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Morning journal and courier. [volume] (New Haven [Conn.]) 1848-1894, August 23, 1887, Image 3

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015483/1887-08-23/ed-1/seq-3/

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August 24. 1887.
6
VOL. LV
pew
' if
1 IV
J.
1
i
BARNSLESY TABLE DAMASK.
Extra Fine Double Damask Table Linen at very low prices.
DINNER AND TEA NAPKINS,
Special low prices on desirable patterns of Dinner and Tea Napkins.
Knotted Fringe Towels.
mi.
t Sal ties ever shown be'fo
Ask
. oe oeaten.
rocnet Quilts.? 1 1 5
i
' - nl? r, cen" ana W oent8 which are much under price. I ? , . I t
lUrkey Red Linens and Fruit Cloths, D'Oylies, Carver Cloths, Fjinged Napkins. Ul i
liAST' O ALL. LAST CALL.
All ramaintncr nf nnv PhiuI. Tiu..t r 1 - 1 - r i , . , . -.
jr, . 4, . o
offered at the low pnoe of 7 cents a yard.
waiiuea sale ot job lot of White Goods
ffVUbcnv
766 and 768
K
W.P.
vm
rawnuiiun o i KfctT, opposite P. o.
Li 79 to 89 JUILROAD AVENUE.
Rxcursions to Mystic island.
THE STEAMER LM qjjy
Ever' uuriday,
gtU further no, m-j driving home at 8
Tn.
Fare-
, stSl-RESHMENTS-MUSIO.
Ms September lt. sietsl
picnics,excursions
fishingaFarties.
'4.!C5 Steamer IVERNIA having been
23n25Cthoroughljr overhauled and put in
One class condition, oan be chartered for plonlos,
esourslons and fishing parties. Family parties
carried with comfort and safety ,ana landed at dif
farent jpoints along shore. Inquire of C- E.
THOMPSON, 79 Clinton avenue, or address J. E.
BISHOP OO., V. O. Box IIS. Fair Haven, Conn.
Miscellaneous.
"i JAS. B. HOWE,
PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT
Examination of Accounts
A Specialty.
TWENTY YEARS EXPERIENCE.
. Best of References.
State Agent Improved Hall
Type writer, Model 1887.
' ' Offlee, S34 Chanel Street.
JeM r :
IiBroTBl Hall Typewriter.
MODEL 1S8T.
Price $40. - - Weight 7 lbs,
JAMES B. R0WE,
WBNKttAI. AG'T FOB OONVBOTIODT.
' 8S4 Cnapel street.
" Second-hand Irrlters taken in " ange.
UARSOEN C. PERRY,
soccessoa to
-HE.VKV PMJJIB,
. 3B CHAPEL STREET,
. invites Inspection of the large and se
et atek f goods now on sale, Inclnd
ag some exclusive styles In
Embroideries, Laces,
Dress Trimmings,
Jet Ornaments,
Passementeries.
RandkerenlefB, Rachlnss,
' Buttons, etc.
Together with fall assortment of
FANCY GOODS,
' - A LARGE LINE OF
TOILET ARTICLES
Is being offered; also LITBIN'S
and other choice extracts.
Special attention la called to the new
stoeK or
INFANTS' and CHILDREN'S OUTFITS
LADIES' FURNISHINGS.
tare Jnst opened a complete line of
In fan Is Hand-Made Worsted
acqaes, Jerseys, Blankets, etc.
Marsden C. Perry,
Chapel Street.
'my 8
GET THE BEST.
HOT AIR FURNACES.
JPf OW IS THE TIME
For all who are thinking of making changes In
the warming of their houses to examine the merits
ef the different Hot Air Furnaces. The celebrated
" ..Richardson, Boynton & Co.'s
Are guaranteed to he gas-tight, substantial) durable
and perfect la operation.
No red hot chimneys or celd bouse. '
A full line now on our store floor. We should be
pleased to have you call and examine them, . ..
It is also the Proper Time
o pat your Furnaces in repair Cor the Winter. Do
bu early and when cold weather oomea you will
be prepared.
GEORGES. ARNOLD,
Corner State and Crown Streets,
WILEY'S CROCKERY STORE.
Baskets. Baskets.
Picnic Baskets, Lunch Baskets,
' market Baskets, Laundry Baskets,
Bushel Baskets, Oyster Baskets,
..Clothes Baskets, Clara Baskets
Offloe Baskets, 4o.,o- j-v , -,. t
A Itttrg e Tarlely for sale Low," '
- FRUIT JARS.
PRICES REDUCED.
J7" X. w JOLaXDTST,
SI Church Street.
Opposite Postefflce.
Crockery and Cutlery for Loan
In. BENNETT fc HALE,
Bicycles and Tricycles.
Agents for
At 6. 8PACJI.IUI10 BROS.
Sportizis GrOOdS.
All kinds of difficult Blcycls repairing a specialty
US ORAM R ST., NRW HAVEN, GT.
- Best 'Gtaicf -nil Yin.
' STREETER'S
Great Clearing-Out Sale
CONTINUES,
THE G003S MUST BE SOLD
And Prloes are Way Down.
,p r fx is Cn. Mat:snance or tne rear to ouy jeweiry
ef all kinds Gold and Silver Watches, Clocks, and
" al Varlliesof Silver Table Ware of all descriptions
The oublic are improving the opportunity, which
Is on. rarely offered. . !
Call and Get a Bargain.
iOEaL.STRI.ETER,
i
749 Chape
Pe.
Street.
3
Jj tfy g
Crane nd franklin
..; compaay, :
I;" 833 Chapel Street,
nZT nooa to 'iirrrax, maouirb oo.'a
: OIL STOVES
ItrLFRIGERATORS.
SpeciaX Notices.
to see oar 15c, 25b, 38c and 50 cent Towels.
Crochet Ouilts.
xoiuuco, biuunix, uriuguams. put in one lot ana
'
at 11 cents a yard;
GILBERT,
FOR RENT.
A M rfTR front chamber, handsomelv furn
ished, with alcove. Also a handsome suite of
Lrurnished rooms. Inquire at
auietf 494 CHAPEI. 8TREET
THE ARIjINGTON,
THE NEW HOTEL..
Btea4ow Street, Corner of Wbltlns.
Rooms Light, Well Furnished
AND COHf PORTABLE.
All modern Improvements.
TERMS MODERATE.
Commercial Traveler, find accommo
dation, unsurpassed.
S2.00 per day. Rooms 75 cents.
S. E. BICKFORD,
je20tf
Proprietor.
HOTEL DEVONSHIRE.
42D STREET, NEW YORK.
Opposite Grand Central Depot
ADJOINING LINCOLN BANE.
fsafc. Rooms from 50 cents upwards. Elegant
1 Buiwior amines, jtestauranc nrst-ciass at
him 1 ' prices.
pot free,
tf
Baggage to and from de
li.
, It. HASB&-.
French Language and Literature
THOROUGHLY TATTOHT h An e-rrviHenoeH
Parisian gentleman having the highest testimonials I
wi raienjirces iiom icnooisana private iamiiies.
Pupil's residence or his. From September 1st se-
leoiea classes iormea at iioaoie; Duiiding, room 31.
an!5tf PROFESSOR, P. O. B88. New Haven.
THE ELDERAGE
Boarding and Day School, 136 Sherman avenue.
The MISSES BANGS, Principals.
Reopens September 21st- Kindergarten, Prima
ry. Intermediate and Colleeiate classes.
Special attention given to the study and use of
tne nsKiisn language.
German and French taught by the natural raeth
od. Lessons in Choral singing. auJO 5w
THE HOGARTH ACADEMY.
. The Largest and Best.
Prof. Lee is assisted bv able instructors. The 80-
cratic method is used. More progress in hree
montns tnan is made In a year by the old method.
The following branches taught: Arithmetic, Aige-
ura, utmiy, irionomctry. integral ana amer-
ential Calculus. BDellincr. Readinsr. OeoErraDfar.
Orammar, Composition, Corespondence. Banking,
Exchange and Commercial Law, Elocution. Tele
graphy, Shorthand, Typewriting. Pen Drawinr.
etc., etc. German by the natural method. Life
scholarship fJo. special rates less. School opens
eepiemner o, itsm. rupus can commence any tune.
night school for young ladles and young men who
are busy through the day. Call or send for circu
lar. auress srsaivsr. a. iu. aixiixs,
Hogarth Academy, corner Church and Chapel
streets. New Haven, Conn, aulO 8m
MISS BARTLETT'ShomT&ayschool
For Young Ladles mad Children,
33 WALL STRE ET,
Will open September 21. Primary Department and
Kindergarten. Circulars sent on application.
jy23eodl(ttTtd ; '
WEST END INSTITUTE.
MRS. S. L. CADY'S
ENGLISH AND FUENCH
BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL
For Young Ladies and Misses.
A Preparatory Course for Little Girls.
Lessons in French (natural method) given to
them without charge.
ALSO
OBJECT DltAWING LESSONS
for which no charge is made in any depart
ment of the school.
The Institute reopens September 22d.
For full particulars apply at 93 Howe street after
September 1st. - ' au!5 tsw
TWENTY-FIRST YEAR.
Boston Conservatory
of Music
AND
Julius Eichberq's School for Violin
Platwg.
Instruction in all branches of Vocal and Instru
mental Music.
Fall Term Opens Sept. 19, 20, 31.
Address or apply 10 JULIUS EICHBEHG,
154 Tremont street, Boston, Mass.
Men! Ion this paper. jy20 3m
Over 46, 48 and 50 Chnrcli St.
THI8 old and reliable college will reopen Sep
tember 5. Thorough comrron sense instruc
tion in all Business Branches, SHORTHAND and
TfPE WRITING. Practical Business Department,
including Wholesale and Retail Dry Goods and Pro
duce Negotiations, governed by New York and Chi
cago Markets,
Tnis is the most economical Business school in
New England, time and money considered.
low rate, ot tuition ior snort term or lire f cno;-
arship.
Call for olrcular .r make tersooal application at
tar August J. j .. ...aulT..
SUMMER SCHOOL OF FRENCH
Language and literature at Fenwlck, Conn., and
watoo tiiu, k. t.
NATURAL METHOD
By Profesaor R. De Larrard, 40 Pratt street. Hart-
tord. Conn.
Terms 25 lessoiis 812.
All aDDltcatiOD to be made before Julr 1. either at
the above address or at the Journal's office. Best
of references and testimonials sent on request.
SECURITY INSURANCE CO.
OF NRW HAVEN.
No. 3 Lyon Building;, No. T69 Chapel St.
CASH ASSETS $508,458.55.
directors: . f"
CHARLES 8. LEETE, JAMES D. DEWELIi,
- President. Vice President.
Thomas R. Trowbridge, Daniel Trowbridge.
J. m. mason, . a i ; . wiicox,
J. A. Bishop, William B. Tyler,
Cornelius Pierpont,
H. MASON, Secretary,
H. C. Fdtjjb, Ass't Sec'y.
NewYoTlt Life InsnraiiCB Go.
Organized in 1845. Purely Mutual.
CASH ASSETS, Jan. 1, 1687 ... . ..IIS, 431,458
Divisible surplus, Co.'s standard .$ 8,080,627
Tontine surplus 4.176,425
Surplus by State standard. 4U percent.. 15,148,319
Policies In force, 97,719, insuring 804,373,540
Income in 1886 19.280,408
Annual premiums In force 16,386,068
New business in 1886,22,027. policies, in
suring 85.178.294
Interest receipts in 1886....' 8,723,502
Death losses naid in 1886 2.757.035
Interest receipts over death losses 1886. . 965,467
Interest receipts over death losses last o .
.years ,. . 8,37Sf,:
THvlihl uirnlii. lj uu.h SI nnninirarMW S26
Death 4os.es In 1886 to eacrn $1,000 ins. ... . 9.77
rw.t h IdMM nnri nMMM tA I nmnM. v
t 1886 (Oont of insurance! ... ... 81 perct
I The New York Life lames a greater vari' ty of
videod. are larger than those of any other com-'
pany.
For full particulars and rates write to or call at
is Connecticut omce.
811 Chanel Street.. New ;' Haven.
HENRY O. LEWIS, Supt. of City Agents.
A. L. GUHNEY, General Agent.
FOR RENT.
THE lower .t r mom fljifc nf rtmw hrick home
No. 696 George street; has a 1 the modern im-
.uruvements: i per moaio. addiv to
DA. BLAKESLEE,
utf 674 George Street.
FOR SALE.
A three-storv brick house and barn. No. 100
York Sauare Place: side entrance andlrear
Lc&rrlae entrance hv Piernont rtrairt HnnM
I bas all modern ImDrovements: deeo lot: Dears.
cherries, grapes, small fruit, &c Barn has box
stall and excellent cellar, supplied with water.
Also the prelty littlecottage 89 Wha'l"y . avenue
near isroaaway; nnely nnisned in wood and witn
all modern improvements, and situated within the
limits of tkeeix minute horse railroad ears at Uni
versity Pote. .Inquire Of JOSEPH oHELDON,
Or on Hhe' premises; t : ' ? 1 1 I auaatf
RENTING SEASON.
FALL OF 1SS7.
A large list of houses and tenements in various
parts of the city for rnt.
- Rents collected promptly.
Rents collected promptly.
Settlements made promptly.'
Settlements made promptly.
Horace P. Iloadlef ,
HOIDLEI BDILDINO.
Open Evenings.
FOR SALE.
A OOOD HOUSE, near horse cars; modern
fjjlLimprovements; nearly an acre of ground;
good fruit, &c. '
JOHN T.SLOAN,
838 Chapel Street.
Open evenings. .
: FOR SALE.
jMl CHARMING country residence, fifteen min-
XtiilLutAB from the eltv A baraain.
Valuable factory site, close to station, on N. Y.,
N. H. & a. u. H., free to manuracturer. Aaaress
JCNTERPR18E,
aula let aprtn naveih yonn.
Houses and Lot For Sale or Ex
change
Ot College street. Hish. George Whaller I
avenue, tsnerman, uowara ana eyivan btb
Lnues. West Haven. Westvllle. and many oth
er lots and houses. Prices and terms to accommo
date, Uai) and examine 1 noes.
FOB RENT,
A number of flrst-class bouses and a few tene
ments at low pnoes.
Honey to loan on real estate at 5 pt r cent.
Call at
NO. 70 CHURCH STREET. ROOM I
Offlne OTMn BTiininn from 7 to 8.
L. F. COMSTOCK & CO.
FOR RENT.
M THREE FLOOBS, S-iiO, in the center of the
city. No. 139 Temple street, adaped for heavy
machinery. Will rent low for a term of years.
CHARLES H, WEBB,
alt)
850 Chspel Street,
FOR SALE,
A A MirAhle residence on Chanel street !
j"U good house and lot; contains all modern lm-
L&UlLTiravements.
Alan a. nrst-clasa residence on Oranee street.
Both of the above will be sold at a Bargain.
MERWIN'S REAL ESTATE OFFICE,
TS9 Chapel Street,
FOB SALE.
Jtifc. THE larae brick house and lot. with barn
JSTTTj In rear. No. 9 Wooster Place. Inquire on the
Janlkpremises or or
aultf B. MANVILLE & CO.
FARM FOR SALE.
Forty acres in fine condition.
Large two-story frame house: 12 rooms.
Good barn and out building; high ground.
Just the place to summer.
On main road. Easy drive of city.
Terms easy.
GEORGE A. ISBELL.
Room 1. 792 Chapel Street.
SEASIDE BUILDING LOTS
AT
W00DM0NT.
The Popular and Grow
ing Summer Resort.
Ten Acres to be Plotted.
Tne Lots are now offered for sale.
Only one mile from tne station.
Nineteen dally trains; U minutes
from New Haven; commutation fare
about T cents per trip.
A. beautiful location; a charming
lope to tne water.
Broad avenue.; a Central Park; IT
corner lota.
Tne owners of back lots to have tne
nse of a plot on tbe shore.
Restrictive clauses In all the deeds.
more than half the ahore front In
Wndmont already ocennled.
Apslr now and secure a choice of
the lots.
Send for a plan and description to
OLIN H. CLARK, Box 488,
Hartford, Conn.
FOR RENT.
WStk HOUSES and tenements in all parts of the
iilcity. -
FOR SALE,
On easy terms, houses and building lots.
J. L. KIERNAN,
Room 3, 818 Chapel street.
Open evenings from 7 to 9. 1e24
FOR SALE.
tTHE brick house and lot No. 6 High street,
the late residence of George W. Goodsell,
now deceased. Immediate possession eiven.
A large part of the purchase money may remain on
mortgage at a low rate of interest.
mhl8tf 81 Church Street.
A Good House for a L.11 tie Money
TWO-FAMILY house in 'good location.
Only $500 cash. The balance can remain on
,mortgage, or be paid in installments if de
sired. This is an opportunity to get a good paying
property for a little money.
uau at
R. E. BALDWIN'S
Real Estate Agency. 818 Chapel 8t.
J30daw
For Sale or Rent
ia TN West Haven, near the N. Y. A N. H. R.
Hi R. depot, a two-story brick factory, 80x50
ULfaot. with one storv additions, and other
buildings, with engine, boiler and main shafting
oompltte; all about new. Apply to James Graham
or George K. K.eley. tpa
HINMAN'S REAL ESTATE AND
FIRE INSURANCE AGENCY.
$36, Honey to Loan at 5 per cent, interest on
real estate. Houses and Lots in a'l parts of
UuLthe city. Choice Seashore Cottages for sale
or rent. SAVIN ROCK and Lota on Beach street
and vicinity for sale. Ben', and Collections a spe
cialty. Fire, Life and Accident policies placed in
flrst-class cmpanies.
HINMAN'S REAL ESTATE AGENCY.
G8 Church St.. opposite postofflce. Open evenings.
Building: Lots and Houses
Owned and For Sale by
MASS EN A CLARK,
Room 1, 87 Church street,
CLARK BUILDING.
Terms Easy on the Installment Plan, if reauired
Read my list of lots fronting the following
streets and avenues: Lamberton street. Cedar
street, John street. Grant street, St. Ronan street.
Arch street. Red field street, Daggett street. West
street, Washington street, Morris street, Wilson
street, oak street. Evergreen court. Rosette street,
Starr street, Harriet street. Bassett street, Newhali
street. State street, Howard avenue. Greenwich av
enue, Hallock avenue, Kimberly avenue, Whitney
avenue, Dixwell avenue, Columbus avenue. Win
throp avenue. Winchester avenue.
One large House and Lot on the corner of Olive
and Woosier streets; one lsrge store. State street;
UBiirar uiA,tniwii nunmb, uuw id Allin grown
and Oranee Center. Derby avenue. East Haven
Lots in Hamden near the church; lots in Branford
and Augurville; houses and lots in Montowese.
North Haven; bouses and lots in different parts of
tne city. Home oi tne oest factory sites In the city.
jubu uiuor 1UM uiu numerous w mention. axo tl
A Few Hundred Dollar Will Se
cure a Good Home.
ONE FAMILY HOUSE. 200 Atwater
Houm and barn, 29 Auburn street. Two-fam-
,ily house. No. 11 Clay street. Two-family
i. 460 Orchard street, a.11 to be sold low if mxYA
within ten days. Also for rent, first floor 78 Woot
sey street; first floor 10 Newhali street; 115 Portsea
street; 121 Portsea street; 810 Congress avenue, and
second floor 29 Auburn street.
A. W. HOLMES, HOUSEHMOVER, OFFICE
OH UUUUU11 Bllif.E.1-. nolo
fflLiSCZll&VLCDXlS.
FOR SALE.
A second-hand canopy top pony phsa-
especially strong and durable; will I
Can be seen at
87 ELM 8TREET.
FOR KENT.
A good square Ha'nes Piano at a low fig
ure. AUUICTQ vn&niuctf,
. 1 ': a22t
jnjonn. State Agr'l Soc'y.
I- 1 u-? j-m annual r air will oe neiu
sept. 13, 14, IS and 16,1887.
. . Entries for Spesd close Sept. 1st.
All entries of Neat Cattle. Horses. Sheen and I
Swine under No 1 to No. 8 and No. 17 to No. 81 In.
elusive must be made on or before Sept. 8rd, and all
oiner entries must oe maae on or oerore rjept. I2th,
Kena ior premium 11st to w. AUKO?8,Cor. Sec
East H rt ford, Ot.
au20 d4tw4t
THIS PAPER ''' Tha'K
Local Weaber Reeor.
ro Aco. 82, 1887.
7.
I a. n.
S.
r. u.
.77
70
Barometer 80.01
Thermometer 71
Humidity .. ... 95 -
Wind, direction and
29 79
70
95
velocity .in miies
per hour S9
WR
sws
Weather
. ...... ft Rain H'vyilain
L't Rain
Keen bar.
S9.86: mean temp., 70:
bumid
Itv. 93.
Max temp., TO: inin. temp.
rainfall,
. inches. - -
Max. hourly velocity or wind, is miies.
" fOB ADO. ,188
Sean bar. 29.98; mean. temp.. 61.
Max. temp., 77: min.Jemp. 48.
.1.
J. a: 8 HERMAN. 8. O. U. 8.
Nnte A minus sirn I lnredxed to thermometer
leadings indicate temperature below sero.
A dash jin connection witn rainiau indicate
precipitation too small to measure.
I melted snow.
MI.l.tTI)RE ALT! AN A
AUGUST 23.
8 cm Rises,
Suit Sets,
6:09:
6:4 ) !
Moon Sets,
9:S9
t Hioh Watek,
i 1:17
DEATHS.
FREIDXAN At Stony Creek, Aug. 20, Leopold
Freidnian or raducan, K.y., aged 57 years and II
Funeral services will be held at the residence of E.
Obendorfer, 76 Olive street, in this city, on Wed
nesday, Aug. 24, at 2 p. di , Rev. Dr. K lee berg
offlciatinar. Friends are invited.
CRABTREE In this city, August 23, 17, George
Crabtree. aeed 66 years.
Notice of funersl ereafter.
HALE In Fair Haven East, Nancy, wife of Augus
tus ii&le. acea .) vears.
Funeral services at her late residence. Hill street.
Tuesday, August 23. at 4 o'clock. Relatives and
friends are respectfully invited to attend itbout
further not c.
SCR ANTON -In this city, August 21, Emetine Lati
mer cranton. aaea r.s vears.
Funeral services will be held at her late residence.
fto. iv iiousion street, x ureuay. August m, at x
o'clock. - Relatives and friends are respectfully
invited to attend witnout iurtner notice. t
FRESBNIUS In this city, August 21, Charles Fre
sefaius. acred 2 years and 8 months.
Toe funeral will take place from his late residence.
4W uonxress avenue. -i uesaav. auxust va. at a
o'clock p. m. Relatives and friends are invited to
attend without further notine. . -- - - 2t
PARKER In New Milford, August 22, Joseph
fnrlier. ot tnis cltv. aeed T7 years.
Notice of funeral hereafter.
FODSiD ATBAY.
- In Fair Haven. Ausruat 18. two HORSES.
WvTli8 owner can recover the same bv Droving-
property ana paying expenses. a.ppirat
au28 t Fair Haven
FRESH FRUITS.
Delaware and Jersey Peaches received daily.
Native Citron Melons every morninr.
Watermelons. Bartlett A Clat D's favorite Pears
for eating.
Cooper 4c Nichols,
371 SUte Street.
ACADEMY OP 4LUSIC
AKD
MODERN LANGUAGES,
10 WOOSTER PLACE,
NEW HAVEN.
Instruction given in Solo and Chotus Singing,
Piano, Violin, Violoncello, and all Orchestral I- -
struments.
Theory of music and Composition.
Class or private lessons.
The German language taught orally and gram-
matically, Conversation class every evening.
For particulars and circulars apply to
Carl S. Gaerti.er,
au 3m DIRECTOR.
A FRIEND IN NEED.
DR. SWEET'S
INFALLIBLE LINIMEM .
FrDred f rom the reoiM of Dr. Stephen Sutjf -.
of Connecticut, the (Treat natural Bone Setter. Ha
been uned for more than fifty jrears and fa the b t
kaown remedy for Rheumatism, Neural sria. Spraii a,
Bru'saa, Bums, Oits, Wounds, and all externa' In
juries. ECZEMA
And Every Species of Itching
and .Burning Diseases Cured
by Cullcura.
It affords me pleasure to eive tou this report of
tbe cure of our little grandchild by yonr CimctmA
Rehbdiks. When six months old ma left hand be-
Kn to swell and had every appearance of a large
il. We poulticed it, but all to no purpose. About
five months after it became a running sore. Soon
other sores formed. He then had two of them on
each hand and as his blood became more and more
impure it took less time for them to break out. A
sore came on the chin, beneath the under lip, which
was very offensive. Mis ueaa was one soua scan,
discharging a great deal. This was his condition at
twenty -two months old when I undertook the care
of him. his mother having died when he was a little
more than a year old ot consumption iscroruia-oi
course). He could walk a little, but could not get
up li ne fell aown ana couia not move wnen in ueu,
having no use of his hands. I immediately com
menced with the Cuticura Remedies, using the
Cuticuraand Cuticura Soap freelv,and when he had
taken one bottle of the Cuticura Resolvent, his head
was completely cured and he was improved in every
way. We were very much encouraged and con
tinned the use of the Remedies for a year and a
half . One sore after another healed, a bony matter
forming in each one of these five deep ones just be
fore healing, wbich would Anally grow loose and
were taken out; then they would heal rapidly. One
of these ugly bone formations I preserved. After
taking a dozen and a half bottles he was complete
ly cured, and is now, at the age of six years, a
strong and healthy child. The scars on his hands
must always remain; his hands are strong, though
we once feared he would never be able to use them.
All that physicians did for hiin did him no good. All
who saw the child before using the Cuticura Reme
dies and see the child now consider it a wonderful
cure. If the above facts are of any use to you, you
are at liberty to use them. MRS. E. S. DRIGGS.
may s. 1&K. oiz r.. uiay DO.. Diuoimngwu, m.
The child was really in a worse condition than he
I appeared to his grandmother, who, being with him
every day, became accustomed to the disease.
Cuticura Remedies
Are sold everywhere. Prices: Cuticura, 50 cents;
Resolvent, $1 ; 8oap, 35 cents. Prepared by Potter
Drug and Chemical Co., Boston, Haas.
Send lor "How to Cure Skin Diseases. '
ITM I ING, Scaly, Pimply and Oily Skin
I I W rl beautified by Cuticura Soap.
OH! MY RACK, BY BACK!
Pain. Inflammation and Weakness of the
Kidneys, Hips and sides relieved In
I one nil n me ny inetiDiiwrs auu
Pain Plaster. New and infallible. At
' druggists'. 25c. Potter Drug and Chemical
Co.. Boston.
j27wasaw
LADIES!
Do Your Own Dyeing at Borne witn
PEERLESS DYES.
Thev will dve everything. Thev are sold every
where. Price 1 Oe a package 40 colors. Tbey have
so equM for strength, brightness amount In pack
ages or for fastness ot color, or non-fading quali
ties, x ne-y ao not crock or smut, r or Hue oy &.
F. Wood's Sons, druggistsand
.notheearie
o. S
Church street, Oh.rles 8. Lee e & Co, wholesale
druggists. New Haven, Conn
mlfedly
Var Bllleusne.s,
Constipation.
It eools the Blood It gives
delight.
It sharpens up the SPP-
It aldjflhe liver do Its part
And stimulates the feeble
heart.
For Stick Beadaeas
Dyspepsia, -
KRATCn AXLE
BEST IN THE WOULD
UllllHWM
"Oetthegennwe.
Sold
KIDDER'S
FOR
INDIGESTION AND DYSPEPSIA
A CERTAIN BEREDY FOB
Indli-Astlon. Acute and Atonic Dyspepsia. Chronic
nri n.tm.Tnte.Mnml Catarrh. Vomitine in Pre tr
uancy. Cholera Infantum, and in convalescence
from Acute Diseases.
Over 5.030 physicians nave sent 10 us tne most
flatterine opinions upon Digestylin as a remedy
It is not a secret remeay, out bkkdqdo pre pa
ction, the formula of which is plainly printed on
.h hntii.. T. vmt DIGESTIVE POWE8 is cre
ated by a careful and proper treatment of the fer
ments in manufacture. Tt is very agreeable to the
taste and acceptable lo tne most aeucate stcmacn.
It will nn.iri.alv PURE CHOLERA INFANTUM.
Summer Complaints and CHRONIC DIARRHGBA,
all of which aie direct results of imperfect diges
tion. Give your children Digestylin. One bottle
may save a life. Not one case of death reported
for the past year from above diseases where the pa
tumi nan tassn Liiiresi.viu. juk jwir . uruKKisv iui
it. Price 91.00. Large bottles. If he does
not keep it send one dollar to us and we will send
WIT!. P. K 1 ODE It 4c CO.,
MAN UFAuruiunu umiuoiu,
fSthtfaltw 83 JToten at.. N. Y
IJEWS for IiADIES!
YOUTH and BEAUTY
Can Be Obtained .
.. IT 111X0
c iiiivTOir'a
WITCH HAZEL
TOILET CREAM.
ItU th only preparmtroa In tbs
',rH warraaet to cam and erftdr
eat ail impuriUu 1 n th Aim.
.ufhuPlmplra, Mlt RBa,
and advesi th complexion a freah-
f assaai w ssm nuu emm jira
id traulDeiieT wwc emBno. oe
-vtinofi ' y idt otber. even
by th. dangerous om of arsealc.
Ik i qaaled as a beautified o(
U DAI
Witch
converu tno
25 cents. For sals by all druggists.
Witoh Hazel Extract UO., Ulintouviue, (Jonn
VvrT
DOM I
mhS3 eodar
News by Telegraph
FROM AliL. QUARTERS.
LABOR'S GREAT
Pitched : Into- By
K; Socialists.
MLJUL
Angry
POWDERIXS STAR IS SETTING.
McGlynn Makes Trouble
For Hibernians.
BLOODY RIOT AMONG MINERS.
"W a 9 rw "l . i . I
llUmailllC A 1C Ul A. ttreat
Fortune.
THE RIOCCI. OF UNITED LABOR.
Henry George severely Denounced by
the Socialist, la Maes Dleettnac at
Cooper Union.
New Yoek, Aug. 22. The Socialist mass
meeting in the Cooper Union to-night to de
nounce Henry George and the United Labor
party was a very demonstrative affair.
Thomas O'Neil, of the Twentieth assembly
district, was chosen chairman. There wan
deafening applause as Furniture union No. 1
and Framers' union No. 1 entered the hall
bearing red flags. Tbe audience rose to
their feet and shouted with delight. There
was evidently a disoordant element present,
however, for when Chairman O'Neil, after
praising the delegates, who, he said, with
drew from the Syracuse ooarention on a
question of piinciple, began to denonnoe
Henry George be was interrupted by hisses.
The hisses were at onae met by cheers, but
when Mr. O'Neil renewed his attack upon
Mr. George he raised the storm. There was
so much confusion that the chairman brought
his speech to a speedy close, and introduoed
William Penn Rogers, who announced that
he resigned from the United Labor party,
When he mentioned Henry George's name a
storm of cheers and hisses rose again from
the great crowd. The people on the platform
defiantly waved their red flags, whereupon
the opposition shouted "Polioe! Police!"
There was an uproar and a babel of tongues,
but it slowly, subsided and Mr. Rogers was
given a chance to resume bis address. "I
admire the grand mogul of the United Labor
party," he said, "but I believe that he is too
absorbed in his land theory to cars for the
masses." Mr. Rogers was so frequently in
terrupted that he did not prolong-his re
marks. The confusion was increasing and
Chairman O'Neil had a battle with the crowd
before he got them to let him introduce Ed
itor Schevitoh of the Volks Zeltung. The
appearance of this leading light of Socialism
was signalized by more hissing and cheering,
winding up in a row between factions in the
rear of the hall. When hostilities had ceased
Mr. Schevitch said he had nothing to aay
about the two leaders of the Henry George
movement, but when tbey attempted to pre
scribe one medicine for the entire labor
party they made a mistake. Being known as
a Socialist, Mr. Schevitch continued, he had
taken a back seat in the party in order that
the mad dog cry of Socialism should not be
raised. So also had all other Socialists.
Thev had worked' when there was work to
do, but courted no notoriety or public credit
for it. The speaker then mentioned several
parties that had risen aud passed away and
declaied that their fall was due to 'relin
quishing their freedom to tbe dictation of an
individoal. Mr. Schevitch then satirically
reviewed the ticket adopted at Syracuse. Be
was occasionally interrupted, dui on tne
whole his speech was weir "received and he
was loudly applauded at times.
Letters of sympathy were read ana tnen
resolutions were adopted -saying that the
workingmeh of the city repudiate Henry
George, his platform and hiB political ma
chinery; that he has aided the capitalistic
class by casting odium on a body of earnest
workers and thinkers who have ' fonght the
battles of humanity and progress; - calling
on organized labor to rescue the labor move
ment from the boss, . Henry George;
pledging the Socialists to act . politically
against all the existing parties, including the
George party, until a genuine labor party is
formed, and calling upon the opponents of
George in the United Labor party to elect
delegates to a conference to be held Sunday,
September 4, at Webster Hall and also invit
ing all trade ana laoor organizations to sena
delegates to that conference with a view to
separate action.
Ill aid not tase long ior tne meeting to ena
after these resolutions had been read. Other
speeches were made by Edward Fincklestone,
the rejected Syracuse delegate, and Editor
Jonas of the Volks Zeitung, who spoke in
German and said in conclusion: "We are a
labor party, striving for the people; we are
not for Henry George; we are for labor!"
The concluding speech was made by Colonel
Hinton.
Cleveland's VI.lt to St. Louis.
St. Louis, Aug. 22. Definite information
has been leceived that President and Mrs.
Cleveland and accompanying party will ar
rive here on Saturday evening, October l,but
the President will see nobody that evening
except a reception committee that will meet
him at the depot. The party will remain in
St. Louis over the 2d, 3d and 4th, attending
the fair on Monday, the dd, and the Veiled
Prophets' ball on the evening of the 4th, ana
leave at mianignc tor unioago.
Prize Fighters on the Sound.
Nw YoRK,Aug. 22. Late to-night an ex
cursion ateamer left the city with the middle
weights, Dan Sweeny and Ned Wannmaker,
and about a hundred sports on board. A
battle between the pugilists is expeoted to
take place about thirty-five miles up the
Sound early in the morning. Skin-tight
gloves will be worn and Marquis of Qaeens
ury rules will govern. The fight is likely to
be a desperate one as Dot a men are game
fighters.
A Macro Prisoner With a Bator.
Boston, Aug. 22. Charles Avers, colored,
forty years old, awaiting trial at the house of
oorrection in East Cambridge on a charge of
breaking and entering ftt Cambridge, made
assault wfth aTazforupon William H. Sleeper,
ana of the prison offiosri, this morning.
Offioer Sleeper was oonduoting him across the
yard to the solitary oell when he suddenly
drew the razor from one of his sleeves and
commenced to slash right and left at the offi
cer. The first blow out through Mr. Sleeper's
hat and struck on his upper lip, making a
wound about a quarter of an inch deep. Sev
eral keepers rushed to the unfortunate offi
cer'a assistance, but Ayera kept them all at
arm's length with the razor. Finally he made
a break for the workshop, where in a few
moments he was overpowered. The razor he
bad stolen from the barber shop of the prison
where he had been employed.
STRIPPED OP HIS BUTTONS,
A Young Canadian Naval Officer Falls
Among Drunken American Fl.her-
Cbarlottktown, P. E. I., Aug. 22. The
Examiner prints the following telegram from
Iomis: Between sixty and seventy sail of
American fishermen arrived here on Friday
night in anticipation of a storm. The
cruiser Vigilante was among the fleet. About
eight hundred men came on shore and began
drinking at the hotels. The ohief officer of
the Vigilante fell in with some of the drink
ing parties and was drugged. Shortly after
he was seen lying on a pile of rubbish behind
the American Eagle and while in this condi
tion he was assaulted ' by American fisher
men, his buttons and bands being torn off.
Neither the rank nor. the insignia of his posi
tion protected the unfortunate-youg man
from the jeers and insults of the rowdy mob.
Collector Foley wired Captain Gordon of the
condition of affairs and on Sunday morning
the Arcadia arrived on the scene and etraight
aned our itaatters, taking the Vigilant away
and replacing her by the cruiser Critic,- The
young man is very penitent, orying like a
ohild over hip mishap. " .
I he Work or tbe rnolera'.1
Hnww Ano-l 22. In Catania during the
past twenty-four hours there have been nine
teen deaths from cholers; lp Palerma seven.
leen new cases and eleven deaths; in Capua
t nlv a few deaths were reported.
At Malta rlnrint? the past twenty-four
hours there were seven new cases of cholera
and eix deaths.
BEADS SITIASHED ON EVERY SIDE.
A Bloody Blot In Wnlehi Three Hsiil
dred miners Encase.
Wilkksbabrz, Pa., Aug. 22. A fearful
riot took place yesterday at Glen Lyon, five
miles from Nantieoke, in which three hun
dred miners, men and women, engaged. The
combatants were composed of men of various
nationalities, Irish, Welsh, Hnngarians and
Poles being largely represented. Sixty - per
sons were seriously hurt, some of them
probably fatSfly. Strangely enough the oc
currence was started . by a Methodist
preacher named Taggart. ,; It has been the
custom of several Hungarian and Polish mer
chants to send peddlers to Glen Lyon daily'
to supply certain boarding houses.- The lat
ter in many instances are hired by young un
married men who club and . live together.
They order goods of the peddlers who trust
them. The Susquehanna Coal company has
always selected Saturday for pay day. Here'
tofore it has been their practice to pay at
Nantieoke. This time, however, the v naid
themen"tffl6nt,yon,or MorBn.n
ounaay, me aay cnosen ty tne mer-
ehantfl to maka their cVsllAntinn
I Mr, Taegart, of Glen Lyon, has fre
quently preached against this desecration ot
the Sabbath and finally determined to put a
stop to it if possible. Yesterday he organ
ized a posse of his church members for that
purpose. The men got wind of it and made
UP their minds to resist anvthinir of the kind.
The collectors made their appearance and the
natural excitement of tne moment was aug.
mented by a universal indulgence in beer
and whisky. As the day advanced the
churchmen became alarmed at the situation
and kept themselves in hiding. The feeling
of antagonism was so intense, however, that
it finally culminated in a free fight between
men of ODposite nationalities maddened with
drink. Soon three hundred persona, includ
ing some women, were furiously engager,
with sticks, stones and clubs for weapons.
ine not lasted half an hour and men were
struck down on all sides. Dozens were car
ried away with cracked and bleeding heads
to their homes. - A few women were badly
beaten. The riot ceased only when the not
era were too few to carry it on. To-dav it is
reported that ov.r sixty of the rioters are
seriously hurt, many of them fatally. An in
vestigation will be made, with possible ar
rests. The towa is in a fever of excitement.
Liberals Going into the League.
LONDOir, Aug. 22. Several Liberal mem
bers of the House of Commons have joined
the Irish National league. Other members
intend to join.
A Steamer Goes On the Rocks.
Portland, Me., August 22. The steamer
City of Richmond of the Portland, Mt.
Dee ert and Machias line, Captain Dennison,
ran on a rock while entering Mill Bridge
harbor from Machiasport this morning. The
first reports of the accident were much exag
gerated. Telegrams received here late this
afternoon state t jat the boat is but little
damaged. When tbe accident occurred only
about twenty passengers were aboard. No
panic ensued and the passengers were taken
oS by the steamer Forest City which hap
pened along at the time. Tbe steamer is
beached in a safe place. The hole in her will
be mended, she will be pnmped out and she
will make her regular trips next week. The
aeoident was oaused by a dense fog and no
blame is attached to pilots or captain.
THE WRITING ON THE WALL.
District Assembly Forty-Nine Elects
Delegates Unfriendly to Powderly.
New York, Aug. 22.--The election in dis
trict assembly No. 49, K. of L. , last night re
sulted after a long and bitter struggle in a
victory for the anti-Powderly faction. Master
Workman J. E. Quinn was the only member
of the Home club elected to the national con
vention. There were seven hundred votes
cast, and considerable scolding was indulged
in. Forty candidates ran. Those elected are
as follows: Master Workman Quinn, Paul
Mayer, of the clothing cutters; W. Breslin,
electricians; C. J. Purcell salesmen; E. E.
Kudz, secretary of the district; W. N. Reed,
wiremakers; D. J. Noughton, salesmen; Jas.
P. Archibald; paper hangers; James J. Daily,
tile layers; Philip McGrath, machinists, and
George W. Darin of the salesmen. One of
the prominent representatives of the victo
rious faction said: "The opposition to the
administration and to Mr. Powderly is not
based on any fault we have to find with
Powderly himself. We think that he' has
been in office long enough. The tendency
seems to be to keep a crowd around him
which makes its whole object to keep Mr.
Powderly in office. Those offices which are
in the gift of the official head of the order go
to such men, and besides this it is well
known that Mr. Powderly is easily influenced
by those about him and is always ready to
take advice, and the influence that surrounds
him is undoubtedly bad." The anti-Powderly
men talk confidently of defeating Mr. Pow
derly at the Minneapolis convention.
A LABOR AGITATOR
ARRESTED.
Charsred With Deserttns
From the
Regular Army.
Boston, Aug. 22. Remlys Sidelinger,
prominent in this city for several years past
as a labor and temperance reformer, has
been arrested as a deserter from the United
States army in December, 1877. SideliDger
enlisted under his own name in this city
June 23, 1876, and from the first has never
assumed an alias. At the time of the deser.
tion he was with Troop L, Seventh cavalry
stationed at Fort Lincoln, Dak. It appears
that Sidelinger received a postal card warn
ing him that unless he left be would be ar
rested as a deserter and last Wednesday he
called at the recruiting office and gave him
self up. He was taken to New York and
thence forwarded to Jetterson, Mo., barracks.
Sidelinger was president of the Barbers' un
ion at one time and was a leading champion
of the Sunday closing movement. Hi a record
while in this city has been good. He has a
wife and two children here.
FATHER ITI A LONE WILL ATTEND
The Lecture by Dr. McGlynn on Friday
Evening.
Nkw Yoek, Aug. 22. rhe leoture of Dr.
MoGlynn before division No. 8, Ancient
Order of Hibernians, , iu .Brooklyn 'Friday
evening for the benefit of ' the' widows and
orphans of that society is assuming impor
tance from a political and clerical point of
riew. The efforts of a portion of the divis
ion to prevent the doctor from being invited
to leoture were unsuccessful after causing
muoh comment. The latest phase of the
affair is that the eminent and venerable
priest Father Sylvester Malone will probably
be present at the leoture. : Father Malone
has long been known as an ardent friend of
Dr. McGlynn, bat he has hitherto refrained
from openly endorsing the latter'a position.
His brother, Edward Malone, M. D., win
introduce Dr. MoGlynn. He said to-day
when asked if he regarded this as consistent
with his standing as a good Catholic: "Cer
tainly I do. In my estimation and that of
my brother, Rev. Sylvester Malone,' Dr. Mo
Glynn was unjustly excommunicated and as
good Catholics we must follow the. dictates
of our conscience, which forbids us from
severing onr connection with him." The
quarrel in the Hibernians over this matter is
attracting muoh attention in Brooklyn. The
friends of Dr. McGlynn assert that his oppo
nents are being instigated by Boss McLaugh
lin because of Dr. MoGlynn's influence in
the United Labor party.
The county board of the Ancient Order af
Hibernians met to-night to consider the Mc
Glynn matter. After a stormy session it was
voted to iavoke the charter of division No.
3 for inviting the doctor. Members of the
division say the leoture will take place, how
ever, and they will appeal from tbe action of
the county board. A large majority of the
division take this ground.
Death or a Noted Lawyer.
Niw York, Aug. 22. Aaron J. Vander
poel the well known lawyer, died suddenly
this morning in Paris from a shock of apo
plexy, aged sixty-two. He was senior part
ner of the firm of Vanderpoel,Green & Cum
ing and was counsel for the Western Union
and other large corporations. He was once
the law partner of Oakey Hall and was a
kinsman of President VanBuren.
Mall Games Yesterday.
New York, Aug. 22. Owing to a heavy shower
this afternoon the base "ball game between the New
York and Pittsburg clubs wss postponed juntil 11
o'clock to-morrow morning. Two games will be
played, the regular gamehelog called at 4 o'clock.
Boston, Aug. 22. The Boston-Chicago game was
called in tbe fourth inning on account of rain, the
score standing 1 to 1. In the second ' inning Wil
liamson knocked the ball over the center field fence,
a feat that has been performed but once before- in
the history of the Boston club.
Philadelphia Phladalphlas 4, Indianapolis 1.
Washington Detroits 11, Washington.
Cleveland Brooklyns 15, Clevelands 4.
LquisvillerAthletics 6, Lauisvilles 6. .,
:- John Parnell, brother of "the" Irish leader,
has arrived safely in Liverpool. He was sup
posed to have been a passenger on the City
of Montreal.
POLITICS IN OLD VIRGINIA.
The Republican State Committee Fur
nishes Food For the Voters.
Petersburg, Va., Aug. 22. The Republi
can State committee has issued a long circu
lar to the voters in which it discusses the
errors and inconsistencies of the platform
issued, by the Democratic convention at
Roanoke;-' . Speaking of Democratic friendli
ness for he agricultural interests the address
points out that Secretary Manning recom
mended to the Forty-ninth Congress that
wheat, corn, oats, hay and other farm pro
ducts be relieved of tariff duties and that tea
and coffee Bhonld be taxed as luxuries. Mr.
Cleveland endorsed this and the Democratic
party endorsed Mr. Cleveland. "A friend'
ship which would bring the agricultural pro
ducts of the world in competition with our
own in the home market," says the address,
"may prove costly to the farmer." Demo
cratic assurances of friendship to the labor
ing man are timely, oontinnes the address,
from a party whose administration has in
dicted and prosecuted operative labor while
it has brought conviet labor into active com
petition with honest industry in town and
country and whoso membership is co-ordinate
of this State with the Law and Order
league instituted in opposition to labor or
ganization. . The remainder of the address
is devoted almost entirely to State issues,
Governor Lee is charged with attending a
theater with boon companions instead of at
tending a public meeting called by him at
Richmond to protest against the payment of
taxes in coupons; witn going OS to Washing
ton to judge a horse race after inviting British
bondholders to a consultation over the State
debt, and with nsing appointments to office
for the advancement of his own selfish aims.
"From the date of his inauguration he has
fiddled while Rome is burning and frlvilons
levity is the chief characteristic of his term."
The Democrats are called on to explain an
inorease of $4,500,000 in the State debt, the
growing costs ot State administration, tbe
disappearance with adequate results of vari
ous public funds and the stuffiing of ballot
boxes and fraudulent counts in various parts
of the State. In conclusion the address urges
the expulsion of the Demoorata from office as
'the blessings of Demooratio government-
State and federal" upon the enjoyment of
which the Roanoke convention congratulated
the people have not been materially en
joyed.
ine aaaress is signed by William Mahone,
chairman of the committee.
A BAIT FOR SIR. CH&IUBBBLAIN.
The Tories will 'try to Hold Him to
Their Policy.
London, Aug. 22. The division on tbe
proclamation of the league . has now been
fixed for Friday next, before which time the
government will make a farther explanation
with a view of retaining the support of Mr.
Chamberlain, or at least to induce him to
abstain from the debate instead of opposing
the government. The Conservatives are
bopetul of obtaining a majority of 50 to 60.
If the Parnellites obstruct the passage of the
supply bill to any great extent it is rumored
that Mr. smith will endeavor to pass the
-votes en masse by application of the cloture
rule. The government fixes September 5 for
the close of the committee on supply. Par
liament will be prorogued on September 13.
A notice has been placed on tne order book
in Mr. Gladstone's name to make an address
against the proclamation of the league.
ine uiaostonians will noia a conference in
the House of Commons on Thursday to make
arrangements to support the Parnellites.
Deadly Lightning at Fairfield.
Watkrbury, Conn., Aug. 22. Lightning
this afternoon struck the honse of Samuel S.
Meeker on Greenfield Hill, Fairfield, killed
his seven-year-old daughter and injured
others.
SEVENTEEN PERSONS DROWNED
Paring a Regatta on the
Thames
River.
London, Aug. 22. A sad accident hap
pened during a regatta on the Thames below
London bridge yesterdsy. About thirty-five
spectators clambered upon a hay-laden barge.
The ropes holding the tarpaulin cover gave
way and all except one of the spectators were
thrown into the river, about seventeen being
drowned. The water was only three feet
deep, but there was eight leet of mud under
neath. A POSX TRADER IN LUCK. 1
He Finds Himself Heir to Over a
million.
Boston, August 22. Louis De Beck, the
'post trader" at the Charlestown navy yard,
has fallen heir to a iortune of over one mil
lion dollars, being his portion of an estate i
valued at 62,000,000 guilders left by his aunt
in Java, which is to be divided among seven
teen nephews and nieces. The story con
nected with this sudden accession of wealth
is a romantic one. In about the year 1810
Marie Von Water was employed in the family
of La Gasa, a merchant prince of Rotterdam,
who owned vast coffee plantations in Java
and who bad established an enormous trade
between that port and Rotterdam. This
merchant had one son and he became enam
ored of bis father's pretty servant and mar
ried her. Soon after the father and the
young couple sailed for Java and spent the
rest of their lives on the plantations.
The father died in a few years and the
son succeeded to his vast estates
and managed the property so shrewdly
that it increased largely in wealth. He died
in 1853, leaving but one child a son and
his widow. In 1869 the boy, too, died. The
heartbroken woman lost all interest in her
great wealth and left it to her overseers to
care for. In 1875 she died, having reached
the age of ninety-four. The plantations were
in the Holland colony and the government
took possession for the benefit of the heirs,
for whom active searoh was made. The
family on the husband's side was extinct and
it was not until 1887 that the rightful heirs
were discovered, -most of them in Belgium.
They easily proved their relationship to tne
owner of the Java plantations. The case was
presented to the Belgian government support
ported by all the necessary legal papers
and proofs. After Considetable official
correspondence between . the Belgian
and Holland governments the latter signified
its willingness to pay a just sum for the
property with interest for the time it has
been in its hands. The Belgian government
sent Henry M. Stanley, the African explorer,
to appraise the property. He fixed the value
at 62,000,000 guilders, equal to about $23,
goO.OOO of our money. The Holland govern
ment offered no ojection to paying that sum
and a few months ago the necessary papers
transferring the property were signed. Now
all that remains for the interested parties is to
affix their signatures to the papers and receive
their share of the money. The prinolpal
with the accrued Interest will amount to
nearly $2,000,000 for eaoh.
A British Steamer In a Gale.
Baltimore, Aug. 22. The British steam
ship Propetious from Carthegena arrived at
thiB port this afternoon in a badly battered
condition and without a captain, that offioer
having been lost. The chief offioer reports
that on Saturday morning at 7 o'clock sixty
miles off Cape Henry the Propetious encoun
tered a terrific gale which lasted until 3
o'clock in the afternoon. It swept every
thing before it. Some falling stanchions
knocked a hole in the deck through
which the water poured into the
hold. : Finally a large galvanized iron bucket
was torn from its fastenings aft and was
swept up to tbe hole into which it fitted as
snugly as though specially made for the pur
pose. This alone prevented the water from
filling and sinking the ship. Meantime Cap
tain Nicholls was swept overboard and lost.
The planking of tbe deck is badly sprung.
The first officer was quite badly injured about
the kness by flying spars.
A ASead Shot With a Pistol.
Chicago, Aug. 22. A News special from
Gardiner, 111., says: Miss Sarah H. Dodge
was arrested to-night on a charge of being the
murderess of Babcock, the wealthy lumber
man from Chicago who is just dead from a
mysterious pistol shot received at Gardiner.
Miss Dodge is thirty-five years of ace and
has been living alone with her mother on a
farm. Babcock frequently visited the farm
and seems to have paid marked attention to
the daughter notwithstanding that Bhe is far
from attractive. There is gossip to the effect
that Babcock borrowed considerable money
from one or both of the women. Miss Dodge
has a reputation throughout the surround
ing country as a dead shot with a pistol.
Dyspepsia ....
Makes the lives of many people miserable
and often leads to self-destruction. We know
of no remedy for dyspepsia more successful
than Hood's Sarsaparilla. It acts gently, yet
surely and efficiently, tones the stomach and
other organs, removes the faint feeling.creates
a good appetite, cures headache and refreshes
the burdened mind. Give Hood's Sarsa
, parilla a fair trial. It will do yon good.
HENRY IVES' BOOKS.
Noah Davis a Referee to Conduct the
Examination.
New York, Aug. 22. Lawyer Algernon
S. Sullivan appeared in the court of common
pleas, special term, before Judgf BookBtaver
to-day on behalf of his partner, William M.
Cromwell, the assignee of Henry S. Ives &
Co., and asked that the court direct the
members of the firm of Ives & Co', to "testify
regarding certain books of the firm now miss
ing which the assignee needs in making up
his statement of the assets and liabilities of
the firm. Judge Bookstaver agreed that the
books should be produced, but said he wonld
De unaoie to conduct the examination Der
sonally and would appoint a referee. The
attorneys in the case have agreed upon the
appointment of ex Judge Noah Davis as
referee and an order to that effect will be
made by Judge Bookstaver to-morrow morn
ing. Testimony before the referee will nrnh.
ably begin to-morrow afternoon.
H. T. Ives to-day made the following state
ment: "The liabilities of Ives & Co. are
$16,479,723. The deposits are $9,421,091,
mostly due to the interested railroads. We
have already sold to tne companies over $6,
500,000 preferred stock and other securities
at the samh price as they were originally sold
to us, so nothing is lost on them. In the
assets are government bonds, bank stock,
etc., figured at par, but worth from twenty
to eighty per cent, premium. We have ar
ranged to sell $30,000,000 of these and thus
reduce net liabilities to $50,000,000, against
which we hold 28,000 shares C. H. and D.
common stock ; 104.000 shares Dayton
Ft. Wayne and Chicago. 12.000 shares Cin
cinnati, Wabash and Michigan, and 1,800
shares Mineral Range stock. The value of
the C. H. and D. stock will be restored by
the withdrawal of the preferred stock." Mr.
Ives said he figured and equity of $5,000,000
for the firm. He will have to get the conrt'a
consent to make such a sale as he refers to,
but if he can carry out his plans as outlined
he will come out of his trouble with flying
colors.
Six Workmen Killed.
Berlin, Aug. 22. The seaffoldine of the
new city hospital oollapsed to day, killing six
workmen and badly injuring several others
including tbe architect.
METHODISTS IN CAMP,
The Camp meeting Commenced -A Wet
Day Yesterday,
Plainvillb, Aug. 23. The Methodist oamp
meeting began to-day. It rained hard and
consequently there did not oome the. number
that was expected. The rain began to fall
soon after 4 o'olook a. m. It came in tor
rents. Many people were on the grounds last
week. The work was not left to just before
the camp was to open, but work was carried
on so vigorously that by Saturday night the
private and moBt of the society tents were
up. The seats, which have to be stored after
each meeting, were in plaoe. The boarding
house tent was all in readiness, for. business.
The auditorium presents a lovely appearance,
for the trees, old in age and shaped almost
artistically, as if by hand, make a beautiful
ground. There are 'busses at the camp sta
tion which take people to the ground for ten
cents. A good many stayed on the grounds
Saturday night. They wanted to have ser
vices yesterday, but no preacher was present.
It was finally decided to have a love feast.
Mr. Smith, the president, was the one who
conducted tne exercises. The meeting lasted
one hour. It was intended at first that a re
cess be taken after the meeting had been held
an hour, bat the meeting was so interesting
that it was universally concluded to keep on
for two hours and have no recess. About one
hundred and fifty were in attendance.
The afternoon meeting was presided over
by Benjamin P. Ray, who is a member of
the Meriden praying band. He was assisted
by several members of this band. This
meeting was largely attended. The day
came to a close after a meeting at 7 o'clock
in the evening conducted by Rev. Allen
Clark, of Farmington, and all agreed that
the dav had been delightfully spent and that
the dav had been all that could be desired
for their meetings.
lo day's turn of the weather was a sore
disappointment. It began to clear up by
noon. The first sermon of the meeting was
delivered bv Rev. E. L. Bray, of Southing-
ton. It was an able and intensely interest;
ing effort. There are not the number pres
ent which would be here if it had not rained
to day, but nevertheless an extraordinarily
large attendance is expected during the re
mainder ot rue camp.
Went to Testify Aaalnst an Alibi.
Officer Hackett, Richard Walters and John
Ferris of Bridgeport Went to New York yes
terday to testify in opposition to the alibi
defense which it was expected McManns, the
accomplice of Feith, who committed the
Fairchild robbery in that city, would set up.
Hurled in middletown Yesterday.
The remains ot Captain Ezra Clark, a vet
eran navigator who died at his summer resi
dence in Branford on Friday, were buried
in Middletown yesterday. Many friends and
relatives were present, although no public
notice could be given. Captain Clark was
eighty-three years old and bad been a seaman
for more than fifty years in the coaBting
trade, principally between ports on the Con
necticut river and New York. He built
many vessels, among them being the schoon
ers James G. Baldwin, Robert M. Clark and
others. The last one built was the S. S.
Scranton, named after Durham's distinguished
ex-repreeentative and citizen, and the last
vessel he commanded before retiring from
the Bervice. He leaves a handsome property
for his children, a son, Lieutenant Robert
M. Clark of the United States revenue cutter
service, stationed at present at Detroit,
Mich , and two daughters, Mrs. Louisa Good
win, who cared for him, and Mrs. Adams, of
Branford. Captain Clark was an honest,
upright man, a good friend and a worthy
citizen. He retained his faculties unimpaired
to the end.
The Old Green.
To the Editor of the Journal and Courier:
In the Register- of Aug. 16, appeared a
communication headed, "More crossings on
the Green," and - signed Many Citizens.
Taking it in connection with other reports al
most made me laugh- More walks on the Green
wben some have been discontinued, and more
ought to be. The honored Mayor in favor
of it wben he is an "obstructionist " to an
order already passed and money appropriat
ed for a long, long talked of improvement,
viz. : A pavement in Temple street, from
Chapel to Elm streets, that will be a delight
to all citizens,' and be all the cross walks that
will be hud in a century. Such are the ideas
of "more citizens," and yours,
Ex Councilman.
N TATE CORRESPONDENCE.
North Haven.
THOSE DISABILITIES ARB RKMOVEp NEW
HAVENERS ASP NORTH HAYKlfBBS' V'NION
PICNIC.
North Haven, Aug. 83. The building
committee of the fourth school district have
snoQeeded in removing all the "disabilities"
that have heretofore prevented the erection
of the sohool building on the famous "horse
shed" site. The interested parties were suc
cessfully interviewed a tew evenings since
and the transfer of property arranged to the
satisfaction of all concerned. The engineer
who was on the grounds last Saturday staked
the layout of the plana, and the removal of
the sheds will follow in a few days. It is the
design of the building committee to com
mence their work at once, whether the town
assists or not, and have the building ready
for occupancy by January 1, 1888.
There were 336 present at the Congrega
tional Sunday school yesterday.
The contribution to the fresh air fund as
noticed last week was $100 instead of $300.
The Sunday school received an invitation
to accompany the Christian Endeavor socie
ties of this church and the Humphrey street
church, of New Haven, on their pionio to
Pawson Park, which takes place on Friday
of this week. The boat is to leave New
Haven at 8 o'clock a. m. Fare 50 cents for
adults and 25 cents for children under fifteen
years old. G. E. Thorpe, John Todd and
C. B. Foote are the committee from the so
ciety here.
There was no service at St. John's church
yesterday and several members of - that
church visited the Congregational church
and Sunday school. Rev. Mr. Page, of
North Branford, preached. He also Jed in
prayer at the school.
F. C. Bradley's family are to leave for their
Pine Orchard home to-morrow. Mrs. Brad
ley and daughter will visit friends at Madi
son before their return and will probably be
absent some weeks.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Linaley, who have
been absent at Stony Creek a few weeks.have
returned home.
Man wants but little here below " !
But wants that little strong.
This is specially true of a purge. The av
erage man or woman does not precisely hank- i
er for it as a rule, but when taken wishes it
to be prompt, sure and effective. Dr. Pierce's
Pleasant Purgative Pellets leave nothing to
be desired in point of efficacy, and yet their
action is totally free from any unpleasant
symptoms or disagreeable after effects. Pure
ly vegetable, perfectly harmless.
Best, Safest and Surest. If troubled with indiges
tion and dyspepsia try '-Digestylin." Recommend
ed by physicians as the best quick and sure cure,
fl bottle at all druggists' or Wm. F. Kidder & Co.,
81 John street, N. Y.
A WASTED.
POSITION as housekeeper for a widower or
as nurse to an invalid. No objection to tho
or to traveling. A home more to be de
'Jan wages. Address "L K.."
ttalt 103 CEDAR STREET. City.
VAWTED
A2SLsf.BOUTE of 100 to 138 quarts. Address
aa 3tt J.. This Office.
WASTED.
A ;h?T BOY to? business. Apply at
uteS- - MENDEL FREEDM
A GERMAN or Swedish girl t KO general
housework in a small family. Must come
we 1 recommended. Inquire at
au'"0 If 291 YORK STREET.
WANTED.
"FERSON8 of either sex to work on cards at their
a . jwuKo, 4v lv poi twuru, BLeaay em
ployment; no oil pilnting; no canvassing. All
CARD CO., 76 State street, Boston, Mass. P. O.
Box 5,092. auSO 6tTuThSat
WANTED.
FT fff CLOTHES WRINGERS and CAB
rrizi: tswiSKrEjis -iu ucrAiK at
tbe Basket House Furnishing and Furniture Stare
of George D. Lamb, 699 Chapel street. Bovs' Wag
one, Baby Carriages, Easy Chairs, Lounges. Ex
tension Tables, Parlor and Bedroom Suite, Spring
Mattresses, Union Folding Beds. Hanging Lamps,
Stoves, Oil Cloths, Ac. All kinds of first-clrss
Housekeeping Goods, low for cash, or on weekly
payments.
WlWTRIl
JflA GROSS claret bottles quarts.
yJVJ HALL & SON,
si tr 770 Chapel St reet.
Mxxmm&v Resorts.
Railroad Waiting Rooms
-A.-rx:isr
O, HOWES, Proprietor,
Wlllbe open for the season on Monday, May 30,
myar
GO TO CONVEBSE'S
FOR a fine shore dinner. Best on the
shore. New hotel and dining rooms at
tached; west side of Railroad Grove,
West Haven. Transient roomers and
tjons. ' jyal tf "
hnkrHarfl ATa.'. at. .11 hnura Roof- .muimmfvla.
STARIN'S
G-XiBN ISLAND!
THE MOST BEAUTIFUL DAY SUMMER RESORT
IN THE WORLD.
Nature and Art combined in one srrand display.
The fairest charms of nature, and a wealth of novel
attractions, forming in all the model pleasure re
sort. Two grand concerts daily. Eben'0 Celebrat
ed Regimental Band a superb orchestra, and Da
vid's Island Grand Military Band.
Superior dinners, a la carte. Glen Island clam
bake. Klein Deutschland. Menagerie, Aviary and
Mammoth Aquarian, Boating, Bathing, Fishing.
Billiards. Boating, etc.
Steamer John H. Starin
Capt. McAlister, will make the first trip Thursday,
July 7th, and from that date to the close of the sea
son will make two trips weekly from New Haven
to
Glen Island and Return
Every Tuesday and Thursday,
From Starin's Pier, foot of Brewery street (five
minutes' walk from railroad depot) at 8:80 a. m.
sharp. Returning, leave Glen Island at 3:30 p. m,
sharp, arriving in New Haven about 7:45 p. m.
excursion tickets iiew riaven to uieu xsianu
and return) 75 cts.
Single tickets to Glen Island 50 cts.
Fare from u en island to yew iiaven do eta,
Thomas will furnish the music on the boat every
trip. No intoxicating liquors can be obtained on
tnis steamer, uien isiana is omcerea oy emcient
uniformed police. Ladies and children unattended
will find nothing to mar their pleasure. Positively
no free list. C. M. CONKLIN, Agent,
e29 Starin's n.r.
STILES' PARK.
(Formerly Lighthouse Point.)
NOWonen and ready for boarders
and pleasure parties. House and grounds
completely renovated.
I Billiards, Bowling, Shooting Gallery
etc., etc.
An experienced guide with boats rurnisiied nsning
parties.
SHORE DINNERS A SPECIALTY.
Bathin? at all tides. Finest place on the East
Shore. Accessible by stage or boat.
jell A, W. Bauw, rropriBwr.
MERWIN'S POINT HOTEL,
Woodmont, Const.
F. 8. HITCHCOCK Proprietor
This popular hotel will be open June
1st for the season. It i titled up with
all the facilities of a flrst-class resort.
iTbe best bathiner erounds on the shore.
Picnics parties accommodated. Jul tf
BEACH HOUSE,
Savin Rock, West Haven, Conn.
NOW OPEN.
1 HOTEL SEA VIEW
Opens Jane IStta.
For terms and particulars address
m87 3m E. FREEM A.N, West Haven, Conn.
A Word About Catarrh.
' It is the mucous membrane, that wonderful
semi-fluid envelope surrounding the delicate tissues
of the air and food passages, that Catarrh makes
its stronghold. Once established, it eats into tbe
very vitals, and renders life but a long-drawn
breath of misery and disease, dulling the sense of
hearing, trammeling the power of speech, destroy
ing the faculty of smell, tainting the breath, and
killing the refined pleasures of taste. Insidiously,
by creeping from a simple cold in the head, it as
saults the membranous lining and envelops the
bone3, eating through the delicate coats and caus
ing inflammation, sloughing and death. Nothing
short of total eradication will secure health to the
patient, and all alleviatives are simply procrasti
nated sufferings, leading to a fatal termination.
Sanford's Radical Cure, by inhalation and by in
ternal administration, has never failed; even when
the disease has made frightful inroads on delicate
constitutions, hearing, smell and taste have been
recovered, and the disease thoroughly driven out.
Each packet contains one bcttle of the Radical,
Cure, one box of Catarrhal. Solvent and an Im
proved Inhaler, with treatise and directions, and
is sold by all druggists for $1.00.
Potter Drug and Chemical Co., Boston.
HOW IT ACHES.
From the bench and the counter, from the
loom and sewing machine goes up the
cry of pain and weakness. Aching Sides
ana 5acK, .tuaney ana uterine j aura.
Strains and Weakness, Coughs, Cold and
OhPKt Pains and everv Pain and Aciie ot
daily toil relieved in one minute by the Cu
ticura Anti-Pain Plaster. New, elegant
and infallible. At druggists1, 25e. ; five for $1. Pot
ter Dm g and Chemical Co.. Boston. j7 mo th
THE ZANE PATENT
SANITARY WATER CLOSET
Is the Best in the World
in a sanitary point of
viev, as it thoroughly
flushes the soil pipe
land drain every time it
a ncul f'an nA used
in place of the old stylo
water ciosei nimuui!
tering the pipes. Par
ties desiring the beet
Closet made are invited
to examine into ita
merits.
The Boston Water
T J Mtl a fit
and nrnnar Water Closet to be used in the city of
Boston.
35,000 NOW 191 USE.
Price, $25 Complete.
Every Closet Warranted.
JOSEPH ZANE & CO.,
81 Sndbnry Street, Boston.
NEW YORK AGENTS:
FRED. ADEE & CO.,
Corner Beeltman and Cliff Streets.
jel eod3mos
The Best in the World!
SPERRY & BARNES'
SHOULDERS,
BREAKFAST
BACON
and
SAUSAGE
Are Guaranteed
THE BEST IN THE
MARKET.
OnrKETTLKLABD
la strictly Pnre and
Free frem All Adul
teration. LOOK CAREFULLY FOR THE BRAND.
We manufacture all goods bearing cur
brand at our packing house, New Haven.
SPEBBY & BARNES, Hew Haven, Conn.
EAjy?.5"HAY FE7ER
is an inflamed condi
tion of the lining mem
brane of the nostrils.
a - w. - rl 111
tear aucis ana tnroac,
affecting the lungs.
An acrid mucus is se
creted, the discharge is
accompanied with a
burning sensation.
There are severe
spasms of sneezing,
frequent attacks of
headache, watery and
inflamed eyes.
Tax TiUfi CUKE,
PL V'R
HAY-FEVER CREAM BALM
A particle is applied into each nostril and Is
agreable. Price 50 cents at Druggists; by mall
registered, 60 cents. Circulars fre. ELY BROS
2S5 Greenwich Street N. Y. al2eodwtt
6s h
j v.- s
I A
1 (Shaven
WS5
l3&JTrr C3t.l
mo u

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