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The Richmond palladium. (Richmond, Ind.) 1906-1907, September 26, 1906, Image 1

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ABIUM
VOL. XXXI. NO. 239.
Richmond, Indiana, Wednesday Morning, September 26, 1906.
Single Copies, One Cent.
RICHMOND PAI
1500 MARINES ARE
ORDERED TO CUEA
TO OUELLTROIIBLE
Secretary Taft Sends Word
that Efforts at Peace Have
Failed and President Takes
SOME CHANGES III
STATE OF CHURCH
AND THE MtHISTRY
IS SATISFACTORY
Elders, Overseers and Mlnis-
ters of Friends Church
Hear Good Reports from
Quarterly Meetings.
THE WEATHER PROPHET.
INDIANA Fair in north, rain in
south portion Wednesday, Thurs
day f2ir; fresh south winds.
OHIO Fair Wednesday and Thurs
day, except rain in southwest por
tion; fresh couth winds.
HEALTH LAWS ARE
TO BE ASKED FOR
i ' Mi' ' 7.
the Next Possible Step.
GO TO LEAGOE MEETING
BEAR THEIR OWN EXPENSE
TROOPS TO REACH THE
ISLAND BY NEXT SUNDAY
Councilman Englebert and Ex-Councilman
Kennepohl will Attend Ses
sions of National Municipal League
at Chicago.
President T. Henry Davis An
nounces the New Laws
for Which the State Board
will Work This Year.
AFTER MANUFACTURERS
OF IMPURE FOOD STUFF
Machinery Arranged Weeks
Aqo for the Crisis Which
Active Motion.
Ifenry Enclebert, councilman at
large, and B. A. Kennepohl, ex-coun
cilman will attend the convention of
HaS Come Has Been Put fn the National Municipal League at
Chicago Sept. 26-29.
Mr. Englebert lef yesterday rnorn
inc for the Windy City, while Mr.
Kennepohl, who was detained, cn ac
count of being a witness in the case
of Clifford vs. the city of Richmond,
at Greenfield, leaves this morning. At
the last regular meeting of Council
money was not voted for the expen
ses of a committee, to represent the
city at the League, so the two men
will bear the expenses themselves.
Oyster Bay, N. Y., Sept. 25.-
Advices received by President
Roosevelt from Secretary cf War
Taft at Havana tonight indicate
that peace negotiations have fail
ed and American intervention is
inevitable. , Although the presi
dent is very reluctant indeed to
admit the failure of his envoys.
official announcement was made
at the executive office tonicht
that preparations were being
pushed with all possible haste for
the mobilization of troops for Cu
ban invasion.
LIORARV BEING
MUCH
MPNffiD
Washington, Sept. 23. A crisis has
arisen in the peace negotiations In
Cuba.
After a day of unusual activity and
secrecy in the navy department it
was officially announced this after
noon that fifteen hundred marines
had been ordered sent to Cuba with
out delay.
Armed intervention seems at hand
The machinery that was arranged
weeks ago for just such an emergen
cy has been put in motion.
Before Sunday the additional forc
es will be in the harbors of that is
land, ready for landing.
The call came from Secretary Taft
It went direct to the president at Oys
ter Bay. The order for the starting
of the marines came from the presi
dent. t
Within an hour it had been sent out
as a departmental instruction to the
places of rendezvous. It is said that
the Prairie will convey 450 from Bos
ton and vicinity, the Texas 500 from
Norfolk and Charleston navy yards,
the Brooklyn 100 from League Island,
Provisions Are Made to Han
dle the Government Books
Received There.
NEW FLOOR OF SHELVES
FORMER JUVENILE ROOM IS FIT
TED UP IN ORDER THAT DIF
FERENT SOCIETIES MAY MEET
there'.
Provisions are now semg umae at
the Morrison Reeves library to han
dle the large number of books and
pamphlets received from the govern
ment. The library is a government
depository for all reports and other
documents coming from the public
printing office in Washington. There
is so much of this material and it is
of such value that Mrs. Bernhardt
felt it should be adequately taken
care of. With this object in view
another floor of book shelves have
been ordered and will be placed in
the circulating department of the
library. It requires some time to
Newport, Annapolis and Waashington, make the tiers and they will not be
end several hundred on the Moreran Pt in until December,
ships from New
where.
Orleans and else-
MUCH TAX MONEY
4
IS LOST TO CITY
Many Citizens Unable to.Pay
Their Personal Tax, Al
though It Is Small.
This will give the library three
floors of books. A door will be cut
off the third floor, leading into read
ing rooms above the large reading
room. The government books will
be catalogued and made accessible
to all who wish to use them.
Two other improvements which
will be greatly appreciated are also
being made. The room formerly w
ed as the juvenile department, in the
basement, has been frescoed and fitt
ed up with electric lights. It will be
used bjr the History Club as a meet
ing place this winter and other so
cieties are also welcome to use it.
The small room to the right of the
library entrance is also being fitted
up in order that small clubs or com
mittees may meet in it.
Leaisiature Will Be Asked
Amona Other Things to
Take Drastic Measures to
Stop Pollution of Streams.
MEANS A LOSS OF 810000
CITY COUNCIL WILL ACT
IF LAWS WERE STRICTLY FOL
LOWED OUT PROPERTY COULD
BE CONFISCATED BUT IT HAS
NEVER BEEN DONE.
ABOUT NUMBERING HOUSES
System or "Any Number Will do,"
Which Now Exists in Fairview Will
be Corrected An Ordinance to be
Brought Up.
Ten thousand dollars of personal
tax money is lost to the city each
year largely through the inability of
certain tax payers to comply with the
law. The property of the city, in tho
aggregate is assessed at 113,000,000,
- and the collected taxes should
amount to about $ 133,000 each year".
The $10,000 of this amount which can
'not be collected is seldom carried
over. This amount is made up of the
taxable property of such character as
poll tax, household effects tax and
the like. That portion of the city
, population which can not, or do not
come up with the rest are "dunned"
with tax bill?, but it does little good.
They constitute that part of the city's
people who are low wage earners and
have all that they can do to keep
themselves and several children in
existence. They have ben able after
many years of hard manual labor to
accumulate several pieces of furni
ture and a few personal ornaments
which come under the title of assess
ed personal property. If the law
fc'ere strictly followed out and their
property sold for back taxes they
tvould be left destitute. For this rea
son the cases have never been push
ed to an issue in this city. The mat
ter was taken up in Indianapolis snection trip from Cincinnati and left
sometime ago, and those persons who late yesterday evening for Columbus,
tvould not settle up their delinquent iO., from which place they will return
personal taxes had their few effecfslto Cincinnati. There were about
lold satisfy the claims of the city. twenty -five officials in the party.
It is prooable that within the next
month or so there v ill be an ordin
ance introduced into Council which
will provide for the proper number
ing of the houses and lots in Fair-
view. There has been a great deal
of trouble in finding where any per
son lived, through the fact that one
house may be numbered 1129, while
the one nest to it is 129. . Xo order
has been observed by the property
owners in this respect.
Several months ago City Engineer
Charles mapped out that district of
the city, and numbered each house
and lot. The numbers are still In
the Engineer's office and only a few
of them have been taken out.
If the pians of the State Board of
Health do not miscarry, there will be
several new laws enacted by the
state legislature during the coming
session which will chan.ase to a con
siderable extent, several laws, alon
the lines of health preservation.
President T. Henry Davis said yes
terday that the state board had been
considering the chances for some
time, as many of the laws which gov
ern the regulation of the manufac
ture of foods are entirely inadequate.
The manufacturers have taken ad
vantage of several looyfcoles in the
state law, and have put impure foods
upon the market and the people are
using them daily. Many of the man
ufacturers have consented to the sup
ervision of the state board of healtht
in the manufacture of their products
and these firms are putting an excel
lent brand of goods upon the market.
Others have not looked so favorably
unon the actions of the board, in
their investigations, and have at ev
erv opportunity taken advantage of
the law. It is these men that the
State Board of Health is gunning for.
It is the idea of the board to ask the
legislature to extend the state laws
to meet the same requirements that
the United States Inter-State law
calls for, as the latter is very strict
along the line of food adulteration.
Would Collect More Statistics.
Another thins that the board of
health will ask for is that all births,
marriages and diseases, shall be reg
istered just as deaths are registered
at the present time.
It is the aim of the board to make
the requirements governing the re
ports of marriages, births and dis
eases more strict. Heretofore they
have been reported in a very loose
manner many of them escaping the
supervision of the proper authorities
entirely.
The law governing the pollution of
streams is another thing that the
board will ask the legislature to rem
edy. At present the law states that
no manufacturing company can turn
their refuse into the streams, without
the consent of the state board of
healh. As he board is swamped ,with
requests to turn refuse into the many
streams of Indiana, they want that
clause struck out, and make a law
that will absolutely forbid the pollu
tion of the streams of the state.
Tuberculosis Legislation.
The State Tuberculosis Commis
sion will also be active in asking the
legislature for help along their line,
that of. caring for the victims of the
'white plague" in this state. During
the session of the last legislature
health. As the board is swamped with
to investigate the consumptive condi
tions of Indiana, and make a com
plete report. This the commission
has done and they recommend that
the state establish and control a
State Health Farm for the benefit of
the many consumptives. It has been
demonstrated that outdoor life is the
best cure that can be administered
for consumption and the commission
thinks that a state farm should be
provided for, for those persons in the
state suffering with the disease. The
Tuberculosis Commission will have
the hearty backing of the state board
of health in this venture.
Dr. Davis is very optimistic as to
the success of the bills. He thinks
they will pass both houses of the leg
islature, without great opposition.
May not amount to much, but manages to get in the telegraphic news frequently.
Despite the denials of trouble there is a feeling of uneasiness along the Mexican boraer. News Item.
DELIBERATIONS OF YEARLY
MEETING TO BEGIN TODAY
The Rev. Robert Douglas in
Stirring Sermon, Censures
Ministers Who, Preach for
Money Alone.
HDUSANDS OF VOTES
CAST N
THE CONTEST
Triumph Lodge Increases Its Lead, Though Odd
Fellows Cast Approximately as Many Votes
for the Week and Now Have Good Position
w,'
in the Race.
HOW THE VOTE STANDS.
The Total Vote, as Compiled Tuesday, Sept. 25, the end of the
eighth week.
Triumph Lodge, K. of P. 113,915
Richmond Grove of Druids 68,149
Richmond Lodge of Elks (withdrawn) 20,068
Eden Lodge, D. of R. (I. 0. 0. F.) . 43,627
Hokendauqua Tribe Red Men .. ... -.13,892
Knights of Columbus .. .. ... 9,736
Modern Woodmen V 7,464
Sol Meredith Post, G. A. R. 30
G. 0. P , 29
Ancient Order Hibernians 10
Richmond Lodge of Masons 10
Richmond Country Club 7
Eagles 4
CLIEFOHD REFUSED
COUNCIL MINUTES
Tax Ferret Can't Get Needed
Evidence and His Case Is
Postponed.
SHREWD MOVE BY STUDY
CITY ATTORNEY REQUESTS CITY
CLERK TAGGART TO GIVE NO
RECORDS TO THE ATTORNEYS
FIGHTING CASE.
HEAVIER ENGINES NEEDED
Were Inspecting Line.
The chief clerks and the head offi
cials of the Cincinnati division of the
Pennsylvania system were in this
city yesterday. They came on an in-
R. & I. Trains Unable to Keep on
Schedule Time Because Loco
motives Are Too Small. .
The G. It. & I train from the north
yesterday afternoon -was late one hour
and thirty-five minutes. The "" en
gines which the company is using on
the southern division of the road are
entirely too small to pull the long
trains on schedule time and the same
train has been all the way from fif
teen minutes to two hours late every
day. It is thought that larger en
gines will be placed on the southern
division of the road to accommodate
the heavy traffic.
To Be Piano Teacher.
Milton. Ind.. Sept. 25. (Spl.) Miss
Carrie Michael has accepted a posi
tion as teacher of piano in a college
for girls at Thomasville, Georgia.
She will leave in a few days to. take
up the work-
Many thousands of votes were cast during the eighth week of the Palla
dium's voting contest as the figures in the table published above will show.
Triumph Lodge, Knights of Pythias, has increased its lead considerably, but
the most surprising gain of the week was that of Eden Degree, I. O. O. F.,
which jumped from a comparatively obscure position into a prominent one.
The Odd Fellows have barely got started in the work and they hope to crawl
well onto the leaders the coming week. The Druids still remain in second
place without having had any difficulty in so doing, and also will be heard
from later.
All coupons published this week will be dated October 2, and must be
returned to this office not later than next Tuesday evening, at 6 o'clock.
More than six weeks yet remain forthe contest and in that period there
will likely be some surprising changes in the standing.
CONDITIONS OF CONTEST.
m
FIRST PRIZE To the secret or fraternal organization In Ricnmond! op in
any town in Wayne County, which shall receive the largest number of
votes during the period of this contest, a STARR PIANO with ME
CHANICAL PLAYER ATTACHMENT, built within the piano, will
be given absolutely free. The cost of this instrument is $850.
SECOND PRIZE To the secret or fraternal organization in Richmond or
in any town in Wayne County which shall receive the second largest
number of votes, a beautiful lodge altar with elegantly leather bound
Bib, valued at $75, will be given absolutely free.
THIRD PRIZE To the member. of any men's secret or fraternal organi
zation in Richmond or Wayne County who shall procure the greatest
number of votes for his lodge, a solitaire diamond ring, costinp $75
will be given aDsolutely free.
FOURTH PRIZE To the lady who Is a member of any woman's secret or
fraternal organization in Richmond or Wayne County who shall pro
cure the largest number of votes for her lodge, a solitaire diamond ring
will be given absolutely free-
HOW VOTING WILL BE CONDUCTED
Trie .-orriest fs free for all. Everybody can vote without the expendi
ture of a single penny. Each day a coupon will appear in the Palladium on
page 4. Fill in the coupon today as a starter, with the name of the secret
or fraternal organization and its location.
Mail or bring the coupon to the Palladium office. North Ninth and A
streets and the vote will-be counted as directed The expiration date of
Continued on Page Four ' '
The Clifford case which ras to
have been opened yesterday at Green
field was postponed on motion of
Clifford's attorneys, who were not
able to introduce certain evidence,
which is in the hands of City Clerk
Taggart, who withholds it at the re
quest of City Attorney Study. The
case will come up October 25th.
Sometime ago Clifford brought suit
against the City of Richmond to re
cover about $11,000 which he claims
as his share and commission for ser
.vices rendered by him as a tax ferret.
Attorney Sylvester Meek, "of Conners
ville, attorney for Clifford, stated yes
terday afternoon that he knew where
about $C,000 more could be raked up
out of the City and county books in
to a claim, and that when the city
is through with this case, they may
be confronted with another of the
same character.
The case yesterday was postponed
because City Attorney Thomas J.
Study informed City Clerk Taggart
not to allow the opposition iiryers
access to la's minutes of Council pro
ceedings, relative to the case.
Attorney Meek and Mr. Clifford
sought the aid of Judge Fox yester
day in gaining possession of the
council" minutes, but the court re
fused to lend any aid. Attorneys
Shively and Shively have been engag
ed by Clifford, to assist Attorney
Meek, in getting the needed records.
SITE IS DECIDED UPON
Pan Handle Light Plant in Richmond
Is to Be Erected Near tho
Present Shops.
The plans for the erection of the
Pennsylvania light plant in this-city
are well under way, and it will be only
a course of a few months until the
plant is completed.
Supt. Neff of the Richmond division
stated yesterday that the plant would
be erected near the present shops and
would be mn-ia conjunction with
them.
At 10 o'clock this morninlg the an
nual delilerations of Indiana Yearly
Meeting of Friends will begin in East
Main Street Friends church and the
sessions , will continue until Tuesday
afternoon of next week. There aro
already several hundred delegates
and visitors here and before tonight
many more will have reached the city,
most of whom will -remain until tho
final adjournment.
Yesterday was devoted to tha ses
sions of the Meeting on Ministry unci
Oversight, the first session taking
place at 10 o'clock yesterday fore
noon. Probably 100 persons were
present, including delegates and visi
tors from within and without the ju
risdiction of Indiana Yearly meeting.
There was a half hour spent in devo
tion during which time John Henry
Douglas, of Pasadena, Cal., one of
the most prominent Friends ministers
in the far "West, made an address. Ho
spoke of the need for work in the
evangelistic line throughout the
country and expressed tho hope that
the Friends would bo in the front in
the work of conductiug revivals. Th..,
Rev. Enos .Harvey, of Fainiiount,
clerk of the meeting, on Ministry and
Oversight, presided at the sessions
rnd he was assist-s 3 by Mrs. Emma
Hedges, of New Custlc.
More Young Members Present.
Ona thing was notlcei-.blo ubout the
session thats'iovs the evolution in
the Friends -Ieuon-iiiation. There
were more youn? overseers, elders
and ministers than ever before.
There were several of the old time
members of h3 church present, who.e
attire stamp Uiern -. unmistakably as
Friends, but tho majority were young
or middle eced men and women with
nothing to distinguish them from
members of other churches. T.hcie
were less than five of the old time
Quaker-bonnets in evidence.
The reports made to the MeetJnf?
from the different Quarterly Meet
ings showed the state of the church
and ministry to be quite satisfactory,
in fact, improved over last year. The
best report came from the Winchester
Meeting, where recent revivals have
increased the membership, both in the
church and Sunday school. Peihaps
the most discouraging report from tho
Traverse City Meeting. f
It is within the jurisdiction of the
Meeting on Ministry and Oversight to
question the doctrine of any minister
in the church or to point . out his
faults and show him how they may
be corrected. There was no occasion
for this however yesterday.
Sermon of Robt. Douglas.
Addresses were made to the Meet
ing by different members of . the
church, perhaps the most significant
of which was that of the Rev. Robert
Douglas, of Versailles, Ohio. The
(Continued to Page EigHt)
ATTENDANCE VERY LARGE
FIRST CHAPEL EXERCISES
Hign School Orchestra Furnished
Good Music Prof. Torrence Elect
ed President of the Athletic Association.
Engineer Mead Here.
C. E. Mead of Dayton, consulting
engineer for the city, was In the city
yesterday lending his professional ser
vices to the supervision of the pre
liminary work of re-equipping the city
light plant. Mr. Mead and the Board
of Public "Works made an Inspection
of the plant yesterday afternoon.
At the, first chape 1 exercises held
Monday morning at the High School
the attendance was larger than ever
before on such an occasion. Prof. EI
labarger, in his talk, thanked the stu
dents for their excellent order during
the first week of school, despite the
fact that there was much confusion in
arranging the program. The orches
tra rendered selections from "Forty
Five Minutes from Broadway."
At a meeting of the Athletic Asso
ciation Monday, Prof. Torrence was
unanimously elected President of the
Association. He made a short speech
in which he suggested that the boys
be more liberal in their support of the
association as they were now c-ciipsed
by some of the girls in the school in
this respect. The other officers
elected were: Omar Sands, vice pres
ident; Donald Graves, secretary;
John Murray, treasurer. Omar Sand3
was also elected manager of the bas-
ket ball team. Games with some of "
the larger High Schools in the state,
will be arranged for.
On Fishing Trip.
B. F. Harris, W. S. Kauffman, Dr.
C. S. Wilson and Dr. M. F. Johnston
have gone to Tippecanoe Lake for a
week's fishing. " -
J

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