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The Richmond palladium. (Richmond, Ind.) 1906-1907, September 01, 1906, Image 1

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TE
fflCHMONB PAI
ABIUM
H
VOL. XXXI. NO, 215.
Richmond, Indiana, Saturday Morning, September 1, 1906.
Single Copies, One Cent.
IHSTITUTE WORK
COMESJTO , CLOSE
Jhe Wayne County Teachers'
Annua! Session in Connec
Mon with the Chautauqua
Most Valuable Ever Held.
SUPT. JORDAN AND ALL
THE TEACHERS PLEASED
Yesterday Afternoon Zueblin
Continued His Tearing
Down Process, Attacking
Standing Army and Pension
System.
TODAY'S PROGRAM.
10:30 a. m. Mind Lecture, Hon.
W. H. Sanders.
2:30 p. m. "Domestic Science,"
Mrs. Virginia L. Meredith.
4:00 p. m. Reading "If I Were
King,"
Mrs. Ruth
L.
Hemen-
way.
7:30 p. m. Concert.
8:00 p. m. Stereoptican Lecture
and Moving Pictures on Japan,
K. Morimoto.
c What undoubtedly was the most in-
teresting, the most valuable and there
fore the most successful institute the
Wayne County teachers Association
has ever held, came to Its conclusion
at the Chautauqua grounds yesterday
afternoon. . The presence of two
such able educators as Prof. S. D.
Fess and Prof. Charles L. Zjueblin,
was responsible for the really intel
lectual feast that this year's institute
proved ao be. Not only did the
teachers find the program one of un
usual merit, but other Chautauquans,
a majority of whom are probably pa
trons of the schools in city or county
out ide of the city, were given an in
, eight Into educational matters that
pertain to the schools of today which
had a most wholesome effect.
Teachers Well Satisfied.
Supt. Charles Jordan was delighted
with the Institute and he ajso was
greatly pleased at the warm words
of commendation which came to him
from the teachers themselves. There
was a wide difference between the
work of Prof. Fess and Prof. Zueblin.
The former's excellent, practical and
on the whole. eloquent analysis "of his
tory was much like turning a search
light upon an old and familiar build
ing, the details of which had never
been thoroughly understood until the
light came. Prof. Fess gave a new
meaning to much of .the history that
the teac'iers were - already familiar
"with, and he certainly performed a
most valuable service in his concise
and thoroughly intelligent suggestions
as to the proper methods of teaching
history.
Prof. Zueblin led one into the realms
of thought, whether they cared to
agree with him or not in all that he
had to say. His almost marvelous in
Bight into every phase of society, his
ability to uncover the flaws that most
people have been wholly unconscious
of, and his great sincerity and earn
estness give him a place on the insti
tute platform that probably cannot be
lilled by another educator in the coun
try. Prof. Zueblin's utterances were
In some cases sensational, it has been
declared, but on the whole they were
calculated to awaken people.
Prof. Zueblin on "Justice."
Yesterday afternoon in his closing
lecture. Prof. Zueblin's subject was
Justice," and he made at attack upon
Borne of the political methods that the
masses, he said, were led to believe
were In the cause of Justice. The
'stand pat" policy in anything, Prof.
Zueblin said, was the declaration of an
Immoral leader every time, for it
showed a disposition to not permit an
Issue to be uncovered for investiga
tion. Tha pension system was also
taken up and pretty thoroughly shaken
to pieces, Prof. Zueblin declaring that
if the searchlight of honesty were
thrown upon the pension system it
would reveal a huge scandal one
which would show that there are thou
sands of men not entitled to a penny
from the government who are drawing
pensions. The speaker was careful
(Continued on Page Five.)
ENTHUSIASM IS LACKING
Democrats Couldn't Muster Enough
of Party to Elect Committeemen
and Delegates.
The meeting of Wayne Township
Democrats to elect ward chairmen
and precinct committeemen, which
was called for last night, failed to be
a mature success. In many of the
wards no party members showed up
and In others only two or three were
on hand, so that buciness was post
poed util a later date. -
Dr. Hoover Improving.
Dr. Hoover on South A street is
able to be out and attend to his work
again.
THE WEATHER PROPHET.
INDIANA AND OHIO Fair Saturday;
, showers Sunday; light winds
shifting to fresh southeast. -
A LYNCHING PREVENTED
BY OFFICERS OF THE LAW
Colored Man at Danville, Kentucky,
Assaulted a Five-Year-Old White
Girl and the Citizens Tried to Mob
Him.
Danville, Ky., Aug. 31. The quick
run of officers from Somerset to this
city, prevented the lynching of Perry
Copenhaver, a negro who, it in
charged, committed a criminal assault
on the five-year-old daughter of Leon
ard Fairchild, of Wayne county. The
negro was identified by the victim and
a mob quickly gathered.
He was hustled to Somerset, but the
mob started to that city from Monti
cello, and an order from the county
judge wa3 given for the transfer of
the prisoner to this city. Feeling is
high in Vv'ayne county and the officers
here will take every precaution to pre
vent mob violence.
PHILADELPHIA IS
SEVERELY SHOCKED
Announcement that Late
President Was Embezzler
Causes a Sensation.
RECEIVER EARLE'S REPORT
HE SAYS THAT HIPPE HAD STO
LEN SECURITIES AND THAT HE
MADE LOANS WHICH AMOUNT
ED TO THEFTS.
Publishers Press 4
Philadelphia, Aug. 31. The state
ment of Receiver Earle, of the Real
Estate Trust company of this city,
that Frank K. Hippie, the late presi
dent of the concern, had stolen se
curities valued at 65,000, and that
the lending of $3,000,000 to Adolph
Segal, on insufficient security,
amounted to as much as theft, created
a profound sensation throughout the
city. The revelation was an especial
ly cruel blow to his many intimate
friends, most of whom are prominent
in the Presbj-terian church, either as
clergymen or laymen. So high was
their estimation of the man who ab
horred tobacco and liquor, and re
frained from reading Sunday newspa
pers, that not only the various organ
izations in the Presbyterian church
made the trust company their deposi
tory, but hundreds of members of that
denomination placed their money in
his company. The number of pastors
who used the bank to care for their
savings was exceptionally large.
The criticism heretofore expressed
by depositors of the failure of the di
rectors of the company to discover
Hippie's transactions, has increased
and many of the larger creditors are
angry at what they term the negli
gence of these men. There is now
pending before the local courts an ap
plication for the appointment of a co
receiver, who shall directly represent
the depositors and inform them of the
true condition of the company.
It is alleged several of the directors
had knowledge that some of Hippie s
transactions were unsafe, but they
had such confidence in his integrity
that they did not suspect the true
state of affairs or entertain the belief
that his operations were irregular. It
became known that the employes of
the company were aware there was
something wrong with the accounts.
Several of them went so far as to
leave checks with their fellow em
ployes when they went on vacation,
for an immediate withdrawal of their
deposits if their suspicions were con
firmed. CONTINUE THEIR EFFORTS
TO PREACH ANOTHER YEAR
Colored Ministers Attending Wesley
an Conference Signify Their Wil
lingness to Continue in the Minis
tory of God.
yesterday the Weslyan Conference
was devoted to the final examination
into the characters of the ministers.
All the brethern expressed themsel
ves as willing to contribute their
efforts for another year in religious
work. The remainder of the session
was , e devoted to preaching. Miss
Walker, matron of the Girl's Rescue
Home, Indianapolis, gave an interest
ing talk upon her work in that city
and the success she has met w'th in
rescuing youny girls from dangerous
paths. Fourteen dollars was raised
as a contribution to her work.
T.
WASHINGTON HERE
Richard Carroll, Who Will Lec
ture at Chautauqua, Is
Doing Great Work.
HAS SCHOOL BOR ORPHANS
ELOQUENT NEGRO ORATOR AND
EDUCATOR HAS VIEWS WHICH
ARE PECULIARLY HIS OWN
RACE PROBLEM.
Owing to it being necessary for K.
Morimoto, the Japanese lecturer to
fill an important engagement else
where, Richard Carroll has traded
places with him on the Chautauqua
program. Morimoto will take Car
rols place on the program tonight
and Carroll will speak Monday night
Unusual interest attaches to the
lecture of Mr. Carroll owing to the
work he has done and his views on
the negro problem. Himself a negro
and having been engaged in the ed
ucation of his race, Mr. Carroll is
well Qualified to talk on the most
serious problem now confronting the
American nation. Mr. Carroll is a
second Booker T. Washington. At
Columbus South Carolina he has an
industrial school for destitute negro
orphans, from the ages of one to
thirteen years. This school and farm
is supported and owned by Mr. Car
roll. He now has fifty one children
in his care.
Mr. Carroll made the Palladium a
pleasant visit last night and some
of the views to which he gave ex
presion are both original and highly
valuable. No one should miss Mr.
Carroll whether he be black or white.
The solution which Mr. Carroll will
offer in his ecture for the race prob
em will bear the closest attention of
all.
Few colored men are more pleasing
to talk to and from the press notices
no colored man is a better orator
than Mr. Carroll. He comes North
backed by recommendations of the
leading white men of the South.
An interesting incident which oc
ciirred at Lafayette recently illus
trates the character of Mr. Carroll.
He was refused a glass of soda water
in- a confectionery conducted by a
white man. A leading resident of the
city was anxious to take up the mat
ter and see that a colored man of
Mr. Carroll's standing should get the
treatment bT a white wherever he
went." But Mr. Carroll objected and
went even farther by lecturing to a
gathering of his own people in Laf
ayette and upholding the confection
er. He said that 'he hoped all white
shop keepers would refuse to sell to
the negroes and then colored people
would start stores of their own.
JACKS0NS WILL REUNE
Members of the Family Will Gather at
Jackson Park on Friday, Sep-
tember 7.
Centerville, (Ind., Aug. 31. (Spl.)
The annual reunion of the Jackson
family will be held at Jackson Park
on Friday, September 7. Captain C.
B. Jackson is president. The first
vice president is Caleb J. Harvej', of
Centerville. Mrs. Sadie Jackson
Brannenberg, of Anderson, is Secre
tary. All communications should be
addressed to the secretary.
JACKSON PARK POPULAR
Among the Many Picnics to be Held
There Next Week is that of Cen
terville Rebekahs.
Centerville, Ind., Aug. 31, (Spl.)
Evelyn Lodge, Daughters of Rebe-
kah and their families will have an
all day picnic at Jackson Park next
Tuesday, September 4. The members
of Hoosier Lodge I. O. O. F. and their
families are invited to be present.
MOVED TO INDIANAPOLIS
Elliot Fisher Company Leaves Rich
mond Charles Jamison to Ac-
company Them.
The Elliot Fisher Company, billing
and adding machine agents which
has had its main offices iere for the
past few jears, has moved them to
Indianapolis, from which point the
future business of the concern will be
directed. Charles Jameson, , one of
the attaches of the concern, living
in this city, will accompany the firm
to Indianapolis.
Centerville Services.
There will be special services at the
Friends church for old people to
morrow at 10:30 a. m. The sermon
will be by Folger "Wilson of Richmond.
Serviceswill be held at the M. E.
church tomorrow at 10:30 a. m., and
aa 7:30 p. m. Preaching by the pas
tor, the Rev. E. B. Westhafer.
SECOND
BOOKER
G A DISPLAYS pfc fJj
A Dollar for a Good Piece of News.
Beginning tomorrow the Palladium will again offer a dollar each
week for the best piece of news "tipped off" to it. The rules. and reg
ulations governing this offer are as simple as the A. -B. C's. The
Palladium wants the news. It realizes that no matter how big the
orps of reporters it could, not get all that was going on. Three thou
sand subscribers in all parts of the city and county can hear things
the reporters would never learn. These are the things the Palladium
wants to know. When you hear something that you think , would
make a news item call the Palladium by 'phone, write a postal, or get
word in any manner to this office. You need not write the item, just
give the "tip" Once having the "tip" the reporter will run down the
story. If your "tip" happens to be the best one of the week, you will
get the dollar. If you have an item and don't want your name used
in connection with the prize. It will be withheld. The award of the
prize will be made each week and published in the Monday issue.
The contest begins tomorrow. Try to win the first dollar.
CONTRACT LET FOR
AUTOMATIC SYSTEM
Richmond Home Telephone
Directors Held Important
Meeting Yesterday.
CONDUITS BEING LAID
IT IS THOUGHT THAT THE NEW
SYSTEM WILL BE IN AND
'PHONE BUILDING ERECTED
BY FIRST OF YEAR,
The Board of Directors of the
Home Telephone company met yes
terday afternoon and ratified the rec-
omendation of the Citizens Commit
tee for the installation of the auto
matic system. The Citizens Com
mittee went to Columbus Tuesday
and inspected both manual and auto
matic systems recommending the lat
ter.
The directors made arrangements
at once for closing a deal with a Chi
cago firm for supplying the automa
tic equipment.
Two car loads of conduits arrived
in the city the first of the week, and
work of laj-ing them began Tuesday,
it is estimated that when all of It is
subterred there will be over 25 lin
eal miles in use. Twenty- five miles
of cable, at a total cost of about $25,
000, is to be strung. The estimate
of Supt. Bailey calling for $ 68,000
worth of outside construction work,
was approved by the board of direc
tors. The company sets the first of the
year as the latest date when Rich
mond subscribers may have the op
portunity of using the automatic
system. It is expected that at that
time they will be completely housed
in their new building.
Going East to School.
Miss Florence McGuire, of East
Main street, will have this fall fof
National Park Seminary, where she
will attend school. Miss Marie Camp
bell will return there again.
THINGS THAT COME WITH SEPTEMBER.
NEW HAVEII HOME
OF BRYAN LEAGUE
In Old College Town Boom of
Great Nebraskan is For
mally Launched.
NOMINEE A THIRD TIME
HIS FRIENDS TAKE ADVANTAGE
OF THE PRESENT ENTHUS
IASM TO SECURE HIS NOMIN
ATION IN 1908.
Publishers' Presal
New Haven, Conn., Aug. 31. The
boom of William Jennings Bryan for
President in 190S was formally laun
ched at the Tontine Hotel today. The
meeting was attended by Democrat
politicians, including Ex (Governor
Garvan, of Rhode Island. Mr. Bryan
was present at the meeting and
spoke for half an hour.
What will probably be known as
the Bryan League was formed. Wm.
Kennedy of Naugatuck was made
President. Former National Com
mitteeman J. J. Fitzgerald of Rhode
Island, was elected secretary.
Dr. Crockett of Auburn Maine,
spoke on democratic conditions in
the state.
Ex-Governor Garvan of Rhode Is
land made a strong speech. He said
that this time was a big Improvement
in democratic conditions in Rhode
Island and the outlook for democracy i
was hrisrht. ' "I
Mr. Bryan spoke on the various pol
itical issues and concluded by saying
that it took courage to be a democrat
in New England.
SEVENTH ANNUAL REUNION
Hunter Family Will Gather Near Lynn
Saturday, September 8 Rifle .
Shoot to Be Feaaure.
The. seventh annual Hunter reunion
of Randolph and Wayne counties will
be held In R. T. Chenoweth's grove
one mile East of Lj'nn on Saturday,
September 8, 1906. One of the
amusements of the day will be a rifle
shoot. Norman Anderson i3 presi
dent and O. T. Lewis, secreaary.
LABOR DAY TO BE
QUIETLY OBSERVED
Factories and Stores to Close
and Picnic Is to Be Held
at Beallview
THE REV. KUHN TO SPEAK
GOOD STREET CAR SERVICE
WILL BE PROVIDED AND A
LARGE CROWD IS EXPECTED
BIG BASKET DINNER.
Monday is Labor Day. Richmond
will observe the day well and every
factory In the city, it is understood,
will be closed. Most business houses
will be closed throughout the day,
though some will be open during" the
forenoon. The Labor picnic to be
held at Beallview, under the auspices
of the South Side Improvement As
sociation promises to be a most Inter
esting and successful affair. The
committee in charge of the celebra
tion have their plans well laid and
only a stormy day can interfere ser
iously. There will be excellent pro
vision made to accomodate all per
sons who desire to spend the day
in the grove and a big basket dinner
will be a feature. In the afternoon
there will be an address by the Rev.
T. H. Kuhn. The South Side Im
provement Association desires the
public to understand that everybody
is invited. Good street car service
will be provided. Cars may be taken
at any part of the system, transfering
at Main and Eighth streets for the
south side.
TALES ARE CONFLICTING
IS CHILD A MURDERER
r
While Woman at Clay City, Ind., Vas
In Front of a Telephone Her Head
Was Torn Away by Discharge cf a
Shot Gun.
Publishers' Press J
Clay Cu . Mrs. Kath-
erine Crase was Instantly killed by
the discharge of a shot gun, which
tore away the back of her head. She
was at the telephone and fell in front
of the Instrument, letting the receiver
fall. Her 8-year-old son said he load
ed the gun to hunt squirrels and that
his mother took it from him and went
into the house. He said he was in
the room when she shot herself, bit
later declared that he was in the
yard when the shot was firei and
went inside and found his mother
da
Bond Will Teach.
Archibald Bond who graduated at
Earlham last June will have charge
of the science department at the
PlainSeld Academy this year. The
academy which burned down last
year has been entirely rebuilt at the j
cost of about $12,000 and the coming!
year promises to be a fruitful one as !
an excellent corps of teachers has 1
been engaged, j
STEPS ARE TO BE
TAKEH TO PROVIDE
PAVILIONAT GLEN
Chautauqua Directors to Ap
proach the City With a
Proposition to Erect a Per
manent Place for the Meetings.
WET WEATHER HAS SHOWN
THE NEED FOR BUILDING
Col. Shaw Thinks Fireproof
Suitable, and Attractive Pa
vilion Could be Erected for
$10,000 Profitable In
vestment. It fs an assured fact that within the
next week or so steps will be taken by
the management of the Richmond
Chautauqua to begin a movement that
will result in the provision of a perma
nent Chautauqua building at Glen
Miller, not only to house the Chautau
qua, but to be used for public gat he r
ingfis of other kinds. Every member
of the board of directors of the local
Chautauqua, and every person who has
Interested himself to the extent of in
have provided, recognizes the absolute
need of a pavilion that will offer both
comfort and protection to audiences
during times of storm.
Supt. Jordan Favors It.
Supt. Jordan ,who has been active In
the Chautauqua work by reason of his
oversight of that part of the program
devoted to the Wayne County Teach
ers' Association, said yesterday that
there was no question that the assem
blies could be a much greater success
than now, If it were assured the audi
ences that no matter what the condi
tion of the weather they would bo en
abled to listen to the programs with
out suffering great inconvenience.
Richard Sedgwick, president of the
Chautauqua, is also a strong advocate
of a permanent building. The Asso
ciation is turning approximately $1,
000 each year into the city's treasury
for the use of the park. That sum
represents all profits, for there is not
a member of the association, who is
paid a salary, nor does the organiza
tion itself retain any oi the profits.
The city, it is asserted, could well af
ford to build a pavillion at a cost of
from $10,000 to $20,000 for the returns
each year would net a handsome divi
dend on the Investment.
Opinion of Col. Shaw.
.Col. Shaw, whose knowledge of sucn
things is very extensive, Is of the
opinion that an attractive .and alto
gether suitable pavillion could be
built for $10,000. The structure
would be of steel, primarily, and there
fore fire proof. The directors, it Is
understood, will take up the matter
later on and will likely make a formal
request of the city to build a pavillloa
for next season's assembly.
IS CHARGED WITH THEFT
Charles Steele, of Richmond Avenua,
Arrested Last Night on Charge
of Stealing Chickens.
Charles Steele, 1U Richmond ave
nue, was arrested last night on Infor
mation as to his having stolen two
chickens, which were afterward sold
to B. A. Kennepohl, proprietor of the
Retreat Saloon on North D street. It
was not known last night of whom the
chickens were stolen, but on the In
formation given by Kennepohl. Officer
Bunday made the arrest. The case
will come up this morning in City
court -
Ramsey Pounstone Home.
Ramsey Poundstone, who has be(n
summering at Petoskej', has returned
home. He will take a position In the
editorial department of the Item.
Labor Day Observance.
Mayor Zimmerman's Labor Day
proclamation, issued yesterday. Is
as follows:
Whereas, The laws of the state
cf Indiana pronounce Labor Day
as a legal holiday and the Gover
nor of the state has seen fit to is
sue a proclamation setting forth
the meaning of the day, I request
that in as far as possible all busi
ness be. suspended on Monday,
September 3, and the day be given
over to an observance of the im
portance cf labor. Let labor be
accorded all honors due it and it
is proper that its sovereignty
should be observed fittingly. Hon
or is due the toilers of the land,
so let everyone pause during the
cycle of the year to make public
acknowledgement of the power it
has been toward the upbuilding
of the nation, state and city.
W. W. ZIMMERMAN, Mayor.

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