OCR Interpretation


The Richmond palladium. (Richmond, Ind.) 1906-1907, November 30, 1906, Image 1

Image and text provided by Indiana State Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015675/1906-11-30/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

E
KICHMOND PA
.ABIlCTMl
VOL. XXXI. NO. 303.
Richmond, Indiana, Friday Morning, November 30, 1SC6.
Single Copy, One Cent.
WILL PAY HONOR
TO THEIR DEAD
Resident of the
QUIET, HOMELIKE
AND VERY HAPPY
THE WEATHER PROPHET.
INDIANA Rising temperature;
creasing southerly winds.
OHIO Snow or rain and warmer.
in-
SOUTHERN KILLED
HP
Oil OWN RAILROAD
he Private Car of Samue
Soencer Burned in a Bad
Wreck Near Lynchburg, Vir
qinia, Yesterday.
With party of friends
WAS ON A HUNTING TRIP
II Fated Train had Stopped
for Repairs and Was Struck
by Limited Approaching in
the Rear.
I Publishers' Tress. J
Lynchburg, Va., Nov. 29. Samuel
ppencer, president of the Southern
railway, was killed and his body burn
ed beyond recognition at Lawyer, Va.,
t miles from here. Others killed
Were Philip Schuyler of New York.
Spencer's special train dispatcher, D.
T. Davis of Alexandria, Va.; the engi
neer, J. Terry, and one man not iden-
Ified.
Two others killed are Charles D.
Usher of Gill & Fisher, commission
Merchants of Baltimore, and F. T.
itedmond of Baltimore.
The Washington -and Southwestern
restibulted limited ran into the rear
nd of the train known as the Jack
sonville limited. Spencer's private
?oach was entirely burned. It was at-
ached to the Jacksonville train. It
Was split open by the locomotive and
nstantly caught Are.
Spencer was on his way south on a
hunting trip, and had several guests
with him in his car.
The accident was caused by the
JTacksonvilie train stopping to repair
i knuckle. The operator gave the
rain following a clear block, and the
collision resulted.
, The car ahead of Spencer's private
ar, a Pullman sleeper, was derailed,
put all the passengers escaped. The
Hub car on the same train was de
stroyed by Are, but none was injured.
The seriously injured are Samuel
pox, negro cook in Spencer's car;
William Milliard, a negro porter in
Bpencer's car, and eight negro passen
gers in the forward end of the train.
L Samuel Spencer was a resident of
'ashington, but hi3 business head
quarters were in New York. He was
ripe of the most prominent railroad
men of the United States and for
nearly 20 years was at the head of one
or more railroad enterprises. At the
time of his death, in addition to the
Southern, he was president and direc
tor in the Alabama Great'Csouthern
Railroad company; the Cincinnati,
N'ew Orleans and Pacific Railway
company; the Georgia Southern and
Florida Railway company, and the
Mobile and Ohio Railroad Company.
He was also a director of the Central
Railroad of Georgia; the Chicago, Mil
waukee and St. Paul Kailway corn-
many: the Erie Railway company; the
Northern Pacific company, and other
corporations. Spencer was president
of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad
Jrompany in 1SS7 and 1SSS. He was
appointed receiver for the Richmond
nd Danville Railway company, and
receiver for the East Tennessee, Vir
ginia and Georgia Railway company,
ire was a member of the Rapid
Transit commission of New York
from 1S91 to 1894.
Spencer was born in Columbus, Ga.,
In IS 47, and was educated in the Uni
versity of Virginia. In 1872 he mar
ried Louisa Vivian Benning at Colum
bus, Ga.
Philip Schuyler, who lost his life in
the wreck, was a member of one o
the oldest and best known New York
families, being a grand son of General
Schuyler of revolutionary fame and
grand nephew of Alexander Hamil
ton. He was born in 1S36, served
with the army of the Potomac during
the civil war. lived at Ardsley, N. Y.,
and was a director of the New York
Life Insurance and Trust company of
this city.
A LARGE CHICKEN
HAWK WAS CAPTURED
Cambridge City. Ind., Nov. 29. (Spl.)
Henry Strickrnth recentlv- captured
a large ctucken hawk on his farm i
south of town, which is now on ex-i
hibition in the show window of C. A. i
Morgan's Annex Restaurant. The!
bird measures ?, feet and 2 inches
from the tip of one wing to the other
and is about 1.1 inches in height. It
had befti making depredations on the
chickens in that vicinity and was
captured in a steel trap.
SAM ARNOLD BECOMES
ONE OF THE AUTOISTSl
Samuel Arnold, the genial proprie
tor of the Arnold Hotel, is now the
proud possessor of a new Mitchell au
tomobile, which he purchased In Chi
cago several days ago. He received
the machine yesterday morning and
"Sam" immediately set tabout learn
ing the intricacies of the "whizz car"
The machine Is one of the handsom
- iu the citv.
THANKSGIVING WAS
SAD FOR GILLETTE
Youngster Charged with Mur
der of Grace Brown Fears
to Hear Verdict.
ON VERGE OF COLLAPSE
SEEKS HIS COUNSEL FOR EN
COURAGEMENT AND REAS
SERTS THAT STORY TOLD ON
WITNESS STAND WS TRUE.
Herkimer, X. Y., Nov. 29. Chester
Gillette, who yesterday went on the
witness stand to defend himself of
the charge of murder of Grace Brown,
spent a dreary Thanksgiving day to
day in Herkimer jail. Rejected by the
knowledge that his story of the trag
edy of Big Moose Lake had failed to
give the slightest impression of In
nocence, the young prisoner verged
on collapse all day. This afternoon
his counsel. Senator Mills, called up
on him and cheered him with words
of encouragement..
"Do you not think the jury will be
lieve my story?" asked Gilllette of his
counsel. "It is the truth, every word
of it."
Senator Mills told his client that
lb had acquitted himself well, but he
must prepare himself for a sworn
cross examination tomorrow which
will likely last all day.
Gillette rested all last night under
the influence of sedatives.
Every one here believes fhat his
story has failed to impress the jury
and that his conviction for the mur
der of "Billy" Brown is certain.
CHANCE FOR YOUNG STARS
Maany Supers Are Needed for "The
Pit" Tonight Five Women Are
Also Needed.
There is an opportunity tonight for
croodlv number of men and a few
young women to make their debut be
fore the footlights with one of the
best dramatic companies in the coun
try. "The Pit," which will be present
ed at the Gennett this evening, re
quires a large number of people in
the famous grain pit scene and In
large cities there is never difficulty in
getting as many . of these supernu
niaries Is is desired. Manager Swish
er today advertises for seventy-five
men and five women to take part in
this scene tonight. Applicants are to
be at the stage door of the Gennett
at 7 o'clock.
First Photo Taken
' MAYOR SCHMITZ OF SAN FRANCISCO.
Mayor Schmitz returned to San Francisco yesterday and although
charged with graft in connection with the distribution of funds for earth
quake sufferers and extortion from keepers of French reaurants, four
thousand people turned out to give their-executive a royal welcome. In a
stirring speech he told the citizens that he had hurried home from Europe
to face the charges which were made against him by political enemies. He
declared that he needed no quarter nor would give none.
Schmitz is known as the "union labor mayor," hav'ng been elected
by the Labor party. He is now serving his third term.. Mayor Schmitz is
a native of San Francisco, forty-two years old. His father was a German
musician and his mother was Irish. Schmitz studied medicine, but left cof
leoe on account of ill health. He is a musician and a manufacturer.
Elks to Hold Beautiful Memo
rial Service at Gennett
Next Sunday.
FINE SOUVENIR PROGRAM
COVER RICHLY EMBOSSED WITH
FINELY ANTLERED ELK AS
THE CENTRAL FIGURE THE
DEATH ROLL.
A beautifully designed and printed
souvenir program has been issued for
the annual Elks' Memorial services,
which will be held Sunday afternoon
in the Gennett theater. The cover is
richly embossed, the head of a fully
antlered Elk being the central figure
The clock dial showing the hour to be
II, a significant feature of Elkdom.
also appears. The inner pages of
the souvenir in addition to giving a
complete program of the memorial
services, give the roster of the lodge
membership and all officers.
The special committees for the Me
morial services follow:
F. S. Anderson, General Chairman.
Committee on Speakers A. A. Burr.
B. C. Robbins and R. K. Shiveley.
Committee on Music Will Earhart,
J. F. Thompson and F. J. Bartel.
Committee on Program Milo H.
Ferrell, Earl Mann and E. B. Calvert.
Committee on Hall E. E. Eggemey-
er, Geo. B. Dougan and H. C. Downing.
Committee on Decoration F. H.
Lemon, W. A. Park and H. Needham.
Purposes of Memorial.
The program contains the following
explanation of the custom of Elks the
world over, of holding annual memori
al services:
"In compliance with a beautiful cus
tom inaugurated by the Grand Lodge
of Elks, the first Sunday in December
of each year ia designated as a day to
commemorate in sacred session, the
memory of our departed brothers.
"Noble Elks have fallen, pierced by
the arrow of death; their trials ended,
their faults forgotten, their virtues
cherished, they now rest in peace.
"It is our duty as Elks, to inscribe
upon our Memorial Tablets records of
their works in Charity, Justice, Broth
erly Love and Fidelity, and preserve
them in tne annais oi ine jsenevoient
and Protective Order of Elks.
"No deaths have occurred within the
past two years, yet we meet as Elks,
bound together by that electric cur
rent which unites the 1 '.rts of men
(Continued to Page Eight.)
PENNY SELLS CIGAR
BUSINESS AT CAMBRIDGE
Harry Penny, county clerk-elect,
has sold his cigar manufacturing bus
iness at Cambridge City and after be
ing connected with the business for
more than twenty years. Mr. Penny
will move to Richmond within the
next two weeks and has rented . a
home on North Fourteenth street,
near D.
Since His Return,
J' X '
amp r i ft an misriANn tn admiration Gee! Wonder if I'll ever have that amount of nerve.
There is an organized crusade in
Item.
WILL PREACH FOR
THREE CHURCHES
Tne RgV J L Rutin iS tO COITl-
bine Ministerial Duties with
Lecturinig.
HE HAS A FULL PROGRAM
SPLENDID RACE AGAINST CON
GRESSMAN WATSON HAS TEND
ED TO MAKE PREACHER-POLI
TICIAN VERY POPULAR.
The Rev. T. H. Kuhn of . this city,
who resigned his pastorate here, to
devote his time to his campaign
against Congressman Watson several
months ago, has' received several
very flattering offers from some of the
larger of the Christian churches of
the state, they desiring his services
as pastor, but owing to the fact that
the Rev. Mr. Kuhn desires to give the
most of his time to tne lecture plat
form, he does not wish to accept a
call that would necessarily occupy all
of his time.
He has accepted calls to the church
es of New Lisbon, Raleigh and Flat
rock. The latter two charges are
churches in Rush county and he will
preach for each once a month. He
will give half of his time to the churcn
at New Lisbon.
Dr. Kuhn is receiving calls from all
parts of the state for lectures and dur
ing the next three months, the heighth
of the lecture season, he will be kept
busy. - On Dec. 7, he will deliver a
lecture at Windfall, Ind., on Dec
9th he will deliver the K. of P. Memo
rial address at Connersville, and
Dec. 12th he will speak at Shelbyville
under the auspices of the Union Y. P.
S. C. E.
The month of January will also be a
busy one for the '"preacher politician,"
on the lecture platform, as he has re
ceived many calls for addresses
throughout the month, but he has as
vet arranged no dates.
IF SO, WAS VERY QUIET
To All Appearances the Lid Remains
in Its Accustomed Place All of
Yesterday.
; If the "lid" was tilted in Richmond
yesterday, patrons of drink dispens-
ing.mavuuimmS..iuui -i- i
toed it in and out very quietly, for
the police did not find any evidence
of unlawful sales. There were a few
persofls who evidently had forgotten
that saloons must close on Thanks-
giving day lor m some instances er- falJ and wiI1 haTe it under fui head
forts were made to gain entrance to waj- early next spring.
such places, only to find the doors j
barred and the interiors exposed to j rnn DAIDO nc OI'ATCC
view as the law requires.
James Fuller Dead.
James Fuller, aged 75 years, died ,
at his home No. 1SS Fort Wayne Ave. .
last night as result of a stroke of j
paralysis. His wife and two children
Mrs. Fred Miller and Thomas Fuller j
survive.
' 4y '
Germany against the useless and ex
DAMAGE SUIT TO RESULT
FROM JOS. COMER'S DEATH
Attorneys for the Family are Said to
be Ascertaining Where the Respon
sibility Should be Placed Before
Suing.
It Is said that a damage suit is
to result from the tragic death of Jo
seph Comer, which occurred in the
Minck Brewery two weeks ago, as a
result of Comer having picked up
an incandescent burner which was
fed by a wire that had come in con
tact with a high tension wire of the
Richmond Interurban Company.
The matter has been under the full
est investigation by attorneys for the
family since the coroner's verdict was
filed and action is to result within a
few days, it is said. It is not announc
ed against which company, the Rich
mond Light, Heat & Power Company
or the Richmond Street & Interurban
Company, the suit will be directed, or
whether both will be parties to the
action, but likely the interurban com
pany will be alleged to be responsi
ble as it was the feed wire erected
by this company, .with which the ser
vice wire of the Light, Heat & Power
Company is said to have came in con
tact, thus permitting a heavy voltage
of electricity to enter the brewery.
E. J. LOWENSTEIN DEAD
Former Richmond Man in Michigan
City for Murder Passed Away
From Bright's Disease.
Emanuel J. Lowenstein, a peddler,
who killed Henry Stiver of Muncie
three years ago, and who at one time j
resided in Richmond, died Saturday !
in the Michigan City prison after a !
long illness. Death was due to i
I3right's disease. Lowenstein killed i
Stiver in a fight that followed a quar
rel relative to the sale of patent med
icine which Lowenstein was peddling.
He . was convicted of manslaughter
and'sentenced to prison for an inde
terminate period of from one to four
teen 3-ears.
A "DUSTLESS" COMPANY
Local Men to Go Into House Cleaning
Business Along the Most Sci
entific Lines.
A local company has been formed
fop the purpoS3 of going into the
dustIess- housecleaning business,
T - commmv has DUrchased a moVa-
ble mactine similar to the ones that
were operating in Richmond the past
RENTED AT COLISEUM
Testerdav was another busy day for
the Coliseum managers as over fif-
teen hundred pairs of skates were
rented during the day. Last night an
unusually large crowd was present at
the rink to skate, while many persoas
attended to watch the gay festivities.
pensive "finery" of women. News
SEASONED CEMENT
POLE IS ERECTED
Invention of Supt. Bailey of
Home Telephone Company
Is Successful.
FILLS LONG FELT WANT
UNIQUE TELEPHONE POLE TO
TAKE THE PLACE OF THOSE TA
EN FROM THE FORESTS AT-
TRACTS ATTENTION.
flat proDaoiy was tne hrst cou
crete telephone or telegraph pole ever
erected in the United States, if not in
the 'world, was set in place yesterday
by the Richmond Home elephono Com
pany, and bids fair to be the complete
success that its designer, Supt. fiaiiey
anticipates. The pole was ylaced in
the alley at the rear of the company's
new building on North 9th street, and
it will be an object of interest to all
persons, but more particular!- to
those connected with the telephony
telegraph or" electric lighting business.
Pine Poles Hard to Get.
it is a iact wen Known tnat pine
poles are becoming more difficult to
obtain each year, the forests from
which they are derived, gradually be
ing depleted. In conscquenco the
prices increase in proportion anrl at
this time a pine pole 30 feet lorg
costs approximately 6. Supt. Uailey
has been seriously considerinig substi-
tutes for pine poles for j-ears. and like
ly other men in his profession have
racked their brain in. a like manner
However, it remained for Supt. Bailey
to evolve, a plan and execute it and
this he has done. , The concrete pole
which yesterday was put in place i
thirty feet in length, as straight as an
arrow and ornamental. .Its shape is
octagon, and mortises are provided so
tht linemen may mount to the top
when occasions require. There are
also mortises at the top for cros?
arms, which are bolted in place
The skeleton work of the pole consists
(Continued to Page Eight)
THEATER GOERS INJURED
Switch Engine Collides with Traction
Car at Dayton and Many Are
Badly Injured.
Dayton, O.. .Nov. 29. (SpL) A
switch engine collided wMi a trac
tion car on tne uayton and XenI line
near here tonight, and many were in
jured, none fatally. The car was fill
ed with a crowd of Xenia people who
had been attending the theater at
Dayton. . -
Chas. Sorter Improved.
Milton, Ind., Xov. 23. (Spl) Chas.
A. Sorber, who was stricken while at
work in hi3 barn recently is much
Improved. It is thought he had a mild
attack of. apoplexy.
Thanksgiving Day Observed in
a Most. Fitting Manner by
Richmond People.
FOOD FOR MIND AND BODY
ALL DENOMINATIONS HELD SER
VICES WHILE FESTAL BOARDS
GROANED WITH CHOICE OF
THE LAND.
The observance of Thanksgiving
in Richmond was more gouoraf" hau
in many years. It was i J;- of fami
ly reunions and the' homo wa? tlu
place that almost rer b .nly who
could clain; a home, sttent i!ie greater
part of the day. The ve.uhi-c was n
bit unseasonable, but enjoyable Urc all
that. Warm sunsh ot ;nd ;u almost
cloudless sky were mudly typical ,.f
the day and to many a H.atii!g f
snow on the ground Mould f.ue tteiii'
ed more appropriate.
The ciiurch seivlvs yesterday
morning were in al. imiances l.irgHy
attended, especially in those church
es where union services were he!J,
two and sometimes thro? congr ra
tions joining. Special mumc.i! pro
grams were Riven, aul the stuiopm
were appropriate to the day. i'lcba li
ly a thousand Richn.oud npio i;t
the city to spend the day with rela
tives and friends in ueirrhhoring cit
ies and towns. In ad.iUiO'i to heay
out-going traffic on the interurban
lines, the C. C. & L. and the Pennsyl
vania also did much business. To off
set the exodus of R'chmonditet tln-ro
was a considerable L-flux of visitors
uho came to break '4raad and ctt tur
key with relatives iu ems Quaker City.
Cemetery Association " Dinners.
At Centerville and . Williamsburg
the Cemetery Associations piepareJ
special Thanksgiving dinners and ths
patronage at both iv.-io was large.
At Centervilk- 418 persons were serv
ed and ot this number btweei fifty
ard one hundred wny from Uicb
Eiond. The WiMiauisbur.-; Cemetery
Association fared almost as veil.
Richmond's hotels. ' uxnooia'.ly tbo
Arlington and the Wester ts usual
had sumptuous holiday H lor
their guests and the diuing rooms ot
loin hotels were tl!3el bjtii at the
noon and evening "hours." Quite a
hv.ffe number of traveling men pass
ed the .lay in Richmond.
Several of the men's social clubs
I.ej t 'open house'' yesi.-srd.tv and
Richmond Idse of !J!k had its usu
al Lig spread waich was served in the
aftcinooa tt 4 o'clock,
TO CONTINUE AGITATION
F0 FLAT TWO-CENT FARE
'Homeless 26," Travelers Organira-
i.
tion Are Determined to Have. Low
Rate on Railroads in Indiana and
Pennsylvania.
"The Homeless 26" an organiza
tion of traveling men in which a nuni
her of Richmond men are members,
announces in a circular letter just
issued that it will continue its agita
tion for 2-cent passenger fares in In
diana and Pennsylvania and for the
complete abolition of the rebate
charge now made by the railroads in
selling interchangeable- milearo
books. "The Homeless 20" is an or
ganization of commercial travelers
banded together for the purpose of
forcing certain reforms on the rail
roads. -
An aggressive campaign for a
straight 2-cent fare and a mileage
book to sell for S 20 flat was conduct
ed in Pennsylvania. As a result of the
agitation passenger fares were cut
from 3 to 2 1-2 cents a mile and the
rebate charge of $10 on mile?g.
books was cut in half.. "The llom'ess
26" is not satisfied and will not be,
according to tne circular, until the
objects- sought at the time of organi
zation are obtained. v
Another reform now demanded is
uniformity in the charge of handling
baggage.. The commercial traveler
think that present charges are exces
sive and , arbitrary, they demand a
reduction and a uniform scheduls
that will be effective in all large cit
ies. The circular In discussing this
phase of the organization's
wor!;
says:
MR. AND MRS. CHAPMAN
ENTERTAINED FOR SON
Cambridge City, Nor. 29. Sol.)
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Chapman enter
tained a number of young people at
their home in East Cambridge, Mon
day evening. In honor of their on
Verne, all the guests being masqu-id.
The evening was spent fn an enjoya
ble manner with games, music, etc.
Those present were Editi Morgan,
Catherine Doney, Ina Ingermann. Er
ma Morgan. Hazel Scott, ilslen Dyke,
Louisa Kimmel and Rufus Kecve.
Olan Scott, Robert BertschLesiie and
Bernard Clawson, Fred Wright, Russel
and Verne Chapman and Carl and
Walter Ingerman. Refreshments
:jwere served.

xml | txt