wm De necessary o a or, i ii aoia will he considered final.
No samples win oe given ui ft""""!
Band Bun Spanish Laces.
Sli inches wide. 7c per yard; Pi2$1!0
5 inches wide. $1 per yard; P? Jj nrice
4U inches wide, very fine, $1.50; importers price
S3 50
s iTi.-hs'a wide 1 : importers' price 82.25.
ChMt1S7l'ovVr Vlack SI per yard;- importers
price $1 7". Equal value in narrow widths.
Space wiil not admit of enumerating.
Oriental Flouncing.
38 inches wide 39c; importers' price 55e.
40 inches wide 45c; importers' price 80c.
48 Inches wide 50c; importers' price too
42 inches wide 58c; importers' price 85c.
Beaded Grenadine.
j 25 per yard; importers price 51-
per yard: sold in this city at 1 6.
;3 75 per yard: sold in this city at $, .
Beaded Sets.
50c per set of vest and collar; importers' price . 5c.
75c per set of vest and collar; importers' price 81.25.
Beaded Fronts.
79c eaeh bead fronts; importers' price $1.25.
$1.25 each bead fronts; importers price $1--
l.oo eacn oeaa irouw. uupuirei. ' .
I eajh bead fronts; importers' price 82.75.
,2.50 each bead fronts; importers' price $4. -Orienial
Laces in various widths; as a sample, lu
Inches wide, I2$c; importers' price 20c.
In Hamburg Edgings
w nraduce the greatest values ever shown, from
2c per yard up to $1. Words cannot express on
paper the enormous reductions from former prices.
Beal Duchess Laces.
inches wide 89c per yard: Importers' price $1.75.
3 inches wide $1.50 per yard ; importers' price S3. .5.
ik ir.inii wide SI.25 Der yd: importers' price $3 25.
5 inches wide $1.50 per yd; importers' price $4.25
inches wide !
r yard; importers' price $4.75. L
J inches wide i.
I inches wide $3.'
Der vd: importe s' price $5.
5 per yd; importers' price $9.
McINTYRE, MAGUIRE & CO.
Crosby's Vitalized Phosphites,
THRRR4IN OEKVE POOD. Onretall
Used by all rnysicians. jjruuoistb uh b ulah, . ou -
Je7eodtf ,mtm
33. 2t- JBFPOOTT,
ART WALL PAPER STORE,
S60 CHAPEL.
I am now prepared to show a very nice line of Wall
ders to matcn. anyone ie m "y. v" , r , .
Decorative Painting, Paper Hanging, Graminsr, Gilding,
All Mrden exMuiea rvmpur,
All raer ecu r ,f Vk rllOM
ELASTIC HOSE
Haying Increased our facilities for the manu
facture of
ELASTIC GOODS
We are able to furnish without delay, made
to measure of the
BEST IMPORTED STOCK,
FRKSH FROM OCR OWN LOOMS
ELASTIC STOCKINGS,
KNEE CAPS, ANKLETS,
AND
WRISTLETS, &c,
FOB THE SUPPORT OF
Taricosc Veins, Swollen Limbs,
Weak Knees or Sprained
Joints.
WE ALSO MAKE THE
SILK ELASTIC BELT
For the relief of Corpulency, and which is an
Abdominal Supporter, is the most comfort
able article of the kind ever offered.
Physicians and Druggists supplied with
any grade of the above goods at
BOTTOM PRICES.
E. Li. WASHBURN
84 CHURCH STREET,
61 CENTER STREET.
Kcw Haven, Conn. '
BENNETT & IIAXE,
TOBOGGANS, SUITS, &c.
General Agents
A. Cr. SPlDLVlNfi dc BKOS.
Sportlne Goods of all Kinds.
BICYCLES, PARTS AND SUNDRIES.
112 OK A WOE ST., NEW HAYES) CT.
8. & J. M.
57, 59 & 61 ORAMEST.,
FURNITURE DEALERS
UNDERTAKERS,
Have the finest Painted Bedroom Suite in the olt
New Parlor Ruits, Walnut Bedroom Suits.
The best Spring Bed for the money.
Splint, Rattan, Oane and Rush Seat Chain
gnat variety, as low aa can be bought.
UNDERTAKING
.nlo frA loVir. av riav wir.Vt papa
PIVIlipUjr nbAU17U a.n. v. j i - .
Bodies prosarvod without ice in the best manner.
Also Sole Apent for Washburn's Deodoring and
Disinfecting fluid.
A new lot of Folding Chairs and Stools to rent for
narties or funerals. jy
F. A. CARLTON,
Plumbing, Steam and Gasfitting
Jobbing Promptly Attended To.
OFFICE 190 Oeorce, cor. Temple St.
STEAM HEATING BUILDING.
tSr-KSTIfflATES GIVEN
tnlltf
J0HX E. EARLE,
So. 868 Chapel Street,
New Haven, Conn
Gives h fcpersoaal attention to procuring
Patents for Inventors.
Iff THE
rwrTED STATES AND FOREIGN COUNTRIES
A practice of more than thirty years, and fre-
?uent visits so wo "-
amiliarity with every department of, and mode of
rjreceedlng at, me . ' i.y v ' w""
with the fact that he now visits wasningtonsemi-
mnnthlv to (rive M personal anenuon totneinter
"l?? i(rnf warrants him In the assertion that
bo office in this oountry is able to offer the nam
facilities to Inventers in securing their inventions
by letter Patent and particularly to those whose
armlicatlons have been rejected an examination ot
wliich ke will make free of charge.
. . m.r1a sat TA.LMlt OfflOB. at a BTllAvil GharCTA.
Ri& faoilitiefl for procuring Patonia in Foreign
Countries are uneouaJed.
itafers to more tnan one thousand clients for whom
he ha procurwu ww- i
tyi8dw
DYNAMITE
'Explodes Rats, Mice, Weasel, Wood
chuck. Skunk, Roaches, Bed Bugr, Wa
ter Burs, Potato Bugs. Flies, Insects
Vermin, etc. It baa no eonal.
Grand results surely follow its use. It drives out
.mi Mice: tbev do not die on the premises.
nine trial will convince you of its merits. 15 and
Sold bv aU druggists in this city. WELLS &
CALHOUN, Wholesale Druggists, 815 State street.
Bole Wholesale . sew to
Blair
nim
in a
Life Tie.
l - - Ta. Tr-t Tunnvrr ATM RftTiVrnnf. Sfcno.V
nd fMlare. alsoOriental Flonncinga. Bead
. -w r":" -Fionnein. Bead!
hv a well known Boston house, amounting- to
the could handle. Fortunate for the New
purchase at same
price they paid for it.
K.r n, mJnnters.' feeling assured
----
Beal Point.
4 inches wide $2.50 per yd; importers' price $8.
Beal Duchcss and Point Collars,
Scarfs and Fichus.
Real Duchess Scarfs $2 each; importers' price $5.75.
Beal Duchess Scarfs 1 2 each; importers' price $6.
Real Duchess Scarfs $2.59 each; imp. price $7.75.
Real Duchess Scarfs $2.75 each: Importers' price $9
Real Duchess Scrfs S3 each; importers' price $9.50
Real Duchess Scarfs $1 75 each; imp. price $11 .
Real Duchess Scarfs $4.50 each; imp. price $12.50.
Combination Duchess and Point
Fihns.
$3 50 each; importers' price $10.
tl.r0 -ach; importers' price $12.75.
6.75 each; importers' price $21.
$7.50 each; importers' prica $J4.
Collars.
$1 each; importers' price $i.
$3.75 each; importers' price $8.50.
1 set $4; importers' price $13.50. v
Point and Duchess Handker
chief. $1.50 each: importers' price $3.50.
$2.75 each; importers' price $5.
$3.75 each; importers' price $7.50.
t6 each; importers' price $11.50.
7.50 each; importers' price $16.
$8.75 each; importers' price $17.50.
Ladies' and ficnu' Handker
chiefs, Ladies' H. S. Embroidered Handkerchiefs, white,
colored.
12c each ; importers' price 20c.
19c each; importers' price 25c.
85c each; importers' price 33c.
Gents H. S. all linen, colored and white noraers.
10c each; importers' price !5c.
12Uc each : importers' price 20c.
19c each, white h. .; importers' price 25c.
WeakneBeandNerToni Deransement
BROADWAY PAPER STORE,
ELM COB. YORK.
Papers, C ilin Decorations, with
suitable bor-
selection. Also
"v" V . '
Glazing and Kalsomming.
rOTVIVKrTIOlV.
SPECIAL NOTICE.
On account of business interests which
demand a portion of my time, my office will
be opened ONLY on
Mondays, Tuesdays & Wednesdays
Of Each Week
UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE.
H. If. BROWN, M. D.,
No. 93 Olive Street.
NEW H4.VEN, CONN.
Hours 10 a m. to 12 m.. 8 to 4, 7 to 8 p. m,
Clairvoyance.
SIRS. J. JT. CLARK
Test and Business Medium,
928 Crown Street.
Now is the time to use Mrs. Clark's Blood and
Liver Pur-fler. The most valuable curative ever
compounded from choiceBt productions of our
fields and woods. It is a specific for Malaria, BU
liousnes?. and all diseases caused by impurities of
the blood. Mrs. Clark can be consulted daily from
10 a m. to 1. and 2 to 5 p. m., ana evenings.
netic treatment.
f9
CONSUMPTION.
I havR m. nonittve rflmsdv IVtr th .rtnvA (Vitesse : bv Its 1189
thousands of cases of the wnrat kind and of lnnp a; an ding
Dave oeen carea. inaeea, bo set on iris my isitn in iinouicacj
that I will Bend TWO BOTTLE 8 FREE, together with a VAU
UIRIjI i nfi&iian un mia uiseasu, in any Biiuerm . ui v w
yeta P, O. adaroa. PS. T. A SIACPM, 181 f earl St. K. Y
The LIFE FOOD
of the century, is the name applied to Dr. E.
U. Flower's JNerve ana Drain fins oy one
who has been cured by them when the lead
ing physician oould do no more.
Nervous Prostration,
Loss of Brain Power,
- Wreck of Mind and Body.
These ara the terrible fruits of this age of
lightning activity, where man lives ten years
in one, and grows gray in a aay; out tuese
terrible conditions are immediately arrested,
and the shattered system restored, when
Dr. E. O. Flower's Nerve and Brain Pills are
taken regularly. Bead every word from the
followidg well known business man of Bos
ton. A. A. Eowe. Central Wharf, Boston.
MDr. H. CI. r lower e nerve jrius nave aone
for me what the best medical talent of Phila
delphia and Boston oould not accomplish.
They have entirely cureu mo ui a norvoun
prostration whioh was the curse of my life,
and wholly unfitted me for business. Every
nill is worth Its weient in eoia. -
100 pills in evt,ry bottle. For sale by all
reliable druggists.
THE R. C. FLOWER MEDICAL CO.
1769 Washington Street,
BOSTON,
- MASS.
PEHU YflfifM. PiLLS
"CHICHESTER'S ENGLISH."
The Original and Only Genuine.
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Monday, February 21, 1887.
PROGRESS FllOn POVERTY.
Edward Atkinson says much that is
timely and well worth attention, but nothing
that he has lately said is more impressive
than his address on "Progress from Poverty."
Mr. Atkinson pointed out that experience
shows that the great remedy for socialism is
the development of the individual and the
education of the young. Labor is fast learn
ing that diminished profits and prices go
hand in hand with higher wages and lower
cost. The earning power of capital haa de
creased since 1860 from 8 to 4 per cent..,
while labor's condition has improved. The
veiy poor are not more numerous than for
merly. In the organization of labor is found
an attempt to equalize the disparities of
modern conditions. High wages are the cor
relative of low cost. Pauper labor is to be
feared only by those of pauper intelligence.
He has investigated fifty arts. They all
show progress developing from poverty; high
wages with diminished profits, and on all
sides an approach to more equal conditions
of the employer and laborer.
Concerning the conflict between labor and
capital Mr. Atkinson said: "If a capitalist
saves what wonld otherwise be wasted, of
what harm is he? Of old he kept everything
to himself; now he has to allow others to
share the benefits of his work. More than
90 per cent, of the people enjoy substantial
equality now. The rich have more clothing,
but the poor wear out more. In fuel they
are equal consumers. The greatest disparity
between the two is in shelter and in the con
trol of their time. Subsistence is now so
abundant that there is complaint of overpro
duction. There is more capital than could
be used." And further: A great cry goes
up eternally about the railroads. For my
part I would rather have the Yanderbilte
carry my trunk than to carry it myself.
They can do it cheaper. All modern agita
tion leads me to conclude that social and
politioal conditions are to be improved by
evolution, not by revolution. There is not
as art in wnich the profit is not less than
the waste of twenty-five years ago. The
margin of profit has become very small. If
men become rich by saving the waste and
applying it to the benefit of labor, who
suffers ?
Such talk as this from a man who has
studied social and economic questions as Mr.
Atkinson has is cheering as well as instruct
ive. Facts are facts, and even Mr. Powderly
and the General Executive Board will have
to face them.
EDITORIAL BOTES.
The legislature of this State has been in
session six weeks, and has made but little
progress. But past experience teaches that
there is nothing to be gained by attempting
to hurry it.
Chauncey If. Depew apparently does not
feel as hopeless about the solution of the
car-heating problem as he did. The New
York Central railroad company has decided
to try the system of heating passenger cars
by steam from the locomotive.
A recent decision of the patent examiner
at Washington deals with the word "Rats!"
which is much used nowadays. Au inventor
recently applied for an improvement on the
chestnut bell, by which, when the bell was
rung, the word "Eats!" would appear on the
surface and "paralyze" the user of the an
cient joke effectually. The examiner de
cided that the word "Bats!" is not patenta
ble. Shipments of frozen mutton, says the
Buenos Ayres Standard, have been so fre
quent of late, and some cargoes so large, that
the market is beginning to pay attention to
the steady growth of this branch of River
Platte exports and to the prospect of its im
mense development at no distant date. The
exports of the first nine months last year
amounted to 326,000 carcasses, not including
20,000 quarters.
The National Fare Food association can
and seems likely to do a muoh needed work.
It is an organization composed mainly of
business men, largely wholesale and retail
grocers, the purpose of which is to prevent
the adulterations in food and drugs, but
more especially in food, and the means to be
taken to secure the object is the education of
the public sentiment throngh appeals to the
press, the pulpit, the platform and the public
schools. Success to its efforts.
Dr. Riegler, of Pestb, is said to have just
made a very curious experiment in pho
tography, and one that to many people will
appear almost incredible. He has photo
graphed a bullet after it had been fired from
a rifle and while it was proceeding with a
velocity of 440 metres rather more than a,
quarter of a mile a second. A Werndl in
fantry rifle was the weapon selected for the
purpose of conducting the experiment, which
was in every way successful, a perfect repro
duction of the bullet being the result.
One of the longshoremen lately on strike
in New York city says that having applied
for $10 from the relief fund of the Knights
of Labor, he received $5 on condition of
signing a receipt for $15. Two other stories
to the same effect were told. One of them
was of a striker who had received $5 and
receipted for $10,and the other of a man who
was asked to receipt for $20 in return for $8
These stories Tijicate that somebody is
swindling tne nonest workingman, who is
willing to blindly follow such a leader ft.
Quinn.
The discussion of the woman, suffrage bill
in the New York legislature had some queer
features. One of the amendments to the bill
which was introduced provided that on and
after the 1st day of January, 1888, all' bach
elors attaining the age of thirty years, com
petent to provide for a partner, yet abstain
ing from entering into the sacred bonds of
matrimony, shall be subject to a forfeiture
of one-qnarter of their annual income, which
i amount shall be collected by tha State comp-
troller and distributed equitably among the
widows and orphans of the State.
In a recent address as president of the
Sritish Institution of Civil Engineers Ed
ward Woods stated that the locomotives of
fifty years ago contained the essential fea
tures of those of to-day, the great improve
ments wrought having been in constructive
detail. The modern engines possess at least
four times as great steaming power, coupled
with sixfold weight. Compared with a mod
ern locomotive the Planet type of 1832 to
1836 had a weight of seven and one-half tons
instead of forty-five tons, a fire-grate area of
7 square feet instead of 40 square feet, a
heating surface of 300 square feet instead of
1,400 square feet.
COMiTIIJPIICATIONS.
A Complaint From A Man
Who
Wants To Work.
To the Editor of the Journal and Courier:
This is a hard time and there seems to be
no good place for the peaceable and honest
workingman, who has really learned his
trade, and asks only to be left to work at it in
peace. Me goes quietly about nis business,
troubling nobody, but steadily earning a
comfortable living, helping his children in
their love for study and passing the time
'o day on excellent terms with the boss. I
am that man and have worked for this same
boss ever sinee I was "out of my time," and,
in fact, I learned my trade in his shop, and
we never had a disagreeable word together.
On my way home one evening, there stepB
up to me a stranger, who says he is a "walk
ing delegate," and surprises me by informing
me that I must join the union (to enable him
to get the regular percentage for roping me
in, I suppose, though he doesn't say that)
and assures me that if I refuse he will see to
it that no more work is given me. He as
serts that no union man will work with me,
and that he is going straight to the boss and
will order him mind you, I am positive
that he used the word order he will order
the boss not to employ any but union men
in his shop. I feel half afraid not to listen
to him, and later I do as he says,
join his union and pay my fee,
for the delegate will be sure
not to overlook that item and then go back
to work again as usual. But I can see plain
ly enough that matters are not quite as they
were. I feel as if an invisible wall had been
built up between the boss and me; he loeks
sad-eyed and unhappy. Now I am a union
man, and am expecting every day that one
f the boys will find fault with the way the
foreman brushes his hair or ties on his apron,
and that the walking delegate will order us
out. Think of me idling in the streets in
working hours me that in all my life never
was obliged to miss a day's work except on
account of personal matters and with three
of the children working day and night at
their lessons, and wanting new books (they
always want shoes) as they go up into a high
er class at school, and a new baby coming,
and the Lord knows when I may
cet to work and we too busy with all
these thoughts to care a wooden-button
mould what the foreman does with his apron
or his hair. I think, Mr. Editor, you must
see that the industrious, capable working
man, willing aud even anxious to work, is
now in a tight place. Non-union no work.
Union strikes, walking delegates and per
haps Knights of Labor. I say it is blanked
hard. Workingman.
Aericultural Note. If any animal on the
farm earns his annual sty-penned it must be
the hog. Lowell Courier.
A ball is to be given at Washington on
the occasion of the christening of Secretary
Whitney's infant. The baby can be relied
on to furnish the bawl. Omaha World.
Said Jones, "She's plighted her hand to me.
I'm happy enough to climb a tree;"
Said Brown to Jones, "Don't be soft headed.
You'll have more cause when you are wedded."
"If misfortune overtakes you, smile,"
advises a poet. That's all well enough, but
supposing misfortune overtakes you iu a
strictly prohibition town? -Burlington Free
Press.
"Mrs. Fanele is a homoeopathist.isn't she?"
remarked Mrs. McSwilligen during a call on
Mrs. Snaggs. "No, Jl don't think she is,"
was the reply. "She's very seldom at home
when I call." Pittsburg Chronicle.
The Reason. Tom ''I don't see why so
many people make a fuss over that Miss
Jobes; she isn't any better looking or as nice
as some of the other girls." Harry "That's
true, my dear boy, but her pa is a million
aire. That's why she carries so high a head."
Tom "Oh, that's it, is it? She holds up
her head by a cheque reign." Boston Bud
get.
Another Boodle Case. Mistress "Here is
a silver SDOon under your pillow. What
does this mean, Bridget?' Bridget
Shure, mum, night before last I dreampt
for the second toime that I was sick and to
take a tayspoonful of medicine, and I didn't
have any spoon, and to save mesilf gettin up
in the noight and disturbin' iverybody in the
bouse, 1 put tne spoon under me peiiow,
mum, for me convainance, mum," Texas
Siftings.
?t!B conductor's stoby.
My car, you know, was number thirty
And by the crossing she would wait;
When streets were dry or streets were dirty
Each day I found her sure as fate.
Ah, me, with what a pretty motion
She waved her dainty little glove!
I loved at sight and I'd a notion
That she returned my ardent love.
I grew to look with heart a-beating
To see her standing coyly there.
And passion thrilled my tender greeting
Whene'er J murmured "Miss, your fare"'
But now, I vainly try to blot her
From out a heart of miseree.
For she was but a female spotter
Sit still, my soul she spotted me !
Cleveland Sun.
DECK BUNTING IN THE BAYOUS
Disappearance of mallards aodlTeal-
How Professionals Hunt.
New Orleans Cor. New York Sun.
The only explanation of the disappearance
of the ducks from their former haunts near
the city is the destruction of the feed wild
celery, water cress, wild rice, etc. During
the past month these plants have died in
such quantities that the ducks have fled to
other feeding places, and those that remain
behind are remarkably thin and nave a
fishy flavor. The unusually low water in the
river and in the swamps, in conseguence of
which most of the lagoons are dry, may have
something to do with the disappearance
of these swamp plants and the flight of the
ducks.
The ducks have retired deeper into the
swamps, and laice i-,eray ana uayoa aes
Allemanus have become tne minting grounds
for mallards and teal. The latter is one of
the oldest hunting grounds in the Union, and
the supply of game is apparently as inex
haustible to day as it was a century and a
half ago, when the Dutch hunters from
whom the bayou is named supplied the town
of New Orleans with ducks. There are over
four hundred professional hunters on Bayou
des Allemands alone, and from the single
station of Bayou des Allemands, on the
Southern Pacific roads, no less than one
million duckB were Bhipped to New Orleans
last year, and as many as twelve thousand
in a single day. The average number killed
each year by a good professional hunter is
seven thousand.
The professionals hunt in parties of from
ten to thirty, and have regularly organized
camps in the center of the swamp. They
have their rude huts built in the higher
patches of ground, and running from their
houses for miles back in the prairie are
ditches that they have out and whioh they
keep always open. It is through these mini
ature canals that they push their pirogues
when searching for ducks. Both sides of
the bayou are complete networks of these
ditches, running in all directions. The
most rigid observance is maintained of the
rights of ownership of these canals. It is
this that prevents amateur hunters from ac
complishing much in the way of shooting
ducks, as they have no use of these canals
and are unable to force their pirogues or dug
outs through the thick matted, grass every
where covering the swamp. Even the
professionals find this grass very trouble
some, and more than half the ducks killed
are lost in it. Nearly all the best hunting
grounds in the bayou have thus been taken
up, and the amateurs are left only the
outlying districts, where ducks are few and
the hunting bad.
Just west of the duck fields are the snipe
and woodcock grounds in bt. Mary parisn,
where a good hunter will pick off three
hundred and fifty snipe and one hundred and
fifty woodcock a day. Bath snipe aad
woodcock are abundant just now, and there
are some prairie chickens to be found also.
The supply of these, of wild turkeys, deer,
rabbits and other game is making good some
, of the dehoiency due to the lack of, quca.
The Proposed Criminal Court.
To the Editor of the Journal and Courier:
That there is a necessity for some reform
in the administration of criminal justice in
the county of New Haven is admitted by all
honest thinking men. The records of the
ity, borough and justice courts in the
county fully show the large volume of crimi
nal business that annually flews through
them into the Superior court, to be swal
lowed in the maelstrom of its nolles. Last
year about 600 cases, half of which were
from the City court of New Haven, were
appealed to the Superior court, of which not
more than one-sixth were tried. The balaacs
were disposed of by settlement or nolle, and
the fact that all minor cases are so settled or
nolled has become so well known among the
criminal community that they make little or
no defense in the lower court, preferring to
take their chances in the higher. This is
notably so in liquor eases, a demurrer be
ing filed and the accused going to the higher
court without the shadow of a trial, expect
ing there to escape, either by the failure of
evidence or the act of the State's attorney,
without the shadow of fine or cost. Even
lawyers trade upon . this expectation. A !
notable example occurred in the City court
last week. A man who had been repeatedly
arrested and convicted for the same offense
was arrested again for indecent exposure. The
evidence was absolutely conclusive. Five
witnesses swore to seeing the man on two
different days, the 5th and 7th of this month,
expose himself in the most outrageous man
ner to girls or women on the public street.
He was sentenced to $25 for each offence.
The attorney at once saw the man's wife and
induced her to pay him $50. For this sum
the attorney procured a bondsman and
agreed to save the man harmless. And yet
in every case of appeal the State pays the
osts.
It was testified before the committee in
Hartford that nearly $6,000 was paid from
the State treasury back to the City court last
year as costs in appealed cases
If this was half of the business of the eounty
then $12,000 was paid back to the city, bor
ough and justice courts last year in appealed
cases, only a few of which were tried, an
other few settled upon the payment of a
small amount of money and the balance dis
posed of by nolles, etc. Admit, then, that
some reform is necessary, what shall it be?
Prof. Johnson T. Piatt says, and some others
agree with him, that another judge of the
Superior court is all that is required. The
judges of the Superior court are itinerant,
and hold court in various parts of the
State as civil business requires. If
there was another judge would he hold
criminal court in New Haven any more than
now? It was said when the criminal court
was established in Waterbury that that
would relieve New Haven and give more
time to the trial of criminal causes or reduce
the number of trials so that the New Haven
cases could be tried. Such has not been the
result. The criminal court of Waterbury
has, say, two hundred cases on its docket,
but the number in New Haven is as large as
ever and there are no more trials. Even Mr.
Doolittle did not think when before the com
mittee in Hartford that another judge of
the Superior court would remedy
the evil. He would be absorbed
in civil business and we should
be as bad off as ever. But suppose a judge
was appointed for the Superior court and as
signed to New Haven for the trial of the
class of oases which the bill provides shall go
to the new oourt, for it must be remembered
that no case where the offense is State prison
ean be tried by the new court, and there were
thirty-seven ot these last year from this City
court and probably as many more from the
county, enough to keep ona judge the entire
time; sappose. however, a judge is appoint
ed; his salary is $4,500 a year, while a oil1
provides only a salary of $3,000 for te new
court judge. Is it worth $1,60, a year to
call a man a Superior coiirt judge?
nut, witu a new superior court judge you
must also have an assistant State attorney
and the same jury as in the new court. If
the new judge was called a Superior court
judge all the argument of this class of objec
tions-would be removed, for the bill pro
vides that the records shall be kept by the
clerk of the Superior court, and the new
court would probably occupy for a large part
of the year the unused criminal court room
in the new Superior court building. But a
$3,000 Superior court judge would be an
anomaly, and really ought the judges of the
Superior court to give their time to the trial
of petty cases of jail offences or fines? And
on the other hand ought there to be a failure
of justice because there is no judge to try
the cases when the evidence can be had, and
often not to be had at all?
Another plan proposed ia to give the City
court a jury. One argument in favor of a
new court with a jury is, it would at once
prevent, by the certainty of trial, one-half of
tne appeals and save that money to the State
treasury. Bat sappose a jary was given to
the City court in criminal cases and no ap
peal allowed, every person tried would elect
to be tried by a jury, and especially if he
could raise $5 for a lawyer, for the chance
of one man out of twelve is greater
than the chance to influence one judge.
There were nearly 4,000 cases in the City
court last year. Given 1,000 of these jury
trials, or three a day, and it would require
three judges and three oourt rooms to dis
pose of them, unless the suggestion of Mr.
Pigott was adopted and the City court judges
sit days, evenings and Sundays. Bui adopt
the Jry tor tne City court, what chance
would there be for a conviction in a large
majority of cases? Mr. Pigott in his very
interesting article in the Register objects to a
jury fresh from the barnyard and the hay
mow" to trv liquor cases, but he would not
object to a jury from the saloons and street
corners. If it is difficult now to enforce our
criminal laws, what would it be with a city
jury in the City court paid $1 a day for their
services, as ex -Judge Robinson suggests. Mr.
Reynolds pays $1.50 for his "outside poor"
upon the streets.
The only objection or any weight urged
against th& new court is its cost. This is no
objection. There would be no cost for a
court room. There is plenty of room in the
new court building The salary of the judge
is fixed at $3,00Q. The bill provides that the
new judge may also hold a civil side of the
court when called upon, without extra pay.
This would save S7UU or more, and reduce
the actual cost for judge to say $2,300. The
attorney has a salary of $2,000, making for
judge and attorney $4,300. The jury would
cost $30 a day, and it is estimated would sit
175 days in the year. Costing then for jury in
round numbers $0,000 for the year, $11,000
would be the entire appropriation for the new
court for the year. What would be the return?
First, an indefinite amount saved in tne
expense of side judges in the
Common Pleas court, $U0; saved in
costs in cases not appealed, $0,000; saved in
costs and fines in eighty-one liquor cases,
supposing fiftv convictions and $75 the aver
age cost and tine,$3,750;and last and greatest
of all the wonderful effect in restraining
crime and encouraging the wouldba well
doers by the certainty of speedy trials and
sure convictions where guilty, and acquittals
where innocent. Ten thousand dollars com
ing back from the court, or more, would re
duce the actual cost of the court to a mere
trifle, and if nothing came back in money the
nronnnod new court would be worth all it
costs in influence on the criminal classes by
the assurance it gives of speedy trials. J.
Someone has discovered that George Wash
ington was once a book agent, out as ne
didn't lug around a history of the southern
rebellion in ninety-seven parts price 50 cents,
each, no subscription taken for less than the
entire work, one part to be delivered every
two weeks and occasionally come down on
the subscriber like a wolf on the fold with
ten numbers at one fell swoop, when he only
had thirty-three oents in his pocket, we shall
celebrate his birthday as usual by working
the regulation number of hours. Norristown
Herald.
Sweet and Sonr.
Stepping into a druggist's store the ether day,
our attention was called to something new for the
cure of coughs and colds, which we were informed
was having a wonderful success wherever tried.
Thedruggist explained to us the secret of its re
maskable efficacy: The new preparatir n is a com
pound of lactart (the pure acid ot milk) and honey,
and its effectiveness is owing to the wonderful mucus-dissolving
power of lactart, and the well-known
soothing and healing qualities of honey. The com
bination of a sweet and sour for the cure of throat
troubles has been tried from time immemorial, and
in the lactart and honey the principle is found in
its most effective form. The taste of the new rem
edy is simply delightful, and its curative effect is
testified to by the thousands who have tried and
are now using it. In a climate like ours, where
coughs and eolds are so eternally prevalent, a rem
edy such as Lactart and Honey is simply a nation
al boon. Nothing better has ever been devised for
children. Savs Mr. P. A- Biaisdell, of Boston: "I
desire to add 'my testimonial to the merits of Lac
tart and Honev'f or coughs, colds, hoarseness and
sore throat. It is a sovereign remedy, and no fam
ily can with safety be without a bottle of Lactart
and Honey in the house,"
DRESS
GOODS
Our line of Dress Goods include
all the
LeailiiMlies aeries
NEW SPRING SHADES.
A new lot ot French Sateens and
Ginghams in New Designs.
A selection made now will give
you a choice In a large number
of patterns.
LOW PRICES
For Dry Goods the order for this
wcelt.
Wilcox & Co.
OHAPEL STREET,
NEW HAVEN, CONN.
WLxstzllVLXtzaus.
THE COURTNEY METHOD
OF SINGING.
Mrs. Louise Gap Coirtw
of New York,
Has begun a series of lessons, which are given on
Wednesdays in New Haven at
156 GROVE STREET.
Voices will be tried every WEDNESDAY free o
charge, f jo
PICTURE FRAMES I
AND
Pictures Framefl to Orfler
AT
H. J. AUGUR'S ART ROOMS
73 OJEt-J.J$TGrJl ST.
Gold, Bronze and Natural Woods in great variety
and of the finest quality, and lower than usual
prices.
w Whist and Euchre Tally
Cards Just Received.
Also a Fine Line of Articles
Suitable for Prizes.
Call and Examine Them.
HOUSE
BUILDERS !
LOOK AT OUR
Hardwood Mantles.
Elegant Design.
Superior 'Workmanship.
LOW PRICES.
CHAMBERLIS & CO.,
Oransre and Crown 'Streets.
s?gii,j.?!.j,i
LADIES
Enamel vour Rantres twice a yew, tops once
a week and you have the finest-polished stove in the
world. For sale by aU Grocers and Stove Dealers. ,
Parlor Pride M'p'g Co., 140 Commercial street,
Boston; Yale, Bryant & Co., New Haven, Ct.; Geo.
S. Smith & Co., Norwich, Conn., Jobbing Agents.
jalfl
Germ and
FOULD'S
All the
phosphates
Gluten of
(aoaa.
A breakfast cooked in less
Iron, Pot
the wheat
berry.
THE
N
E
W j
CEREAL.
Rich in
Nutrition.
An
appetite
inducer.
than 10 minutes. More
uouriahiDe than a pound
ash) re
tained. of steak. It will give the
wnoie raimiy Health ana
happiness.
YOU CAN
Q
E
T
I
T
WHEAT
GERM
OF YOUR
riy juui vyaieis 111
AToVa rr.nr finma nnl 'Plirt
Id file's with if. flnnk it as
GROCER.
Very pal
atable. Easily
digested.
you woum uatmeai. it is
line giving, brain teeaing
MEAL.
fel4 lm nr
BABY'S SKIN,
Infantile and Birtli Humors
Speedily Cured by
Cuticura.
FOR Cleansing the Skin and Scalp of Birth Hu
mors, for aV Aying Itching, Bum ine; and Infla
matlon for curing the first symptoms of Eczema,
Psoriasis, Milk Crust, Scala Head, Scrofula and
other inherited skin and blood diseases, Cuticura.
the great Skin Cure, and Cuticura Soap, an exqui
site Skin Beautifler, externally, and Cuticura Re
solvent, the new Blood Purifier, internally, are in
fallible. Absolutely pure.
Mr Oldest Child,
Now six years of age, when an infant six months
old, was attacked with a v'rulent, malignant skin
disease. AU ordinary remt.Mes failing, we called
our family physician, who attempted to cure it;
but it spread with almost incredible rapidity, until
the lower portion of the little fellows person, from
the middle of his back down to his knees was one
solid rash, ugly, painful, blotched and malicious.
We had no rest at night, no peace by day. The
physician did not know then, and does not know
now. what it was. Finally we were advised to try
Cuticura Remedies. Without the knowledge of our
physician I procured a box of Cuticura and a cake
of Cuticura Soap. The effect
Was Simply IflarvelloeiN,
Using the two together, first washing him thor
oughly with Cuticura Soap, then anointing him
with Cuticura. From the first application a change
for the better appeared. The doctor said we had
no further use of him, and ceased his visits, in
three or four weeks a complete cure was wrought,
leaving the littl fellow's person as white and
healthy as though he had never been attacked. In
my opinion your valuable remedies saved his life,
and to-day he is a strong, healthy child, perfectly
welj no repetition of the disease having ever oc
curs 1. You are welcome to make any use of this
you wy deem best. GEO. B. SMITH,
Attorney-at Law and Ex. Pros. Attorney
Ashland, Ohio.
.Reference: J. G. "Weisr, Druggist, Ashland, O.
A
Cuticura Reined lea
Are sold everywhere. Prices: Ccticpha, E0 cents;
Resolvent, $1: Soap, 25 cents. Prepared by Pot
ter Druq and Chemical Co., Boston, Mass.
Send for "How to Care Skin Diseases. '
B A DV Use Cuticura Soap, an exquisitely
DADI perfumed skin Beautifler.
RHEUMATIC PAINS
ft
Neuralgic, Sciatic, Sudden, Sharp and
Nervous Pains and Strains relieved In
one minute by the Cuticura anti
Paln Planter. Warranted, At all
druggists, 25 cents: five for $1. Potter
Drug and Chemical Company, Boston1
jaldwasaw
EDPINAUI
PERFUMERY
AND
TOILET ARTICLES J
HENRY DREYFUS,
Bete Asrat tor tfceU. B.
10 t'Ol RTLAND ST., N. T,
aSlwedaatf
V
naH;UarD, Cobb.

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