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Western Kansas world. (WaKeeney, Kan.) 1885-current, July 25, 1885, Image 5

Image and text provided by Kansas State Historical Society; Topeka, KS

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015485/1885-07-25/ed-1/seq-5/

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if.:-. VERBECK'S
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IS WHERE THE BUSINESS IS DONE !
"WHERE PEOPLE CAN FIND ALL KINDS OP GOODS IS WHERE
THEY WANT TO DO THEIR BUYING ; THAT IS,
WHEN THETRICES SUIT, AS THEY ARE ALWAYS SURE TO DO
I? GIb at Tlis
'
IN LUMBER,
I Head the Cavalcade.
My Stork is Complete. Parties who are in need or Lumber will find
it to their Interest to examinemy Stock before buying !
$
ON FENCE POSTS
I gu aran te e
W SPRING STOCK
Ha Jts.t
.BSThe Stock is Complete, and Prices are Lower than ever before.cc3
IN HOSIERY,
I have a Nice,
1
GROCERIES
C-A-IfcTT ZKZEEEEF.
I have them to sell because New Stocks keep arriving. Sugar, Cof
fee, Tea, Canned Goods, Soda, Baking Powder, Syrups and lots of other
articles in this line, people are going to buy at the Place where they are
found Pure. Best Uncolored Japan Tea, onhj 50c.
BOOTS AND SHOES
I have Ox all kinds, Coarse, Fine
the Stock is good, and utie Sale leads
My Stock of
is not excelled in this
'an suit the Devotee of
GLq1 In big Lots. Prices )
Odl t correspondingly low. J
ome and see me. Let us get acquainted. I am sure to have in you
then a steady Customer.
Goods Will be delivered
between tlie Hours or
"fours hastily, but truly,
Array of tacts:
t o p lei se!
OF BUY GOODS
k.sri'i"vecl.
Large Stock.
and Intermediate. The-Quality of
to another.
HJs and Qps
section of the State. I
Fashion or the Cowboy.
( forn, Flour, Feed, Vegetables,
( Garden Seeds 'way down.
to any part of the City
u ana i -ejvcj v xmy.
GEO. I. VERBECK
TREGO COUNTY TRACINGS.
Served up by the "World's" Rustling
Reporters.
COLLYER CAWINGS.
Coluteb, July 22.
Happy.
ThankfuL
Glorious rain.
New potatoes $1.25 a bushel.
Almost a hot wind on Sunday.
A showery Thursday last week
Nicest of corn-growing weather.
Another heavy dew this morning.
Fears of hot winds have vanished.
More than a breeze Monday night.
Now is tho summer of our content.
Good 'demand for agricultural imple
ments. Drummers are on the alert for fall
orders.
D. J. Hille and W. L. Olson visited
Collyer on Sunday.
G. J. Greene, ofFreemont, registered
at tho Occidental on Sunday.
Latest. Kaining again, with tho pros
pect of its continuing all night.
Corn leaves rolled a little as the warm
breeze of Sunday breathed upon them.
The fall emigrant now wendeth his
way westward in his canopied prairie
schooner.
The many cool, bright moonlight even
ings of the past week have been universal
ly enjoyed.
Buffalo Park w as represented in town
on Monday by Eev. J. Q. A. Weller and
James D. Sloey.
Both the G. A. K. and W. B. C. societies
held meetings Saturday afternoon which
m ere well attended.
Potato bugs have done a stripping
business of late, and the vines in some
places are much wilted.
Merchants, hotel keepers and land
agents aie hopefully looking forward to
a large fall immigration.
A brother-in-law of A. Brandenburg has
just arrived with a carload of farming
utensils and a few cattle.
Mr. Halthusen purchased 13,000 pounds
of wool in this vicinity, mostly from
Messrs. Adams and Cope.
A notice has been publicly posted that
the Colher base ball club will give a
dance the last of this month.
At the Catholic services last Sunflay a
large congregation was in attendance,
considoiing the heat of the day and the
distance which most of the worshipers
came.
O. W. Chapman and Charles Green
wood, of Silver City, low? spent a day in
town this week, when L F. Jones sold to
tho latter a township o railroad land
southwest of town. Mr. Chapman had
previously become an invester to the
extent of ten sections.
Three settlers arrived on Tnesday
night's train. They were John Gray,
his brother and a friend, of Salina. The
first-named gentleman- was here a short
time ago, when he purchased Charles
Thiel's , homestead and placed papers
upon an adjoining pre-emption.
Most of our carpenters put in bids for
building the school yard fence. The
contract was let to E. A. Hanchet, his bid
being the lowest by about 50 per cent. It
is tho opinion of some that the 500 feet of
fencing cannot possibly be built at his
terms without loss.
Anyone wanting a job of black
smithing done should call on Charles
T. Milms, of Colher, who is pre
pared to perform all branches of
blacksmith work, including the lepairing
of farm machinery. You will find Mr.
Milms ready for business at T. K.
Phillips' old shop. 331-3
Mrs. C. A. Sperry so far recovered from
her stroke of paralysis as to be able to
attend (he W. R C. meeting last Saturday,
in which society she holds the honorable
position of chaplain. Mrs. Sperry ex
pressed much gratitude to the friends
who extended their sympathy to her in
her late sickness, and fully appreciates
their kindness.
L. LeBron is having a well bored on
his claim,, a half a mile south of town.
On Saturday work came to a sudden stop
by the auger striking solid rock at a
depth of 50 feet. As the auger made no
impression upon the rock, a specimen of
it could not be obtained to ascertain its
nature, but as soon as a suitable drill
can be secured work will be resumed.
While waiting, the borers tubed the well
east of town, and, when completed, had
procured four and a half feet of water, at
a depth of 75 feet At a depth of 25 feet
the auger entered magnesia lime stone,
and that, interspersed with sand, com
posed the earths through which it passed
in the last fifty feet.
Monday evening's setting sun found
no way to shed its last rays upon the
earth ere it said its goodnight by descend
ing below the horizon, for there in the west
rose a mass of black, heavy clouds, which
fhe sun was obliged to sink behind, and
thereby deprived the lovers of the beauti
fnl of Nature's last work of art in her
series of sunsets. The clouds gained the
mastery, and onward they pressed, until.
; at midnight, their power was heralded
by a northwest wind which made
the hearts of the people as well as
the houses tremble. The heavenly
blue was invisible, and only black, angry
clouds canopying the heavens could be
seen by the rapid flashes of lightning.
Soon the wind had delivered its errand,
and the rain, which it had foretold, began
to descend, accompanied by heavy rolling
thunder. "With the morning's dawn also
came the dawn of hope in the minds of
many who had begun to fear the re
appearance of the destructive hot winds,
A large amount of rain had fallen, and
the crops will continue to grow in pro
portion. Absent niindedness was the cause of
considerable trouble between two families
of this neighborhood not long since. As
the matter has been settled without the
threatened law suit, the names of the
parties will be withheld. The facts, as
obtained, were: A lady called at the
post office for her mail, and while there
laid upon the delivery window shelf a
gentleman's watch, where it was some
time after found by the postmaster as he
passed through the room attending to his
other duties. From the post-office the
lady went to one of the stores, where,
while doing her shopping, she first missed
her property, and immediately concluded
it had been taken from -her by a little boy
who had been in the store, but who
was then on his way home with his
father. The lady and her husband, tak
ing with them a third party as witness,
started in pursuit, overtook the boy, made
a search of both the wagon and the boy,
but failed to find the watch. When the
postmaster learned the trouble, he soon
produced the watch, which was immedi
ately claimed by the lady. As said
before, a lawsuit was seriously threatened
by the boy's father, but now he has
thought better of the matter, and will not
prosecute.
W.C.
OGALLAH OOZINGS.
Ogam&aii, July 22.
Business good.
Farmers happy.
Plumming in order.
Mr. Logan traded for a big yoke of
oxen the other day.
W. S. Knapp built a house on his
homestead this week.
Mr. Combs has gone to Wa-Keeney to
assist in the institute.
Amos McCollum, Laura Marquand,
Bernenice Tetter and Nora Yetter are
taking their first term of institute work.
We hope they may have a pleasant and
profitable time.
C. TJ. Later.
GEN. GRANT'S BOOK.
I have been appointed sole agent
in Trego county for this eagerly-looked-i'or
book. This work will be
published in two large octavo vol
umes of five or six hundred pages
each, and sold,
ONLY BY SUBSCRIPTION,
at the following rates: per
In fine cloth binding, plain set.
edges S 7.00
In full sheep binding, marbled
edges ;.v.. 9.00
In fine half morocco binding,
marbled edges 11.00
In fine Turkey morocco, bev
eled boards, antique back
and gilt edges 18.00
The first volume will be ready for
delivery about Dec. 1, 1885, and the
last about Jan. 1, 1886.
No subscription will be binding
on the subscriber unless the book is
as good as represented by the agent.
General Grant is not interested in
any other history of himself, nor has
he endorsed any other. This work
is copyrighted by General Grant
himself, aud the bulk of the profits
will go to him and his family.
This work is written entirely by
by General Grant, and will contain
TWO PINE STEEL ENGRAVINGS
Of him, fifteen or twenty maps and
some other illustrations.
The book leads us through Grant's
boyhood life, his West Point life,
hisexperience in the Mexican war,
hismilitary and civil life afterwards,
and then takes us with him through
the war of the Rebellion, to the end
of that wonderful series of success
ful campaigns which marked him as
the grandest soldier of the day and
gave back to a grateful and generous
people an unbroken home land. It
is a grand work by a grand man,
and very few loyal and intelligent
Americans will be without it.
Everything about it is first class in
every particular.
J, A. STAYT, Agent.
334-2
, SHOATST0SELL
AND
Cattle Wanted g Take Care of.
John H. Mock will have shoats
in town to sell on Saturday.
He lives on the Saline, has good
range, and would like to take about
150 head of cattle to keep.
Any one wishing information
can find it by calling on J. Escherr
in, this citv.-
Right This Way ;
34
v
Come to Collyer, and buy your
Goods at
L0D A. FISHER'S, s-.
LOWER PRICES THAN EVER ON-X-
Lumber,
Lumber,
LUMBER.
Posts, POSTS, Posts.
AND
We are carrying a Grand Stock of
FURNITURE, STOVES, CARPETS, OIL CLOTH,
PUMPS, HAT RAKES, MOLED! WAGONS.
IF
PAINTS, OILS, GLASS AND POTTY,
We lxave tlie Largest Stoclk
in tlie "VSTest.
Do not buy Goods -- no matter what you are
needing - until you come to Collyer and
see Goods and Prices. .
MAKE OUR STORE HEADQUARTERS WHILE
IN TOWN.
All Ms of ProtatatoiiEitoie!
THE STOVER IMPROVED
WIND MILL
The Tests of a Good
m uirai
Light Running.
The Stover Mill has all
these and only 3
Principl WorRing Joints.
"The Stover is fully warranted
against all storms, is self-regnlating and
runs as steadily as clock work.
JgiTPumps, Tanks and Sinks putinS
Wind Mills and Pumps repaired at low
prices. Write to, or come and see me, for
prices on Stover Mill.
G. T. GALLOWAY, Agent,
Wa-Keeney, "Kansas
BUFFALO PARK, KAJSTS.
LARGEST STOCK IN GOVE COUNTY. YOUR PATRONAGE:
SOLICITED.
L. e. WKMEAKAS.
We refer with pleasure to the pro-:
f essional card of S. R Hogan, Esq., which ;
appears in this issue. Mr. Hogan has:
been in our city long enough to "obtain .
the lay of the land' and we are glad
that he has determined to locate here.:
He is, bright, energetic, well connected,!
and ought to succeed. .
w
..
v - vfs
ST
Lumber,
Lumber.
Wind Mill are
Mr. Lucas, from the south part of
Graham county, works for Frank Ells
worth in the coal and lumber yard. Mr.
Lucas has built him a nice residence on
the west side of Franklin street, a shore
distance south of Deacon Groff s.
Instead of Baker & Shultz, it now
reads. J. H. Baker & Sons. " .,
H..J ., S
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mMManww mi
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