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Western Kansas world. [volume] (WaKeeney, Kan.) 1885-current, June 27, 1885, Image 2

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WESTERN KAS. WORLD.
W. S. TILTON, Editor.
Satueday, June 27, 1885.
5. a. c. OF K.
The World is in receipt of the cata
logue of the State Agricultural College
of Kansas 1884-85.
The pamphlet con tains jnore than fifty
pages, and bristles with matter reflective
of the importance of the institution.
We can not resist the temptation of
copying, from the last page of the cata
logue, this
8UMMABY.
During the twenty-two Tears of its ex
istence, the college has received 2,585
'different students 1,744 young men and
841 young -women. .Most of these have
come from farmers' homes, and, after
from three months to three years of study,
have gone back to such Tiomes without
graduation.
The number of graduates up to 1884 is
102 of -whom 37 are -women. Graduates
previous to 1877 pursued, with two ex
ceptions, a classical course, and received
the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Since
1877, all have received the degree of
Bachelor of Science after a four-years
course in the sciences with good English
training.
The 65 young men are engaged in busi
ness as follows:
Farmerd ' 16
Fruit-growers
Mechanics
General business men
Printer. . .
Civil engineering '.
Officer in army
Observers in signal service 2
Teachers and students of special sci
ences G
Teachers in public schools 4
Doctors and students of medicine 4
Dentist 1
Ministers and students of theology. . . 4
Lawyers and students at law 8
Deceased 2
Total G5
The 37 young women are occupied as
follows:
Housewives. ..." 13
Teachers 13
Milliners and dressmakers 2
Clerks or typewriters 5
At homo . 2
Deceased 2
Total.
Whole Ant Hills of Wheat.
Seeing John Morgan, of Buffalo Park,
on the street Monday reminded us of a
promise which we made him some weeks
ago, and had not yet redeemed.
The promise was entirely voluntary on
our part, and came about in this way:
A few weeks ago a brother of John's
David, we believe came out from the
Indiana tall timber, wheie he had grown
up, to visit John and see western Kansas.
John, of course, brought his brother into
the World office on coming to tho cih
again. David is just about as wakeful
a talker as John. John proceeded to tell
a good story at his expense, and David,
with some reluctance, helped him out be
tween almost deafening roars of laughter
by tho crowd which was present. It was
this story which we then declared our
intention to give to our readers:
John, in his florid style, began by saying:
"My brother, nearly the first thing
after we met for the first time in western
Kansas, began to tell mo about seeing
bunches of threshed wheat piled up evory
little piece along the U. P. railway track
for many miles on the plains to the cast
of Buffalo Park. I could not tsll what he
was driving at, but I told him it must be
that people had hauled the grain, and
placed it in that position, in order to have
it handy to the cars. Nothing more was
said about it, and I had almost forgotten
the circumstance, when, one day, as my
brother and myself were riding in the
buggy down by tho Saline, he attracted
my attention by exclaiming, 'There is one
of those piles of wheat.' I could hardly
hold myself. It was one of our gravel
piles thrown up by ants!" Immense
roaring by tho crowd! ,
Here David put in his explanation:
"I didn't Imow John was going to tell
this. I was not to blame. I was in com
pany with a man who claimed to have
traveled all over the West, and he told
me that those mounds along the railroad
track were piles of wheat." Crowning
fit of laughter.
There was no saloon handy, and David
saved a general treat. However, he
has brought his family west, and they
are residents of Buffalo Park.
Saline river was unfordable sev
eral times during the latter part of last
week. Captafn Fonts ascertained experi
mentally that this was so last Saturday
night. He had been at Logan to get his
eon, who had been attending school there,
and Mrs. Captain Fouts, who had been to
Nebraska on a visit. Well along in the
night they reached the north bank of the
Saline, within aboiit a hundred yards of
their residence, but the house is on this
side of the stream. They had to go into
camp until the next day, when the stream
had fallen enough to permit them to cross.
More public improvements have
been make this week in tho shape of east-and-west
ditching on the south side of
Warren avenue, between Washington and
Franklin streets, the elevation of the
stone walk between Osborn & Monroe's
and the TJ. S. land office, the piling of
dirt along the roadway in the draw just
east of the Oakes House, and so on.
The champion bold frauct seems to
be Frank Eaton, Mendota, Kan. He
writes to us on a postal card, 'Tlease
send me the Woblt for three months."
He is ahead of the follows who remember
us with almost daily regularity with
postal cards, bearing the request, "Please
cond me a copy of your paper."
e "OS's jil . "WaJ'
Judge Conger has a new buggy.
Monday aiid Tuesday were cold.
That is the way to express it
Eev. Mr. Weller, of Buffalo Park,
was in town on Monday and Tuesday.
"
An interesting article from the pen
of J. Cantrel B. is crowded but until next
week.
Mr.JLipe has been sick the most of
the week. He was in his shop again
yesferday.
--
Mr. Guy Blair, a brother of A. H's,
is now in the ofSce with. him. Guy is
from Solomon City.
-
John A. Nelson has a new land-omco
sign a la the Warren, Keeney & Co. land
sign of by-gone days.
-
The young man -who painted the
fancy signs on so many- Wa-Keeney
windows last week went west.
Mrs. Benedict has had her house
weatherboarded, and a kitchen attached
to the rear of the main building.
There i3 now an established road
from here to Wa-Keeney, to the land
office. Lane County Herald, at Watson.
m
Mr. Middleby informs us that his
bull whose leg was broken was not fight
in??. He is onlv a vearling, and the other
bulls simply pounced on him and did the.
injury. r
Mr. and Mrs. Conger, from east of
the Mississippi, who had been visiting at
Dr. Conger's for about a week, started
home Wednesday morning. Mr. Conger
is a brother of the doctor's.
Joseph Escher has been confined to
his residence several weeks by sickness.
We do not understand that hi3 condition
is dangerous. He has a man employed
to work in his harness shop.
Wo learn that Commander Caddick
has decided that the meetings of the
Captain Trego Post will be on the first
and third Tuesday evenings of each
month, instead of Saturday evenings.
D. H. Henkel asked us on the street,
Tuesday morning, "Do I look like a
young widower?" By that sign we ascer
tained that Mrs. Henkel had just started
on a visit to the state of old Virginia.
W. E. Phillips, general agent of tho
Kansas Mutual Life association, was in
town in tho earlier days of tho week. He
reports that new policy holders are
recruited with convenience and dispatch.
Geo. Galloway has built himself a
blacksmith shop a short distance west of
the opera house. This shop will be run
under George's own superintendency.
He has a man named Metz employed as
blacksmith.
Dr. Jones now has his office in the
Scott drug store both day and night.
The remembr;u(co of this will prevent
people as ho desire his services from
prowling around his residence in tho
night to find him. where he does not stay.
Awning business is decidedly boomy.
This week the sidewalk has been covered
in fiont of Hille's ''land office," Vorbcck's
new stone building and tho wooden house
where Tosh keeps the jewelry store.
This is a big connective stretch of awning
to be built within bne week.
John Pounquist reports a good time
at Mapes's Grove on Friday of last week.
It had not rained much down there the
night before, and quite a crowd was
present Ice cream was manufactured
on the ground. All got enough
to eat, and went homo well pleased with
what they had seen.
M. F. Fuson, the conductor of the
mail line between this place and Ness
City, assured us Wednesday morning that
from twelve miles south of Wa-Keeney
to within seven miles of Ness City, no
rain had fallen along his route for weeks,
and that the ground was getting very
dry. Despite this fact, Mr. Fuson reports
corn looking well in the dry district, and
he says that wheat will yield in the
neighborhood of one-third of a crop.
.
Our old radical Eepublican neighbor,
now of the Santa Fe, N. M. Leader, an
nounces himself in favor of reform with
a big K. Cleveland is not rapid enough
for him, it would seem. -Even the Dem
ocrats ought to, have known that Cleve
land is built too much on the ponderous
lozy style to bo fast with either his body
or mind. But Stultz's big E reform item
reminds us that "Jim" Millard took a
sort of richochet tumble over the country
as far as Kirwin the first half of this
we.k. In other words, he was on a
pleaturj roll, with a big P and E.
Tho probababiliiy is that before the
Would is issued again Baker & Shultz
will be in their xiew office. They will
occupy the southwest corner room on the
first floor of Mr. J. H. Baker's new build
ing, and have a consultation room just
back of their office. The north and east
first-floor rooms of the building will be
occupied by a bakery and restaurant, and
the upper story will be the residence of
Mr. Baker's family. Mr. Baker has
erected a good building, which is an or
nament to the city, and we believe it will
boa profitable investment to him.
Last week Dr. aucb Mrs. Jones and
Mr. and Mrs. T. E. Moore took a
trip to Colorado. Saturday niglit they
reached Denver, and pnfc up at the
Alvord House. They were just in from
Manitou, and were tired. Mr. Moore, on
retiring, placed his pantaloons on a chair
near the foot of his bed. He was entirely
unconscious of when the thief made the
raid, .but he missed very plainlv in the
morning the $S3.00 which hjid been
stolen. The hotel jnanagemenTare cen
surable for not having a decent lock on
the door of the room which Mr. Moore
occupied. Mrs. Jones look a B. & M.
train at Denver, on her way to Iowa, to
take a visit. The jest of the partv.came
east, Mrs. Moore stopping at Grinnelljor
a few days to visit friend and .relatives.
' - ,- iitfirTi.i.-; v
CASTLE ROCK RIPPLES;;:
- Castle Kock, Jane 23,
Another cold wave.
Kain is badly needed.
Cattle are laying on fat rapidly. " '
Oats are a total failure hereabouts? '
Nearly all the rye has been cut for
fodder.
f
Buffalo grass is'the most heavily seeded
thatwe have ever seen it
The roundup and count in the Forrester
pool was completed last weeK.
"Mrs.-Samuel Harlin is just recovering
from an acuto attack of asthma and pneu
monia. Early corn is rolling up badly, and
some of it tasseling out while lesithan
knee high. sS':v :
Early millet is quite ruined by the
drouth, but that sowed late will do-well
I if we have rain soon.
Shearing is over, and the shearers-have
returned from their spring's labors, their
pockets heavy with hard-earned shekels.
Again on Thursday last a fine shower,
which seemed about to come to our aid,
passed around to the north, benefitting
our friends on Big creek and elsewhere.
If the drouth has seriously damaged
the crops, it has also killed nearly one
half the "loco," and the remainder is fast
going. "No loss without somo small
gain."
The first case of "blackleg" for this
season has just made its appearance. If
rapid fattening makes cattle liable .to the
disease, then there are many fit subjects
on the range. , .:K
One of the high-grade Polled Angus
bulls recently brought m by Mr. Middleby
has had the misfortune to break its leg.
The animal had been turned into a pas
ture with some other bulls, and received
the injury in a combat with one of them.
Mr. Samuel Bingaman's new house is
fast approaching completion. It is 15 ft.
by 38 ft., full story and a half high, with
threo gables. When finished, it -will be
the finest building in this vicinity, as
would bo expected by any one at all
familiar with Mr. Bingaman's workman
shin. X.
A Good Dish for a Two-Year Baby.
2arion Ilarland, in Babyhood.
When properly made, milk toast is a
most satisfactory supper for babie3 over
two years old. Pare away the crust from
slices of stale, light, sweet bread, and with
a cake-cutter or sharp edged tumbler cut
each of these into a round, cooky-shaped
piece.
(They taste better to baby and to
bigger children in this form than in the
rectangular slice. I know one baby,
twenty years of age, who when appotito
flags begs for "t-ound cream-toast, such,
as mamma used to make for us when we
were wee bits of things.";
Spread the rounds on a platter; set
them on the oven a few minutes until
they begin to roughen all over. Then
toast them quickly over a clear fire, and
scrape off every burnt crumb to bring
the surface to a uniform shade of yellow
brown. Dip each piece, as it is taken
from the toaster, for a hasty second into
boiling water (salted), butter lightly, and
pile them in a bowl. Cover out of sight
with scalding .milk, also salted, fit ona
close top to tho bowl, and set in a pan of
boiling water in a pretty brisk oven for
fifteen or twenty minutes. The process
will yield a dish so unliko the insipid
stuff accepted and eaten under tho name
of "dip," or "milk," or "soft toast" as to
justify the beholders and eater in the ex
penditure of thought and pains required
for its production. Babies soon discrimi
nate between "messes" and dainty, deli
cate food, none tho less delicious because
the ingredients are simple and inexpensive.
If you can instead of scalding milk use
half cream, half milk, the toast is still
more nutritious and palatable.
A Practical Joke at Obcrlin.
McCook Kcb) Tribune.
A very neat (and withal practical) joke
was perpetrated by Inspector Lee, of the
United States interior department, upon
the land attorneys at Oberlin, Kan , re
cently. The inspector assumed the role
of a land seeker, and visited each land
man in the town, inquiring concerning
tho timber claim relinquishments in their
possession. Every man took tho bait in
a surprisingly voracious manner and
gave Lee the information desired, where-'
upon the inspector went to the local
United States land office at Oberlin, and
instead of making application for the
numerous and sundry timber claims, had
them all cancelled. Oberlin land men
are very cute not men that can't learn
and profit and we imagine that the
person that catches them napping again
will be smooth, very.
Every family should have a bottle of
Chamberlain's Colic, Cholera and Diar-
riicoa'i.Tsmeay ror use aunng me summer.
Its prompt use has saved untold suffering-,
many lives and many doctor bills. It
is the acknowledged standard, and can
be depended upon, besides it is pleasant
to take. It is put up in 25 cent, 50 cent
and one dollar bottles. .
In writing of that country, Mr. O. S.
McClain, a prominent real estate dealer,
301 Fifteenth street, Denver, Colorado,
says : " I removed here from Iowa in 1374.
As a healthy country, Colorado has proved
to be equal to my .most sanguine expec
tations. The air is clear, pure and light,
The water here in Denver is obtained
from artesian wells, GOO feet deep, which
are numerous in the city, and free from
alkali, mineral taint and vegetable matter;
but in many places the water is impreg
nated with alkali, and persons not ac
customed to it are almost certain to be
taken with cramping pains in the stomach,
diarrcea or bowel complaint of some form;
and right here I wish to give my friends
and the public a bit of advice, which is
based on eleven years' experience. Cham
berlain's Colic, Cholera, and Diarcea
Bemedy is a certain cure for alkali
poisoning, cramping pains and diarhoea.
It's a remedy I would not do without for
any consideration, and I have heard
many such expressions from persons who
have tned it.
Sold by AVAGNERS & GBIM.
r .
"53
W-rT'fi3?p-e,?p&F
v&
f
ijgtiii-vjieiigft'
WA-KEEHEY MARKET REPORT.
corrected weekly. ;
... Buying- Selling I
Prices Prices
.Chop - . f
Corn... - Sl0200?
Eye...-- , ,.90j
Eye & Corn mixed , - 'l 10
Wheat -50a6Ge - ' f
Bve . 40o - i
Corn. -. -
Corn meal -
Flour ;
White beans - "
Bacon ,
TTnm
Coffee
Sugar ."
Canned Tomatoes
" Blackberries
" Easpberries
" California Fruits
Sr-"&i?.4
ajMaiii
$1.5039100.1
S2.80S3.20i, , -rvT , ....
fin S3 ft I krand Bk on kft lup.
1UC:
14ci
16cto20ci
12otol5ci
2 for 25c
2for25ci
15c!
30c!
Molasses
50c to 60c!
4c to 8cj
7c!
10c 1
12)c
10c to 15c :
324 to $25 per m j
$20!
Calicoes ,
Muslins
Lawrence LL T-
IndianHead...
Fruit of tie Loom -
Shirting
Lumber
Dimension
Common Boards
Sheeting
$20!
S!
$3!
$4.50!
17c to 18c!
Shingles Star A Star
". 5 in. clear
Lath
Fence Posts...
Coaii
Soft
- Blacksmith . . ." " -
$6 to $7!
' $14!
10c!
125c!
Butter
Eggs
10c
12Jjfc
WRITE OLTT TOUR OKDER. j
If you would like to have Kalso-!
mining, Painting, Graining and Pa-j
per-hanging done, I vn do it fori
you and give you satisfaction.
Please give me your order by mail.
John" Iiokkquist,
319 Wa-Keeney, Kansas.
ROCK,
Strawberry Roan Stallion. I
Horse is 10 hands high: weighs.
1400 in good condition ; has 8 white "
feefc and star in forehead, with black"
main and tail; age; 7 years; a gen-;
eral purpose hor&e, with great con-!
stitutioii and endurance; ' especially
adapted to securing a good cross
from native mares; sired bv a
FULL BL000 COPPEBBOTTOH.
Trotring stock on Dam's side.
Will stand for mares during season as
follows, each week:
Wa-Keenev, Saturdavs. Mondays and
Thursdays at MEAD'S 'STABLE.
Ogallah. on Wednesdays
C. H. Gibbs's ranch on Tuesdavs.
Season expires July 4. j H&lf-UF88(1
This horse formerly stood at Winterset, I - -.t-Iowa,
where he proved to be a suro stock j GOJL JT ii'Jui
gctier.
TERMS. 58 to insure mare to be with :
foal. 10 to insure Ihing colt to stand j
and suck: money due when colt sucks. !
$6 for season. $i for single service. I
If mare is disposed of before known to !
be foal, monoy is then due.
Care will be taken to prevent accidents, ;
but we will not bo responsible should I
any occur. C. H. GIBBS.
J. M. OSTEAKDEE. j
r-. ' cjw.ijmsa
n-
j. II MARCH & CO., -BANKERS.
WA-KEEXEY, KANSAS.
DEALS IK REAL ESTATE.
SST'Choico improved farms for sale or rent. A personal interview or
correspondence solicited from parties desiring to buy or sell
real estate in Trego county, Kansas.
And pays out on pre-emptions, loans moner, discounts notes, issues certifi
cates of deposit payable on demand,
Sells Pasage Tickets
To and from Europe, buys and sells exchange, makes collections and does
a general banking business.
J. w
DRUGGIST AND
DEALER IN
" .PURE DRUGS AID MEDICINES,
fotiOIQE) (PERFUMERY JW). (T08LET) (ARTICLES,
FINE CIGARS AND TOBACCO,
-PAINTS, OILS, BRUSHES AND PAINTERS' SUPPLIER
PATENT MEDICINES
Oi
And Everything in Druggists' Sundries. Soda water at Poptdar Prices.
B3P" I am giving my whole attention to the Drug business, and can and will meet
anybody's prices. t
WEBUCH &
Are again in trade at their old stand and are prepared to
supply everyone with
(jJROSERiES,) tj-'LOUn) g (EDJ) fflRDWaR,)
Stoves, Tinware, Queensware, &c, &c. ,
Have a Car Load of Barbed Wire
. Call and see
Agents for the STUDEBAKER Wagon and
1 L -h Wo now have a Tinner employed, and
?g$r-4f- jv . Man-nc 3i$3tf$ -? Hhr
STOCK BRANDS.
W.
H. WILLCOX.
Address t Ranch
at3Villcox,-Trego
ca, Xan '
Shecattlebrandi
ed
and
Steers
ditional
COLUMBIA RANGE.
Bestor, Bestok 4 Hatjghton.
All cattle DV on
left hip. Horses
DV on left shoul
der. Address, Will
cox P. O., Trego
coM Kan:
JOSEPH MIDDLEBY.
T and bar on left
hip and bar run
ning parallel on
the neck.
Address, Gibson,
Trego co.. Kan.
GEORGE BAKER.
MB (connected) on
left hip.
Address, Wa-Kee
ney, Kansas.
WEBSTER BROTHERS.
kaitch on sxtjlxv iuver, 6 miles north
of collyek.
Post-office ad
dress, Cbllyer, Ks.
All cattle brand
ed A I on left side.
Horses, the same
brand on left hip.
Earmark on all
cattle, nnderbit in both ears.
Keeler,
PEOPBIETOE
I lifll'
First door north of City drug store,
east sille of Franklin street.
Everything
in Pirst Class Style.
WA-KEENEY, KANSAS.
j
FREDDIE
ian e
ottom, "
iWill stand riormanentlv for thft nominn-
Soason at
MEAD'S STABLE- ,
$10 for Insurance.
$8 for Season.
82 to bo paid at first Service.
Season till first oi September.
Nine months to prove if mare is with fcal.
JAMES HENRY.
BANK,
iOOTT,
APOTHECARY::
KERSHAW
at the Lowest Prices.
our Prices.
Give1 us a
McCOBMICK Reaper and 'Mower.
are ready to do any kind of Tinwork.
gf ? ;
w Hi ..pun
rpt?aron left-
S?&&&Irip.Ad-
ISbSu7
jf
3?3
100 FARMS WANTED !
If those having farms, for sate
will place them ,in our hands, vru
will sell them as, rapidly as possible.
" - BAKERS SHULTZ.
GETTING- REA0Y FOR THE
BOOM.
. Kelly & Walker unloaded this
veek a car load of wagons and plows.
MAST,FOOS&CO.
SPRINGFIELD. 0.
WA
IBOH TUMHK
ESS
Strong and DurabJt
. ynu sot
BUKIXK, swxix.
WARP, or
ALSO, TBS
BUCKS Yl
FOKCE
PDMP
Krrtr Ttmsm Bl
Winter TIjw.
1 &3Skad for aa
'Circulars uA
Gall and see Engine
and Pump in operation.
H. G. ISSSLER,
COLL YEJR, K AITS A 3
Agent for Trego and Gove Co's.
iestinhe$9i:
m
-1 iflr
s I i!
limMMm,
i! Jji Si
OHAS. .N.
(iTm'T
"?"',
CT,
ufritfij
-DEALER m-
i
FEBITMWITiBB
r.
' CIGAES,
TOBAOaOSj
"ft-
-AND-
CONFECTIONERY.
Wants to buy all the Produce, at
the highest market price, which the
farmers have to dispose of.
Call and see me.
CSAS. BENEDICT.
How Lost, How Restored !
''Jnst published, a new edition of Db.
CuiiVERWELii's Celebrated Essay on.
the radical cure of SPEB3IATOBBHCBA or
Seminel weakness, Involuntary Seminal
Losses, Iupotency, Mental and Physioal
Incapacity, Impediments to Marriasre. etc. -
also CoiisuaiPTiox, Epilepsy and Fits,
induced by self-indulgence, or sexual ex
travagance, &c.
The celebrated author, in this ad
mirable essay, clearly demonstrates from
a thirty 'years' successful practice, that '
the alarming consequences of self abuso
may be radically cured; pointing out a
mode of self cure at once simple, certain,
and effectual, by means of which every t
sufferer, no matter what his condition
may be, may cure himself cheaply, pri
vately, and radically.
SST'This lecture should bo in the
hands of every youth and every man in -'
the land. " s1
Sent under seal, in a plain envelope, to
any address, jost-faid, on receipt of six
cents or two postage stamps. Address
- THE CULVERWELL MEDICAL
41 Ann8t New York, N. K.;P.O.Box46"0. J
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