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The Richmond palladium. (Richmond, Ind.) 1906-1907, October 15, 1906, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015675/1906-10-15/ed-1/seq-1/

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BIG
PAJL
N
A
VOL. XXXI. NO, 258.
Richmond, Indiana, Monday Morning, October 15, 1906.
Single Copies, One Cent.
rrp
WHITE SOX
THE PROUD
W
TITLE
WOHLD
Before Thousands of Delirious
Fans, Comiskey's Hitless
Wonders Take Final Hard
Fling at the Cubs.
SECURE MOST DECISIVE
VICTORY OF THE SERIES
South Siders Drive Mordecai
Brown, the best Pitcher in
National League to Bench-
Score, 8 to 3.
White Sox won the game and
championship.
It is conclusively proven that
the American League play is as
fast as National, very probably
faster.
The game was played at the
South Side grounds. It was first
time during the series that either
team won on its own diamond.
The opposing pitchers were
Brown and Overall for the Nation
als, and "Doc" White for the Am
ericans. The attendance yesterday was
29,249.
The total attendance for the six
games has been 109,845.
The total receipts for the five
games have been $117,678.
The great Walsh pitched two
winners for the White Sox; Nick
Altrock .pitched one, and White
one.
Throughout the series the Sox
outbatted the. Cubs, a thing they
were not expected to do.
The Cubs were fully confident
of winning the White Sox
had only -"' tne champion
ship. -
Most of the leading base ball
writers had picked the Nationals
as easy winners.
f Publishers Prfcj
Chicago, Oct. 15 Hail the White
Sox, World's Champions!
In the deciding game of the series
this afternoon, before 29,429 delirious
fans, they rudely jerked Mordecai
Brown from his pedestal as the best
Iitcher in the National League, and
tossed him upon the shelf where they
put Reulbach and Pfeister on Satur
day. Before the second inning was over
Col. Comiskey's hitless wonders had
made eight hits off the three-fingered
miner, of which two were two-baggers.
He couldn't have won if he
had six fingers on his pitching fin, the
way the Southsiders went after him,
and he joined Tajlor, Lundgren, Reul
bach and a few substitutes sitting
gloomily on the bench.
Seven runs were assembled by the
White Sox before Mr. Brown was tin
canned and in the eighth inning they
grabbed off another just to be sure.
Overall, who was first aid to the in
jured, yielded up six more hits to the
sluggers, and when the day was done
the Cubs had gathered but three runs
from seven hits off of Dr. White.
Spectacular Features of Day.
The spectacular features of the day
were much the same as those furnish
ed by the big West Side crowd on Sat
urday, although there was no live
stock exhibition. The chickens and
bears were all barred at the gates,
and so were some five thousand In
dians who arrived at the lot after one
o'clock. Comiskey and Murphy hav
ing decided that they had as much
money in the box office as they want
ed, stopped the sale of geueral admis
sion tickets an hour and a half before
the game began.
Those who were turned away had
tht advantage over those who got in
m ono point they could go back
;. and eat their Sunday dinners
while the 29,000 faithful who bulged
out the fences of Commys park dined
off sandwiches or went hungry until
the championship was decided. There
CHAMPOS
was a band in the yard, too which" , the Lewisville wells could be drawn
cheered the spints of the dinneiless ; ou"
lmt happy rooters. It was not hired .
for the wake by the Cubs it was a "On Their New CapS.
voluntary organization that sat in a j The members of the Fire Depart
box and tooted "Marching Through i ment yesterday donned their new
Georgia," every time there was a lull
In the cheering.
Eddie Hahn Got Even.
It was a great game. Eddie Hahn
got good and even for his smashed
nose. His fearful revenge upon the
Cub pitchers, which began yesterday,
culminated when he made four hits
during the game. He would have got
five had not Sheckard leaped into
Continued on. Page Two.)
SCORE Of DECIDING GAME
I
White Sox. fl. H. O. A. E.
Hahn, rf 2 4 0 0 0
Jones, cf 2 0 3 0 0
Isbell, 2b 1 3 1 4 0
Davis, ss .' 2 2 1 4 0
Hohe, 3b 1 2 3 3 1
Donohue, lb 0 2 13 1 1
Dougherty, If 0 0 1 0 0
Sullivan c u' 0 3 10
White, p 0 0 1 3 0
Totals 8 14 27 18 2
0
THE SCORE
Cubs
White Sox
SUMMARY OF THE GAME:
Left on Bases Sox, 9; Cubs, 10-
Two Base Hits Hofman, Schulte, Davis, Donohue, Overall, Evers.
Sacrifice Hits Jones, Sheckard.
Stolen Bases Rohe.
Double Plays Davis to Donohue.
Struck Out By White,, 2; by Overall, 3.
Bases on Balls Off White, 4; off Brown, 1; off Overall, 2.
Hit by Pitched Ball Chance.
Umpires O'Laughlin and Johnstone.
Attendance 29,249.
Time of Game Two hours.
HAZZARD HAS HISTORIES
HE SHIPPED SOME AWAY.
MAN WHO KEPT ALL HENRY
COUNTY BUSY SHOWS UP AT
NATIONAL CAPITAL WITH LOT
OF BOOKS TO SELL.
Washington, Oct. 14 Sheriff Burr,
of Henry county, Indiana, did not get
all of Historian Geo. Hazzard's books
when he attempted to serve a write of
attachment on them a few days ago.
In fact, he missed it by a box full or
more, for Mr. Hazzard turned up in
this city a few days ago and had a
bill of lading for a box of his books
which reached here by freight.
Mr. Hazzard has been putting in a
few days calling on- Indianians and
trying to sell his history. So far as
is known he has sold books to Col.
W. W. Dudley, Charles F. Sudwarth, of
New Castle, and Court Clements, who
married a daughter of General Grose
in New Castle.
Mr. Hazzard promptly denied the
reports coming from New Castle, that
he had fled the country, or was stay
ing away while the Henry county
grand jury was in session. He says
the he will be back in New Castle
next week, and will be on hand when
the forgery charges against him "come
to trial.
PAID FOR THE RIGHT
TO LAY GAS PIPE LINE.
Richmond Gas Company Gave Com
missioner of Henry County $500
For Right of Way From Near Lew
isville to Millville.
New Castle. Ind., Oct. 14 (SpD
Something that has heretofore
been unusual, but will be more the
rule in the future, occured at the Au
ditor's office the other day when a
representative of the Richmond Gas
Co. paid iuto the treasury of Henry
county ?500 in consideration of the
franchise granted it by the commis
sioners to lay a pipe line along the
highway from near Lewisville to con
nect with its main line near Millville.
In the past boards have granted fran
chises of all kinds and generally no
money consideration was thought of
or asked. But a new order of things
will likely prevail in the future and
the county will not give away any of
its rights.
The Richmond company has al
ready commenced work on the line
and are pushing it with all possible
vigor. They are depending on the
lewisville field to replenish the sup
ply at Richmond, which is not at all
satisfactory. It is rumored that the
big pumping plant in the Cadiz field
will be moved to near Millville where
i cays which are built after the plan
of their old ones. The new uniforms
which have been ordered will arrive
sometime this week.
Longman Begins Duties.
William Longman, who was re-eentlj-
appointed a police officer to
fill the vacancy made by the resigna
tion of Charles Sutton, will assume
his duties today. He . will be assigned
to District 10 which covers the
South End.
f OR WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP.
R. H. O. A. E.
1 2 3 0 0
0 0 2 0 0
0 1 0 0 0
.0 0 9 0 0
0 0 0 0.0
1 12 0 0
116 2 0
0 0 0 0 0
0 10 2 0
0 0 0 0 0
8 7 24 17 0
0 Sheckard, If
0 Chance, lb
mnfeldt. 3b - .....
1 Evers, 2 b 1 1 2
0 Kling, c 1
0 Brown, p
0 Overall,, p 0
Gessler 0 0
Totals 8
Gessler batted for Overall in ninth.
BY INNINGS:
K. II. E.
03 7 0
8 14 2
1 0 0
.... 3 4 0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
PRES. BRADFORD
VISITS RICHMOND
Head of C, C. & L. With Party
of Officials Come Down
From Chicago.
GREAT FUTURE FOR ROAD.
GENIAL EXECUTIVE PROMISES
RICHMOND PEOPLE THAT
THEY MAY EXPECT GREAT
THINGS OF THE NEW LINE.
W. A. Bradford arrived in the city
yesterday in his private car "Wiscon
sin, No. 100" accompanied by General
Superintendent Dalton of the C. C. &
L, R. R.. J. L.. Chadwick. of New
York, George A. Fernald, of Boston
and George E. Senwell, of New York
who are on a pleasure and inspection
trip registered at the Westcott Ho
tel and will leave this morning for
Chicago. Mr. Bradford, who at one
time lived in the city still is presi
dent of the C. C. & L. R. R. and re
cently elected to that of?ee in the
Wisconsin Central.
President Bradford came to Rich
mond from Chicago. The work now
going on in the extension of the line
into Chicago Was viewed by the par
ty. President Bradford expressed him
self as being highly pleased with the
progress that was being made, but
he would not offer an opinion as to
when through service would be in
stalled between Cincinnati and Chi
cago.
Mr. Bradord was urged to give a
statement concerning the future of
the C. C. & L. "I don't like to talk
publicly about this matter," he said,
"but one thing you may tell your
readers and that is the C. C. & L
has a mighty bright future."
"Will you return to Richmond
some day. to make your home?" was
asked.
"No I think not, although Rich
mond is a very pretty little city," the
genial railroad executive replied.
He said that his connection with
the Wisconsin Central would not in
the least affect the C. C. & L. He said
there would be no such thing as a
consolidation or alliance of inter
ests. ,
THE COMPANY HELD LIABLE
Famous Green Paint Suit Decided
Favor of Farmer Cow and
Paint Did Not Mix.
The appellate court has decided
the Union Traction company's fa
mous green paint suit in favor of far
mer Spurgeon and his cow.
Several months ago a cow belong
ing to Simon Spurgeon, a farmer on
the right of way of the Union Trac
tion company, died as a result of eat
ing the green paint from a pole. Mr.
Spurgeon brought suit and won the
case, it being held that the company
should have fenced in he right of way
as agreed.
The company took the case to the
higher court and decision was affirm
ed. The appellate court held that
where .an interurban railroad ac
quired a right of way with conven
ants binding it to fence and without
performing such convenants it
brought paints upon the right of way
and negligently left them exposed so
stock were apt to be poisoned, the
compani' is liable.
SCENE OF GAYETY
CHANGED TO ONE
OF WILDRAMPAGE
Light Hearted Parisians Were
Cheated Out of Their Mon
ey at Long Champs, and
Seek to Recover the Loss.
DESTROY JUDGE'S STAND
AND TRAMPLE A JOCKEY
Crowd Gets Back $60,000 of
Bookmakers' III Gotten Gain
Hose of Firemen Turned on
Infuriated Mass.
Publishers' Press
Paris, Oct. la The first real riot
ous demonstration in France since the
riots of May 1, last, took place at the
Long Champs race course Sunday, and
as a result fighting lasted for over
four hours, between the authorities
and a mob of frantic people, and more
than one hundred persons were in
jured, several fatally.
In the third race one of the best
of the selling platers of the French
turf was down to meet several cheap
animals, and the crowd made him an
overwhelming favorite in the betting
in the mutuals. It was felt that he
could not be beaten, and seldom has
a horse been plunged on in the man
ner this one .was this year. At the
start his jockey took him back, al
though he was buck-jumping and fight
ing for his head, and sent him upon
the rail. Before he could get through,
however, two of the other horses in
the race, well piloted by clever jock
eys, ranged on each side of the favor
ite and he was soon successfully poc
keted. He was not able to get through
until well near the finish line, when
he fame with a great rush, but just
failed to get up. Most of the crowd
thought that the favorite won, and
when an outsider was posted as the
actual purse gatherer, the crowd went
crazy.
Invade the Race Course.
They invaded the course, tore down
the judge's stand, an'd were it not
for the fact that the police acted very
promptly and surrounded the, officials
it is likely that some one would have
been killed One man knocked down
the jockey on the favorite and kicked
him in the head, badly injivfing him.
The infuriated mob then charged
upon the paddock and enclosure and
tore them down breaking everything
they could. While ' they were doing
this a gang of . the famous "gueril
las of Paris," who congregate at the
track made an assault on the place
where the mutuals are sold and al
though the men in charge tried in
every way to protect their money
they failed and the crowd succeeded
in getting away with $60,000. ,
Firemen Turned Hose on Crowd.,
The police on duty could do noth
ing to check the mob and they called
udoii the firemen to aid them. Al
though the latter sent several
streams of water into the faces of
the rioters they were useless and
finally the mounted police, who had
been hurriedly summoned, arrived
and charged the crowd.
Sixty arrests were made and the
race meeting had to be abandoned.
"OH, YES! IT'S VERY EASY."
If You Think It's a Snap to Run
Newspaper, Try it a Day and
be Convinced.
The New Castle Courier says:
"Did jou ever count the words in a
column of a newspaper? There are
over a thousand words in a column.
Suppose you sit down and write one
thousand words on one subject and
another until you have written about
fifteen thousand words. Try it and
see if it is right easy. Keep that gait
up for a month. Then chase a local
item all over town and after you have
secured the facts all right condense
them in a few lines, an hour's work.
that can be read 'in a few seconds.
Do this for a dozen items that seem
insignificant after they are printed,
but which you know are imiortant,
then have the items criticized and
inaccuracies pointed out to you when
it is to late to correct them. Oh yes
it's easy to conduct a newspaper."
AWARD OF PRIZE.
The person who "tipped off'
the story about the assault of A. P.
Uhly at the Wright funeral, the ac
count of which appears in this
issue, will please call at this of
fice today and receive the $1 prize
for the week ending last night. A
number of persons telephoned in
to the office' about sudden death
of Will By ram, which was a very
good news story, and the first one
to send in the news might have
won the prize had it not been that
a reporter of the Palladium was,
sitting by Mr. Byram's side at
the time of his fatal attack.
PUT MARINES AND
CAPTAIN SCHR0EDER
Captain Seaton Schroeder, commander of the battleship Virginia, who re
cently selected" a camping place for marines landed in Havana, is a man of
considerable distinction, in the. navy. He entered the Naval academy In 1S64,
and in 1879 took part In the removal of the Egyptian obelisk, known as "Cleo
patra's Needle," from Egypt to New York, where it now stands in Central
park. Captain Schroeder was governor of the island of Guam from 1IX) to
1903, when he became chief intelligence officer of the navy. In 1887 he pub
lished "Fall of Maximilian's Empire,"
TEACHER GAMBLED
ONLY WITH EQUALS
Contends It is Not Wrong to
Play Poker Just for
Pleasure,
IS CUSTOM OF SOCIETY
EFFORT BEING MADE
VOKE LICENSE OF
MASTER WHO LIKES
UP TO COTTON.
TO RE
SCHOOL CARDS
Rensselaer, Ind , Oct. 14 (Spl)
That playing poker with his social
equals was not wrong was the con
tention of B. N. Fendig when he ad
mitted to State Superintendent Cot
ton the charges of gambling -made
against him by County Superintend
ent Hamilton, who had revoked his
license to teach. The matter had been
appealed to Superintendent Cotton.
The charges were made against
Fendig following a raid by the police
on a poker room in which Fendig
declared that on the night in ques
tion he was not one of the players,
but had gone to the room to warn
a frifcnd that a raid was to be made.
He had not left before the officers
arrived.
On cross examination by Superin
tendent Cotton, Fendig admitted that
he had played at Rosenbaum's; that
he had lost as much as $25 at one
sitting; that he had layed as late
as 3 o'clock in the morning.
Just a Social Game.
In his defense Fendig said he had
admitted to Superintendent Harniltbn
playing 5-cent and 10-cent social
games, but he declared he did not
consider his morality would be im
paired by playing; that he did not be
lieve playing with his equals was
wrong; that he did not play for gain;
that he did not lose , more than he
could afford and was willing to re
turn money, to others who did; that
he owed no gambling debts and none
was owing to him.
Attorney- Foltz, for Fendig, declar
ed that it was the custom of society
people in the city to play cards 'for
money and prizes and such games
were not considered immoral.
Superintendent Cotton has taken
the case under advisement and will
give his decision later.
REPORTS STOLEN HORSE.
George Banks, Living st Hollands
burg, Asks Police to Find His .
Black Gelding.
: George Banks, living at Hollands
burg, about 14 miles north of this city,
yesterday reported to the police 'the
loss of a black gelding, sixteen and
one-half hands high, and a piano box
buggy, with a set of new harness
which were stolen from his barn Sat
urday." Supt. of Police Bailey sent out
cards to surrounding towns and cities.
Reception for Pastor.
Milton, Oct. 15 (SpL) The M. E.
church congregation tendered a recep
tion Thursday night to the pastor,
the , Rev. A. R. Jones, and wife, in
honor of. their return to the charge by
the conference. About one hundred
persons were present. Refreshments
were served. The' pastor wa3 pre
sented with a nice chair.
BLLEJACKETS ASHORE.
OF BATTLESHIP VIRGINIA.
and he ia a contributor to
ARE MAKING DUST FLY
WORK IS MOVING RAPIDLY.
THE ENTIRE CITY SHOWS MARKS
OF THE IMPROVEMENT THE
HOME TELEPHONE COMPANY IS
NOW MAKING.
With 125 men and fourteen teams
at work, the Home Telephone com-
pany is making the dust fly in its re-
construction work at various points in
the city. The trench and cement work
, . , . . ,4. . ,
will be completed within a week or so
and the extensive cellar for the new
building on North Ninth street will
be finished tonight and the plot turn-
ed over to the contractor to start
building Tuesday. Trench and cement
work is , in progress on Elm Place,
South Ninth and on South A between
Eighth . and Tenth. A peculiar piece
of telephone construction will be that
of crossing the river. The conduits
will run out of one bank from which
point the work will be aereal to the op-
posite bank where they will again en-
ter the ground. The laying of the
conduits at the foot of North A street
and the river was probably the hard- be helped yesterday, as Uhly'a ac
est task of all. Blasting had to be tions were such that no man could
resorted to as a means of getting ten
feet through solid rock below surface,
and for the past day or so .the air
at that place has been full of rocks
and chipped stone.
SEED COM HARVEST DAY
OCTOBER Z5 IS TIME SET.
inrfiu r.orn Growers' Association
Urges Farmers to Get Their corn
in Before tne i-reezing weainer
Comes to Spoil Crop.
The Indiana Corn Growers' Assoc!-
ation at its last annual meeting nam-
ed Thursday, October 25, as Seed
Corn 'Harvest Day." The reason fori
this action-is that much loss comes
through corn allowed to stand in the
fleld and which Is subjected to the
hard freezes of November and Decern-
ber. The Corn Growers Association
believes that if every ear of corn In-
tended for next year's seed could be
harvested by October 25, and proper-
ly stored, millions of bushels could be
added to the crop of Indiana. Far-j
m ers. are urged to go into their . best j
fields and select the best ears f rom J
strong-vigorous stalks. Hang this I
corn where every ear will be subject- j
ed to a free circulation of pure air j
and, where it will be protected during j
the winter. Two or three times the!
amount of seed actually required fori
planting next spring should be se-1
lected in order that a more rigid
lection may be made before planting j
time. This work cannot be urged I
too strongly and farmers should not j request of their old father and moth
fail to act on this warning. The far-1 er, protected them against the mis-
mers of Indiana should have a defi
nite ' time for this work and should
arrange to do the work at that time.
Change Place of Party.
Owing to the death of Mrs. R. J.
Wade's brother, the party which was t
to have been given Friday night at
the parsonage for the choir, will be
given instead by Mrs. J. O. Barber atj
her home on South Thirteenth street.!
The choir will hold its regular re
hearsal Friday evening from 7 to 8
o'clock after which the members will
repair, to Mrs. Barber's home.
WRIGHT FUNERAL
IS FOLLOWED DY
OIlllTAUSSAOLT
A. P. Uhly, Who . Had Been a
Mourner at Services Suf
fers at Hands of Charles
and Calvin Wright.
ALL CONCERNED IN CASE
WELL KNOWN PEOPLE
Victim oi the Assault Claims
That He Prevented the Men
From Stealing Their Fath
er's Farm.
A. I. Uhly, the master carpenter"
for the Pennsylvania railroad was as
saulted near Greensfork yesterday,
by Charles F. Wright, a machine
hand at the Wayne Works, this city.
shortly after the funeral of the lat
ter's father had taken place. Accord
ing to the statement of Mr. Uhly last
night, Calvin F. Wright a machinist
at the factory of the Starr Piano Co.
was also implicated in the assault as
he struck him on the face three dif
ferent times, but this Wright denies.
From what can be learned the trou
ble between the three men has been
of long standing, and ' at several
times previous to yesterday's assault
the men have been kept apart byj
rlends who feared that troub,e of a
serious nature wouia result, nut yes
terday the men met at the funeral of
" "r ' "7. , ..1 II I 1
luiiviui v ui iru uau irnu ihh ui LJ1V
former home of the deceased, trouble
started and Uhly was severely beat
en, he suffering several gashes across
the right side of his face and numer
ous other bruises. He was taken to
(,jtJ,J ; , , . T
tor attended to his injuries and ho
later returned to his home In this
city.
Wrights Story of the ff air.
- when asked 88 to how tr,e assault
had been committed, and the reasons
for the k t , Uh , . 7hark..
Wright last night told the following
story:
"Uhly has long been associated
sisier oi mine in mis cuy, ai-
though he is a married man, and wo
o( the family resented him havlns
any dealings with the family affairs.
as to tolerate such would be the samo
as owning up to the fact that we
countenanced his actions. Although
he has at no time had a right to ln-
terfere into our family affairs he has
done so with a zest owing to associai
tions with my sister. I did not want
to have any trouble but it could not
have resisted punching him. We as a
family did not wish to have any thing
to do with him, and especially o
during the sickness and death of our
father. He had on several instance
accompanied my sister to the home of
my father, and as he and my mother
are old people, Uhly could tell them
anything, and he told them on sev
eral instances that he and my sister
were in love and were going to get
married, he 1. Undine them tn iho lut-t
that he was already a married man.
Uhly was ordered to leave father's
farm last Friday and he did not show
I u' u"" wuay uen me lunerai was
. J. H A. . A
neia. lie naa nired a cab and had
brought a big bunch of provisions up.
iaa "iuub auie w
buy their own provisions. He imme
diately took charge of affairs , as
though he was a friend, of the family
and I got very angry at his actions.
j When we returned after the funeral
i Uhly was still there and went about
ordering things as though he was
the boss. As the cabs had drawn near
the barn Uhly came walking up" and
I told him to leave the farm iramedl-
ately for If he stayed around trouble
J would follow. He swelled up and
I said sou cannot make me leave. It
was then Uhly made a pass as
though he was going to draw a gun,
and I grabbed his hand, and began
punching him and would have proh-
ably killed him if my brother and
several other witnesses to th affair
had not grabbed me and pulled me
from him. After I had quit pounding
him he turned and ran, and later my
sister joined him in a lane and coax-
ed him to leave which he did.
Uhly's Story Is Different.
Later in the evening Mr. Uhly was
seen, and he stated: "Those fellows
se-Ion the west side (refering to the
Wright brothers) have long had a
grudge against me, because I, at the
(Continued to Page Eight)
THE WEATHER PROPHET.
INDIANA Fair Monday, except rain
in the extreme southwest por
tions; Tuesday rain; fresh south
winds.
OHIO Fair Monday and Tuesday ex
cept rain Tuesday in the south
west portion; fresh and variabls
winds. -

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