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The Richmond palladium. (Richmond, Ind.) 1906-1907, May 19, 1906, Image 8

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The Richmond Palladium Saturday, May 19, 1906-
PHYSIOLOGIES ARE
CHEAPER III OHIO
School Books Bought for Less
in Buckeye State Than
They are Here.
AN EXPLANATION GIVEN
PRESIDENT KELLY A MEMBER OF
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
TELLS HOW THIS HAPPENS TO
BE THE CASE.
Conn's physiologies, adopted by the
State Board of Education, this week,
for use In the schools of this sfte for
jthe next five years, sell at a lower
price In Ohio than in Indiana. The
contract for furnishing physiologies
wag let to SIver, Burdette & Co., of
Chicago, at 30 cents each for the pri
mary books and 50 cents each for the
advanced books.
In Ohio the contract price for the
game books it 27 cents for the primary
and 45 cents for the advanced. There
is a law in Ohio which provides that
the contract price of any school book
shall not be higher than 25 per cent,
below the catalogue price as shown by
the published list of the publisher.
The list price of Conn's primary phys
iology, is 35 cents, and that of the ad
vanced books 60 cents. Deducting
25 per cent, from these prices, the
contract price in Ohio is reached. In
Ohio the greight and other charges
for transporting the books to the place
of distribution are paid by the school
authorities. . In Indiana this cost is
paid by the publisher, the law provid
ng that he mustt deliver the books. In
this State he is also required by law
,to pay 5 per cent of the cot of distrib
uting the books by the retail dealers,
and the State pays another 5 per cent.
What Pres. Kelly Says.
President Kelly, of Earlham, a mem
ber of the State Board of Education,
was asked whether this matter receiv
ed consideration by the board. "The
board," he replied, "went into that
question very carefully, and it was the
unanimous sense of the members that
taking all things into consideration,
the price at which the books were of
fered to us was just about fhe same as
that at whch they are sold in Ohio or
any other State. We called in the
agents and asked them about the cost
of transportation, and they all seemed
to agree that it amounted to about 5
per cent of the contract price. An
other advantage that the publisher has
in Ohio is that there he gets an im
mediate cash settlement for his books
while in Indana he s obliged to wait
for his money. So we think we are
getting as favorable terms as any
other state."
THE CITY IN BRIEF
mut yfle
Peanut
and U-all-no mints at
Price's.
& f
Stop the White Wagorfe for pare Ice
Union Ice Co. . Otto Rltls. Mgr. tf
You can get swdy; cream at Price's.
Telephone the fcifchmond Steam
Laundry to get youV laundry. tf
,
A box of Prlce'Sk excellent choco
lates will be nice, take with you.
Kibbey &
L Co's
line of Straws is
fine.
t 15-3t
Creme de Menthe
fcii othe
riwn at
other cooling
phosphate drinks dr;
Price's
fountain.
The Union Ice
for Artificial Ice.
Telephones, Home
1. Bell 10R tf
Price s Ice cresn certainly can't be
excelled for qualltA-, eight popular
flavors to select fiom
The finest Itae of Panamas ever
brought to Rlcknrond will be found
this week at Kibbey &. Co's 15-3t
For the best Ice ream sodas, buffa
loes, sundaes ao6 egg chocolates,
.Frlce s is they pjfce.
Palladium Want Ads Pay.
Ban on White Shoes.
Publishers Press
Columbus, Ind., May 18. The
girls of the senior class of the
Columbus high school held a
meeting last evening and decided
to do away with white shoes on
commencement day. White shoes
and white dresses heretofore have
been regarded as necessary at
graduation exercises.
$1 to
Co J
r
Our new Spring Suits Coats extra lonj
shapely shoulders,
The Swellest Suits of the Season
Ill SOCIETY'S REALM
DANCE GIVEN BY RUSH BOWMAN
AND NORMAN CRAIGHEAD WAS
PLEASANT AFFAIR.
Opening Dance Was Given at Jackson
Park Last Night by the Friday
Night Dancing Club Mr. and Mrs.
Dudley Elmer Vill Entertain the
Buzzers This Evening Alice Ca
rey Club Ends Season.
The dance given last evening at
the I. O. O. F. Hall by Rush Bowman
and Norman Craighead was attended
by about sixty young people and the
evening was spent in a delightful
manner. The music ' was furnished
by White and Wilson. Among" those
present were Mr. and Mrs. Charles
Kolp, the Misses Ruby and Ada Kel
ly, Margaret Doan, Virginia Graves,
Esther McKone, Leonora and Viola
Wickemeyer, Marguerite Green, Lou
ise Williams. Electa Henley, Pearl
Hasecoster, Deborah Eedgwlck, Nina
Harris, Ruby Reid, Katherine Rettig,
Edna Bayer, Carolyn Hollingsworth,
Bertha Garver, Florence King, Merle
Bartel, Martha McClelland. Mildred
Gaar, Fannie Jones, Cora Weighman;
Messrs. Frank Bymaster, Wheaton
Tallant, Myron Crane, Robert Tal-
lant, Orba Decker, Kenneth Hlghley,
Roy Dennis, Harry Reid, George Bay
er, Frank LIchtenfels, Donald Graves,
Edwin Wilson, Taylor Schriber, Nor
man Craighead, Lawrence Luken,
Carl Plerson, Walter Craighead. Ray
Marchant, Robert Carter, Elmer
Dickinson, Stanley Schaefer, Howard
Hunt, Tom Kaufman, Rush Bowman,
Harry Frankle, Robert Crane. Carl
Meyers, Wales Gaston, Munroe Vor-
hees, Wilbur Hasemier,- John Clem
ents and Tom Campbell.
The opening dance of the season
was held last evening at Jackson
Park by the Friday Night Dancing
Club. The music was furnished by
piano and drums and the beautiful
pavllllon looked prettier than ever,
having recently been refitted. The
Friday Night Dancing Club will meet
every two weeks at Jackson Park
throughout the summer months.
-X- .
The members of the T. M. R. Club
a high school organization, held a
bam dance last evening east of the
city. The ,young people spent a mer
ry evening. The trip to and from the
barn was made in a hay wagon. Re
freshments were served and old fash
ioned country dances were danced.
All the fraternities at Miami Milll-
tary Academy, Germantown, O., will
give a fraternity dance Friday even
ing of next week. The Messrs. Robert
Carter, Earl Henley, George Bayer
and Dudley Cates of this city will
probably attend. The first three
young men were formerly students
at this institution.
Mr. and Mrs. Dudley N. Elmer will
entertain the members of the Buzzers
Club this evening at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. G. R. Williams, East Main
street. The evening will be spent at
whist.
v-
A social will be given this evening
in the parlors of the dormitory of
Earlham College and besides the stu
dents several young people from this
city will attend. The evening will be
spent at games and in a social man
ner. Refreshments will be served.
-K-
MIss Marie Kaufman of this- city
and Miss Irene Wilson of New Cas
tle, who Izzjnerly attended Earlham
College, will attend the annual hop
and banquet which, will be given by
the Beta Theta Phi fraternity at Inj
diana University, Bloomington, dur
ing commencement week.
45-
The Alice Carey Club held its reg
ular meeting of the season Thursday
afternoon at the home of Mrs. Mary
Price, North Fifteenth street. The af
ternoon was devoted to reading and
an impromptu musical program was
rendered. The annual bancuet of the
club will be held some time in June
at the home of Mrs. Charles Ross,
South Thirteenth street.
There will be a duplicate bridge
party at the Country Club on Monday
afternoon at 2:30. Ladles are asked
to arrange for their partners.
Seeks a New Manager.
fPalU.iium Special.
Greenfield, Ind., May 18. The Rev
H. H. Harmon ,who successfully man
aged last year's Chautauqua in this
city, and who was to be in charge this
year, has notified the Federation of
Women's Clubs, under whose auspic
es the Chautauqua will be held, that
he will be unable to serve: He has
accepted a call to the First Christian
church, Lincoln, Neb.
Palladium Want Ads Pay.
$1
wide trousers.
SOCIETIES ASK
GOVERNMENT AID
City's Missionary Workers
Want Aid for Sufferers in
Congo Free State.
PETITION THE PRESIDENT
STUDY OF CONDITIONS IN AFRI
CA HAS SHOWN RICHMOND WO
MEN THAT HELP IS NEEDED
FROM THE OUTSIDE.
After spending several weeks in the
study of social and religious condi
tions in Congo. Free State, Africa, the
members of .the different missionary
societies of the Richmnd churches
have found that affars in that part of
the world need great attention and are
now petitioning the United States,
through President Roosevelt, to give
some aid to the stricken state.
Investigation of the way the natives
are treated in Central Africa has
shown that they are held in an op
pressed state and are frequently
slaves. The government and chance
for the advancement of religion is
poor, and for these reasons the socie
ties here think that something should
be done by the United States.
Those Signing Petition.
The-petition which was sent to.
President Roosevelt, was as follows:
Richmond, Ind., May 18, 1906.
To the President of the United States,
Hon. Theodore Roosevelt, Washing
ton, D. C:
Dear sir: The Women's Foreign
Missionary Societies of the Churches
in the City of Richmond, Indiana, re
spectfully request your influence in
bringing about a better state" of af
fars in the Congo Free State, Africa.
We earnestly petition that something
be done for the oppressed natives
there.
The organizations making the re
quest are as follows:
Women's Foreign Missionary Soci
ety of Friends' Church, Mrs. Marvel,
president, 180 members.
Women's Foreign Missionary Socie
ty of First Presbyterian church, Mrs.
Winchester .president, 63 members.
Women's Foreign Missionary Socie
ty of Second Presbyterian church,
Mrs. Overman, president, 35 members.
Women's Foreign Missionary Socie
ty of United Presbyterian church,
Mrs. Scott,, president, 54 members.
Women's Foreign Missionary Socie
ty of First English Lutheran church,
Mrs. Nusbaum, president, 76 mem
bers.
Women's Foreign Missionary Socie
ty of Second English Lutheran church,
Mrs. Knollenberg, president, 12 mem
bers. '
Women's Foreign Missionary Socie
ty of German Lutheran church, Mrs.
Klopp, president, 75 members.
Young Ladies' Society of German
Vutheran church, Miss Klue, presi
dent, 80 members.
Women's Foreign Missionary Socie
ty of Front Street Lutheran church,
Mrs. Feeger, president, 500 members.
Women's Foreign Missionary Socie
ty of First Methodist church, Mrs. Ew
ing, president, 47 members.
Women's Foreign Missionary Socie
ty of Grace Methodist church, Mrs
Kelley. president, 60 members.
Women's Foreign Missionary Socle
ty of Fifth Street Methodist church,
Mrs. Hill, president, 25 members.
Women's Foreign Missionary Socle
ty of Christian Church, Mrs. Wilson,
president, 72 members .
Women's Foreign Missionary Socie
ty of Episcopal church, Mrs. Test,
president, 15 members.
Women's Foreign Missionary Socle
ty of Baptist church, Mrs. Firth, pres
ident, 75 members.
Members Wesleyan Methodist
church (colored") Rev. J. R. Harvey,
pastor, 55 members.
Total members 1,424.
In behalf of a delegated committee,
PHARIBA W. STEPHENS,
Chairman.
D0WIE AGAIN DENIES GUILT
Ex-Leader of Zion Challenges Voliva
While Standing at His Daugh
ter's Grave.
Publishers' Presn
Chicagq, May 18. John Alexander
Dowie is again calling for the written
charges which Volva a month ago
promsed he would make public as
soon as he was convinced the first
apostle was sufficiently strong to en
dure the shock.
Standing at the grave of his daugh
ter, Esther, Dowie denied in the most
solemn fashion that he had been
guiljy of immorality. Accompanied
by his wife and fifty followers, Dowie
had driven to the graveyard, where
he placed Easter lilies on his daugh
ter's grave.
rs
Nyide coiia
WEDDING WAS SURPRISE
FATHER KNEW NOTHING
Miss Oda Kemper Was So Quietly
Married to fra Pierce That Her
Parents Knew Nothing of it No
Objections Just a Surprise.
Thursday afternoon Miss Oda Kem
per, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ad
am Kemper of South Fourteenth
street, was quietly married to Mr. Ira
Pierce, who is a brakeman on the
Richmond division of the Pan Han
dle. The ceremony was performed
by tite Rev. Joseph Beck at the Trini
ty Lutheran church parsonage on
South Seventh street, where Mrs.
Lillian Beck, the bride's sister makes
her home.
So quiet were the plans for the
wedding kept by the young couple
that not even the brides parents were
aware of her marriage, until several
hours after the ceremony had been
performed. Mrs. Lillian Beck did not
know her sister contemplated matri
mony until she and Mr. Pierce pre
sented themselves at the parsonage
Thursday afternoon and asked the
Rev. Mr. Beck to unite them in mar
riage. After the ceremony Mr. and
Mrs. Pierce left for Middletown, O.. to
visit the parents of the groom. Yes
terday they left Middletown for a
short visit in Chicago.
It was reported Thursday evening
that Miss Kemper and Mr. Pierce
had been quietly married and a Pal
ladium reporter asked Mr. Adam
Kemper to confirm the story. He stat
ed that he knew nothing of the mat
ter, adding with a smile that he
would know if anyone did. Mr. Kem
per then told the reporter that the
wedding of Miss Mattle Kemper,
which took place the same evening,
was probably the grounds for the
story that his daughter was married.
Yesterday afternoon Mr, Kemper met
the same reporter on the street and
"owned up" that his daughter had
stolen a march on him. Mr. Kemper
said he had no objections to the
match but could offer no reasons why
the wedding was made a surprise
affair.
NEW MOVE BY TRACTIONS
GET ENTRANCE TO CHICAGO
Indiana Men, It is Asserted, Buy Cal
umet Line For Syndicate Controll
ing nldiana Roads Will be Rushed
to Completion.
According to dispatches yesterday
the Philadelphia syndicate, which
controls the traction lines of Indiana
has obtained entrance to Chicago for
Its electric cars. The dispatches say
that George R. McCullough and Hor
ace C. Stilwell, acting for the syndi
cate have bought the Calumet car
line, which extends from Chicago to
Hammond and that arrangements
have been completed whereby inter-
urban cars brought into Chicago over
the Calumet line may connect at Sixty-ninth
street with the elevated road
and proceed to the heart of the busi
ness district of the city.
For years the syndicate operating
traction lines in this State and Ohio
has sought to gain entrance, to Chi
cago, but strong opposition to suf
face tracks have barred Indiana in-
terurbans from the city. This objec
tion seems to have been overcome by
the arrangement to use the "L" road.
It is now thought the syndicate
lines originally projected from vari
ous points to Chicago will be rushed
to completion and that among these
the Indiana Union Traction system
will be extended from LogansDort by
way of Rochester and North Judson.
MAYORS DISCUSS LAWS
Five of Them Favor Minor Changes
in the Cities and Town Act.
Palladium Special.
Logansport, Ind.. May 18. Al
though there are eleven cities of the
fourth class in the State, only five
of them were represented at the,
meeting of mayors in the office ' of
Mayor deorge P. McKee, of Logans
port Thursday afternoon and. evening.
Those present were Field Sweezey, of
Marion; F. C. Miller, of Michigan
City; George E. Greene, of Vincennes
M. A. Brouse, of Kokomo, and Mc
Kee, of Logansport.
Mayor McKee is president of the
association , which the maj'ors have
formed, and he presided at the meet
ing. They discussed in a general way
the new cities and towns law under
which their administrations are now
working, and In some particulars ex
pressed themselves in favor of chan
ges, although as a whole they are
well pleased with the workings of the
law.
YOUS
Our
and lapels,
i1ere
803 MAIN ST.
TO RETAIN Ai
ENLARGE PLANT
Light Committee Holds Meet
ing to Prepare a Favorable
report for Council.
NEW UNIT RECOMMENDED
DETAILED ACCOUNT OF THE VOL
UMINOUS REPORT NOT GIVEN
OUT THE COMMITTEE VIEWS
PLANT AND NEEDED LAND.
The general committee appointed to
investigate the condition of the Mu
nicipal Light Plant, met yesterday af
ternoon at 2 o'clock at the city build
ing. Before any business was trans
acted, the committee, at the sugges
tion of the Board of Public Works, vis
ited the city plant and while there
made a thorough investigation of its
condition, which they found to be ex
cellent. The land on the river front
which is owned by the" Richmond
Light, Heat & Power company, and
which the city desires to secure for
dumping purposes, was looked at by
the committee and it is believed that
they will advise that this Vnd be se
cured. Not long ago the city began
condemnation proceedings for this
property and the Light, Heat and
Power company finally made a prop
osition to the city to sell the land for
$1,000. Up to the present time no
action has been taken on this offer. It
is probable that council will be asked
in the near future to appropriate this
sum so that the city can control it in
fee simple. f
Go Over the Reports.
After the inspection of the Munici
pal plant the committee returned to
the city buildng and the report of the
sub-committee, which will be present
ed to council at its meeting Monday
night was gone over and approved.
The reports of Prof. Mathews, who in
spected the plant, and E. G. McMahan,
the accountant, who audited the books
of the city plant, will be embodied in
this report. The exact nature of this
report is still kept a secret, but one
of the members of the committee stat
ed yesterday that it will be one of the
most interesting documents ever pre
sented to council, aitl will show the
Municipal plant to be in a splendid
condition. The advisability of retan-
ng the plant wll be strongly empha
sized. The report covers every fea
ture of the investigation and is of
great length. A new unit, which the
Board of Public Works greatly de
sires, will be recommended.
In short the report will be to retain
the plant and to enlarge it to meet fu
ture demands.
WAS DECLARED INSANE
ED ELLIOTT'S CONDITION.
Former Cambridge City Resident
Stricken at Logansport and will be
Admitted to Hospital Son of the
Late Calvin Elliott.
Ed Elliott, son of the late Calvin
Elliott of Cambridge City and who
has many Richmond frientfs has be
come unbalanced mentally. The Lo
gansport Reporter says:
An insanity commission sat upon
the case of Ed. Elliott, well known
traveling salesman of this city, Tues
day, and declared him to be of un
sound mind and recommended his
care in the Longcllff asylum.
The case of Mr. Elliott is one most
pitiful. In the very best of health and
Ik
WILL BE
927-929
MAIN -STREET.
9
v
i
I
IK
display will certainly please a man who wishes style and durability at a moderate cost
day 9iu.uu io $io.uu.
Our $15.00 and $16.00 Suits
mm
25 lb, ClotlrtBag Granu
dereta Whekt Food perl
This new brtakfast
foot!
that make Quaker Oat
est wheat anp is the
nt)
food on the market.
Fnce tor the flay per p
la
Dressed Chickens vSnd Turkeys (Youno)
A full line of ftesh vegetables and fruits.
Your patronage appeciated and we will -fill your
Saturday ord( r wiin the best on the market.
PHONE YOUR ORDERS.
J. M. Edgemeyer tn ond Mam sts.
- .1. 4. 4. .j. 4 .4
spirits, he was stricken one day a few
months ago with paralysis while driv
ing and fell from the buggy. He" was
carried home and for weeks lay linger
ing between life and death. At last
he won in the battle for life only to
lose his mentality.
Are your clothes faded? Use Russ
bleaching blue and make them-whlte
again. 10c at all good grocers.
101-3 Richmond Ave.
anner Rue
Let lis again
lerKUg
SAVE YOUR
I I
WE
mm
We mote a specialty of prompt delivery and low
prices, det your rag order in early and then yon
won't hate to wait.
Bann
V
A Saturday Special
d Oak, Weathered
LACED ON SALE SATUR-
DAY, MAfr 19, at 8
I
J n
T lr.
Ml $110
are Particular Favorites.
L!51
ted Sugar .. .. $1.25.
package ..10c.
is made by the people
Made from the choic-
st delicious breakfast
ckage
10c.
i 4 ! Z 4
Durty?th past eight months we have
the most prominent
Richmond
You k
work.
Ask thorn nhmiL nnr
t. Ihn mii1r.nl tirnuptvm
of you
arti.tlo and complete,
Tel. No. 1396
Terabf Concert Quartet
1
... Phone 1879
ana xarpet m
remind you that
ana carper to.
OUD CARPETS
Finish. .
a.m.
FURNITURE,
BEDDING,
PICTURES.
I
-
BriAes of
If vaii vni
5c
I
WIDUP fa
THOMPSON
!
r

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