OCR Interpretation


Morning journal and courier. [volume] (New Haven [Conn.]) 1848-1894, April 11, 1887, Image 3

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015483/1887-04-11/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

April 11. 1887.
mm
VOL. L
Special fpriicjes.
TODAY
Throughout
- H TTDITT Attnvf- I I ' I -J J . -r
i-ijr wuuil wm uc uiauc iu
largest on record.,
r ? . .
(BARGAINS WlSiL BE OFFERED
-AND A-
CHOICE SELECTION OF NOVELTIES
NEVER BEFORE EQUALED.
500 Choice Wool Dress Patterns, exclusive styles.
Thousands of yards of PONGEE, CHINA, FOULARD
and SUMMER SILKS ; styles the best ; prices the lowest.
Parasols and Sun Umbrellas !
The most .choice styles of the
low prices.
STRIPED TUXEDO PARASOLS
SjrinJacMsani Wrajs, Raglans ani Jersey Waists.
7Q4 and 768 "iTT
JOHNSON &
411 and 413 State Street,
IT"
Liebetschaner Lager.
, "Liebetschaner" lager, for which we are
sole agents for New Haven. It is a very
choice beer and pot np in white flint bottles.
Champagne Cider.
Bottled by us. It is sweet, has good life
and will snit the most particular.
OUR ANNUAL OPENING AND EXHIBITION
OF
CARPETS AND PAPER HANGINGS for tie SPRING TRADE
NOXrXT I3V phog-hjsss.
Our offering at this time comprises all the latest Novelties in Moquetts, Wiltons, Body
Brussels, Tapestry Brussels, 3-ply and 2-ply Ingrains,
(y Paper Hangings and Ceiling Decorations in great variety. fiJ
Our Upholstery Department is crowded with Choice Bargains in Portieres, Turcoman, Fur
niture Coverings, etc., etc.
Linoleum, the cork oil cloth, for durability and economy, is the best in the world. We are
manufacturers' agent for the same, and can give you the gennine.
"Visit our Carpet Department and be convinced thtt you can save money
9 4 Chapel
K
W. P. GILBERT,
65 CHURCH STREET, opposite P.O.
. 79 to 89 RAILROAD AVENUE.
fiscjellauecros.
Auctioneer.
H AVISO had many years experience in the
business, I offer my services as autioneer in
the selling of household furniture, carpets, bedding,
etc.. and goods of any kind and description. Leave
orders at F. M. Hall's Crockery Store, No. SO
Church street; or orders by mail promptly at
tended to. I ASHfcB.
m22tf
IiPTSi Hall Typewriter.
MODEL 1887.
Price $40. - - Weight 7 lbs.
JAMES B. ROWE,
GENERAL ACT FOR CONNECTICUT.
834 Chapel Street.
Second-hand writers taken In
LN this city, a child's carriage pillow. The finder
will be suitably rewarded t.yreturnin
Horse and Boggy For Sale.
OW account or removing iu r .
yyyy oner mr etvio uiv Bpiouum j uT3
Dorse, wmmg o yet,nj wiu, T o.
and trentle: excellent roader; also a Brocket &
"Tutile piano box buggy in good condition. 1 ne
above loiter together or separate at a great bargain.
Can be seen table 107 Co-
---nuWtt. -- i: 808 Orange Street.
FOR SALE.
A otIWO. atronar. sound and kind horse.
would make a good coupe horse. Color,
" To are the horse inouire of Hugh Brown,
09 Winchester avenue, between 1 and 2 pm.
aS6t JOHN W. ALONG.
BANTAMS.
A TRIO of Golden or Silver Sea Bright Ban
tams or a setting of eggs. Price must be
reasonable. Address BANTAM,
mSOdAwtf This Office.
District of New Haven,ss. Probate Court, I
April 7, A. D. 1887. f
TESTATE of CHARLES BATES, late of New Ha-
WJJ ven, in said district, deceased.
Upon the application of Robert T. Merwin. of New
Haven, praying that an instrument in writing pur
porting to be the last will and testament of said de
ceased may be proved, approved, allowed and ad
mitted to probate as per application on file more
Mr MB?- .., . k. .,
and determined at the Probate Office in New Ha
ven, in said district, on the 14th day of April, A, D.
1887, at 9 o'clock in the forenoon, and that notice
be given of the pendency of said application and
the time and place of hearing thereon, by publish
ing the same three times in some newspaper having
a circulation in said district,
a circuit, u HEATON ROBERTSON,
aft tt Judge.
AT
ATWATEH'S
PAPER & TWINE WAREHOUSE
060 0RAND AVENUE,
New Haven, Conn..
Can be found a full line of Manilla, Tissue, Book,
Tar and Sheathing Paper. Card Board, Carpet
Lining, Twine and Rope, Inks, Mucilage. Pens Pen
cils, Fancy Papertries, 8chool Supplies, B ai k
Books and Stationery of all kinds.
Also Seines, Nets, Fish Lines, Poles Hooks, &c.
Our goods are alt new and will be sold
v.; ' AT LOWEST PRICKS.
W. JT. AT WATER & CO.,
Successors to
H. J. AT WATER A CO.
apStf
F. A. CARLTON,
Plumbing, Steam and Gasfitting
Jobbing Promptly Attended To.
OFFICE ISO George, cor. Temple St.
STEAM HEATING BUILDING.
ty-ESTlSATHS GIVBN.ja
. lltf
P.UCAD I IIMRFR
VyllL.ni luiiiuuiii
. Tellew Pine. Carolina Pine.
Flooring, Ceiling, Timber and
ft il 1 n it
2x4, xi, 4x4, 4xC4aS, Ac, ;
Cneappr f nan Spruce,
- aW Mre best for general use. Very superior him
.bet tor buiMing seashore cottages, r
Fot orcnapel Street," "
AND'
the Week I
ruaKe inis weejcs . Dusmess tne
. , 1 ' I 1 . I
- :
f - i : ?
leading manufacturers, at very
and ST, GEORGE PARASOLS,
A TTlTi EITJELJ7! tit'X.
BROTHER,
Corner Court Streets.
33
Dublin Stont, London Porter, Scotch Ale,
Ginger Ale, Bass Ale, White Label, Uham
pagnes, Sherries, Ports, Madeira, Clarets,
imported and California.
Wine of Cocoa.
Wo hare jnst taken the agency for the sale
of this preparation in New Haven. It is
highly recommended by Dr. Hammond and
other physicians lor nervous prostration, etc.
Street.
ggoarfl and fjooxng.
FOR RENT.
TWO larc-e connecting rooms, unfurnished
iSsinr or furnished, with board. A rare chance for
.jilLright parties.
1 W HALLUX AVJMNU.U.
att 3tT
FOR RENT,
dtuk A X Tnf front nh&mber. handsomelv furn-
tj ished, with alcove. Also a handsome suite of
jtr " " """ " rooms, inquire at
aul6lf 494 CHAPEL 8TREET.
Motels.
THE SHELBVBNE,
At Atlantic City, N. jr.
DIRECTLY on the beach. Hot and
loold sea water baths.
Open all the year.
iioatm
A. B. ROBERTS.
HOTEL DEVONSHIRE.
4-2D STREET, NEW YORK.
Opposite Grand Central Depot
ADJOINING LINCOLN BANK.
AMA Rooms from 50 cents upwards. Elegant
m suits for families. Restaurant first-class at
moderate prices. Baggage to and from de
pot tree. s. a., hasu x
tf
Houses for Sale Honey to Loan.
NOW is the time to buy a good house for a
iULlittle money. Terms accommodating.
Money to loan on first mortgage security. Call at
R. E. BALDWIN'S
Seal Estate Agency, 618 Chapel St.
ap2daw
Building Lots For Sale
ON Whitney avenue at low prices, 900 feet
E. WHITNEY.
FOR RENT.
THE premises No. 187 High Street, lately
occupied by Warren Robinson as a Joiner
BhOD.
A Steam Engine and Woodworking Mahinerv
irniuMiijr vcui ua nuuea ix aesireu.
Apply for terms at
PHILLIPS' MONUMENTAL WORKS,
mal8eod 143 High Street, N. H
FOR RENT.
MM PYTHIAN HALL (over Journal and Cou
rier Office), Tuesday evening. Apply at Pho-
li Kjgrapic ttooma oi 1. a. STODDARD.
i3tt 844 Chapel street.
A Few Hundred Dollars Will Se
cure a Good Home.
ONE FAMILY HOU8E, 200 Atwater street.
House and barn. 20 Auhlll-n Mt.n. Twn.fm-
,ilV hOUSe. No. 11 Clav rtnuat. Tnvhtnl.
luse. 460 Orchard street. All to ha nlil in if aniH
within ten days. Also for rent, first floor 78 Wool
sey street; first floor 10 Newhall street; 115 Portsea
street; 121 Portsea street; 810 Oongrees avenue, and
second floor 29 Auburn street.
! A. M. HOliMES. HOUSE MOVER. OFFICE
. W OHUROH STREET. nolg
1 FOR RENT.
FROM May lBt, the Foote mansion. No. 129
Whitnev avenue, near HumDhrev street. An.
LdIv to CHAS. A. WHITE.
tMit 69 Church Street.
FOR SALE.
THE brick home and las No. s Hiffh street.
Mi. I A it nr i . ii
Lnow deceased. ImmedlnlA wmmmob riven!
A large part of the purchase money may remain oa
waiu rie ox in L reel.
. . JAMES GARDNER CLARE, Adm.,
mblgg 81 Church Street.
FOR SALE.
A BAKERY,
THE stock, fixtures and good will of an old ee
lished and well ta ing cash business In the
center of the city. The trade is large, and the busi
ness in all respects first class.
To the right person this is a rare opportunity.
Address
apltf BOX 1,067, City.
Dos Cart For Sale.
A superior and a-enuine Rnirlish twm?
.Cart; seats four persons. Inquire at sta-
A IX VVAXjXj BxxtttKT.
BICYCLES.
N?w Kapid, ItadgerMPnampion
f Challenge and deal.
Second'taand afaetll Cheap.
WILLIAM M. FrTsBIE A CO.,
S AslcBlral Street
SjeaX Estate.
FORREST.
THE store, with cellar, and two tinner Wta
i o LuniHi Hbrvtrc. Apply IO
AKIHUlt BENNETT.
Janitor of Hoadiey Bonding, Room 9.
aa if
FUR SALE.
t HOUSES on the following streets and ave
nues: College street, George street, Lafay-
Sylvan avenue. Sherman avenue. Also a number
on (Jhapel street, and many others. Terms made
easy.
jl numuer or desirable building lots.
FOR RENT,
A number of houses and tenements; pries low.
: Rents tpolleoted,- ", j
Honey to loan on real estate at 5 p?r cent.
NO. TO GHUKCtf BTHEET, BOOM . -
MP Office open evenings from 7 to 8.
THE lower rartof No. 56 Kdwards street.
Pill Te rooms OQ first; floor and one up stairs; $15
lattajper montn; gas ana city water. Apply io
WM. F. DANN,
apStf 8? Franklin Street.
FOR RENT.
THE two brick houses No. 203 and 205 Or
BPI'hi ange street; has all the modern conveniences
jtttonpossession May 1st.
Apply at BEECHER'S EXCHANGE,
769 Chapel Street.
Only 1,500.
THE premises Ko. 93 Ivy street, consisting
la" or a rrauoe dwelling containing seven rooms.
JtiUjLsize of lot 55x150. with choice fruit. This
ruinous low price id quoted that an estate may be
Closed. xs ajiAjantR o HAunanuu,
7b9 Chapel street.
For Sale In West Haven.
NiL A snug house of six rooms and lot 90 feet
4'u H00' within live minutes wane 01 the depot
icjlLor tiie-consouaaiea rauroaa.
Apply to
ap8
WALTER A. MAIN,
West Haven..
FOR SALE,
THE large double house (Nob. 319 and
381 Orchard streets will be Bold at a
bargain, suitable for two families. Owners removed
from city.
CHAS. II. WEBB,
850 Chapel Street.
ap7
Farm For Sale,
fcifc. NE N R New Haven, Conn. . containing about
; 32 acre J, under splendid state of production.
i!!ILThe vield of the uronertv has been the past
fw years nearly $2,500 per annum. m A peach or
chard covering the choicest varieties, 1.200 thrifty
trees. Just in bearing, will very materially increase
the income. Comparatively little labor will be
needed. A comtortaoie House ana capacious oara
are on the premises. A commanding view both of
landscape and water, the latter extending the
length of Long Island Sound to Montauk Point; it
is within 30 minutes' dr.ve from New Haven ; 15
minutes from West Haven station. Consolidated
railroad. A bargain is offered in this place and
satisfactory reasons given for selling. For partic
ulars apply or address
a8 769 Chapel Street. New Haven. Conn.
Farm For Sale,
TOWN OF MHjFORD, Conn., near Long
liSILlsland Sound, containing about 20 acres of
land, with house and barn, will be sold at a low
price cheap.
Also a nice house and lot 150x200 feet, corner
West Chapel and Central avenue, will be sold at a
I bargain.
A factory building. 50x110 feet; 40 horse power
engine and 80 horse power Bigelow boiler . Also
about an acre and a half of land.
BEECHER'S EXCHANGE,
apS 769 Chapel Street.
FOR RENT,
k. THE brick house No. 82 Trumbull street,
J third door from Orange ten rooms with
Lmodern improvements.
H. P. HOADLEY,
a7 6t Hoadiey Building.
FOR SALE,
l FARM of 135 acres situated less than five
T.rnilM frnm New Hiuvn Omen, with firnnd
iiiH-buildincrg. abundance of f rut. rood neighbors
together with Devon cows, bull, pair of good horses,
four wagons, 7 pigs, forty chickens, twelve ducks,
mowing machine, ploughs and all farming utensils.
Will sell very low and make terms to suit pur
chasers. Would exchange for house in Fair Haven.
GEORGE A. ISBELL.
Room 1.
792 Chapel Street.
FOR RENT.
u CENTRAL offices, single or connecting
rooms Steam heat. All conveniences.
L atttit 72H ORANGE.STREET.
FOR RENT.
t HOUSE No. 9 Park street, in perfect order.
13 rooms, all modern improvements.
T. G. SLOAN BON,
Boom 3 Benedict's Building.
Open evenings.
FOR SALE,
!k THE elegant property known as "Rose
Si"; Hill" in the city or Waterbury, Connecticut,
OUJLbeloneine to the' estate of the late Carrie J.
Welton, namely:
The mansion and outhouses on Prospect and
Grove streets, along with about six acres of land.
Also two acres of land on corner of Riverside and
West Main streets.
Also 341 shares of capital stock of Holmes, Booth
& Hayden's company, and
509 shares of capital stock of Oak vi lie Pin compa
ny of Waterbury, Connecticut.
1 1 iL. It i tir, m i n, r-xecuior,
a4 7t 100 East id street. New York city.
For alc or Rent
l A firrst-class residence with all comforts
and conveniences and very desirably located.
La good customer w.ll be treated liberally.
B. C. LAKE,
m31 18t 65 Church Mreet.
FOR RENT.
HOUSE No. 109 Day street from May 1st.
Apply to CHARLES SHELTON,
48 Church Street,
From 9 to 12 a. m. m30 8t
FOR RENT,
I HOUSE. 10 rooms. Gas and City water,
with barn and carriage house, 315 Whitney
avenue. Price $20. Inquire at
313 WHITNEY AVENUE, or
m30 tf 303 Grand Avenue.
FOR RENT.
FROM Mav 1st - The eleeant residence No.
iUlLrooms. with all modern improvements. Also
Oft 1 1 vi i rl, t atNMrt. Iirincu fmntiainin. Ifl nF 19
barn. The lot is well stocked with choice fruits.
The location is one of the best in the city. Rent
$600. Inquire at
UINIBAM'S KEAL ESTATE AUEBUI,
m30 tf 63 Church Street, Room 1.
OFFICES TO RENT.
tTWO large offices in Austin Building, 851
Chapel street, up one flight, heated by steam
and will furnish incandescent electric lights if de
sired. If not rented by April 15th will rent desk
room to different parties. Rooms large enough for
ten desks. Apply at room 4, 851 Chapel 8 tree t,
mh30tf F. A GILBERT.
FOR RENT,
l SECOND avenue house. West Haven ; fur
nished or unfurnished; reasonable rent to re
Lsponsible parties. Address D. M. M..
nutf Box 251, West Haven Postoffice.
FOR RENT.
THE store and house No. 104K Oranee
lljjll street, suitable for store and dwelling, now
Also houses Nos. 6 and 8 Trumbull street, with
modern improvements.
MEB WIN'S REAL ESTATE OFFICE,
759 Chapel Street.
m25
FOR RENT,
FROM Mav 1. the store 802 Chanel street.
now occupied by J. B. Screwenberg. Apply
,at TOWNSENIl WATKOUS.
m23tf Office, 153 Church Street.
For Rent. For Rent.
a. OUR list of rents Is always large and open
I rn nanM.t(nn frnm R In t Via mnniniv until
iliilL8:30 at evenine. We have now 47 rents on
our boards, at prices ranging from $8 per month
upward to $100 per month, and located in all parts
ox the city.
Prompt paying tenants like to deal with us, and
others know better than to hire of us. We average
at this time of year about fifty calls daily from
muse looaing lor a rem. xnereiore our list is a
good place to exhibit houses and tenements for
rent.
It is generally acknowledged by those who have
tried it, that we get more net income out of a
house than the owner can get, and save him all
time and annoyance in taking care of his own
property, and we are Just as prompt in accounting
w uwiwiB h wo ui ...iiw.ing 1 1 uin Ljio tenants.
Try us.
Horace i-. Hoadiey,
a HOADLEY BUILDING.
jalg Opposite Postoffice.
Fair Haven Lots For Sale.
On Blatchley Avenue,
On Saltonstall Street,
On Wolcott Street,
On Exchange Street,
On James Street.
Prices Low.
Terms Easy.
Two New Cottages on Blatchley Avenue.
Ocen Mondav. Wednesdav and Karnrriii mn
tags. C. H. WEBB.
mi5tt 850 Chapel St.
FOR RENT.
FROM APRIL 1st, the new residence No. 28
Acaiiemv Btreet: modern imnronmnniA in
cluding steam heat. Apply to
X-. (J. XJUKHAM,
m14tf t 445 Chapel Street.
FOR RENT,
SEVERAL well lighted lofts, with or with
out steam power. 8. PECK & CO.,
jaowana: HI Day Street,
FOR RENT,
A NUMBER of tenements in all parts of
.the city.
FOR SALE,
, . J ' ' "-.V. ulUAUUgUH. ftp
ply at the office of
i. L. KIERNAN,
Room 8, 818 Chapel street.
Open evenings from 7 to 9. ni9
HIN MAN'S REAL ESTATE AND
-PlRE INSURANCE AGENCY.
i-tftt ' MONEY at per? cent, interest. Builders
I f! ill an" borrowers accommodated on short no
- . tice. Honaes-and lots for sale in all parts bf
theiSty. Farms and shore property. Rents and
collections a specialty. All kinds of insurance
placed in fi rat-class oompanies. ...
HINMAN & COOKE, Agents,
S3 Church St., opposite postofflce. Open evenings.
Local Weatlier Record.
roa Apart. 10, 1887.
7. 8. 10
A. M. P. M. P. 11,
Barometer 30.03 30.14 : 29.99
Thermometer 48 79
Riimirtitv-. .
71
30
Wind, direction and
velocity in miles .
per hour 62 NW9 W3
Weather ..' Fair Clear. Clear
Mean bar, 30.06; mean temp., 65; mean humid
ity, so.
Max temp., 80: mtn. temp 41; rainfall, .00
laches.
Mas. hourly velocity of wind. 11 miles.
FOB iPBIL, 10, 1885.
Mean bar. 30.18; mean temp., 54.
Max. temp., 69; min. temp. 42.
V rz. 'A- J. H. SHERMAN, S.,0. U. 8: A.
Ifote: A minus sign I preflxed to ermometer
readings indicates temperature below aero.
A dashr lin connection with rainfall indicates
precipiufti uin rag axnaii w weaBixrv. -f
MewetnowMCai
M IN I AT UBE ALMANAC.
APRIL 10.
Btm Risks, 5:20 1 Moon Rises, fHiosr Watcs,
stm bets, o:2t) ia:i4
DEATHS.
PARMELEE Entered into rest. April 9, Mary E.
wife of P. R. ParmAlfw. nsvui 63 vears.
GALLAGHER At the residence of her daughter.
sirs, jona ford, 41 Stevens street, Mrs. xinaget
Gallagher, asred 6A vea.ro. '
SMITH -In East Haven, April 10, Captain Samuel
OlllH.lI. imn 1 VAatfl.
Funeral will take place from his late residence,
xtast Haven, Thursday arternoon, at s O'clock.
Relatives and friends are invited to attend with
out further notice.
JHARINE LIST.
PORT OF NEW HAVEN.
arrived, April 9.
Sen J J Hanson, Stevens, Balto, coal.
Sen Sarah Walters, Walters, Norfolk, coal.
Sch Franklin Pierce, Weir, N Y, brick.
8ch Luzsrne, Twaddles N Y, brick.
Sen C H Delemater, French, N Y, brick and clay.
Sch Win Young, Carter, Va, oysters.
CLEARED AND SAILED.
Sch J Price. Smith, Va.
Sch James H Hoyt, Dissowav, Balto.
Sch Seveuty Six, Steele. N Y.
Sch Albert Mason, Abbott, N Y.
Sch Wm Somers, SomerS, N Y.
Sch Maud Witherell. Fodden, N Y.
Sch C H Hodgdon, Campbell, N Y.
Sch Rachel Jane. Kidd, N Y.
Sch B F Jayne. NY.
FOR RENT,
l A NEW. modern, central, 10 room house,
to adults only. Price $400. Inquire at
L all2t 224 CROWN STREET.
FOR RENT,
tTHE new hause, with all modern improve
ments, 113 Atwater street. Fair Haven. Ap
ply on the premises, from 9 a. m. to 5 p. m.
aUtf E, C. BEACH.
FOR RENT.
tFROM May 1st, desirable front corner of
fice with connecting room and lavatory, one
flight, steam heat,
alltf GEORGE H. FORD.
FOR RENT,
t SEVERAL desirable dwellings, floor and
tenements in different parts of the city, at
from $8 to $30. Particulars on application.
EDW. MALLEY,
all 8t 928 Chapel Street.
FOR SALE,
h. BUILDING LOT on South Quinnipiac
street. Fair Haven East; pleasantly situated
ILand well stocked with fruit trees. Inauire at
9 Quinnipiac street, or 872 Chapel street, all 'it
Beard of Ceuncilmcn.
TO the Sheriff of the City of New Haven greet
ing: You are hereby required to warn the Board of
Gounollmen of said cltv to meet at the Chamber of
the Board in said city, on Monday, the 11th day
of April, 188T, at 7:30 o'clock p. m.
tnven unaer my nana mis vtn oay oi April,
1887. SAMUEL A. YORK, Mayor.
The foregoing is a true copy of the original war
rant.
Attest: THOMAS C. HOLLIS,
Labor Saving.
Use Klenzer to polish your
plated table scrviec, and observe
the Instantaneous reult.
Price 15 cents per bottle. For sale by
JOHN BRIGHT,
8tO Chapel Street.
INVESTMENT SECURITIES.
100 shares Second National Bank.
20 shares Merchants'1 National Bank stock.
100 shares Dan bury & Nor walk RR. Co. "s stock.
Milwaukee ard St. Paul bondi.
New York & New England bonds.
New York Elevated RR. bonds.
BUNNELL &SCRANTON,
Bankers and Brokers,
732 ANH 734 i HAPEi. 8TKEET.
Notice to Contractors
SEALED prO(oaTs will be received at the office
of L. B. Morris, No. 95 Orange street, until 4
o'clock p. hi. on the 30th day of April. !887. for the
construction of an almshouse in New Haven. Pro
posals will be received for the mason work, carpen
ter work, painting, plumbing and heating, separ
ately or altogether.
Plans can be examined and specifications ob
tained at the office of Allen & Tyler, architects. No.
82 Church street, room 13 No proposals will be
received after the time specified. The right to re
ject any and all bids is reserved.
By order f the Selectmen and Building Commit
tee L. B. MORRIS,
all Ot Chairman.
Hamilton Park.
The above Park will be for
rent tills season to any parties
who wish to hire it for ball
ginies, picnics, games or driving'.
Bunnell & Scranton.
all 3t
NOTE !
Our ReiuctM in Prices
Y!4t pounds best Granulated Sugar SI.
3 pounds extra fine Prunes ?5c.
6 pounds Laundry Starch 25c.
5 pounds box dry Cod 35c.
W pound box Epps1 C ooa 20c.
pound box Baker's Cocoa 34c. .
a pouna oox ttaxer s unocotate iyc,
inglish Jams. 1 pound jars. 30c
1 quart Canary Seed 10c.
1 8 barrel Win Favor Flour 75c.
A. M. FOOTE,
458 STATE STREET,
Between Court and Elai Streets.
Bonis ani stocis for sale
100 shares Banbury & Norwalk RR.. guaranteed 5
percent.; non-taxable.
lu snares Boutmngton water co.
10 shares N. Y. & N. J. Telephone Co.
60 shares Wheeler & Wilson Manufacturing Co.
83,000 Western Union Telegraph 7s.
sia.uuu J. 1 .. IN . n. A 11. isc mortgage 48.
S5.000 Mahoninir Coal RR fis. guaranteed.
SO shares Detroit, Hillsdale & Southwestern RR,
T.uumcato s. Northwest, 1st 78 ot lull.
$1,000 Metropolitan Elevated RR. 1st 6 per cent.
Western Farm Loans, principal and
ia9mi Ku.r.uieeu.
W.T. HATCH & SONS,
ilass, China, Wooden Ware, Tin
Ware, &c, &c.
Lowest Market Prices Go To
Wiley's,
51 CHURCH STREET,
Opposite Postonlee.
At
Orders received for packing crockery,
REMOVAL.
Wo
have removed to our spacious new quarters,
. km. Itfm ntnek of Fine Rackets, at
where
prices
es irom i.ov w -
you want a Fine Racket get our Waterproof
w Vintnr
xr y
'New
Restrlnclnz a Specialty.
Give us a call at Factory, ...
,W. G. SHEPARD,
Corner JTamea anal Rlwer Streets,
Bet ond Yale Boat House.
Easter Cards
AT HALF PRICE.
697 CHAPEL STREET.
NORTHROP THE ART DEALER.
COCKLE'S
ANTI-BILIOUS
x- PILLS,
THE &EAT ETGlilSH EEMEDY
Tor JArer, Bile, inaigstiOT, eic z
cury ; contains only
ttent: J. N CHlTTENTON, N
Fran from Km.
.ble Znrjredlenta.
News by Telegraph
FROM ALL QUARTERS.
THE VOICE OF ENGLAND
Against The Coercion Of
The Irish.
THE. METING IliDE PARK.
Dr. McGIynn Starts On His
Crusade.
DEATH OF JOHN T. RAYMOND
Large Rolling Mills Burn
ed In Toledo.
THE HIDE PARK IU KKTIJiC!.
A monster Gatnerine to Protest
Asalnat Coercion Some Fears or
Trouble But tne Police to be There In
Plenty.
Boston, April 10. E. A. Perry cables
from London to the Herald:
The fears of disorder at the monster Hyde
Park meeting have induced the police author
ities to make lame preparations for the re
pression of tnrbnlence. With the fate of
Sir Edward Henderson in memory his suc
cessor is not likely to fall below the exigen
cies of the occasion. The residents in the
vicinity of Hyde Park have been nervous at
the prospect, bnt omeial assurances are now
given that the force will be so disposed as to
guarantee the maintenanae of public order.
The apprehensions of rioting at the meeting
were voiced in the Post this morning in an
article which excites much discussion. The
Post calls the demonstration an appeal to
mob rule, and while not disputing the legal
ity of public meetings within certain well
understood limits, it asserts that "in the
hands of the reckless parliamentary
minority and as an instrument of menace
to the supremacy of Parliament it can
only be by some unfortunate technicality
that such meetings can escape being called
treasonable." But, however strongly the
government may be opposed to this method
of agitation, they are not likely to follow the
Post's advice and prevent the assemblage by
force, even though Edward Norris, one of
t8e Conservative members for the Tower
hamlets, has warned the authorities through
the columns of the limes that the story of
the meeting may be written in letters of
blood. The plans for the great gathering
have been perfected with as much care as
was exercised in planning the Easter volun
teer manoeuvres. Fourteen wagonettes will
be disposed in a semi-circle parallel to Park
Lane between the marble arch and the Hyde
corner and the following members of Parlia
ment will preside: Professor Stuart, Mr. La
bonchere, Mr. J. Rowlands, Mr. Broadhnrst,
Mr. Peyton Uobb, lion. .Bernard Uolendge,
Mr. William Hunter, Mr. Octavus Morgan,
Mr. William Cremer, Mr. George " Howell
and Mr. Edward Pickersgill. These are all
Uladstomte members. Messrs. Kedmond
and T. P. O'Connor will form the Parnellite
contingent and it is hoped that the lord
mayor of Dublin will be able to loin tnem.
The Liberal and Radical clubs will muster at
their several headquarters and the visiting
organizations will form in procession. -From
these points they will march to the park
with bands and banners and tne great meet
ing will be organized at 3 p. m. The as
semblage will be addressed from sev
eral platforms and ample arrangements
have been made for keeping np the now of
oratory. Mr. Jacob Bright and Mr. Herbert
Gladstone will take part in the speaking and
the resolutions will be put by bugle call. Al
together in view of the vast multitude that
the bank holiday sends into tne streets and
the thorough preparations which have been
made the meeting will be a most impressive
demonstration unless the clerk of the weather
frowns upon it in bitter earnest. Unfortu
nately April is a treacherous month.
An active campaign has been opened
against the new land bill for Ireland. The
vigor with. which it is carried on would be
better appreciated were the . agitation against
the crimes bill less vociferous. By my esti
mates the opDosition- is really more danger
ous than the anti coercion demonstations,for
while the Unionist Liberals show a solid
front on the latter issue they are by no means
united in support of the agrarian proposals.
The Spectator this week sees in the measure
clear evidence that the Conservatives have
thrown over the landed interest, and the
Economist declares that the bill is "fatal, is
based on false principles and can
never be passed by Parliament." These
two journals are influential exponents of
the Unionist opposition and their joint expo
sition cf the project is a perilous fire in the
rear. The Ulster land committee yesterday
condemned the bill with the exception of the
clauses regarding leases, in which judgment
they are alone with the National league.
That landlorns generally do not favor the
measure may be gathered from the frequent
letters in the papers, the gist of which is that
any legislation which prevents a land owner
from receiving either his rent or his land in
lieu of it is little better than confiscation.
Dr. Patton wrote to the Times recently that
the provisions in the bill creating bankruptcy
jurisdiction in county courts is of a novel
character, likely to meet with opposition
from parties, and his prediction bids fair to
be realized.
Irish Speakers In Great Demand.
Boston, April 10. Clancy cables from
Dublin to the Herald: When I left London
Thursday evening the agitation against the
coercion bill was in full swing. Up to that
time but one meeting in England had been
held in favor of the bill and about three hun
dred against it, and the prospect was that
this proportion would be maintained. The
demands from Liberal organizations for
Irish members as speakers were so numerous
that it was impossible to comply with one
fourth of them and those demands came
from not merely one or two districts, but
from every quarter of the island. Many of
the requests were peculiar and suggestive,
being for Irish members only who have
been in jail. The meetings moreover are
very large and enthuaiastio,and altogether the
agitation promises to be more like the great
Bulgarian agitation of 1879 than any since.
It is not certain that while the Liberal Un
ionist leaders are chiefly to blame not only
for the introduction of the coercion bill, but
also for its most drastio provisions, very
many if not the majority of the rank and file
of the party are simply quaking in their
shoes at the certain result of their action, a
result clearly foreshadowed by the wholesale
passing over of their principal supporters in
the country to the Gladstontan campaign.
The coercion bill therefore, which was in
tended finally to trample out the home rule
movement both in England and Ireland, has
really been and will be the greatest service
yet rendered to the Irish cause. Nothing
else could have so effectually conduced
to the rapid conversion to home rule of the
wavering section of the Liberals, whose aid
alone is wanting to the rapid and complete
success of the Gladstone pelicy. The ap
pointment of King iiarmon to tne post ot
under secretary for Ireland, if it has really
been made, will be another powerful factor
working in the same direction. Such an ap
pointment damns the government as a mere
partisan instrument of the landlords. Har
mon began as a home rnler. He was, in
fact, the first home ruler returned to Parlia
ment from an Irish constituency under mat
title and he remained one, in appearance,
until the electors at Sligo, having round tnat
he was more of a landlord than a home ruler,
turned him out. When he could get bo
more out of the Nationalists he became an
Orangeman and has ' since figured in that
capacity without doing any service to him
self or his new allies.
Suspected of marderlntr Mr. Week,
New YoRKj April 10. Charles Miller,
alias "Butoh," and John Green wald are
looked up at police headquarters on the
charge of being implicated in the murder of
Lyman S. Weeks, a clerk in a Broadway
store who was killed by a burglar on the
night of March 15th at his residence, No.
1,071 DeKalb avenue, Brooklyn. Ever since
the murder the police of this city and Brook
lyn have been following up every clue in
hopes of capturing the assassin. In the ear
ly part of last week Inspector Byrnes re
ceived information that'Millerj'who had just
been sent to the penitentiary for a robbery
committed since the murder, and Green wald,
who was under arrest for a Jersey burglary,
were implicated in the robbery. Two other
thieves named Paul Kraus au, John Baker
gawe enough evidence to-iaateifcthe crime on
Wilier and Green wald. . Yesterday Mr. Z.
H. Chamberlain identified the accused as the
suspicious parties he saw in front of Mr.
Weeks' house on the night of the tragedy.
PROHIBITION II TEXAS.
Senator Maier Follows Senator Rea
Kan and Comes Oat Squarely In Its
jraver.
Fort Worth,- Tex., April 10. Ex-Lieutenant
Governor Gibbs addressed a letter to
ex-Senator Maxey asking him to come out
against the prohibition amendment which is
to be voted on in August. Mr. Maxey's re
ply was made public yesterday. The object
of Gibbs was to get Maxey to address a State
anti-prohibition meeting. "Maxey says: Your
letter places the proposed amendment in the
nature of sumptuary legislation. I do not so
regard it. The State has power of the ques
tion as an integral part of the police powers
never granted to the general government.
The police powers of the . State ire wholly
distinct from sumptuary legislation. As
the people of Texas have the lawful power
in the mode and manner prescribed by the
constitution to adopt or reject the proposed
amendment, I propose to abide by what
Mr. Jefferson laid down as a cardinal princi
ple of democracy absolute acqui
escence in the decisions of the
majority, the vital principle of
republics from which there is no
appeal but to force." Mr. Maxey says: "The
Democratic party should not suffer itself to
be dragged into this controversy. The only
real question involved is: Is its adoption ex
pedient? On this the wisest and purest men
differ. The Democratic party as such has noth
ing and ongbtto have nothing to do with the
question. As citizens let every man exercise
his best judgment and vote accordingly. I
propose to exercise my right, and while I
do not have the confidence which
some have in the efficacy of the
measure to the full extent claimed,
I will in the interests of good morals, peace
and prosperity resolve the doubt in favor of
that side which seeks the greatest number
and vote for the amendment."
Mr. Maxey's letter-has not reached the peo
ple generally, but it. is Bafe to say it will
create a sensation.
Captain Borton Reaches the Battery.
New York, April 10. Captain Paul Boy-
ton, who started in his rubber suit from
Hudson, N. Y., at noon on Tuesday to pad
dle to the Battery, a distance of 130 miles,
arrived at his destination about three o'clock
this afternoon. The captain's arrival was
the sigual for the firing of guns and torpe
does, accompanied by the tooting of steam
whistles from the many vessels in the harbor
and the cheers and waving of handkerchiefs
from the crowds that lined the Battery and
piers. Captain Hoy ton seemed little the
worse lor nis journey altnougn it was stated
that he had lost twenty pounds in weight
since he started.
LORD UNSDOWNE IN FEAR'
That HI Life nay fee Attempted When
He Opens Parliament.
Ottawa, April 10. There is much ex
citement here over an official notice to
the effect that during the presence of Lord
Lansdowne in the Senate chamber in open
ing Parliament on the 14th the galleries of
the Senate will be closed. This is the first
time in the history of the Dominion that
such a step has been taken, the galleries of
the Senate always on such occasions being
open to the public, who are admitted by
ticket. A tame excuse is given that it will
prevent confnsipn. The opinion is
that his excellency Has received tnreats wnicn
he is afraid will be carried into effect if a
crowd is permitted to enter the gallery of
the chamber while he is opening
Parliament on the floor below. Extra pre
caution is to be taken to insure his safety in
passing between the government house and
the senate on tne day .parliament opens. A
strong escort will accompany him going and
coming. This, however, is always done.
Death era Waterbury Physician.
Waterbury, Conn, April 10.- John J.
Jacques, M. D., died this evening, aged
about sixty years. He was the father of
Theatrical Manager Jean Jacques and owner
of the new Jacques opera house here. He
had been in poor nealtn lor many years.
Death followed a slight attack of paralysis at
noon.
Shaken to Death by a Stallion.
Kockford, HI., April 10. John Hogan
met his death in a horrible manner yester
day. He was at Westfield Corners with a
stallion and while exhibiting the horse it
struck him with its fore feet and knocked
him down. While down the horse lay down
on the man with its knees. Another man
who was present stabbed the stallion in the
neck with a knife. As the horse arose from
Hogan's body it grabbed the prostrate man
by the nape of the neck and shook him so
that he died in eight minutes. He was 21
years of age.
JOHN T. RAYMOND DEAD.
The Famous Comedian Saeenmfea to a
Complication of Dlaeaaea.
Evansvuxe, Ind., April 10. John T.
Raymond breathed his last at the St. George
Hotel at 3 o'clock this morning. Mr. Ray
mond arrived in this city Friday at noon suf
fering from a complication of diseases and
was unable to fill his engagement. On his
arrival the best medical aid was procured
and everything possible was done for his re
lief. He seemed considerably improved dur
ing yesterday, but grew worse after 9 o'clock
last night.
An Earthquake In Vermont.
Burijnqton, Vt., April 10. A heavy
shook of earthquake was felt here at 2:40
p.m. to-day. The vibrations lasted fifteen
seconds and were introduced by a startling
report like that of a cannon. Houses shook
and the people ran terror-stricken into the
streets. No damage followed, however. The
shock had been preceded by a slight tremor
ten minutes before.
THE LOSS HALF A MILLION.
A Larse Rollins mill Destroyed And
Four Hundred men Ont of Work.
Toledo, O., April 10. The Maumee roll
ing mills in East Toledo were burned this
evening. The loss is placed at $500,000, in
surance $80,000. It is believed that the fire
was caused by the night watchman dropping
a match which he had used to light his
pipe near an oil barrel. Over four hundred
men will be thrown out of employment. It
is not known whether the mills will be re
built or not.
SOCIETY PEOBLE IN JAIL
Charged With Trying to Delraud An
Insurance Company.
Niw York, April 10. Dr. William M.
Reynolds, of 108 West Forty-seventh street,
was arrested Saturday and his wife was ar
rested to-day on charges of attempting to
defraud an insurance company. Their exam
ination was set down for Tuesday. The affair
is likely to cause a sensation as the accused
occupy high positions in society, especially
Mrs. Beynolds, who is the leader in a quite
exclusive set. The Beynolds family occu
pied In summer a cottage'at Flushing which
has been twice visited by fire within a recent
period. The insurance company interested
found reason to suspect something wrong and
the charge is now made after considerable
detective work that the furniture on which
insurance was collected was remoued from
the house before each of the fires occurred.
The aocused vigorously deny the charge and
claim ample ability to refute it.
AN EASTER RIOT IN BELFAST.
The Police Fire on the Klofe and
.Wound One lllan Severely.
Belfast, April 10. The nsnal Easter fes
tivities were indulged in by the various re
ligious denominations to-day and following
them came an inevitable riot resulting from
any demonstration of a religious character
that may take place in this town. There was
scarcely any disorder . during the early part
of the day, but toward evening crowds ag
gregated on the street corners and as dark
ness set in they became noisy and demon
strative. The police attempted to clear the
streets, but were attaoked by the mob and
driven away. Beinforeements arrived and
another charge was made upon , the
mob, which resisted stubbornly and
pelted the police unmercifully. Finally the
police were ordered to fire, which they did,
wounding one man severely and the crowd
fell back, but did not disperse altogether.
Desultory stone throwing was indulged in by
the mob nntil nearly midnight when all be
came quiet. The meb, however, is making
unmistakable preparations for a renewal of
the fight to-morrow morning and a repetition
of last sn tamer's hostilities is : feared. The
police have been ordered to deal summarily
with the mob.
Thirteen Dltn KHlfd
BERLitTj April 11. By an "explosion in a
nitro glycerine factory at Frieburg yesterday
thirteen men were killed and a number of
others injured.
DR. m'GLYNN'S CRUSADE.
He Will Speak In Cincinnati, Chicago
and many Other Cities.
New York, April 10. Dr. McGIynn is
going to speak in the Music Hall, Cincinnati,
on Tuesday and in Indianapolis on Thurrday
of this week. Later he expects to talk for
tne oenent or tne labor unions of Chicago,
St. Louis, New Haven, Brooklyn and Phila
delphia. On May 8 he will talk in the Bos
ton Theater on "Ireland for the Irish" under
the auspices of the United Irish societies and
tne next night in Lowell for the Irish Na
tional league. Dr. McGIynn attended mass
at ot. tyeeiua's ennrch in lOoth street at 6 a.
m. to-day and afterward went to' see Dr.- Cur
ran, who Win retreat at the Hoboken monas
tery. : He took the 4 p. m: train on the
Pennsylvania railroad foifCincihnati.' " '
Dr. Cnrran's ten davs' retreat eioirew to
day, but. 'he will not leave the monastery
uui.li io-morrow morning.
The Eev. Dr. E. L. Burtsell. castor of the
Church of the Eoirmanv in Second avenne
heard confessions in the church last night
and officiated at all the holy services in. the
church last week.
Cansht a Shot From a Cannon.
New York, April 10. Prof. C. P. Blatt
gave an exhibition on the roof of the Police
Gazette building yesterdavof his cannon ball
feat. Half a pound of powder was exploded
behind a 25-pound shot in a small field can
non. Prof.Blatt stood thirty feet away from
tne cannon and cangnt tne shot.
New Rolen For Bicycle Racers.
Boston, April 10. The L. A. W. racing
board has made certain changes in the rules.
The following national championships have
been established by the board: Half mile.
one,two, three, five, ten, and twenty miles
Dicycie, aDd one, two and five miles tricycle.
These national championships will be assign
ed yearly by the board to league clubs only
under such conditions as they may impose.
In the location of championships with clubs
the board will require that no prize offered
for any event in the meeting where the
championship is run shall exceed in value
$50. And they will further require that the
entry of any person whose amateur standing
is in doubt shall be rejected. That this
rule may be observed the board will claim
tne right to know tne fnll programme of the
meeting and to inspect the list entries.
Another Attempt Against The Czar.
London, Apiil 11. The Morning Post's
Vienna correspondent telegraphs that a re
port is current at the Austrian capital that
on Wednesday last another unsuccessful at
tempt was made to assassinate the Czar and
that all of the conspirators except two, a
man and a woman, both of whom had
bombs, escaped arrest.
London, April 11. The Times' St. Peters
burg dispatch confirms the report that a
number of Nihilists were arrested on Wed
nesday, the day that the Czar arrived there
from Gatschina, bnt the correspondent is un
able to confirm the rumor that an attempt
was made to assassinate his majesty. It is
surmised that the press censorship may have
much to do with the correspondents inability
to say whether or not the Czar's life was at
tempted. WHAT CAPTAIN WARD SAYS.
Some Valuable Information About the
New Rules of Pitching Full Inter,
pretatlon of the Pitching Rules.
"Bnt few pitchers," says Captain Ward of
the New York base ball club, "understand
the new rules of pitching perfectly. Of
course we expect men to object to changes in
the rules, but this time it is only the jump
ing men who are doing the kicking. Such
men as Keefe, Welch, Radbourne and several
other easy pitchers like them, do not say
anything against the change. Why! Because
they know it is much easier to pitch in a
free-and-easy manner than to do a double
shuffle or a breakdown while pitching the
ball. To understand the change better let
us oompare the old and new rules.
"In the old rules the pitcher was supposed
to keep within the lines of his position while
in the act of delivering the ball. He was re
quired to face the batter, meaning that he
could not turn his back. He was not to balk.
Now, which of these three things didn't he
do? He took a hop, skip and a jump and let
the ball go. He was always out of the box
and as for balking, he did little else. I, like
many others, believe that this tended to in
jure the game of base ball far more than any
thing else. It was the starting point of ail
the disputes over the umpire's decisions, and
to do away with these is the main point
which we worked to seenre. We believe it
has been accomplished.
"Here is the new rule:
"The pitcher shall take his position facing the
batsman, with both feet squarely on the grouad.the
right foot on the rear line of the box, his left foot
in advance of the right, and to the left of an imag
inary line from his right foot to the center of home
base. He shall not raise his right foot, unless in
the act of delivering the ball, nor make more than
one step in such delivery. He shall hold the ball,
before delivery, fairly in front of his body and in
sight of the umpire. In the case of left handed
pitchers the above words, 'lef t1 and 'right are to be
reversed. When a pitcher feigns to throw the ball
to a base he must resume the above position, and
pause momentarily before delivering the ball to the
bat.
"Some pitchers think that they obey the
rule when they stand a little sideways. This
is wrong. The American association have
instructed their men that they must stand
square, and the League will do the same.
"The kicking is mostly on account of the
freer batting which will be done, but it is
declared by some pitchers that the position
is unnatural. I can't see it in that -way.
"Heretofore the pitcher could make any
motion he chose in delivering the ball ; now
he can take but one step in so doing. For
this reason the box was shortened to five and
a half feet. This is said to be too short.
Well, all I have to say about that is that I
would like to see the man who will cover five
and a half feet in pitching the ball.
In pitching the ball he may take as long a
stride as he sees fit. After he has taken the
step and is in the act of delivering the ball,
he can raise his right foot. He is not com
pelled to keep it on the ground, as has been
explained several times, but I don't think
the foot will be lifted very often, as it is
wanted for a purchase on the ground. In
delivering the bail the pitcher throws his
body forward, landing square on his left
foot.
"The umpire can see every move made by
the pitcher, and at the same time see the
ball. Heretofore he could not watch the feet
of a pitcher and the ball also. But this
brings np another kick on the part of the
pitcher. He says he cannot pitch so swiftly
or get such a good enrve on the ball. Here,
again, I differ with him to a certain extent. I
think he will be able to get almost the same
curve that he had under the
old rules. He may . not be as
i-peedy at first, but after practice the speed
will come back. Look at George pitcu. tie
has probably greater speed under the new
rule than he had under the old one. He has
plenty ef curve, too. Just ask any of the
New York pitchers.
"Compare a pitcher under the new rules
with a catcher. A pitcher has to pitch the ball
50 feet, while a catcher must throw 120 feet
to second base; yet a catcher never takes
more than one step; he doesn't have the
time. Take Ewing or one of the other great
catchers. He throws to second with as
much force as a pitcher employs in pitching
over the plate. If he did not he would never
catch his man.
"One of the most important changes in the
pitching rules is that which tends to prevent
a balk. The rule was arranged with much
care, and is calculated to do away with any
motion on the part of the pitcher to deceive
a base runner. Heretofore pitchers made a
forward motion, which the umpire saw plain
ly was not a motion to pitch, but from a side
view obtained by the runner it seemed as
though he was about to deliver the ball.
When attention was called to the fact tho ex
cuse was made that it was one of the man's
preliminary motions in pitching the ball,and
of course the umpire could do nothing bnt
let it pass. In many cases the base runner
was caught at first by reason of the motion.
The trick was a rather sharp one, but it
operated against some of the prettiest
features of a base ball game.
"The rule must be rigidly interpreted. It
does not prevent a pitcher from throwing to
the bases when he likes, bnt he must not
make any preparatory motion to pitch the
ball before pitching it. When the pitcher
does make a feint, he must, if to first base,
pivot around on his right foot and take one
step, and then, in resuming his position,
pivot around on his right foot again, and
place his left foot in its former place. If
feinting to second he must pivot half way
around and take the step, then return to bis
position in the same manner as before. In
throwing to base his step can be as long as
he may see fit, but his right foot must be
kept on the ground, not necessarily fiat, the
toe resting on the ground being sufficient.
"After making a feint or throwing the
ball to a base he must pause, bo that the um
pire may plainly see that he is in position.
This does away with another sharp trick by
pitchers. They would make the -feint to
throw the ball to a base, but instead of do
ing so wonld turn quickly and put the ball
over the plate with the result of a strike
being called on the batsman. Some of the
pitchers did it so neatly that they could ; get
a strike about every time they tried it.
"In throwing the ball to third base the
motion is the same as to the others, only
that the pitcher must wheel round to the
left. This regulation step which the pitcher
is obliged to take' will do much to encourage
base stealing on account of the time required
to make the move.- Naturally therefore the
decisions at the- bases must be closed : How
ever, all such decisions will be in favor of
the base runner and will be a strong point of
interest to the game." .
FAIR-HAVEN.
Easter Services Yesterday Large Con
gregatlona Other News.
At the First church yesterday morning the pas
tor. Rev. Burdett Hart, preached a very interesting
sermon to a large congregation. The floral display
was one of the finest ever seen in the church. The
platform and communion table were literallv load
ed with flowers, arranged with great care and taste,
producing a fairy-like scene. The music was un
usually Bne.the selections bring of a high order and
appropriate to the occasion and the singing by the
cnoir neing a very mipurLjm. iijuui.b m mo ad
vice. The Easter concert which was to have been
given by the Sunday school in the evening was
postponed, owing to misunderstanding on the part
or tne music commisee.
The East Pearl street Methodist church was well
filled yesterday morning. A very able Easter ser
mon was uenverea.
At arace church the rector. Rev. Mr. Sanford,
preached There was a lovely display of choice
nowers.
The muni At Kr. TTrAnnis ehtiren was verv fine.
At Grace church there was a praise service' at 6:30
a. m.. holv communion at 10:30 and a Sunday
school festival at a:30 p. m.
Xjast evening mere were nasier concerns at xjie
Baptist church and the Second Congregational
church.
Mr. Lloyd Thompson, of Niagara Falls. N. Y.,
and famil'v are visitin&r Mr. Edward Easter, of Pier-
Eont street. Mr. Thompson proposes to take up
is residence here.
Ferry street was crowded with people yesterday
going to and from East Rock park.
Mrs. Potter of North Front street, widow of the
late Charles Potter, is quite ill with cancer of the
stomach.
Mrs. Alvah.Oranniss, who has been ill for some
time with a severe attack of neuralgia, is recover
ing as ner many mends will Da glad to learn.
So many Fair Haven neonle went to town last
night to attend the East-r services at the large
churches that the horse railroad company ran extra
cars.
The forty hours' adoration of the Blessed Sacra
ment will be commenced at the 10:30 solemn high
mass next Sunday at St. Francis1 church.
Officer Mack made three arrestR Saturday night
"Pepe" Bunnell was found in the rear of Wood
ward's block and was taken in on a charge of va
grancy. The other arrests were for drunkenness.
The borough police have made twelve arrests so
far this month.
Arthur Cobb and William Ely, formerly Fair Ha
ven residents, are now the proprietors of a success
ful pie bakery in Rochester, N. Y., which they
started about six months ago.
The temperance meetina at the OuinniDiac rink
yesterday afternoon was well attended, and there
was some good speaKing.
THE PLUmBERV STRIKE.
The Bosses Say They Will Not Yield If
It Takes All Summer.
The master plumbers say that they don't
intend to yield to the demand of the striking
plumbers and that they expect to fight it out
on that basis if it takes all summer. They
say the demands made are very unreasonable
and that the striking is making the business
so dull in turn that not much help will be
needed. There are about thirty-five journey
men plumbers in town, about thirty of whom
struck. Good plumbers have been earning
$20 a week right along. The striking
plumbers demand that no man- be paid less
than $3 a day whether worth it or not, donble
pay for over hours, and that no non-union
man shall have work. One of the bosses in
dignantly said last evening, "Why, if we
give in now, next thing we know our men
won't allow us to do anything except pay
off ' on pay days and will dictate where we
shall buy our groceries or where we shall get
a shave."
Entertainments.
haverlt's minstrels.
The Haverly Minstrel company will be at
Carll's Opera House to-morrow njght. A
rare treat is in store for all those who go to
see the performance, as they are sure to see
a refined and enjoyable entertainment. This
famous organization is decidedly the best in
its line. The show is clean from beginning
to end, as coarseness or vulgarity is not per
mitted. As a result of this large audiences
are attracted. Colonel J. H. Haverly will be
in personal command, this being the first
season he has traveled himself for eleven
years and his first visit to New Haven in ten
years. The grand parade will take place to
morrow at 11 a. in. rrom (jam's upera llouse
and Colonel Haverly and William Emerson
will ride in a carriage at the head.
rcddygore.
At the New Haven Opera House this eve
ning -'Ruddygore," Gilbert & Sullivan's la
test operatic production, will be the attrac
tion, and a large audience will gather to
witness this its first production in New Ha
ven. An exchange says: Year after year
Messrs. Gilbert & Sullivan have sent over
the Atlantic, congenially wedded, assort
ments of wit and melody. "Ruddygore" is
unquestionably one or the best things that
Sir Arthur Sullivan has ever done.
Its pictures will surely give delight, and
the freshness and melodiousness of the ma
jority of the musical pieces will charm for a
long time.
' 'Ruddygore will also be tri ven on Tuesday
and Wednesday evenings and at a Wednes
day matinee.
BUNNELL'S GRAND OPERA ROUSE.
This week Mr. Sid C. France, the sensa
tional actor, supported by a strong dramatic
company, will present at Bunnell's on Mon
day, Tuesday and Wednesday evenings the
very attractive drama "Marked for Life."
The piece abounds in interesting situations,
which as presented by Mr. r ranee and nis
company make it nignly entertaining
throughout. Un Thursday, f riday and Sat
urday Mr. France and his company play
Dead to the world," wnicn wnne oirrering
from the former, like it presents scenes that
always maintain an intense interest among
the audience from beginning to end. In the
museum hall Lawrence Donovan, who
jumped from Brooklyn bridge and the Niag
ara Falls suspension bridge, will appear. He
is the champion jumper of the world. Pro
fessor Rogers remains one week more witn
his amusing shadowgraphs.
Easter scarfs,
Easter gloves,
Easter novelties,
At Stone's, Chapel, corner State street.
Sale of Art Ooods.
We must always show new goods, there
fore the old must be sold to make room for
the new. I have filled my rear gallery with
pictures and bric-a-brac that I propose to
offer for a short time at prices from one-third
to three-quarters of their value. The reduced
prices are marked in large, plain figures.
Pictures varying in value from $3 to $65 are
marked at prices from $1 to $45. I can assure
those who visit this sale that so good bar
gains were never before offered in New
Haven. Evarts Cutler.
ap 6 tf
Pure Cream Butter at the Creamery, tf
Take a D. K. and be O. K. See ad. m7tf
The finest line in neckwear can be found
at B. J Stone's, Chapel, corner church.
F. m. Brown Sc Co.
Are displaying the latest fashions in gents'
furnishing gooda, comprising gloves, hosiery,
handkerchiefs, suspenders and the largest
variety of neckwear to be found in the city
at popular prices.
E. & W.
The latest styles just received by B. J.
Stone. 8 3t
Stony Cfeek And Branford Oysters
Served in all styles at the City Hail Restau
rant, Church street corner Court. nl7 tf
At the City Hall Dining Rooms,
Church street, corner Court, regular suppers
from 5 to 7, 30 cents. J
B. J. Stone is still in the "custom shirt
business" (fancv percales and flannels shirt
ing just received). Style and fit guaranteed.
Fabric and workmanship not excelled. Give
him a "call." Chapel, corner Church.
"Rough on Pain" Plaster, Poroused, 10c. Best.
Rough on Pain," Liquid Quick cure, 20c
Rough on Catarrh." Cures all worst cases. 50c.
"Rough on Piles." Sium cure. 50c. Druggists.
"Rough on Dirt" for the toilet, bath or
shamoc" Perfectly harmless. Nice for washing
infantsTchildren or adults. For miners. roh'h.
lil rJimi oihers whose employment begrimes tne
clotting .dhLds. IYaiuPabe in osp.fcjls asy
lums and prisons as a disinfectant and puriner.
As a Spring Medicine
TAKE
A SURE REMEDY
Zferted and Prored! by Tears of Use inalZ
parts of the Country.
Thousands who have been radically rared
of dangerous diseases gladly testify of its
merit, " it cures because
It Purifies the Blood,
It Cleanses the Liver,
It Strengthens the Kidneys,
It Regulates the Bowels.
KT"By this four-fold action It has won
derful power over disease, purifying the sys
tem of the poisonous humors that cause
JUidncy and T'riitfiry Disease, JlilifM
es,Jadce, Constipation, Piles, or
in Rheumatism, Neuralgia, 2ferv
Otis disorders, and many
Female Complaints.
TV THOUSANDS OP CASES It has cured
where ail else had failed. It Is mild butetB-
cient, mertaxn n uown, uui um-iukw
all
The natural action of the Kidneys' fs restor
ed, the Liver is cleansed of all aisease, and
the Bowels move freely and healthfully.
SoldEvurywhere. Price $1. Liquid or Dry.
Send for circular and testimonials to 3
Wells, Richardson Co., Burlington, Vt.
ilpNEY-
V W a . VI
WlttntB.
WAITED
A POSITION by an experienced nurse to take
-f?? 'anaJaU1 lady or children; infant
V f lS1- Bestof "ference given. Call it
au "t 31 FRANK STREET, City.
WANTED.
A THOROUGHLY competent girl for cooking
washing and ironing. Applat COIKlne.
all 2t A 1 W I M t- T-1, T.I,
TWO competent girls to do ge'neral housework
for two small families a short distance in the
country. Apply at 41 ELM STREET
all 2t
"'. WAKTEU,
ANY lady wishing for a good, reliable woman
to go out by the day to do any kind of house
work, and can furnish good reference, can find
such a person at
all lt 878 DAVENPORT AVENUE.
" WANTED,
A POSITION as houskeeper; would prefer el
derly paople or a widower's family; is a good
nurs?, and would accept any position not menial.
Address J, c. E .
al!2t City.
WANTED,
tTO BENT, single house with all modern
improvements, about 9 or 10 rooms, centrally
.located, with lawn and earden. in best neigh
borhood. Address RENT,
all It . Box 702, City.
WANTED.
A SITUATION by a respectable girl to do gen
eral heusewArlr in n. nriuatA fnmilir drii
references. Please call at her present place.
"-r ia Wxll i'iNl!; A V EN UK.
WANTED.
A SITUATION by a respectable girl to do sec
ond work or housework in a tkrivATn fflmilv.
Good reference. Inquire at her present place.
01 ' n X KU 3W U l.L. Sx rtEET.
WANTED.
A GOOD TINNER, one who understands gener
al lobbing. Inquire of J. MERCHANT, 28
Grand aveuue, opposite horse railroad stables.
a z&
WANTED.
JSi. BOARD AND ROOM in the neighborhoed
Pill of Wooster Square by two gentlemen. Ad-
BOX 924.
a'J 4t
New Haven P. O.
WANTED.
A SITUATION by a capable girl to do general
quired. Inquire for two days at
io r.Uill Dixtu..x.
WANTED.
A GOOD wood moulding worker, steady work
and fair pay.
BtKUK BUlxJJlJNU AND LUMBER CO.,
a7 6t Derby, Conn.
WANTED,
I ff GROSS claret bottles quarts.
a7 tf
770 Chapel Street.
WANTED.
IMMEDIATELY, house painters and paper hang
ers; steady work and good waers guaranteed
to first-class workmen. J, Wolcott & Co.. 61 Or
ange street' a5 6t
WANTED.
MTO RENT, a house of from 8 to 13 rooms,
centrally located, with modern conveniences,
from May 1st ; or a convenient tenement of 5
or 6 roJius. Address, stating price, &c,
ml2 A. C. S., This Office.
WANTED.
A MAN of temperate and moral habits, seeking
- . - . " i r.M-ub (in uiu escaD-
lisned house in his own section. Salary $70 to
$100 per month. References exacted.
fg2 16 Barclay St.. N. Y.
WANTED.
5nff CLOTHES WRINGERS and CAB-
J t PET SWEEPERS TO RRPATW
the Basket House Furnishing and Fiimit.iii.n Rrnr.
of George D. Lamb, 699 Chapel street. Bovs' Wag
ons. Baby Carriages, Easy Chairs, Lounges. Ex
tension Tables. Parlor and Eedroom Knit. Knrint.
Mattresses, Union Folding Beds, Hanging Lamps.
Stoves, Oil Cloths, &c. All kinds of firstclrsa
Housekeeping Goods, low for cash, or on weekly
payments.
tttjertaitmretits.
MONDAY, TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY
nisuu ana weanesaay matinee.
APRIL. 11th, 12th, 13th.
R.D'Oyly Carte's Opera Company
Under the management cf
ma. JOHN STETSON.
Presenting GILBERT & SULLIVAN'S new nrf
entirely original supernatural opera in two acts.
entitled
OR, THE WITCH'S CURSE.
With a brilliant cast. Chorus of Bridesmaids.
Bucks and Blades. Augmented Orchestra, beau
tiful scenery from original models of the Savoy
Theater, London, painted by H. L. Ried. Ancestors
and military uniforms from designs supplied by the
a M-1" ai b uaiici r, aaiuuuii.
Reserved chairs Si. 50. 1 00. 75c. Oennral Admin-
sion 50c. Matinee (Wednesday) $1.00, 75c., 50c, 25c.
CARLL'S OPERA HOUSE.
ONE NIGHT ONLY.
TUESDAY, APRIL 12th.
HAVERLY'S
ORIGINAL MASTODON
MINSTRELS !
Including the great and only
BILLY EMERSON.
GOV, ADD RYMAN, E. M. HALL ,
THE GORMANS,
And all the old favorites in an entire chang-e of pro
gramme, under the personal supervision of J. H.
HAVERLY
Seats at Loomis Prices as usual.
EASTER - WEEK.
The Sensational Actor,
Mr. Sid O. France,
Supported by bis Powerful Company in the follow
ing repertoire:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday,
Klarktul I" or Eire.
Thursday, Friday, Saturday,
Dead to tlie World.
IN THE MUSEUM HALL DONOVAN, the
champion jumper of the world. The hero of Brook
lyn Bridge and Niagara Falls. Professor Rogers'
"Shadftwcraph.'1
XistzUmicaxis.
Marsden C. Perry,
S CHAPEL STREET.
HENRY PLUMB,
I now offer to the old patrons
un l tiiA mihlic srenerallr achoico
line of New Spring and Summer
Novelties, comprising
DRESS TRIMMINGS,
EMBROIDERIES,
LACES,
HANDKERCHIEFS,
HOSIERY,
CLOVES,
FANS,
PGCKETBGOKS,
BUTTONS,
Ami a complete line of Fancy
Goods.
TOILET ARTICLES.
A Fall Assortment Of
TOOTH BRUSHES,
NAIL BRUSHES,
HAIR BRUSHES,
COMBS.
CHOICE SOAPS,
ALSO
EU BINS' and other leading per.
fumes.
GLOVES.
A fine assortment of Kid and
Suede Gloves In all the most de
sirable lengths and shades, suita
ble for Easter trade.
Have added a new and band,
some line 'of Infants' and Chil
dren's Dresses, to which special
attention Is called.
IMRStpi C. PERRY,
Successor to ' "'
HENRV PLume,
836 Chapel Street.
4 5t

xml | txt