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The Richmond palladium. (Richmond, Ind.) 1906-1907, May 04, 1906, Image 1

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.ABI
VOL. XXXI. NO. 105.
Richmond, Indiana, Friday, May 4, 1906.
Single Copies, Two Cents.
HARD COAL MINERS
INTEIIO TO STRIKE
President Mitchell Gives Up
Hope of Conciliation and
Outlook Is Bad.
CLARK OWES $100,
DEDICATION OF
HEW HOSE HOUSE
South Siders Entertain People
of City and Formally Pre
sent New Building.
-OP OF THE
OF
GRAFT IN TERRE HAUTE
Ex County Treasurer ef Vigo County
Used Funds for His Own Interests
County Commissioners Will Or
der arr Investigation.
Schillinger Will Offer Places to
C. VV. Merrill, B. B. John
son and J. H. Mills.
nn rrri
TLD
00
MAKE
BOARD
WORKS
V
in'
J
CONVENTION AT SCRANTON
THERE WERE MANY STRIKE
SPEECHES YESTERDAY AND
BREAK WILL COME TODAY OR
SATURDAY.
Publishers' Press
Scran ton, Pu., May 3. The anthra
clty convention now in session will
declare a strike either tomorrow or
Saturday. This is the only Informa
tion that can he drawn from an offi
cial statnient issued tonight by John
Mitchell, president of the Miners'
Union. The statement was made
public after a stormy session today
of the miners' convention, at which
nothing but strike speeches ' were
made. Nothing but the formalities
of organization were expressed at the
first session of the convention today,
but theso were put through with a
rush. Uefore a motion to go Into ex
ecutive session could be made by
any of the minor parlimentarians
two delegates got the floor and made
strike speeches, the last of the two
making a motion that a strike order
be substituted for the suspension
order. It was at this Juncture that a
motion to go Into executive session
was made, and the reporters left the
hall. No secret was made that noth
ing but strike speeches followed,
though no vote was taken.
Take Cue From Mitchell.
After tho convention had organized
at the morning session an adjourn
ment was taken until this afternoon,
when Mr. Mitchell, after stating li
brief what propositions and counter
propositions had passed between the
operators and miners, said signifi
cantly to the convention:
"Your committee has gone as far
as It thought advisable to go, and we
believe further than you Instructed
us to go, in order to avoid suspen
sion of work, and to make contract
for the government of your offalrs for
the coming year. I am sure I voice
the .sentiment of every inember of
the committee, the members of which
have worked in entire harmony dur-,
Ing these months. when I
say that' we regret that we have not
been able to make a tentative agree
ment that would secure for you bet
ter wages and better conditions of
employment."
The delegates were quick to take
the cuo from the chairman's remarks
and In their sneeches on the conven
tion floor said that tlie situation war
ranted a strike. The second delegate
recognized said he was weary of the
endless discussion that has taken
place in the last three months and
he moved that the convention sub
stitute n strike order for the suspen
sion order.
The convention went Into execu
tive session and the motion was with
drawn to permit a :-co discussion of
the situation. Delegates tonight af
ter hearing the statement of John
Mitchell say that it means a strike.
MUST FACE PROSECUTION
John R. Walsh Is Held for Federal
Grand Jury Charged With Mis
appropriating Funds.
Publishers' Press!
Chicago. May 3. John R. Walsh,
former president of the defunct Chi
cago National Bank, was today held
to the Federal grand jury, in bonds of
$30,000, by United States Commis
sioner Mark Footc. 'When Mr. Walsh
appeared before the commissioners,
Assistant United States District At
torney Childs said that the Govern
ment was ready for tho hearing. At
torney Rltscher. for Mr. Walsh, said
that. Inasmuch as the Federal officers
had not yet concluded their Investiga
tion of the statement of facts submit
ted some time ago by Mr. Walsh, and
Inasmuch as the Federal grand jury
will go into session Mav 15, he be
lieved It best for the interests of his
clients that he waive examination.
Commissioner Foote then said that
he could do nothing else than hold
Mr. Walsh to the grand jury, which
was done, the bonds being fixed at
$.10,000. The bonds were at onco fur
nished by Mr. Walsh.
Walsh Is charged with misappropri
ating funds and with several viola
tions of the national banking laws.
CUT BY BARBED WIRE
Small Son of Dempsey Dennis Pain
fully Injured While Playing
With Some Companions.
. While playing with his companions
en North 19th 8trret.Emrsoa Pierson
the eleven year old son of Dempsey
rierson of North Seventeenth street
ran Into a barbed wire fence, cutting
a gash in his neck about an Inch long.
It was a very narrow escape for the
boy as one barb almost entered the
wind pipe. f
Publishers' Pressl
Terre Haute, Ind., May 3. The cit
izens' committee of five which super
vised the examination of county rec
ords by an auditing company, met
this afternoon to adopt its recom
mendations to the County Commis
sioners, based on the report of the
auditing company.
Chairman Rankin says the report
shows that ex-County Treasurer Wil
liam Clark owed the county $78,677.07
when he went out of office December
31. Mr. Rankin says the shortage
still exists, and that what Clark has
paid in since he went out of office was
on the city's account, the county
treasurer also acting as city treasur
er. It is the chairman's impression that
the total shortage Tor the city and
county will amount to more than
$100,000. The city Tias made a con
tract with the same auditing com
pany to get at the facts.
There is also a shortage or a mis
take in the school fund account of
$2S,000. It is not known when the
discrepancy began or if any part of it
was In Clark's terms of office. Prob
ably the commissioners will cause an
investigation to be made. The county
has more than $200,000 school runds
loaned, and on much of it the Interest
has not been collected for years. In
some Instances the Interest charge ex
ceeds the principal.
WILL RECOMMEND
DIVORCE FOR DOKE
Vice Chancellor Pitney Makes
Decision Favorable to To
bacco Manufacturer.
MRS.-DUKE WILL APPEAL
CAPT. HUNTOON THE CORESPON
DENT IN THE CASE MUST PAY
FOR DUKE'S ATTORNEY EVI
DENCE "OVERWHELMING."
Publishers' Press
Newark, N. J., May 3. James B.
Duke, of the American Tobacco Com
pany, won his first round in his suit
for divorce against his wife this after
noon when the Vice-Chancellor Pit
ney, at the conclusion of the evidence
for the defendant, announced that he
considered the allegations of the
plaintiff charging Mrs. Duke with im
proper relations with Captain Frank
T. Huntoon, of the Old Guard of New
York, proven and stated that he
would recommend that the divorce de
cree be granted.
Testimony In the case has been ta
ken for two weeks and this afternoon
after a number of witnesses had testi
fied as to the location of the Duke
home in New York and attempted to
refute the evidence of the witnesses
that had testified against Mrs. Duke,
counsel for both sides decided to sub
mit the case without argumemnt.
An Admission of Guilt.
The court immediately announced
Its decision, the Vice-Chancellor hold
ing that the evidence was "over
whelmingly in proof of the charges
made by the complaint." He stated
that In his opinion the failure of
either Mrs. Duke or Mr. Huntoon to
appear in court and testify was pure
ly an admission of guilt.
It Is announced that the case will
be appealed and it is understood that
counsel for the defendant will cite
the recent decision of the supreme
court of the United States regarding
non-residence, and will allege that
neither of the parties to the suit
were legally residents of New Jersey.
Huntoon Must Pay.
After the court had concluded Mr.
Lindabury said that Inasmuch as Mr.
Huntoon was a party defendant, he
should be held for the cost of the
court as well as counsel fees, where
upon the Vice-Chancellor said that he
had consulted the chancellor in the
matter and signed an o"der to that
effect. He allowed Mr. Duke's coun
sel $3,000. which must be paw by
Huntoon.
WEATHER INDICATIONS.
Temperature May 3, 19C5.
Morning 63
Noon 73
Night 74
Temperature, May 3, 19C6.
Morning 48
Noon 63
Night 56
Indiana Fair and colder Friday;
Saturday, fair; brisk northwest winds.
Ohio Fair Friday, except showers
along the lakes; brisk to high south
west shifting to northwest winds; Sat
urday, fair and cooler.
SEVERAL HUNDRED ATTEND
HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY
MAKES FAST RUN FOR CRG.'D
AND ENDS UP CRASHING INTO
HORSE AND BUGGY.
Hundreds of people visited the new
South Side Hose House at Its dedica
tion last evening and attended one of
the most successful public gatherings
of its kind that has ever been held in
this city. From early in the evening
when Judge Luther Abbott and
Adolph Blickwedel made a few re
marks to the large crowd, until mid
night, the lower rooms and the dance
hall were thronged with people and
the many attractions presented drew
big sums of money.
The members of the South Side Im
provement Association have been
busy preparing for the event for sev
eral weeks, and its success more than
equalled their best hopes. People
from all over the city, representative
business men and others, visited the
new Hose House and found the build
ing to be perfect in its appointments.
It is undoubtedly the most conven
iently arranged Hose House in the
city and it has all modern appliances.
The front part was used last evening
as a place for the speakers' stand and
for the crowd to gather. In the rear
6t the building, there were rival
stands, where a wl;el of fortune was
operated and small prizes awarded.
There was also a country store, work
ed on a similar plan. There was also
a stand with refreshments in this part
of the building.
Successful Dance.
Upstairs, a part of the, floor had
been converted into a dance hall and
many couples enjoyed this form of
amusement to the music of an excel
lent orchestra, composed of Richmond
men. The dance was informal and
very successful.
In the hose house, there is room for
two wagons and four horses, so that
another complete equipment can be
tdded later wjthout inconvenience.
The new wagon is expected to arrive
on May 20 and the Hose House will
probably be in operation within ten
days of that time.
Box 23, at Eighth and E streets.was
rung in last evening at about 10:30
and the complete fire department re
sponded. An accident to a rig hitch
ed at the curb on South E street mar
red the effectiveness of the fast "run"
as the crowd gathered to see what had
happened to the buggy. The Hook
and ladder wagon was going at such
a rate of speed that it could not be
brought to a stop and in order to keep
from running it into the crowd, the
driver allowed his team to crash into
a buggy belonging to Charles Red
dinghaus. The wheels on the right
side of the buggy were smashed, but
otherwise the rig was not damaged.
The horse was uninjured. .
TREATED "SCANDALOUSLY"
Mrs. Josephine Kendall Testified
That Thomas Wiggs Mistreated
Her at Fountain City.
For the first time this month, the
petit jury of the April term convened
yesterday to hear the assault and bat
tery case of State vs. ThomasWiggs,
a resident of Fountain City. The rros
ecuting witness was Mrs. Josephine
Kendall who testified that Wiggs
"mistreated her scandalously" when
she went to tell him to vacate a
house belonging to her and which she
had rented to Wiggs for a short time.
Wiggs was defended by Attorney
Robert L. Study. The prosecuting wit
ness alleges Tiat He struck her,
knocked her down and struck her re
peatedly while she was in that posi
tion. She claims she Is still suffering
from the Injuries which she sustained
in her encounter with Wiggs. The
jury took the case n- a few minutes
before four o'clock and as no verdict
was ready before seven o'clock last
night, none will be received until this
morning.
Sousa Objects to Bill.
Publishers' Press
Washington May 3. Opponents of
the Bennett bill, allowing the circula
tion of copyrighted music for a rental
price, were heard by the House Com
mittee on patents today. A telegram
was read from John P. Sousa, the
bandmaster, protesting agains the
passage of the bill as operating to
withdraw the protection of the law
from the product or the American
brain.
Watson Did Not Vote.
Publishers Press
Washington, D. C. May 3. On the
final vote on the free seed question
Representative Brick was the only In
diana member who voted to discon
tinue the appropriation for seeds. The
following members of the delegation
were recorded as not voting: Foster,
Holliday, Overstreet, Watson, Cro
mer, and Zenor. The last three were
out of the city.
SoUTKAJIBRlOk J
Uncle Sam I hope the Pan-American Congress will help do the business, both In business and in good will.
News Item It is expected that the Pan-American Congress to be held at Rio Jeneiro this summer will
prove very beneficial to all concerned.
HARRY HARRIS IS
NOW IH RICHMOND
Looks Anything but the Des
perate Criminal That He
Has Been Pictured.
HIS MISSION UNKNOWN
CAME HERE FROM HAGERSTOWN
AND WENT IMMEDIATELY TO
SEE MRS. LOCKE IN WEST
RICHMOND.
Harry Harris, cousin and partner
of the notorious John Locke, and who
was released from custody at Mat
toon, 111., a few days ago because he
turned state's evidence and gave out
much valuable information in regard
to the robbing of freight cars on the
Big Four Railway, is in Richmond,
and aside from the fact that he arriv
ed last evening and went at once to
see Mrs. Locke, who is staying with
her father on Chestnut street, noth
ing is known about why he is here or
what his intentions are.
Harris was seen last night and re
fused point blank to discuss himself
or Locke. "I am not talking," was
all he would say, and to each question
he would laugh and shake his head,
but would make no statement. He
would not tell where he came from,
or when he came; how he happened
to be free or why he wanted to see
Mrs. Locke. All questions concern
ing the Locke case were fruitless and
were turned aside with such cunter
questions ,as, "What is the population
of Richmond?" or "Are there many
factories here?"
At Hagerstown Yesterday.
Supt. Bailey, of the police force, re-,
ceived word yesterday morning from
Hagerstown, that Harris was in that
town and the marshall there wanted
to know what to do with him, not
knowing that he had been released.
Bailey informed the authorities that
Harris was his own master and could
go wherever he pleased. Last even
ing at six o'clock. Bailey met Harris
on the Doran bridge. He exchanged
a few words with the man whom he
had accompanied across the continent
less than a month ago and made ar
rangements to have a talk with him
in the evening. At nine o'clock Har
ris went to the City Building and talk
ed wtih Sheriff Smith and Supt. Bailey
for nearly an hour .
Harris looks none of the criminal
but has instead, a rather boyish, in
nocent appearance. He is about
twenty-five years of age, medium
height, and' has a light complexion.
On the road from San Francisco to
Chicago, Harris made life miserable
for Locke by always trying to let peo
ple know that they were under arrest,
and in the dining car, he would man
age to make the handcuff chain rattle
so that other passengers would look
up and see the two men chained to
gether. Harris would then laugh and
Locke would bow his head so that
people could not see his face.
Lorenzo Clark Dead.
Lorenzo Clark well known in this
city died suddenly at Detroit, Michi
gan last night. The cause of his death
was not learned.
PEOPLE BECOMING WISER
TAKE ADVANTAGE OF LAWS
More Take Advantage of the Mortgage
Exemption Law in County This Year
Than Ever Before Amount Reach
ed Nearly $9C0,000.
Between $800,000 and $900,000 in
property have been exempted from
atxation in Wayne county during the
past few weeks by the 1,732 affidavits
of mortgage indebtedness, that have
been filed with the County Auditor
and with the notaries throughout the
county.
Three hundred more affidavits were
filed this year than last, which means
that more people are learning of the
workings of the law in regard to the
taxation of mortgages. In order to
help the poorer classes, a law was
passed by the State Legislature mak
ing mortgaged property partially ex
empt from taxation when the person
who has mortgaged it filed an affida
vit with the auditor or with a notary
to such effect.
IN SMI FRANCISCO
Temporary Quarters Are Fit
ted Up and Good Volume of
Business Transacted.
HEAVY RENT DEMANDED
RESIDENCES FIT FOR HABITA
TION ARE BEING HELD FOR
PRICES SEVERAL TIMES THEIR
NORMAL VALUE.
Publishers' Press
San Francisco, May 3. When the
banks of the city closed the doors of
their temporary quarters this after
noon, the officials were well satisfied
with the volume of business that had
been transacted under difficulties.
The banks reopened this morning, un
der an agreement reached yesterday
whereby deposits were received sub
ject to immediate check for any
amount up to the limit deposited.
These accounts are all marked special
so far it has been deemed unwise to
open the vaults of the larger financial
institutions and the books and money
still in them will not be available un
til Monday or Tuesday of next week.
However, it was felt that the mer
chants should be given an opportu
nity of transacting business and the
scheme was developed and it Is work
ing well. Regular banking business
will be continued next week In the
temporary quarters secured and this
announcement has greatly cheered
all classes.
Abundance of Cash.
There Is an abundance of cash on
hand among most of the merchants
whose places of business were des-
( Continued on Page Three.)
REOPENED
ATTEMPTS LIFE
CUP OF LYE
John A. Rider on Verge of
Death from.Rash Act Com
mitted Yesterday.
AN INVALID FOR A YEAR
THROAT ,MOUTH AND STOMACH
OF UNFORTUNATE MAN ARE
FEARFULLY BURNED AND HIS
DEATH IS PROBABLE.
After several unsuccessful attempts
to take his own life, John A. Ridar,
252 South West Second street, early
yesterday morning swallowed nearly
a tin cupful of concentrated lye and
water, and is now on the verge of
death, with no hope of recovery. Ill
health, which for the past year has
made him an invalid, is assigned- as
the cause for his rash act.
Mr. Rider a., oke early yesterday
morning before any of the other mem
bers of the family were awake and
went to the kitchen. He took a can
of Red Seal Lye and shook a quantity
of it into a tincup. He then added
water and drank the mixture. His
wife heard his staggering " in the
kitchen and ran to see what was the
matter. She found that he had drunk
the poison and imriediately called for
a doctor, who arrived at about seven
o'clock.
Try To Save His Life.
Most of the day was spent working
with the sick man, who continually
begged to be allowed to die, as he was
tired of life and wanted to be dead.
Late in the afternoon he was resting
better, but the poison has completely
destroyed the tissues of the throat,
mouth and stomach and deatliis inev
itable. His face also was badly
burned as a result
Mr. Rider was employed at the Rob
inson & Co. shops as a coremaker be
fore he became sick, about a year ago.
Last winter he made several attempts
to end his life and was being closely
watched by members of his family to
see that he did not do himself harm.
He has a wife and three children,
Frank, Jesse and Clara.
F0RAKER CALLS IT OFF
Ohio Convention Will Not Spring
Presidential Boom for Senator
Just Now..
Publishers' Press
Columbus, O,, May 3. Friends of
Senator Foraker here announce that
the Senator has decided that the pro
posed resolution Indorsing his candi
dacy for the presidency shall not be
offered at the coming State conven
tion. Senator Foraker was advised
that there was sure to be some oppo
sition to the resolution and It might
fail of adoption. In any event it would
cause unpleasantness in the conven
tion. The Senator's attitude on the
railway rate bill is not all satisfac
tory to his constituents.
WITH
MANY DISAPPOINTED ONES
IT IS SAID THAT ALU OTHER AP
POINTMENTS WILL BE DEMO
CRATIC WITH THE EXCEPTION
OF ONE OFFICE.
Mayor-elect - Schillinger, according
to a Democrat of prominence in the
councils of the party in Richnutid, has
about decided upon the make-up of a
part of his official family. It is as
sarted that the number of Democrats
who would like a slice of the Demo
cratic pie that will be cut in Richmond
on the morning of September 1, next,
are so numerous that even the most
consistent wielding of tho pie knife
will not provide enough to feed tho
hungry.
The Board of Public Works, as de
cided upon by Mayor-elect Schillinger,
and his close advisers, is as follows:
B. B. JOHNSON.
CLIFTON W. MERRILL.
JOSEPH H .MILLS.
Messrs. Johnson and Merrill are the
Democratic appointees and Mr. Milla
is the Republican. It is the under
standing that the first two have ac
cepted the offers of places on the
board. Mr. Merrill was chairman of
the City Democratic committee during
'apt Municipal campaign. Mr.
Johnson Was formerly a Republican,
though with such independent tenden
cies that he finally jumped out of the
party and became a full-fledged Inde
pendent. He is understood to have
been an ardent supporter in his sec
ond term and was a Farkerite during
the last National campaign. He was
a supporter of Dr. Schillinger and was
the presiding officer at the Democrat
ic convention which nominated him
for mayor.
It is asserted that the Republican
place on the board of works was first
offered to John J. Harrington, who de
clined the honor. It is not known
whether or not Mr. Mills has accept
ed. The city attorneyship, city engineer,
street commissioner, chief of fire de
partment, superintendent of the cre
matory and the city health board .
members have all bee decided upon,
nccording to the Democrat to whom
the Palladium talked last night, but'
as to who these appointees are has
not leaked out. It Is stated, howev
er .that with one exception none of the
present incumbents will remain.
COFIWIN SPEHCER
DIES SUDDENLY
Noted Speculator Stricken
While Watching a Stock
Ticker at St. Louis.
WORLD'S FAIR DIRECTOR
DECEASED WAS PROMINENT IN
ST. LOUIS EXPOSITION BEING
THIRD VICE PRESIDENT OF
THE ASSOCIATION.
Publishers' Press
St. Louis, May 3. Corwln IL Spen
cer, known throughout the country as
a most daring speculator and one of
the wealthiest men !n St. Louis, died
at 4:31 p. m. Thursday in a room at
the Planters Hotel of acute Indiges
tion. The noted capitalist and broker
was stricken at 1:45 p. m., while
watching the stock ticker In the of
fice of Bartlett, Frazer and Carring
ton. Uttering a cry which startled the
members of the firm. Spencer pitched
forward from his seat. He soon re
covered sufficiently to say that he was
very 111. He declared he was too weak
to be taken home. A cot was sent for
and he was carried to a room In the
hotel. Spencer became unconscious
soon after being carried to the room
and remained so to the end.
The news of Spencer's death came
as a great shock to his business asso
ciates. He was on the floor of the
Merchants Exchange In the forenoon
apparently in the best of health.
Spencer was very prominent In the
direction of the world's fair. He held !
the office of third vice-president and
was chairman of the commimttee on
ceremonies. He was about 50 years
old. His Washington Avenue home,
built a few years ago at a cost of
$160,000 is considered the finest rest
dence In St. Louis.
i

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