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The Richmond palladium. (Richmond, Ind.) 1906-1907, December 29, 1906, Image 1

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WOL. XXKl. SO, 329.
Richmond, indiana, Saturday Morning, December 29, 1906.
Single Copy, One Cent.
PRES. CASSATT IS
CLAIMS HUSBAND
IS RESIDENT HERE
DRUNKENNESS HEAD LIST
TASTE OE TURKEY
AND GODD THIKGS
FORGERY CHARGED
NOTED RAILWAY EXECUTIVE DEAD.
DEAD AT HIS HOME
T
POLICE REPORT FOR YEAR
y n '
PA
AGAIIS
PR S
AOI.
toort
Ut
lift'
Hi PHILADELPHIA
lead of the Pennsylvania Rail
road Passed Away After
: Repeated Denials Had
Been Made of III Health.
DAUSE OF HIS DEATH
I
io niMCM mo ovupnoe
3reat Railroad Executive Suf-
i f nnnrl Mn-h C!rro AfforU nf
ICI bU III L4VI I vmiiisv nivuwn wi
Whooping Cough Contract
ed from Grandchildren.
Publishers' Press.
rriiadeiphia, jmc 2. Alexander j.
paSsatt, president of the Pennsylvan!a
Railroad company, died suddenly Fri
day afternoon at 1 o'clock. The an
ouncement of hla death was made
rom his office In a bulletin, which
fitated that he died of heart disease.
The symptoms were those known to
rrfaon ns Stokes-Adams syn
pope and, as is often the case under
hese circumstances, death was in
stantaneous. Cassatt's health was impaired by an
ittack of whooping cough he contract
ed from two grandchildren during the
jjummer after his return from Europe.
Several times his health was reported
o be in a precarious condition, and
ach report was emphatically denied,
.10 that the public was not expecting
jo receive such a startling announce
ment. f Death occurred at the residence at
J202 West RIttenhouse Square, sur
rounded by members of the family at
lorae at the time.
Early in October Cassatt felt much
better and went regularly to his office
or several weeks, when he was at
acked by a heavy cold. His exac'
"onditlon was not publicly known and
'his cave rise to the many rumors of
lierlous illness. He recovered suffi
ciently to resume his duties, and was
lit Broad street station regularly until
Dec. ,8. his birthday. That was the
ast day he was at his office. Since
hat time he ispent much of his time
hiving and at his home transacting
fjnly the most important business
brought to his attention. He was oui
;J riving last Monday.
Although not feeling as well as he
iad been Cassatt rose from his bed
Friday, but did not leave his room,
frhe family was not alarmed, as he
feemed to be in good spirits, and none
Jiad the slightest thought of death.
bout 1 o'clock, while sitting In a
? hair, the final attack came. He was
nstantly rendered unconscious, and
tils attending physician arrived only
o find him dead.
I
MOURNING FOR 30 DAYS.
4
' - r . . a- n -
weep nespeci jor ueccasea nan-
i, . -- .-
Publishers' Press.
New York, Dec. 2S. The news of
e death of President A. J. Cassatt,
if the Pennsylvania railroad, was re
ceived with expressions of deep sor
;,ow and regret at the offices of the
x)ng Island railroad this afternoon,
'ir. Cassatt had closely identified
himself with the interests of the
Sl'ini' Inland railroad ivhlrh la now
' 1 1 . 1 T 1 1 11 J
.ixti iiiijuviiiij i u i ii 14 ,v nuu ti ui i iv ii
"Ivor the line. President Ralph Pet-
j rs was a very close personal friend
'f Mr. Cassatt. and the two were in
frequent consultation, not only as to
flatters affecting the Long Island
Railroad system, but concerning the
A.-ork of the big tunnel of the Pennsyl
vania railroad under the East and
l'orth rivers and Manhattan Island,
hich Mr. Cassatt considered the
p?; (Continuea on Page Two.)
Ofc FOR A CODIFICATION
l?rosecutor Jessuo Thinks Many of
I the Ancient Criminal Laws
Should be Weeded Out.
0.j Prosecutor Jessup said yesterday
-nat he believed the coming session
' if the legislature would be doing a
j.ockI thing if it should order a com-
iLiete codification of the criminal laws
re Indiana, l'rosecutor Jessup is of
ICne opinion that thre are many an-
reiient criminal statutes still in force
ouf which little or nothing is known
Kind which should be weeded out.
Jtril'r onnrnnv
ARRESTED
a Ii Speed Taken in by the Police on a
of Having Stolen
' O - a
Brass Castings.
re t- VM Sneed. colored. whns nickname I
lb?ttaspberry,, has brought him much'
btoriety, was arrested yesterday on a
giharge of stealing brass castings from
.e Pennsylvania railroad company,
will bo arraigned today.
If V- - ' ' VI
PRESIDENT CASSATT
RELIEVED OF HIS
OFFICE AT LUST
Spartansburg Postoffice Has
Been Abolished by the Fed
eral Authorities.
E.J.RICH, A HAPPY MAN
HE HAD TRIED TO GET RID OF
THE OFFICE BUT HAD A HARD
TIME IN DOING SO MAIL TO
BE SENT TO CRETE.
The troubles of Earnest J. Rich,
the Spartansburg postmaster, who
moved to Richmond last October are
over, and he will not be reauired to
make his weekly trips to that hamlet
in order to settle up the business, if
the dispatch received , yesterday is
correct, and every thing points to
that effect. In a dispatch to the In
dianapolis Star from Washington
Louis Ludlow says:
"The strenuous efforts of citizens
of Spartansburg, Randolph County, to
prevent the abolishment of the post-
office at that place have failed. An
official order for the discontinuance
of this office on January 15 was Issu
ed today. The mail will be sent to
Crete and thence distributed by rural
carrier."
Mr. Rich resigned his position as
postmaster at Spartansburg the first
of October in order to locate in busi
ness in this city. He thought that his
resignation had been accepted as he
had named an appointee to fill his
place and the ijostofflce department
sent an application blank to secure
the names qf the patrons of the
Spartanburg office, sanctioning the
man Mr. Rich had named. Mr. Rich
thinking all was well moved his fam
ily to Richmond leaving his father in
charge of the office. The other man
never received his appointment from
the postoffice department at Washing
ton, and hence Mr. Rich had to act
as postmaster against his will even
though he was a , resident of Rich
mond. His appeals to Congressman
Cromer of the Eighth district were
unfruitful, and it was not until he
had made an appeal to the Federal
authorities, that the matter was fin
ally decided. Mr. Rich received the
announcement with a sigb of relief,
as the office at Spartansburg was a
dead financial loss "to him as he had
to pay the rent for the store room in
which the office was located.
Mr. Rich is inclined to think that
the loss of the postoffice at Spartans
burg will greatly enhance the busi
ness of the community owing to the
fact that the farmers and merchants
used the money order department of
the office, as a medium for banking
purposes. Over $10,000 worth of
business of this kind was' done each
year.
CAPITAL STOCK $400,000
Richmond Home Telephone Company
Makes an Increase From $150.
000 Notice Filed.
Because of the additional value
holdings, including real , estate and
equipment, of the Richmond Home
Telephone Company, the capital
stock of the corporation has been In
creased from $130,000 to $400,000.
Formal notice to this effect was filed
yesterday at Indianapolis with the
Secretary of State by J. W. Moore, an
officer of the company.
OF THE PENNSYLVANIA.
16 WERE KILLED
AND 31 IIIJORED
Fast Express Train Collides
with Snowbound Local at
Aberdeen, Scotland.
MANY EXPOSED TO COLD
I Relief Slow In Reaching Injured on
Account of Terrible Blizzard That
Has Been Raging for Forty-Eight
Hours.
Publishers' Press.
Aberdeen, Scotland, Dec. 29. As a
result of a rear end collision Friday
night between a local and express
train from Aberdeen to Arbroath, six-
j teen persons were killed, thirty-seven
! seriously, some of them fatally, in
jured, while scores of old passengers
' suffered severely from exposure to the
cold before they were finally rescued.
The accident occured a few miles
: from Arbroath, where the local train
was snowbound. The signals becom
ing clogged with snow, refused to
jwork and a clear track was set for
I the express, which followed in the
wake of the local. The engineer of
the express kept his train running at
a high rate of speed and not until
j he 'was close upon the rear end of the
, accommodation, was he aware that a
(collision was inevitable. He immedi
' ately put on the air brakes, but they
had no effect and in an instant the
two trains met.
Relief trains were at once despatch-
' ed to the scene from Aberdeen and
Arbroath, but the heavy blizzard
which has been raging for the past for
ty-eight hours, greatly retarded the
. work of the rescuers.
j The dead and wounded were extri-
; cated from the wreck as quickly as
possible and the wounded were giv
en temporary relief by the physicians
who accompanied the relief trains
They were then put on trains and ta
ken to Aberdeen and Arbroach,
: where they were placed in hospitals.
It is feared that several of them will
' not survive their injuries.
I A temporary morgue was erected
! near the scene of the wreck, where
those who were killed were placed.
As soon as the dead and injured had
been taken care of, the work of rescu
ing the other passengers was taken
up, but not until they had suffered se
verely from exposure to the cold and
snow, were they taken from the
wrecked trains.
Both trains were a mass of wreck
age, and the work of clearing away the
debris continued until well into the
night. The road was blocked for sev
eral hours.
TWO PERISHED IN FLAMES
Mrs. Charles Abbott, Victim of a Fa
tal Fire at Woodbury, N. J.
Had Visited Here.
Xaihan Garwood yesterday received
a telegram from Woodbury, N. J., in
forming him that the home of his
. niece, Mrs. Lewis Starr, was destroyed
j by fire early in the day and that Mrs.
! Charles Abbott, mother of Mrs. Starr,
'and a sister of Mr. Garwood, perished
I in the flames. Mrs. Abbott was about
j 63 years of age. She was known to a
number of Richmond people, having
visited here-
Mrs. Emma A. Swain Arrested
in Newark on Charge of
Shoplifting.
NOT KNOWN IN RICHMOND
ALTHOUGH THE WOMAN SAYS
SHE FORMERLY LIVED IN CITY
LOCAL POLICE KNOW NOTHING
OF HER.
New York, Dec. 2S, (Spl.) Accus
ed of shoplifting but declaring she is
a kleptomaniac and that she is ncf
responsible for her light finge!r, a
middle ageJ soman is a 'prisoner in
the police headquarters, Newark.
She says he name is Mrs. Emma A.
Swain and that her husband is a
wealthy citizen of Richmond. Indiana
She had been stopping in a boarding
house since she 'arrived in Newark,
two weeks ago.
The woman, who was dressed in
deep mourning, was discovered by a
woman detective in a Broad street
department store depositing stolen
articles in an opening in her skirt.
When she was searched it was found
that she had two pockets In her skirt,
each extending nearly to the ground.
They were such as the professional
shoflifters use. They contained
about $200. worth of jewelry, pocket
books, gloves, and other small artic
les. She also had in her possession,
a woman's hunting case gold watch.
This, she admitted she had stolen
from a jewelry store in Dayton, O.
When questioned the prisoner
; would say little about herself, except
: hat Richmond, Ind., was her native
: town, and that her husband is still
there. Ten years ago he had left
her, she. stated, because of the un
pleasant notoriety she had brought
on the family through her weakness
for taking what belonged to others.
' NOT REMEMBERED HERE.
If Mrs. Emma A. Swain, whose ar
rest in New York, is detailed in the
above dispatch, ever resided in Rich
mond, none of the numerous persons
of whom inquiry was made by the
Palladium last night, have any recol
lection of her. It Is evident however,
that the woman formerly resided
here but undoubtedly the name of
Emma A.' Swain is ficticious. It is
regarded as likely that she would
give an assumed name under the cir
cumstances. G. W. DICKINSON IS DEAD
OUTCAST FROM HIS FAMILY
Well Known Character About Town
Died Yesterday at the Reid Memo
rial Hospital Trustee Took Charge
of the Remains.
George William Dickinson, aged
about fifty years, a well known char
acter about town, died at Reid Memori
al hospital yesterday morning. " He
was a charity patient at the hospital
j i . , . t . , . , ... , , .
and it is said that his death, indirect-.
ly, was due to dissipation. Dickin-
son was a rrinnl and dissointA hahit
rendered him an outcast of his family.
As neither relatives r,or friend!
As neither relatives nor friends
claimed the body, the hospital author-'
ities notified the Township trustee
yesterday afternoon and by the, order
of that officer the body was removed
to the undertaking parlors of Doan &
Klute, South 8th street Xo funeral
services will be held, but the inter
ment will take place this afternoon.
GOING TO INDIANAPOLIS
Demas S. Coe Will Take Position on
Staff of the News During the
Legislature.
Demas S. Coe who has been a mem
ber of the reportorial force of the Pal
ladium for the past year, has resign
ed and next week will go to Indiana-
pons to taKe a place on the staff ot time even in winter, "said Mr. Xew
the Indianapolis News during the ses- j kirk "Last week on the days when
sion of the General Assembly. He
will return to Richmond in the
spring.
A DELIGHTFUL BANQUET
Young People's Christian Union Held :
Social at Reid Memorial Church
Last Night.
One of the most delightful social
events at the United Presbyterian
church in several months was the
banquet and social held last nig.it in
the dining hall o the church, the
members of the Young People's
Christian Union participating. The
tables were beautifully decorated and
a sumptuous repast was served.
Following the banquet officers f or
the ensuing year were elected as fol-
lows :
Pres. Jeanette Von Pein.
Vice Pres. Sherman Brown.
Secy. Martha Scott.
Treas. Forrest Farrow.
Up to Yesterday 634 Arrests Had
Been Made by the Department, 269
of Which Were of Liquor Victims
The Other Charges.
The report of the police department
for the fiscal year which will end
with the close of December, shows
that a total of 634 arrests have been
made, up to and including yesterday.
Drunkeness headed the list of causes,
there having been 269 victims of in
temperance who were arrested daring
the period. Five arrests were made
for forgery; seven for grand larceny;
twenty for pettit larceny; three for
assault and battery with intent to
kill; three for highway robbery; one
for burglary and one for murder. For
: violations of the liquor aw tC-re
i were 42 arrests. Vagrancy, suspic
' ion, assault and battery and various
j other minor causes are designated for
the remainder of the arrests.
TD .RETIRE FROM
ACTIVE BUSINESS
President James J. Hill An
nounces He Will Quit Har
ness July 1, 1907.
A REMARKABLE CAREER
HIS ELDEST SON WILL SUCCEED
HIM HILL'S LIFE SPENT IN
HELPING TO DEVELOPE EM
PIRE OF NORTHWEST.
Publishers' Press.
Minneapolis, Minn., Dec. 28. Jas.
J. Hill, president of the Great North
ern Railway and probably the most
picturesque and remarkable charact
er of the railroad and financial world
today, will retire from active business
and active management of his many
mammoth enterprises July 1, 1907.
This announcement comes from Mr.
Hill himself. His successor will be
his eldest son, Louis W. Hill, now
first vice-president of the Great Nor
thern, who possesses in large degree
the exceptional genius of his father
and who will still have at his disposal
the guiding hand of "the Empire
builder of the Northwest." From
time to time in the past few years
there have been rumors that Mr. Hill
was planning to retire. The definite
time for the retirement has never
been announced until today when Mr.
Hill himself named the date for get
ting out of the harness.
"I have planned to retire as soon as
v l:1!, ;: ;,:; CI, tZ
wok oi a meume u
7?? m Lnr?
tnat win enaure.
or n"y ;farf. or eTer "nce "Mm the Wavne Circuit Court When
f . .
birthplace at the age of 18, Mr. HiU
has followed steadily his dream of the
o mr,iro in
came io oi. raui ii um uia wuauiau,
Northwest, and at the age of 68. he
i m ith ,b nnnllh-
, win retire with his work accomplish
ed
T. J. NEWKIRK llf CITY
Declares Thst Southwest is a Great
Country Tells of the Mild
Weather There.
Thomas J. Xewkirk, formerly of.
Richmond, now in the land depart
ment of the Rock Island, was in
Richmond yesterday a short time
transacting business. He is now lo
cated, temporarily at least, at Little
Rock, Ark., and he declares that the
Southwest is a wonderful country for
those seeking Investments. "We are
but a step from the good-old summer
zero weather prevailed an Indiana
I was driving along a country rod
that was dusty and in the door yards
of farmers I saw roses in bloom."
INCREASE CAPITAL STOCK
First National Bank of Hagerstown
Shows Signs of Prosperity After
Short Life.
The First Xational Bank of Hagers
town will soon increase" Its capital
stock from $30,000 to $50,000. The
institution is about one year old and
took the place of the Commercial
Bank, a private institution, which
went to the wall as a result of the
misappropriation of its funds. The
First Xational of Hagerstown is one
of the solid banks of Eastern Indiana
and in an unusually short time has I
1 established an enviable refutation,
Three Hundred Poor Children
Enjoy Annual Feast of the
Penny Club.
SHORT TALKS WERE MADE
THE REVS. CASE AND WADE
SPOKE A FEW WORDS IN KEEP
ING WITH SPIRIT OF THE HAP
PY OCCASION.
Between 230 and COO children,
whose ages range from five to fif
teen years, were the delighted guests
of the women of the Richmond Pen
ny Club In the Pythian Temple yes
terday afternoon.
The occasion- was the annual
Christmas entertainment and dinner
for the poor boys and girls of the
city and the expenses of the affair
were met by Daniel G. Reid. of New
York, in accordance with his custom.
Perhaps yesterday's affair was the
most successful ever held. The
children began to reach the temple
early in the forenoon and they dis
played remarkable patience in wait
ing for the dinner to be served and
for the distribution of toys, dolls and
candy which followed.
. Short talks were made by the Rev.
Mr. Wade of the First Methodist
church and the Rev. Clarence M.
Case, of South Eighth street Friends'
church. There were numerous visi
tors who seemed to derive great
pleasure in witnessing the merry
making of the children. The dinner
was sumptuous. Two hundred pounds
of turkey were consumed in addition
to all the trimmings that combine to
make a Christmas repast complete.
The children displayed marvelous
appetites and as a rule they missed
nothing that was on the menu, from
turkey down to pie. In addition to
the toys and dolls that were distribu
ted, each child received a bag of can
dy and an orange. The little folks
left the temple with light hearts and
if they had any troubles of their own,
they were buried under the thoughts
of the happy day which the Penny
Club and Daniel G. Reid had provid
ed. TAKES BLAME HIMSELF
GEORGE HICKS CONFESSES
Admits that His Brother Had Nothing
to Do With Attempt to Get Fifty
Dollars from First National Bank by
Raising Check.
George Edward Hicks, the young
heero. who tried the "jret-rich-auick"
I -heme, raising a $3 check to $50. but!
j failed to push it through the bank
when h offered it. will be arraigned
arrested Hicks imnlicated his brother,
Jd' k8 that though
inuidy"KB' U"1U y1'- l"u"u
made an endeavor to cash the
.,, . ,
j ' ramlulef check, the actual work of
raising it was done by Findlay.
Yesterday Findlay was taken into
custody, but it was but for a short unfinished when it was dismissed. By
time. It was evident from the stories request of the district attorney. a spe
of the two men that Findlay was tell-' cial grand Jury was drawn for the sole
ing the truth when he denied all J purpose of taking up the insurance
knowledge of the transaction and that I cases. The real activity, however, be-
George Edward was adding another
crime to the first one by his false ac
cusation. Before the Inquiry had proceeded
far, George Edward made a clean
breast of the whole affair and said that
his brother Findlay was innocent.
Hicks will plead guilty when arraign
ed in the circuit court and will ask
for leniency.
K. G. E. ELECTION HELD
William Isenhour Is Named Past
Chief Installation to Take Place
Next Thursday.
The Knights of the Golden Eagle
have elected the following officeis:
Past Chief William Isenhour.
Xoble Chief A- W. Xoss.
Vice Chief William Bricker.
High Priest Xate Blue.
Clerk of Exchequer Henry Harris.
Keeper of Exchequer J. B. Beck
with. Master of Records J. H. Bailey.
Sir Herald W. H. Moon.
Venerable Hermit H. Barker.
Trusttee J. H. Bailey.
All members are requested to be
present next Thursday, as officers are
to be installed.
Poor Season for Trappers.
Milton, Ind., Dec. 28. (Spl.) The
trappers report the poorest season for
several years. A few days ago
Clark Brattain and Cyrus Philport
duz out 7 skunks from
pelts of the odorous animals sold for
$10.30.
AND EAIRCHILD
Former Vice President and a
Trustee of the New York
Life Company Indicted by
the Grand Jury.
HAND OF LAW FALLS ON
HIGHLY PROMINENT MEN
Perkins Gives Bond in $10,000
for His Appearance and
Fairchild is Now in Europe
Careers of Officials.
Publishers Preas.J
Nw York. ijve. -S. George W. Per
kinS. formerly vice president of the
New York Lite Insurance company,
and Charles S. Fairchild, a trustee of
the New ,York Life Insurance com
pany, were Indicted by th grand Jury
on a charge of forgery In the third
degree.'
The indictments were based on what
is known as the Prussian bond trans
action, in which it is charged that a
false statement was made by the New
York Life Insurance company, in order
to satisfy the government of Prussia
as to the securities held by that com
pany. Perkins is a member of the firm of
J. P. Morgan & Co., and Fairchild was
secretary of treasury in the Cleveland
cabinet, after the death of Daniel
Manning in 1SS7, until the end of the
term in 18S9.
Perkins appeared In court and gave
ball in the sum of $10,000. Fairchild
is in Europe.
When Perkins was arraigned he en
tered a plea of not guilty, reserving
the right to withdraw the plea at a
later date. He was given until Jan.
21 to file demurrers. Bail for Perkins
was furnished by J. P. Morgan, Jr.,
who pledged the house at 229 Madison
avenue, valued at $300,000, and Cleve
land H. Dodge, who pledged six acres
of land valued at $50,000.
The grand Jury's investigation of
the affairs of the New York Life Insur
ance company, which resulted In the
indictments was a direct outgrowth
of the investigation of the insurance
companies by a legislative committee
a year ago. r
So voluminous was the testimony
taken by the legislative committee
that District Attorney Jerome was oc
cupied several months examining it.
George W. Jerkins, a former director
of the company, was arrested on a
technical charge of larceny, but that
proceedings was merely a test case,
which was permitted to go through to
the highest court In the state without
any opposition from the accused.
The pressure on District Attorney
Jerome to proceed against high offi
cials increased rather than diminished
as time went on. During the spring
month, the public demand for action
.-was reinforced by Justice O bullivan
of the court of general sessions who
in a sensational charge to the grand
jury directed it to take up and investl-
gate insurance matter., with the as-
distance of the district attorney, ir ne
choose to give assistance, or without
.
it if he did not. The question was
Jury, but no definite eonclusio,
that
conclusion was
reached, and the work begun was left
gan only a few weeks ago, after the ,
conviction of George W. Burnham. i
Jr., general counsel for the Mutual Re
serve company, on the charge of for
gery. The Indictment of Burnham and
two other high officials of the Mntual
Reserve followed the Insurance inves
tigation. The verdict against Burn-,
ham convinced Jerome, so he announc
ed that there might be grounds on
which he could proceed against offi
cials of the Xew York Life. As a re
suit the matter was once more placed
before the grand Jury and pressed vlg
orously. .
Among present and former New
York Life Insurance officials examined
by the grand Jury are George W. Per
kins. Edmund D. Randolph, treasurer;
F. H. Shipman, assistant treasurer;
Woodbury Langdon and George A.
Morrison, who were members of the
finance committee In 1903-04, and Mil
ton M. Mattison, head, bookkeeper of
the treasury department of the com
pany. Another witness was Alexander
Webb. Jr., secretary of the Xew York
Security and Trust company. '
It has been said that when Perkins
was a witness before the grand Jury
he was warned of his legal rights, but
it is understood that he told all he
knew of his connection with, the vari
ous transactions of the Xew York Life
Insurance company.
THE WEATHER PROPHET.
INDIANA Fair Saturday;
snow or rain.
Sunday,
OHIO Cloudy Saturday and Sunday,
possibly rain Sunday; light varia-
bis winds.'

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