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Western Kansas world. [volume] (WaKeeney, Kan.) 1885-current, April 03, 1886, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015485/1886-04-03/ed-1/seq-1/

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EIGHTH YEAE.
For Preteident-Elect in 1888,
O-oneral0 Jolin A.. 3LiOga.ii
OP ILLINOIS.
FARMERS' INSTITUTE.
Is Well
Attended by
Citizens.
Leading
-Agricultural College Faculty Rep
resented by Professors Shel
ton, Lantzand Mrs. Kedzie.
Read the Interesting Report.
SESSION OF THUESDAY EVENING, 25.
The meeting was called to order by the
chairman, H. Eralt
Then followed the reading of a paper
ly Mrs. B. J. F. Hanna, on
fLoricuiiTube.
This paper was of great interest to the
lovers of flowers. Several questions and
remarks followed this excellent article.
After this, Mrs. Nellie S. Kedzie, of the
State Agricultural College, read an essay
on
STSTEMATIO HOUSEKEEPING.
This, indeed, was a paper teeming with
practical thought, ably handled. The
paper brought forth some discussion by
the ladies present.
Mrs Fuson. In most families are to
be found small children, and they break
into system; what are we going to do
in this case?
Mrs. Kedzie stated that all work should
have a. system, and that, too, complied
with as closely as possible: all plans are
more or less elastic, and can be bent in
accord with circumstances, if absolutely
necessary.
In regard to putting np tho stove, and
arranging the pipe in its proper place
rather than suffer the wrath of tho im
patient husband, causing him to
swear it was thought best that
such difficult work be performed by the
good lady of tho house.
HOME TRAINING,
By Mrs. J. W. Carson, was certainly an
excellent paper. Would that fathers
could see life and its temptations as do
mothers; then they would bo more will
ing to quit habits that tend toward de
barring them from having any marked
influence over their sons. How can the
son bo expected to cease from an evil in
which his father constantly indulges.
The father should ever be found exclud
ing the very appearance of evil, and,
through loving kindness, teach, his
children to do the same.
Quite a warm discussion followed tho
reading of Mrs. Carson's paper.
One gentleman stated that she gave an
admirable lecture on boj s, but left the
girls out; to which the lady replied that
it was impossible to go over the entire
ground on an occasion of this kind, for
necessarily the paper had to be limited,
and girls, not being hard to control, were
in the main left out.
Mr. J. A. Nelson thought that the lady
went too far in regard to certain games,
especially that of card-playing. He
could' see no harm m playing cards, nor
see why people should cry out against
their use, when other games were played
by those opposed to cards that, in his
estimation, were as conducive to wrong
as any game of cards usually played.
He thought it was an old saying, and yet
true, that ministers' sons and deacons'
daughters were worse than any other
class of children, and all because too
much surveillance was exercised over
them by the parent Being eo rigid with
the boy inclines him to violate parental
authority and go where forbidden games
are tolerated, indulge in the same, and
perhaps be tne means of making out of
liim a cambler, when, on the other nana.
if the child had had the privilege of
plajmg at homo with his father and
mother, it would not have cared to play
cards or games to such a degree as to
lead to destruction.
Mr. Tilton. The gentleman has
toucbecTupon a large subject, on which
great difference of opinion exists. Tem
perament has a great deal to do with
fascination for the card table. Mr. N.
has a temperament so constituted that
card playing has no decided effect upon
him. But all are not so constituted.
That which would not have an injurious
effect upon him might be the ultimate
ruin of others.
Mrs. Carson. The saying that "min
isters' sons and deacons' daughters are
worse than any other class of children"
is not at all true. Other children are as
bad, and in many instances far worse,
but occupying the position that a minis
ter or deacon does enables the public to
single out their children and hold them
up before the community in s light that
is anything bnt pleasant to the parent;
often, too, it seems, merely for the pur
pose of overthrowing the good designed
to be accomplished. She did not be
lieve in using force, or in saying "You
muBt" or "You shall" do this or that;
but on the other hand believed in exer
cising judgment and-loving kindness.
Are we in duty bound to teach card play
ing in our families? No! What is the
safe ground to take if card playing and
other vicious habits are not enjoined lip
on us? The only safe ground is to let
them all severely alone. In order to
have amusement it is not essential to re
sort to that which is hurtful or out of
which harm is usually produced. At
tractive, profitable and highly instructive
amusement is found in the family read
ing circle, with father, mother, or some
member of the family as leader.
Mrs. Kedzie thought it essential to
teach children to become good conversa
tionalists. Mr. Carson eaid that wo are very prone
to take our position by the wayside, and
pass remarks about those passing by.
Such, should not be. If we expect our
boys to abjure evil, an example most be
set them. If you are addicted to any
habits that you wish, yoar child to ea
cbew andforswear, how can.you exert an
fftffcaoe of right over the child unlaw
you cease the habit yourself, and lead in
the way that you would have your. child
to follow?
Prof. Shelton. After all, I believe that
the discussion before us is a very perti
nent one, for children are an important
crop to raise, requiring careful tallage
until they arrive at the age of maturity.
Mr. Ben C. Rich. An old adage ,says:
"Evil is to him who evil thinks." Let's
make home the best place on earth.
Some are so precise that they don't even
allow their children to whistle. He
wanted nothing to do with a home, of
that kind. Attractive homes are happy
homes. Life is too short to have them
otherwise.
Mr. J. W. Carson thought parents
should abjure quarreling with their
children, because a quarrel never rights
a wrong. In regard to the game of cro
quet, he was of the decided opinion that
it could not be classed in the same cate
gory with playing cards, on account of
its being impracticable for gambling pur
poses as conducted with cards, hence is
not as productive of harm. Gamblers
prefer that by which they can more read
ily accomplish their designs without be
ing exposed to the public gaze.
FRIDAY MORNING SESSION.
The meeting was called to order by the
chairman, M. J2walt, after which a dis
cussion ensued pertaining to cattle, etc.
Mrs. J. W. Carson stated that she was
at one time a "cowboy," and knew some
thing about the care and treatment of
cattle. She was one among the first who
settled in this portion of western Kansas,
and knew what it was to pass through
severe trials and hardships. Millet and
sorghum were grown and harvested for
winter use, and had plenty of same;
would feed once a day of an evening
and at that time the cattle could be seen
coming up from different portions of the
rancbe for their regular supply of feed,
etc. Each morning they would scatter
and remain off until time for feeding,
then return again, knowing that food
awaited them. If all cattle in western
Kansas were fed a little every evening, it
would be to their interest, and the good
of their owners.
H. Ewalt asked for information about
the loco and its effect on cattle.
Prof. Shelton. The loco and its effect
were still an enigma with almost every
one. Where the cause for complaint was
found in the plant, he was unable to
state. The loco had repeatedly been
analyzed by competent chemists, but no
trace of poison could be found therein.
He spoke of a gentleman who took the
plant and made a strong decoction or tea
of the same, and then selecting a flock of
lambs, placed separate from other sheep,
fed them a large quantity of this tea
without any harm following; then why
it should be poisonous, he did not know.
Mr. Bich never had any cattle to die
from loco. He thought loco of itself was
harmless. It is the first green substance
to be found in the early spring upon the
prairies of this country, and if the cattle
have other suitable food, as wild rye,
they will pass over the loco without eat
ing it; but if cattle once acquire a taste
for the loco, then it is impossible to keep
them from wandering far and near in
order to appease their appetite.
Mr. Russell. Cattle affected with loco
become very weak and tremble percepti
bly. It affects them in many ways.
Don't think feeding makes any differ
ence. After cattle become once filled
with loco, they are rarely if ever of any
value, and one had better kill them,
and thus end their suffering.
Mr. Bich. There may be something in
the loco that causes poison to cattle,
which when passed through a process of
analysis goes off. Wild rye abounds on
his ranch, which doubtless accounts for
his cattle not wanting the loco.
The chairman stated that a grub or
worm burrows and lives near the base of
the loco plant, and perhaps it was the
cause of the trouble.
Prof. Lantz said that the loco was a
bi-ennial, and there are several varieties
of the same. Don't know that either
variety is poisonous.
SHEEP HUSBANDRY,
By C. H. Gibbs, is a paper well pre
pared, treating carefully of the topic
chosen. He thought the Merino and
high grades the most profitable for
western Kansas. The Mexican breed
are principally used and propagated.
The average clip is 5 to 8 pounds each.
He did not know of any Downs having
having been brought here with profitable
results. The constitutions of same,
however, are thought to be strong, but
they are not as good herders as the
Merinos, for they are too apt to wander
like cattle.
Prof. Lantz thought butchers would
be interested. In his part of the state,
they prefer a large sheep, selected for
their mutton qualities.
Another gentleman thought the Cots
wold was the best for that purpose, Mr.
Gibbs stated that in his experience the
Shorpshire was next to the Merino in
point of excellence for this country.
Wool produced here is not so oily as that
S reduced in the eastern states; neither
oes it command as good a price. Lack
of oil in the wool is owing to dryness of
the atmosphere.
Prof. Shelton was glad that Mr. G.
did not overestimate the profits in wool
culture. The price ot,wool has depre
ciated in a less ratio than that of wheat,
oats, etc. Therefore, wool-growers need
not be alarmed. The importation of
foreign wools must not be excluded, for
many fabrics manufactured cannot be
made from American wooL
CULTIVATION FOB CHOPS,
By Ben C Bich, waa a choice paper,
ably rendered, and listened to with
marked attention, Jfo discussion fol
lowed. Next on the program for consideration
was
TIHBEB CDXTOBX,
By Prof. D. E, Lants, of the State
Agricultural College. This paper was,
indeed, excellent aad elicited quite an
extended disonssioB.
Mr. Tilton had steadily adhered to the
principle, both poblkly and privately,
that where timber oaa act be growm ia
not a fit place for civilised .ma to Era,
WA-KEENEY,
Krmanently. In no country where tim
r can not be t grown can the highest
type of civilization be sustained. But he
was happy to state that timber would
grow here, and, too, very euoeeasfully,
proof of which was found; on every
hand. The hackberryand fEeoedar and
other indigenous trees are found growing
on streams in uus lmmeaiaie region.
Mr. LeBron. When he went into
planting timber, was advised to plant
cottonwood; did so; they grew nicely.
In 1883 came the dry season, and out of
48,000, all died but 340 Since then he
has planted elm, osage orange, catalpa
and box-elder. They are doing splendid
ly. He is now well satisfied with his
timber claim, and believes that he will
oome through all right
Mrs. Kedzie mentioned about a promi
nent meteorologist of Michigan who had
ascertained that a large elm tree would
give off in every 24 hours over a ton of
water. Such facts tend to prove more
fully the absolute necessity of slantuur
timber upon the plains of western Kan
sas. Mr. Bich. Had on his claim 12 varie
ties of timber, planted in the spring of
1881, in rows, principally cottonwood. in
terspersed with hard-wood trees. In
1883 the cotton-woods died. The white.
or American, ash was his first choice, its
being very hardy and nothing interfered
with its growth. The black walnut
came next, then the oak, and then box
elder. Catalpas were not a suitable tree
for this country, being too easy a prey
for rabbits, etc.
The chairman said, what interested
him most was, How shall we be able to
make final proof on our timber claims?
He had tried in an off-hand way to grow
timber, but invariably.failed. The time
now is when people had to be in earnest
about this timber business; and acting
upon this motive, he has made a large
purchase of seeds, intending ere many
years to have a choice grove of timber.
He believed the nuts gathered from
black walnuts the beet and most profit
able to plant
Mr. Walkey had been here since 1879.
and could speak from experience. Plow
deep, was his motto, and plant trees
known to be a success. The only way he
knew of to get rid of box-elder was to cut
it down and grub the stump out by the
roots.
W. S. Tilton thought the people of this
country, were relying too ..much upon
themselves. He believed in having
some respect for God Almighty, and
not attempt running the country without
His assistance. He referred to the New
England states as an example, showing
that where people strip the country of its
timber, drouths naturally ensue; where
as, if you plant timber results follow
which at once become beneficial to all
mankind.
Prof. Lantz stated that statistics col
lected by Prof. Snow, of the State Uni
versity, at Lawrence, show that the
average rainfall in Kansas for the past
10 years was greater by far than was
that of the 10 preceding years; all owing
to the wonderful increase in timber, both
natural and artificial.
PBIDAY AFTEBNOON.
Meeting called to order by the chair
man. The attendance has materially in
creased, and interest waxes warmer.
The first paper to receive attention
this afternoon was by Mr. L L. McGar
vie, and treated on
HOG RAISING.
He believed in mixed food for the bog,
fed a good deal of sorghum during the
past season with good results. Keep the
best nogs you can get; nave pure water;
clean, warm quarters; ample room.
plenty of suitable food, with careful
treatment, and success will follow. Al
falfa, clover and sorghum are good food,
especially alfalfa. Some thought the
hog oould be kept the year around on
sorghum and do well. Such may do,
but it is most decidedly best to have a
change of diet now and then. Wheat,
oats, rye, bran, eta, make excellent food,
and should be used. Never feed warm
ed feed to hogs if you want them to
thrive and give good returns. Avoid
swill tubs. Always mix food fresh, and
when required for use. His 'choice of
breeds was the Berkshire.
Mr. Walkey, in reeard to ffrowhur
feed, eta, in western Kansas, said if yoa
would oome out to his county, (Jove, he
would take you to a farm near his place
where the man has a crib of 3,000 bushels
of as fine corn as ever grew, and that,
too, produced right in Gore county, at an
altitude of over 2,500 feet above the level
of the sea.
Prof. Shelton. In regard to the par
ticular breed of hogs, he would reoom
mend the Essex as profitable. Alfalfa
was considered by him as of greater val
ue than any other article, having practi
cally tested the same.
No' other grass affords so much nu
triment and fattening qualities. Com
is better for feeding purposes in its nat
ural state than in a oooked form, Cooking
or boiling oorn,tas is usually dona, kills
the power of strength to be derived from
the food. Furthermore, it has a tendency
to ferment, or sour, thus TnaVjng the food
injurious, and should be avoided.
FOULTBY BAISntO
Waa a subject interesting to all, especially-the
ladies.
Mrs. Fuson had purchased one dosan
fowls, paid out $19 for food and shelter
for them and at the 4nd of one year, by
oareful record; found that they had more
thaa paid theur way, leaving her a, profit
besides the hen-coop. .
Miss G. T. Stickney read a lucid paper
on poultry 'raising, as practically, ob
served by her. This work is that which
most women can engage in with an a
suraBoe of marked success from the very
beginning. Thecareof poultry is at onoe
pleasant and profitable, ooiisidermg the
merely nominal outlay ia getting a start.
Mr. Walker's choice of fowls were the
Plymouth Bocks, Black Spanish and
jjegborna.
Mrs, J. W. Carson had had quite an
experieBce with Tearing turkeys aad had
corns to the ooaKsaaioa that's, was .best
toksssoaly a small aambaria. order to
bssBsoamfsi. Too maay .tarksy aToae
w'im XMt Sac.
KANSAS, SATUEDAY,
A H. BLAIR,
Land Atfrrnty mi Btatfttttw Affht
CONTESTS; A SPECIALTY.
WA-KxxRKr - t- .Kansas.
LEE MONROE,
Attorney t Law.
TAH.HXHKKL,
U. s. OammlMtoner.
Monroe & Henkel,
Mw mH Laid limeys,
LEE M0NBOE, Prea't
D. H. HE3TXEL, Boc'jr.
Rial Estati Broktrs & Liaa Agiafs,
WA-KEENEY, - KANSAS. .
70,000 acres wild and improved lands for
sale. Will purchase land in Trego and
adjoining oounties and pay cash for same.
$ 1 00,000 Money t Loan at far Cant.
JOHN A. NELSON,
Attorney at law
AND
Loan, Agent
U. P. Land Agent for Tregoy Gra
ham and Ness Counties,
WA-KEENEY. - KANSAS.
Stock Banches a Specialty.
Parties meaning business request
ed to write me.
F. DAMDOBD. 8. K. HOOIK.
DAOTOEDAHoanr,' '
ATTORNEYS - AT LAW
And Real Estate Dealers.
Buy and sell Real Estate, secure
Homesteads and Timber-claims
for those wanting; gov't land.
Will practice in all State Courts and be
fore the Gov't Land Offioe.
Business solicited.
Office in basement of Eeeney Block,
WA.HBBNBT KANSAS
J. WORD CARSON,
NOTARYPUBLIC,;
Pirckasint Stliiif irt Ueatlic
LAND AGENT 4 ATT' Y.
Makes Soldiers HomesUed Declaratory
Entries, Timber Filingsu Pe-etnftkma, i
Homesteads, Final Proofs. Attends '
to Contests in all phases, etc.
Promptness and fair dealing. All work
guaranteed.
- Offict to liUaWittf Kiiiii llttfc,
UNDER U. S. LAND OFFICE.
Jno. T. AlIiSH.
xF.DiTGApxm.
Allen & Carper.
Real Estate Agents,
Locate claims and do-all kinds' of
landbusineee.
MaJa Office, ;
Branch Office,
- WALLACE, KAN.
WA-KEENEY, KAN.
HOMES 19 IUNGIES FREEfOII ALL
. TakNstfosfyss .
Tkw whawaac :
irdsaestto0nbeMU,fUbsa.
inlaw itui lai anilint ill, wkn
nadiaww at all ttees to 1
Mstxaadst .
HH5 Ei?s
fcnewledgBOfli I nsjir ,
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at .Ctojff wl
Meaadaeaovatoat
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THKThe B. k X.Land Agent,
BB' WA-XXZKZT, XAJr. j
aS I am selling B. k M. I
BVBVJaBVBVBVBBiaDd8(m 10 years' UtM,
VAVaVAVAVAV 1 per cent.; nothing T
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BBBBaBBBBWF able annually; at the end .!
VaVaVaVaVaVaVSi of the 10 years pay the g
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APBIL 3, 1886.
A. J. XABIA. 1AM H, mLXT.
HABLAN & EBLLEY, .
ATTOENEX& -AT--LAW.
Practice in all State & Federal Courts.
. A. J. HARLAN,
Real Estate & Land Agent.
Business before the Land Office
Promptly Attended to.
07K08 UP 8TAIBS IN WORLD BTTILDINO,
WA-KXSKXY, KANSAS.
M. D. HOLLI8TER,
ATTOBNEY-AT-LAW.
All legal business entrusted to my
care will be attended 'to
promptly.
Olfict East Sidt of Main Street,
WA-KEENEY,
KANSAS.
a A. STREAM, .
Notary Public
W. S. BUSH.
Attorney at Law.
STEEAM & BUSH,
REL7E8TATE7AGEHT8,
Locaters and Surveyors,
OAKLEY, ST. JOHN CO., KAN.,
Attend to all kinds of Real Estate busi
ness, buy and sell lands. Contests
a specialty.
Practice in the local land offioo and in
the general land office. Soldiers'
rights a specialty. '
S. R. COWIOK,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
All legal easiness entrusted to my care will receive
prompt and careful attention.
omox WITH WHIII.W BBOI.,
WA-KEENEY,
KANSAS.
'COWiCK & WHEELER BROS, will
give special attention to final proofs and
contests.
35,000 Acres by quarter section around
the town of Kuahton.
BAKER & SONS,
MAIN OFFIOE AT WA-XSENET.
REAL ESTATE DEALERS.
r
150,000 acres Deeded, Ballroad and School
Land For Sale.
Branch Office stBushton.Oovs CoKan.
We do all Kinds of U. S. Land Offioe
Business.
D. S. CLOTFELTER & CO.,
; LAND AGENTS.
ELLIS, KANSAS.
Agents for the sale of 62,000 acres of se
lected lands, lying in Trego and Graham
counties, belonging to
ClitMir, TIWMiiHiawHtt.
W. R. KRITCHFIELD,
-DEAXEBIN
FURNITURE,
Carpets, Window Shades, Pictures,
And EraKysEsaf in Hones FvatskJag Una.
PICTTJ FBAM1 MOULMNaB,
Oriis. SiriiiMackliis&llifiirs.
UNDERTAKER
Buial Sobtt, Cases. Caskets, Itc
Mammoth Stock .
AXD
REASONABLE PRICES
Df KVEBTTHIKO.
Motto. LIVE AND LET LIVE.
W. H. Eeeler,
' PROPRIETOR
CITY SH PARLOR.
Down stairs from in front of Baker's
Meat Market, east side of
Franklin, street.
Xrerything- in first Class ityle.
WA-KEENEY, KANSAS.
J. B. WILSON,
COUNTY SURVEYOR
AND LAND LOCATOR,
WA-IXOTT, . . XAjriAJ.
T WAONDt,
Veterinary Surgeon,
WA-XEENET, KANSAS.
Wm aWC CSStis.
mi &
' aaVi&.
Louia Duoros.
Ronnquist 4 Ducros,
PAINTERS,
Sign "Writers,
6rikurs, KtlsnlHrs, Paper Huxers,
W A-EEENIY, IAN.
. GEO. BARRETT,
CARPENTER, BUILDER,
And Contractor.
Plans and Specifications
PREPARED TO ORDER
Rs8Hxxcs in
Oakes House!
first building east of
A. E. SIGLER.
a4H?v
GarpintirfgnL & Builiir.
BBBs9BSaa-
Special'attention given to buildings
of modern styles.
Shop north of Keeney Block,
WA-KEBNBY, ... KANSAS
HOTEL I
HOTtL !
YOU WILL FIND GROVER,
7 AT THE
WHITE-:-HOUSE,
WALLACE, KANSAS,
Always ready to attend to the slightest
wishes of his guests.
ACCOMMODATIONS GOOD.
PRICES. Only $1.00 Per Day.
$5 00 Per Week.
JAS. K. GROVER, Peop.
OO&CS TO
KERSHAW'S
NEW FEED & BOARDING STABLE,
JTTIT WIST 07 OPXXA 1L0CX,
WHXK
You Want your Horse Fed & Boarded.
Special care given to Animals entrusted
to my keeping.
OOOK BOOK AMD FEED XTXA ATTACHED.
Corn, 0ats4 & Ground Feed
FOR S-AJCE,
nc
LABQX OB SHALL QUANTITIES
AT
LOWEST CASH PRICES.
I have lately put in a Horse Power Feed
Mill and will do
Custom -:- G-rinding.
H. S. DAVIS,
At Kershaw's Livery Stable
A. P. LIPE,
Boot and Shoemaker.
' Cuatasaaf the Fafctic Xasptctfelly Sail.
IU4. ahoy la aorta reeaa of Warlkfe
ft Kcrthaw'a sum toiWaf .
SYaKAftsyt
Kansas.
A. B.JONES,
Physician and Surgeon
Office in Jones k Ferris'a Drug Store.
wwsaaspsy,
Kai
M.H. FARMER,
PHYSICIANS. SURGEON,
Office in Hille'a Drug Store,
Jehn lUnftflMlst.
JWA-ICKWCY, - -t,
JCANfAS.
KTJMBEB6,
COOPER MI0E1SL,
curl1 LV 9
Mesier Well MM
Parties wanting work done in oar
line will please call on or ad.
dress us at Wa-Keeney.
Satisfaction Guaranteed,
COOPEB & MKJKEL.
"BLACKSMITH SHOP.
location changed.
I now manage the shop whick
was 'vacated recently .by Joseph
Marks.
I am prepared to do Horse-shoeing,
repair Wagons, and eonduct a
General Blacksmithing Business.
Rates reasonable.
BEN JACKSON.
Wm. Pearson.
PBAOTICAIi .
Bricklayer asi Stonemason
WA-UEirST, KA1SAI.
Has1 a large stock of Bnrnt Bricks on
hand for sale.
Special attention 'given to building Fiits
Fines.
W. A. WOOKEY,
photographer;
, Over Kritchfeld'a Furniture Store.
I am now prepared to do all lands of
work in the way of
Photographing,
And will remain here
BUT A. SHORT TCCaCB,
Unless my trade 'increases. Every one
now that wants pictures will
please call and see me.
Feick's Livery,
Opposite the Oakes House,
.WA-XXXVZT,
LIVERY, FEED & SALE STAM.E.
Best of Bigs at the Most Reasonable Bates.
. A C 7BICZ, Prop-
TO SECUKE
GOVERNMENT
IE, .A. IN" ID
-ASA-
Homesteq.d,
Timber Claim,
Pre-emption,
Soldier's Filing
-OB FOB
Railroad Lands,
Syndicate Lands,
Private Lands,
Seeded Lands,
Stock Banches,
Improved Farms,
HMtsftai IMiMpistaiits
-OB
rmbtr Ctltirt RiiiiHiistafifif
caii on addbess
WILLIAM WILLSONr
lBat"l" WaBrtK.
BKSBfeil"
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