OCR Interpretation


Republican farmer. [volume] (Bridgeport, Conn.) 1810-1920, March 08, 1918, Image 1

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015536/1918-03-08/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

ALL THE NEWS
THAT'S WORTH
PRINTING
1
ALL THE NEWS
THAT'S WORTH
PRINTING
ESTABLISHED A. D. 1790 VOL. CXXVI
BRIDGEPORT, CONN., FRIDAY, MARCH 8, 1918
NEW SERIES VOL. CXXVI NO. 5602 ,
0,
IMvuMuv
r nnnmnnioifHi
6)
o) CTpraifnlfP1) Ami EAR n
f Is. II utiigljtMi, y tilLIL;
i
Recruiting For Red
Cross Service Over
lit France Is Brisk
500 APPLICANTS SWAMP OFFICES OF ORGANIZA
TION IN TILE FIRST-BRIDGEPORT NATIONAL
BANK TO ENLIST AS TRUCK AND AMBU
LANCE MEN MEN IN DRAFT ARE
ARE BEING REJECTED.
Recruiting for the American Red Cross forces in France has
assumed large proportions in Bridgeport according iu a state
ment made by Lieutenant W. A. Bowman, in charge of the
Bridgeport Depot, Room 308, First-Bridgeport National Bank
building. More than five hundred men have applied to join the
service, but a great number of those had to be turned down be
cause they were within the draft age or were ignorant of either
driving an automobile or gasoline motors.
As fast aa the men fill out their ap
plications and have ibeen examined by
the doctor they are given a driving
and mechanical test at the Locomo
bile pi'PV and if they prove satisfac
tory as drivers their applications arc
immediately forwarded to the Red
Cross heajdiquarters where they are
submitted for approval. When appli
cations are approved the recruit is in
structed to hold himself in readiness
to be summoned to a base depot to
report 'by wire.
Lieutenant Bowman will be assisted
at the local office for a few days by
Lieutenant W. F. Beardslee, son of
George F. Beardslee, first assistant
chief of the Bridgeport Fire Depart
ment, who is here on leave of ab
sence In order that he may bid good
bye to his family and friends before
Bailing for France.
CteJbtes are' being constantly received
from the front urging the Red Cross
officiate in America to speed up re
cruiting in the transport division.
Hundreds of thousands of packing
cases crammed wfth hospital supplies
literally choke the distributing bases
in France for want of drivers to pilot
th thousands of trucks which are
lying idle waiting crews.
Not alone are hospital supplies be
ing held at the French seaports as a
consequence "of the lack of drivers,
but huge lots of Christmas packages
which should have been delivered to
th3 boys in the trenches are held up
because theme are no means of for
warding them to their destination
All successful candidates for enlist
metn vith the Red Cross forces will
be notified toy wire from, headquarters
as to the time to report. They will
be assembled at an Atlantic seaport
and while waiting for the sailing of
the ship which will carry them across
they will .be supplied with a complete
kit for active service. All hotel ex
penses will be paid while they are
waiting, and theiT pay starts from
the moment they receive their order
to report for duty.
There is a big chance for all the
Bridgeport -jontingent to be attached
to General Pershing's army and there
is another possibility of their being
sent to the Italian front later. Ac
cording 'to the latest cables the Red
Cross is organizing a big force to op
erate in Italy, and if anything this
taints to some very 'busy- times being
in store on the Piave
Tr rt in both driving and mechanics
are being made every day at the Lo
comobile plant.
LOST $26,400 IN
CARD GAME, THEN
WAS FOUND SHOT
New York, March 7 Four months
of almost continuous bad luck at the
gamingtable, culminating in a loss of
$26,400 in a five-hour game or cne
min de fer in the Ritz Carlton, Jan 15,
preceded the Bhooting of Nicholas
Iserguine, representative of the for
mer Russian Minister of Finance,
who, was found in his apartment, No.
9 East 47th street, with a note in
dicating he had inflicted the injury
fcimself.
This fact came to light yesterday
when the Russian who formerly was
chief of savings bank inspectors in
his native country, appeared as a wit
ness at the John DoeMnquiry before
Judge Wadhams of General Sessions.
Still pale from the effects of his
wound and limping slightly, the Rus
sian walked hesitatingly to the wit
. ness chair and was questioned by As
sistant District Attorney James E.
Smith. At the end of an hour's ses
sion Mr. Smith had not succeeded in
getting from him the name of a sin
gle person who had won his money.
The debt, it appeared, was to be
liquidated through "liberal terms" ex
tended to him oy - Mr. onaugnnessy.
president of the Olympic Club, in
whose rooms the big game was play
ed. He said he had gone home after
giving Shaughncssy a check, anj
then was asked:
FRENCH REPEL RAIDERS.
Paris. March 7 German raids on
the Verdun front last niqht were re
puUed by the French, the war office
announce.
CHANCE TO PURCHASE
WHITE FLOUR OFFERED
PUBLIC ON SATURDAY
Chance to buy white flour with
potatoes as the accompanying sub
stitute is offered the public through
the Agricultural Department of the
Fairfield County Association,
whkh has already co-operatively
marketed large quantities of food
products for the benefit of the
public.
By onerinr potatoes in combin
ation with white flour, the need of
buying the ordinary substitute
such as corn meal, rice, barley,
oatmeal or hominy, is done away
with, and the cost of the whole
purchase is reduced, as the cereal
substitutes are for the most part
.considerably more expensive than
wheat flour., r '
The public sale is announced fof
Saturday, beginning at 0 a. m. at
the Agricultural Department's
rooms, 987 Main street.
Deputies Condemn Policy of
Rejecting President's
Proposals.
New York, March 7. Presi
dent Wilson's address to Con
gress early in January, in which
he denned 14 conditions for world
peace, has acted like a leaven in
the political life of Austria-Hungary
and the conditions arc re
verted to over and over again as
a possible or concrete basis for
negotiations, as appears from the
discussion in Austrian newspapers
of the latter part of January, just
received here.
The President's proposals also
have received considerable atten
tion in Germany. The papers there
explain the favorable echo the pro
posals have evoked' in Austria by
saying that the objectionable parts
of the President's address do not
apply to Austria as vitally as they
do to Germany.
Various members of the Aus
trian House of Deputies declared
in the budget committee of that
body that it was a mistake to re
ject the Wilson proposals coolly
and contemptuously. They ex
pressed the belief that even at the
present time it should be possible
to reach an understanding with
the Western powers.
ILL FIRST TIME
IN 102 YEARS,
VETERAN EXPIRES
Leominster, Mass., March 7. Joseph
Bashaw, 102 years old, died here last
night after a sickness of 10 days. Rel
atives said , it was the first time h
had ever been sick. He is survived
by eight children, 3S grandchildren
and 25 great grandchildren.
ELLIS ISLAND
FOR WOUNDED
Washington, March 7 The De
partment of Labor today formally an
nounced the transfer of the Ellis
Island immigration station ' to the
army and navy for shelter of wound
ed soldiers and -sailors.
AUSTRIANS
LOOKING
TO U. S.
SUES 2 AUTO DRIVERS
BECAUSE OF COLLISION
HUGHES ASKS $10,000 AND BRINGS ACTION AGAINST DRIV
ER OF MACHINE;.LN" WHICH
OPERATOR OF AUTO
Unusual conditions are presented in a suit in the Superior
court before Judge William M. Maltbie and a jury in which
Frank J. Hughes, former president of the- board of assessors,
asks damages of $10,000.
INDICT WILLIAh
THOMAS AND PAL;
MURDER CHARGED
Thursday, March 7
Arraigned before Judge John P.
Kellogg in the Superior court late
yesterday afternoon following their
indictment for murder in the first de
gree William (Baby Doll) Thomas
and Jacob (Texas) Hawkins, pleaded
not guilty, and were remanded to jail
to await trial at a later term of court
Their arraignment practically con
cluded the business of the February
term of the Superior court, but in
stead of adjournment without day the
court took' a recess. This will allow a
laier session for any purpose between
now and the opening of the May term
in case necessity should arise.
Thomas and Hawkins were before a
grand jury yesterday and after the
testimony of L. E. Evans, a civil en
gineer, Medical Examiner Garlick,
several of the habitues of the. Key
stone club4 and policemen who were
called to suppress the riot which broke
out there January 6, a true bill charg
ing murder in the first degre for the
death of Norris Pannill of Golden Hill
street, was returned.
Immediately after .the presentment
had been made to the court the two
prisoners were put to plea, said "Not
Guilty" and were remanded to jail.
Pannill was shot the morning , of
Sunday, January 6, after trouble had
arisen at the club over a complaint to
the polios that he had been fleeced in
gambling game and thrown from
the place. Sergeant James Burns and
other policemen were sent to the club
in Water street, were refused admit
tance, and shots were fired. Pannill
was hit in the iback by a bullet, but
ran to Gilbert street before he col
lapsed. Reinforcements were called for by
the police, nearly the entire force of
men on duty and many firemen were
sent to the club, and after a siege of
several hours, during which many
shots were fired on both sides, the
frequenters of the club surrendered.
Pannill died of his wound.
Coroner John J. Phelan, who con
ducted" an exhaustive investigation,
held Thomas and Hawkins criminally
responsible for the deaf of Pannill.
Thomas and Hawkins may be tried
for murder at the May term of court.
It is not considered that Thomas ac
tually fired the shot which killed Pan
nill, but there was much testimony
before the coroner that he urged re
sistance to the police and urged oth
ers in the club at the time to shoot.
YANKEE COLONEL
TAKES PRUSSIAN
LIEUT. ALONE
With the American Army in France,
Wednesday, March 6 (By the As
sociated Press) An American staff
colonel while with a French raiding
party for the purpose of obtaining in
formation a few days before his men
took up their positions in the new
American sector on the Lorraine front
met-a Prussian lieutenant in an enemy
trench and captured him. The colonel
with an American captain brought the
Prussian officer back to the lines that
the Americans now are occupying.
The German raid in this new sector
occurred onN Monday night, a sharp
fight taking place in which the Ger
mans suffered a repulse with losses.
In it a unit which was among the most
recent arrivals displayed the custom-
ary American ngnting energy ana ap
parently gave the enemy a much
warmer reception than he expected.
The American troops here are train
ing with French troops, as at the
Chemin des Dames position. This
makes the third American force now
facing the enemy.
During several days of the Ameri
cans service here the casualties have
been tTaordinarily slight, . as the
eector is one of the quietest.
The lines are far apart and the posi
tion i helai by strong points rather
than by continuous trenches. -
I The Prussian lieutenant's capture
was the first instance of an enemy of
ficer being taken prisoner by the
Americans and also the first occasion
upon which an American officer had
captured either an enemy officer or
a soldier in this sector. -
The first session of Parliament un
der the new Canadian government
was called for Monday, March 13.
HE WAS RIDING AND
WHICH HIT IT. -
Thursday, March 7
He was injured in an automobile
accident May 28, 1915. He is suing
Hugh Keegan, driver of the machine
in which he was riding, and George
Burns, owner of the machine, which
collided with it, alleging negligence
upon the part of both.
The accident happened at Connecti
cut and Central avenues. Others in
the machine with Hughes were
Thomas O'Brien and William F. Rus
sell, assessors, and William G. Dow
ling, clerk of the board.
Hughes was thrown from the ma
chine, striking upon his head, was
unconscious for a time, and was con
fined to the hospital for a considera
ble period. He alleges he suffered a
severe scalp wound, abrasions, and a
severe nervous shock, and that his
health has been impaired.
Among the counsel in the case
are Hon. David Fitzgerald, mayor of
New Haven, who appeared for George
Burns, one of the defendants; Judge
Elmore S. Banks and W. A. Redden,
also for Burns; William W. Bent for
Keegan, and Judge William H. Corn-
ley, Jr., for Hughes.
Among the witnesses who are to
testify in the case is Dr. Diefendorf
of New Haven, an expert in nervous
diseases and a widely known alienist,
who appeared in the trial of Harry
Thaw.
Aubrey E. Fuller, a civil engineer
was the first witness and identified a
map of the location, and made meas
urements. Frank J. Hughes, the plaintiff, then
told his story. He saidQn.themorn
ing of the accident, he with the others
mentioned, was riding south in Cen
tral avenue. Coming near Connecti
cut avenue he saw a macHine driven
by Burns approaching from the west.
The collision followed immediately,
and he remembered nothing more un
til later he recovered consciousness in
the hospital.
There was some difficulty in secur
ing the jury, many objections being
made to the regular panel, and it was
necessary for the sheriff to bring in
talesmen.
rrhe accident excited a great deal
of interest at the time it happened
owing to the prominence of the men
concerned. Hughes had for many
years been a member of the board of
;essors. Keegan is well known in
real estate circles, and Burns is a
member of The Burns Co., contract
ors.
The unusual feature of the case is
including Keegan in the suit and al
leging negligence on his part by a
passenger in the automobile he was
driving.
The defense is a denial of both de
fendants of negligence, and the claim
on the part of Keegan that the ma
chine was under the direction of
Hughes.
CONNECTICUT CO.
MAY CHARGE WAR
TAX ON 'SUB' RUNS
According to official advices receiv
ed from New Haven, the Connecticut
Company has started collecting the
war tax of three cents on their inter
burban trolley line between New Ha
ven and Waterbury. When seen to
day officials of the Bridgeport division
stated that they have received no or
ders affecting the lines out of 'this
city and knew nothing of the New
Haven and Waterbury rule other than
by hearsay.
From what can be learned locally
there is no immediate prospect of the
Conecticut Company collecting any
tax from passengers traveling to towns
surrounding Bridgeport, but if the
fare exceeds 35 cents there is a rea
sonable chance of the tax being col
lected sometime in the future. When
this rule will so into effect officials
ot tne company did not know and up
to this time they have received no
notification regarding the matter from
any source.
CALLS GERMANS
POLITICAL BANDITS
Petrograd, March 7 The central ex
ecutive committee of the soldiers' and
workmen's council, while recognizing
that the German peace terms were
those of "political bandits," has called
on its delegates to the Moscow con
gree to vote for the ratification of the
peace, says the Izvestia, the Bolshevik
organ. This action is advised because
the peace has afforded the Social Rev
olution an "absolutely necessary re
spite." Gov. Edge of New .'ersey, signed
the Hurley boxing -bill providing for
eight-round contests witheight-ounce
gloves. : : .
ARTILLERY
AMERICA'S
Gen. Pershing to Have
Gun Supplies on Un
precedented Scale.
SIX DIVISIONS TO
U. S. ARMY CORPS
Washington Perfects Or
ganization Schedule
for Troops Abroad.
Washington, March 7 Based
on the line method of trench
warfare evolved in France, the
war department, it was learned
today, has approved a plan of
organization which fixes six
divisions as the strength of an
army corps.
Three or more Corps will
constitute a field army and the
immediate purpose of the de
partment is to complete the or
ganization 'of the first field
army in- France in the shortest
possible time to give Gen. Per
shing the strength to hold a
fully "Americanized" sector of
the front.
By the six division army corps plan
each corps will occupy a front sector
with two divisions, while two replace
ment or reinforcement lines of two
divisions each will back them up. The
effect is to produce the line of depth
necessary for the type of warfare
now in prgress.
Replacement troops sent from the
United States are fed into the war
machine in France at the third line.
They move forward in regular order
as tlueir training progresses and ar
rive at front line trenches to fill in
casualty gaps only when they have
been thoroughly seasoned.
To fulfil the functions of an army
corps it has been found necessary to
place under a corps commander, m
addition to his six infantry divisions,
aproximately 30,000 men known ac
corps troops. These comprise artillery
units, engineers ,and all types or ser
vice battalions for work on the com
munication lines of their own corps.
A similar organization of about 120,000
men is necessary for each field army
of three corps. These field army
troops maintain the lines from the ad
vanced base of the army back to the
source of supply. In the case of Gen.
Pershing's forces this line connects
with the ocean transport service.
Included in the corps troops are
many units of heavy artillery equipped
with guns ranging up to 10 and 12
inches in calibre both for fixed em
placement and for mobile artillery.
This comprises the artillery reserve of
the corps. . The great general artil
lery reserve of the field army is un
der direct command of the army com
mander and included in his so-called
aimy troops.
The organization schedules show
Gen. Pershing is to be equipped even
tually with artillery of all calibres on
a scale not heretofore dreamed of. The
proportion of artillery to army , rifles
adopted by the war department is
greater than that of either the Brit
ish or the French army and the tend
ency of the department is to increase
the big guns.
Included in the heavy artillery as
signed to corps or field army com
manders will be whole brigades of anti-aircraft
guns, mobile howitzers of
six eight, 10 and even 12 inch calibre,
rifles of similar size including heavy
long range naval guns and probably,
as soon as they are available batteries
of the monster American 16 inch na
val rifles recently developed. With
this array of guns enemy depots, 20
wniles or more in the rear of his
trenches, couia De Kept under oon
bardment. FRANCIS HOUSED
IN VOLOGDA CLUB
Washington, March 7 Ambassador
Francis reporting to the state depart
ment under date of March 4, said he
was temporarily quartered with the
Siamese and Brazilian diplomats in a
club house placed at their disposal by
the mayor of Vologda. He added that
a few of the Red Cross and publicity
workers were still in Petrograd.
The state department was without
advices of the ambassador's intention
to leave Vologda, but it was pointed
out that any move was dependent on
his own judgment, although it was
not expected that he would leave Rus
sian territory.
A dispatch to the state department
from Sweden said that the British
charge d'affaires accompanied by eight
members of the staff had left Hel
singfors on March 4 for Sweden.
Teutons Take Over
Russian Banks And
Lands
of
LEADER OF SECOND PEACE DELEGATION AS
SERTS REVOLUTION IS ANNULLED BY KAlSr
ER'S TREACHERY TROTZKY SAYS BOL- V
SHEVIKI WOULD DO IT ALL OVER
AGAIN FRANCIS REITERATES
AMERICA'S FRIENDSHIP.
Petrograd, March 7 The Germans have captured Jamburg,
east of Narva, while the Turco-German offensive is continuing
beyond Trebizond, says the Russian official agency today. This
action, adds the statement, is despite the official announcement
by the German high command that hostilities against Russia
have ceased.
The German advance eastward into Russia stopped early
Tuesday, but was resumed during the night on several sectors
in order to allow the Germans to
between Jamburg and Gdoff (east of Lake Peipus and south of
Narva.)
MISTIC
Fortnight Truce Until
Peace Pact is Signed
or. Rejected.
KAISER HAS NOT
PICKED NEW KING
King Ferdinand's Broth
er, a Hohenzollern,
May Take Throne.
Amsterdam, March 7 The
preliminary peace treaty sign
ed on Tuesday evening in Buff
tea, says a dispatch from Bu-
pcharest, stipulated that the
armistice between Rumania
and the Central powers should
run for 14 days from midnight
of March 5 with a period of
three days for denunciation.
Complete agreement as reach
ed between the signatories that
the final peace should be con
cluded within this period on
the basis of the preliminary
treaty.
Premier von Seydler, in announc
ing the signing of a preliminary peace
treaty with Rumania in the Austrian
lower house, said:
"Permit me sincerely to congratu
late the house that by the military
and political co-operation of Austria
Hungary with its faithful allies this
fresh and important stage on the road
to a general peace has been reached."
The statement was greeted with
prolonged cheering.
The dynastic question in Rumania
is an internal one. This declaration
was made by Bafon von dem Bussche
Haddenhausen, under secretary for
foreign affairs, in the reichstag in Te-
ply to observations by other speakers
regarding the future of the Rumanian
throne.
It had been reported from several
sources that Prince William of Ho
henzollern, brother of King Ferdinand
of Rumania, was to succeed Ferdinand
on the Rumanian throne. The pre
liminary peace treaty between Ru
mania and the Central powers, how
ever, makes no mention of any pro
posed change in the Rumanian dyn
asty. PRINCESS CAUSE
OF DUKE'S SUICIDE
Amsterdam, March 7 The mystery
in the suicide of Grand Duke Adolph
Frederick of Mecklenberg-Strelitz is
explained in an official statement from
the ducal house, published in the
Rheinische Westfaelische Zeitung.
The statement says the grand duke
attempted to become engaged to a
German princess but the difficulty in
negotiations for dissolving previous
obligations weighed so heavily on the
grand duke's mind that he ended his
Ue.
FO
R
U MANIA
Peasants
V
reach and consolidate the line .
It is reported in Petrograd that
banks have been reopened the prop
erty of landlords restored" and other
conditions approaching the old regime
revived in towns occupied by the Ger
mans. Petrograd was calm and orderly to
day regardless of the presence of
German troops at Narva, near the
capital, and evidences on all sides of
the removal of war supplies.
To a gathering of workmen's and
soldiers' delegates in Moscow on
Monday M. Prokrovsky, leader of th
second pt-ace delegation in Brest-Li-
tovsk, explained the treaty with the
democratic revolution not to deceive
themselves. ,
The new frontiers traced by Ger
many, M. Prokrovsky declared, c.in-
miiuie a ung o; .nn aro"ncl revolutionary-
Russia. Ke said the Ger
mans were trying to stifle- the revolu
tion, tht conuuests of which w?re le
dllCert tn nntfiinw . :
j UB"
mands of Berlin. The decree na
tionalizing the banks had fallen into
abeyance because the German terms
had the effect of converting the banks
into German concerns. Military evac
uation by Russia of Esthonia, Cour
land and Livonia gave the enemy
full authority in those regions.
M. Zinovieff, president of the Pe
trograd council of workmen's and sol
diers' delegates; M. Zverdloff and
others from Petrograd, addressed to
the conference. They said the
Russiaft representatives were obliged
to sign the peace agreement as a
tactical measure, owing to the situar.
tion brought about by Ukraine in
agreeing to ignominious peace terms.
xne meeting aaoptea no resolution.
fihntiM li QTI.Un.Di.n trn rrftmti
workmen's and soldiers' delegates at
its meeting next week in Moscow fail,
to ratify the peace terms forced on
Russia by Germany, it is not unlikely
that Russia and the United States and
her allies again may Be fighttng
against German imperialism as allies,
although allies in a somewhat re
stricted sense.
Lon Trotzky, the Bolshevik! for
eign minister, granted the Associated
Press an interview at the Smolny in
stitute. Replying to a question whether it
might not be possible for the tradi- i
tional friends, Russia and the United '
States, to continue together to battle ;
He-ninKt fiprmnn nnnressinn should '
peace efforts fail, Trotzky replied: '
"America and Russia today have ,
different aims, but if we have com
mon stations on tne same route i see
no reason why we could not travel to
gether in the same car. Each could
have the right to get off when he
wanted to.
"Until a revolution comes in Ger
man v undmiihtedlv Rn.qRia and Amer
ica have a common road. We are
what wo are and cannot change, and
we do not expect the American gov
ernment to change."
M. Trotzky said . that if the Bol
shevik! could go -hack to the state of
affairs which existed last October, just
before they overthrew the Kerensky
government, they would repeat the
whole program which has been put
through since that time.
'Mn Octobsir we did not exclude the
possibility of a holy war," he de
clared.' "Now we consider such a war
possible. The Soldiers' and Work
men's delegates must now fight for
organization and order."
M. Trotzky was asked whether the
United States might assist in the
process of organization by detailing
to the Trans-Siberian railroaxl the 300
American railroad experts now wait
ing in Japan, and what guarantee the
Bolsheviki could give that goods im
ported in consequence of such assist
ance would not fall into German
hands. He said that if the Russian
government fell into German hands it
could not protect such supplies, but
that all sorts of supplies were being
evacuated from Petrograd.
ITALIAN AEROS ACTIVE.
Rome, Wednesday, March 6 The
Italian and. enemy batteries on im
portant sections of the front have
again become active. The statement
from the war office today also re
ports effective work by Italian airships.
t
4

xml | txt