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The Indianapolis journal. (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1867-1904, May 21, 1893, The Sunday Journal, PART TWO, Image 9

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PART TWO.
PAGES9T016
A
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
INDIANAPOLIS, SUNDAY MORNING, MAY 21, 1893-SIXTEEN PAGES.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
SUNDAY
JOl
1 XlLloJ
PEARSON'S
The celebrated HAZELTON BROS. PIANOS, with all their latest improvements, new actions, new scales,
ate, are unequaled by any, and are considered by eminent artists
THE MOST PERFECT PIANO EVER MADE.
The celebrated HAZELTON TIANOS have been before the public for nearly n half century, and arc known everywhere
as the leading Piano of the world. The following is a partial list of tho well-known citizens of Indianapolis who have pur
chased and now have tho HAZELTON PIANO in use:
EX-PRESIDENT JIAriRISON.
GEN. R. S. FOSTER.
NOBLE a BUTLER.
J. S. HILDEBRAND.
JAMES L. ARMSTRONG.
BERQ APPLEOATE.
FRED FAHNLEY,
IL B. H1BBEN.
THOMAS DAVIS.
MRS. B. ALT LAND.
WILLIAM U2ERLE.
BENJAMIN GUNDELFfNGER.
GEORGE W. BEAM:
A. Q. JONES.
C. E. WRIGHT.
O. M. DILLMAN.
GEORGE A. RICHARDS.
IL C MOORE.
MISS M. E. LOWE.
II. F. ALBERSIIARDT.
MISS nATTIE GALBRAITH.
MISS CASSIE DUNN.
MRS. C. BELL.
LOUIS NICOLL
PROF. JAILLET.
' BAMUEL II AN WAY.
E. MUNSELL.
THOS. B. LAYCOCK.
MRS. F. WOERNER.
MRS. M. E. SCHNITKER.
J. REEM.
ST. PATRICK'S SCHOOL.
ROBT ANDERSON G.A.R, POST.
MARY McKERNAN.
J. M.HIGHTSIIUE.
MRS. CARRIE HALL.
JNO. V. 1IAFNER,
C. BANWORTII.
L. W. FERGUSON.
W. W. HOWIE.
JAS. A. ANDERSON.
LOUIS WAPNAITZ.
MRS. M. McKEE.
JOE MORRIS,
C. E. BUSBY.
GLENN H. HOWE,
N. P. D ALTON.
II. J. HIGHLAND.
CHAS. COMSTOCK.
F. E. FULLER.
J. F. FAILEY.
JOS. E. TAG G ART.
JAMES H. PORTER.
E. C. RASSMANN.
P. A. 11 AVER LICK.
E. B. SWIFT.
THOS. McELWEE.
C. E. MERKIFIELD.
CAPT. CHAS. F. DAWSON.
C. W. BRADFORD.
PAUL GRUMMAN.
HENRY SMITH.
ED P. KRAMER.
JOS. ALDRICIL
JAS. E. McGINTY.
MRS. J. F. YOUNG.
E. W. DAWSON.
MISS ATIILENA McCORKLE.
JULIUS MATZKE.
GRAND HOTEL.
CHAS. F. FILL.
.A.
Ex-PreHiclont Harrison Says:
MR. CfEO. C. PEARSON:
Dear fc?ir I ara no musician myselfi hut my wife and daugh
ter are, who regard tho Hazelton Piano as in every respect
satisfactory, and say that they could not desire a better in
strument. BENJAMIN HARRISON.
Tho Hon. Jolin O. Kew Says:
MR. GEO. C. PEARSON:
Dear Sir It allbrds me great pleasure to 8ay that tho
Hnzelton Bros. Piano purchased some nine years ago has
given perfect satisfaction in every respect. We have had
instruments of other celebrated makes in our house, but none
of them proved so satisfactory as the one now in use.
JNO. C. NEW.
LVecl Kalinley, of Fabnley fc MoOrea, Says:
SIR. GEO. C. PEARSON:
Dear Sir We made selection of our Hazelton Eros. Upright
Piano from among tlm Stein way, Hazelton and Kuahe Pianos.
In the comparison tho Hazelton showed itself so far superior
to others in tone, touch, finish and workmanship that we pur
chased the Hazelton. and twelve years of use has fully con
vinced us that the Hazelton Pianos stand unrivaled.
Yours very respectfully. FRED FAHNLEY.
MR. GEO. C. PEARSON:
Dear Sir We thought we were purchasing the "best piano"
when we purchased an Upright Steinway 6c Sons, but we soon
discovered our error alter becomius acquainted with tho
Hazelton Pianos, which had found their way into the homes
of so many of our friends. We becamo so dissatisfied with
our Steinway that wo purchased a Hazelton Upright Piano
The remarkable wearing qualities of
snow so little sicrns of wear and retain
mistaken for now pianos. They are fully warranted for ten years, iust twico as long
new styles lust rereivt'd: cjiso finished in ehonv. ninhnr'nnv Fmrlich VronnK
i i - i " . :
IU1 nana-carvod and engraved panels.
HT Ivr?l?diitfWVAV.V?Jr irf!o'tuient
; v. vx- ciwo i
ulfcUArsb. winch we are offering at
SPECIAL LOW
PEARSON'S
82 and 84 North Pennsylvania Street,
IITDISrA.?OLIS, - - - - I3STD.
Fino PIANO TUNING and REPAIRING a specialty. Squares, 2; Uprights, $2.50.
M
S
INDIANAPOLIS,
Greneral Selling A.gents
HON. JNO. C. NEW.
GEO. F. BRAN HAM.
P. F. BRYCE.
O. II. BRYCE.
a HELwia.
J. W. ELSTON.
HENRY WETZEL.
WM. H. HAGERHORST.
E. L. HASSELD.
PETER M. WRIGHT.
F. A. W. DAVIS.
ALBRECHT KIPP. .
JOHN E. WALTERS.
JOHN T. PARKER.
S. FISCUS.
MARY EASTMAN,
CHARLES ROCKWOOD.
B. K. DAVIS,
RICHARD R. REEVES.
GEO. W. STUBBS.
E. F. MOORE. ,
N. J. OWINGS.
CHARLES F. REBER.
W. II. FULTON.
JOHN I. SCHRINER.
JOSEPH E. HASKELL
P. M. GAPEN.
HENDERSON GEORGE.
CAPT. J. L BIELEK.
WM. A. PFAFF.
JOHN M. COMSTOCK.
F. M. ROTTLER.
charles Mccarty,
chris. schetter.
j. t. tedrowe.
S. W. LONG.
E. C. ATKINS.
G. A. NEARMAN.
II. NEWGARTEN.
JL S. RHAWN.
ROB'T P. BLODAU.
REV. W. F. TAYLOR.
S. W. MILLER
FRANK L. WILMOT.
WM. KRIEL.
J. A. VAN CAMP.
DR. C. B. COMBS.
WM. W. McCREA.
JOHN REAGAN.
P. M. DILL.
JOHN R. LOVE.
W. W. SOTHERLAND.
T. C. WH1TCOMB.
FRED E. HAMLIN.
FRANK H. WILSON.
WM. M. LEVEY.
WM. WILLIAMS.
P. C.8CHWOERER.
JAS. H. KERR.
A. A. WOMACK.
M. W. HUNT.
MRS. EMMA HARGRAVES.
8 AMU EL McCRAY.
MRS. ELLA CUPPY.
A. KiEFER.
J. L. DAVIS.
FIRST GER. M. E. CHURCn.
HON. JOSEPH E. McDONALD. HON. l. t. michener.
PROF. V. W. GRANT. THOMAS E. CHANDLER.
ANDREW SMITH, jr. A. W. HENDRICKS.
MISS MARGUEftET ANDERSON, MRS. M. V. ATCHINSON.
MISS HATTIE WISHARD.
MRS. FLORA V. NELSON.
MRS. S. J. SUFFERN.
MRS. BERTHA TEST.
MRS. H. II. BUSCHER.
MRS. SARAH A. HIBBEN.
mrs. mary Mccarty,
america breiimer.
W. L. BAKER.
MARTIN L. RINEHART.
CHARLES HAYNES.
CHARLES N. ZEPP.
JAMES CARTER.
LOUIS G. DESCIILER.
JOHN CL GREEN.
FRANKLIN C HELM.
II. B. FATOUT.
MRS. E. W. NICHOLSON.
WILLIAM HARD IE.
GEORGE SELLERS,
a L. SHARP.
DECK SHERWOOD.
F. O. FERliELL.
E. M. WILES.
E. T. ALLEN.
JOHN R. ELDER.
A. CLIFFORD.
O. II. PALMER,
DAVID PEPPER,
CHAS. F. MEYER.
MISS SELMA DAMME.
CHAS. A. LEHMAN.
H. KLANKE.
JOHN RAIL.
CHAS. G. KUMLER.
MRS. A. B. LECK.
HENRY EITEL.
BENJ. T. THORNTON,
J. E. FRITTS.
S. A. HARLAN.
ALBERT M INTER.
ALMON LOFTIN.
A. J. McCOLLUM.
CHARLES SOEIINER.
MRS. J. B. GRAYBILL.
P. M. BONE.
MISS ELAN OR WILLIAMS.
B. B. MINER.
MRS. THOS. STOUT.
MRS. J. M. KILER.
MRS. E. P. SULLIVAN.
MRS. J. B. PARKER.
EDWIN E. REXFORD.
JOS. H. STUBBS.
CHAS. STAKE.
S. E. MORSS.
J. S. ROBINSON.
MRS. W. II. SMITH.
HARRY BALSER,
C. C. ODELL.
JEREMIAH CREEDEN.
MRS. C. B. LOCKHART,
V. M. BACKUS.
MISS MARGARET ANDERSON. CHAS. F. WOERNER.
MRS. F. A. MEEK. MRS. J. R. MARTIN.
DR. GEO. J. COOK. JUDGE G. L. RE1NIIARD.
HAUGHVILLE READING ROOMS.
FEW TESTIMONIALS.
Hon. .Li. 1.
MR. GEO. C. PEARSON:
, Dear Sir Tho
which I recently
pleasure we derive
eautiful Hazelton
F AV 1
Hazelton Piano.
tho celebrated HAZELTON PIANOS aro such that after ten or fifteen years of use they
their first full, rich mmlitv nf tnnn tn kmi a wnmlprful vfnnf. in-
j , iiupiwu vatt) i
of Hazelton Pianos vre carry a large stock
imauo auu s i luuiisix i'iaaus; also 1'AUivAiiU and STERLING
PRICES AND ON VERY EASY TERMS-
MUSIC
C
0
SE
IND.,
for tlie
MRS. C. PLOGSTERTH.
MRS. S. D. BOWE
MRS. ELIZABETH MEIER.
MRS. LEHMAN.
MRS. SADIE HUCKE.
MRS. MARY ROYER.
MRS. NETTIE D. FRAZEE.
MRS. C. WENGER.
MISS JENNIE WHITE.
MISS MARY INOERSOLL
MISS EMILY SCHMUCK,
MRS. JULIA TRENARY.
MRS. JOSIE DAWrSON.
MRS. S. H. WYATT.
M. II. GREENEN.
JOHN D. MORAN.
FRED WEBER.
MISS MARY HENCTIMAN.
EDWARD McDEVITT.
MARY HEALEY.
II. E. MATHEWS.
W. H. TUCKER.
RALPH M. HEDGES.
JAMES BELL
CHARLES G. TRAUB.
FRED BRANDT.
M. S. HUEY.
GEORGE LAMB.
LAURA B. APPLEOATE.
R, H. POWER,
BYRON DAWSON.
A. SCHLEICHER.
S. H. SMITH.
R. G. HARSEIM.
J. A. SIMS.
GEO. W. ELBREG.
J. C. MAROTT.
C. J. GARDNER.
HENRY W. PIEL
CLAYTON POTTS.
MRS. C. A. WAITE.
MRS. PEARL SMITH.
OrTO-yTTTrnNZEL
MRS. SARAH E. HARRIS.
CHAS. S. AUSTIN.
MRS. EMMA COFFAY.
INDIANA INSTITUTE FOR
THE BLIND.
PHILIP KEINER.
WM. BUSCHMANN.
MRS. E. RYAN.
MRS. MARGARET SMITH,
MRS. J. A. CLOSSER,
EMILIE BECKER.
MRS. MARY DRUDY.
S. D. PRAY.
C. A. HOLLAND.
MISS BLANCHE BLUE.
W. F. KEAY.
MRS. FANNIE SCnLOSS.
HUNTER BRADFORD.
JNO. E. HANEMAN.
GEO. T. PLANT.
S. A. TOWS LEY.
C. II. HART.
JOS. G. BRUCE.
and tratfed our Steinway as part pay, and ten years of use
has fully convinced us that wo now have what we thought
we were getting at lirsr. "tho best piano."
. Yours truly, HENRY WETZELL.
(Pearson & Wetzell. Wholesale Queensware.)
Miohoner, Attorney. General, Say:
i
beautiful Hazelton Bros. Upright Pia
purchased from you is giving entire sat
lacuon. it is mucn aunnred or all who see and hear it, be
cause of its full, rich tone and exquisite workmanship. My
wifo and daughter join me in thanking vou for seWtinir for
us so line an instrument L. T. MICHENER.
Chas. Soelmer, the Wollknown ex-Piano-Doaler,
Says:
MR. GEO. C. PEARSON:
Dear Sir My lather and myself were engaged in the Diano
trade for nearly thirty years, and during that time handled
almost all the leading brands of pianos, such as Steinway,
Hazelton, Chickering, Knabo and others, but none of thorn
proved so entirely satisfactory in every respect as the Hazelton.
Yours truly, CHARLES SOEHNER.
Indianapolis, Ind.. Juno 12, 1801.
MR. GEO. C. PEARSON. City:
Dear Sir Words can hardly express tho satisfaction and
in owning so hno an instrument as the
Bros. Upright Piano purchased from vou.
A A. A 1 . . . ,
i gives us so mucn Deuer sansiaciion man the Decker Bros.
Inriirht Piano which wo traded to von in nnrf rxmr i
Yours respectfully, MRS. G. G. HO WE.
as any other first-class piano. Beautiful
rsAnon;nn i. ?i . i?
uuii iiuu vutasaiau U1UUI, Wllu UCuutl
of the well-known KRAKAUER BROS.
HOU
THE GBEAT FAIR AT CHICAGO
How to Reach the Grounds from the
City, and the Cost of Transportation.
The Exercise of Common Seme Will Prevent
ill Extortion as to Food and Lodciog
Present Condition of the Exhibits.
8 f edal to the IndianarolU Journal.
Chicago, May 20. With all that hai
been said about the world's fair, so many
questions ara being asked about meant
of transportation to and from Chica
go to tho nrounda, about tho cost
of admission to the fair proper
and to .the various independent ex
hibits inside that the experience of a repre
sentative of the Journal may be of inter
est. There are three ways of reaching
Jackson Park from down town by the
South-side cable line, by the trains of the
elevated road and by the Illinois Central
railway. The fare by cable la 5 cents, and,
starting from the dovrn-tow'n business dis
trict, the trip takes an hoar. By theelevated
road the fare each way is also 5 cents,
and the time about forty minutes. This
road runs through alleyways nearly the
entire d istance and afiorda a comprehensive
but hardly inspiring view of Chicago baok
yards. As the trains approach Sixty-third
street, the terminal station, the elevation
is so high that passengers are aflbrded a
glimpse into the Midway Plaisance and a
full view of Uuflalo Bill's camp and amphi
theater, with Kocky.mountain scenery in
the background, among winch red-blanketed
Indians are strolling, and, if one spec
ulative stranger's surmise is correct, pick
ing up gold dust. Tne time consumed in
traveling by either of these lines is an ob
jection, and as the low rate of fare will in
sure them plenty of patronage, there is the
disagreeable prospect of being compelled
to stand and hang to a strap the entire dis
tance.. The most rapid transit is by what
is ouicially known as the through trains on
the Illinois Central railroad, but which
are known to an irreverent publlo
as "cattle trains." This latter title origi
nates from the fact that the cars nsed are
freight cars with the sides cut out and
seats put in, after the style of open street
cars. Some genius has facetiously dubbed
them the "human box care." Tnes? cars
have no spring), aud a loud and long howl,
which has not yet subsided, went up from
tbe throats of Chicagouns who were afraid
they would be jolted more than was acree
able. Inasmuch as Chicago people endure
the jolting of the cable cars without a mur
mur, this complaint seems unreasonable.
At all events, if they are not the most
luxurious vehicles in the world, they have
the advantage of atlording a Beat to each
and every passenger, as there is positively
no standing room, and of making the trip
lroin VanHnren-etreet station in lifteen, or
at most, twenty minutes. Tbe fare is 10
cents. The facilities of the road are such
that when the trallic jnstiiies it, trains can
be run every tbreo minutes. The traok is
clear and no stops are made belore reach
ing the station at Sixtieth street. Passen
gers at intermediate stations depend upon
the regular suburban trains.
THE FAIR IN GENERAL.
The fair itself in all that its most extrava
gant eulogists have painted it. If the al
ways hurrying American has bat an hoar to
spend there, it is worth his while to go
merely for the sake of the general scenio
effect,' even though he does not enter a
building. The combination of white pal
aces, picturesque lagoons, winding road
ways and green grass, with Lake Michigan
as a foregroundif a lake can properly be
.cai'cd.a "ground'' of any sort is one that
musteatiaiy the most esthetic taste and
remain, in tbe memory a dream of beauty
forever. How, in this unsatisfactory
world, an association of men whose spar
ring, and wrangling and general cater
wauling have occupied so considerable a
share of publio attention for the past three
years, ever succeeded in evolv
ing and carrying out this com
plete and wholly beautiful plan
is one of the mysteries. That it did
succeed should be remembered to its ever
lasting credit. Probably no man. woman
or child in Chicago or out is able to dis
tinguish one from another the various com
missions, directories and other bodies that
make up the management of the fair, or to
define their special duties, bat among them
they have accomplished all that was ex
pected of them, and more. Descriptions
convey no adequate idea of tbe beautiful
results of their work. Only those who see
for themselves cau know.
After the first sight of the buildings and
their setting as a whole, the impressions
of tbe visitor speedily beoomo contused, so
much presses upon tbe attention. If tbe
time allowed for sight-seeing is short, the
departments in which special intereat is
felt should at once be sought out and tho
eyes be closed to all else, for the tempta
tions are so numerous on every hand that
the firmest determination is in danger of
wavering and tbe hours are consumed with
oat having attained what was most desired.
Whether tho stay be long or short, a guide
book, or at least a map of tbe grounds,
will be found of grrat use. The books on
sale within the grounds oost 25 cents each,
but another, just as serviceable, can be
bought outside for 10 cents. A study of
the man aud an understanding of tbe loca
tion of the buildings is essential in order
to economize strength, for the distances
that one may travel are great, and tbe sav
ing of bteps soon becomes an important
consideration. This can only be accom
plished by making a systematic tour and
by avoiding aimless. wttnderings. A classi
fied catalouue of the exhibits costs 15 cents
for eaoa building, but most visitors will
hardly need more than one or two of these,
as, for Instance, that for the Art Gallery
and for the Manufactures and Liberal Arts
Building. 1c several of tbe buildings not
hull the exhibits are yet in order, a wilder
ness of packing boxes bemgon every hand.
Tho work of arranging them goes rapidly
on, but it will be weeks yet before all is
completed. Meanwhile there is enough to
soe whiobever way one turns, and after a
day or two spent there tbe visitor is con
scious of a feeling ot relief that the pack
ing cases are not all open and of an entire
indinerence to their contents.
Tbe United States government building
is in complete order, and the exhibit from
the Smithsonian Institution, the Patent Ox
lice. PostofBce and other departments at
tract much attention from visitors who
have never seen them in Washington. The
Fisheries Building is also in good order,
and the magnificent display made there by
tbe United States Fish Commission will be
one of the great attractions of the fair.
The pictures have not all been hung in the
Art building, bat enough rooms have their
walls tilled to oocupy weeks in examining
if one had the time at command. This is a
display such as has never been known in
this country before, and is worth a long
pilgrimage to tbe artistically inclined. The
Transportation Building includes exhibits
of every means of conveyance, from a
Japanese jinrickisha to an ocean steamship;
the mines and ruining display of the riches
of the rarth's interior lrora ail Quarters of
the slobe; electricity, an exhibit of all tbe
modern improvements that have been made
possible through the use of that force.
The names of agricultural, horticultural
and manufacturing buildings indicate the
character of their respective exhibits, but
only an actual tour can give an idea of the
variety and extent of the products of
nature and of man's handiwork there col
lected. The Manufactures Building,
which is the largest on the grounds, is a
world's fair in itself.
THK WOMAN'S BUILDING.
This building was completed before any
other on the grounds, bat its exhibits are
still in a chaotio state. This building was
first intended for a display of distinctive
work of woman that did not properly come
in competition with other exhibits, women
being competitors and exhibitors in all tho
buildings, but so many interests presented
themselves that this plan was changed,
and it was decided to put the display on
the same footing as those in the other
buildings. How it will rank in merit time
must yet disclose, bat the women man
agers whoknaw something of the contents
of the unopened boxes are serenely confi
dent that the result, when completed, will
be a joy to all women. Among the enter
prises undertaken by the women is a cook
ing school, which is now in progress, and
will last through the entire exposition.
Mrs. Korer, Mrs. Lincoln and other well
known professors of the culinary art will
preside over the cooking stove during the
period. The room is already an attract
ive point to women. Lectures on hygiene
domestic science and other practical topics
in which women have a special concern
will be given in the assembly hall
of the building from dav to day.
Among the exhibits now in place is a large
case of deoorative neelework trom the
hands of Indiana women. Other cases of
tbe ea.uo work are in the Manufactures
Building, and it seems rather a pity that
they should have been divided. This is
the work which was prepared under the
direction of Miss Mary Williamson, and of
which a first view was given to thj Indian
apolis public a few weeks ago. It is great
ly superior in design and execution to any
other, aud is looked at with wonder and
admiration. Eastern women, who did not
look for any decorative art work from the
woolly West that would excel their own in
in or it, are said to be particularly surprised.
Mrs. Meredith, one of tho women managers
for Indiana, says proudly of the women of
her State: "Whatever they undertake
they do well." Mrs. Meredith, who is on
the committee of awards, has her head
quarters in the Administration Building.
She has had theppointmentof many of the
women judges.and says the common impres
sion that they serve only in tbe Woman's
Building is inoorrect, their duties extend
ing throughout all the departments.
The much talked of 'Midway Plaisance,"
or aggregation of side shows, opens
from the main grounds half a block
south of Sixtieth street and directly
in front of tbe Woman's Building. It is an
avenue half a mile long, on each side of
which are the Japanese. Javauese, Esqui
maux and other "Tillages," the street in
Cairo, the Moorish palace and other at
tractions of a foreign Uavor. Tbe entranco
into this avenue is free, but a fee of from
25 to 50 cents is charged for admission
through the gates of the various shows.
Comparatively few visitors will care to see
all these exhibits, two or three being suffi
cient t satisfy the curiosity of most peo
ple, and if their feet should not stray into
the Plaisance at all they need not feel that
they have missed an important feature of
the fair. If they care to enter all the shows
and to buy trinkets at tbe Turkish and
other bazars, they can probably enjoy
themselves and spend a good many dollars.
AS TO THE COST OF A VISIT.
As for the expenses of a visit to the fair,
it need not necessarily be great. A direc
tory recently compiled gives a list of 9,000
houses in which are furnished rooms to
rent, the average rate of rent being 1.25
per day. Good board can be obtained for
25 a week or less, this including but two
meals a day. The Chicago dinner hoar is 6
o'clock end the lunch need not be a costly
meal. To people unaccustomed to res
taurant prices the rates charged in the fair
gionnd seem high, and a meal may easily
be made expensive, but there is no extor
tion if the visitor exercises ordinary watch
fulness and common sense. Frngal-mindcd
Chicagoans carry their luncheons from
home in neat boxes aud boldly consume
them in publio undisturbed by the passing
crowds. Others prefer the lunch counters,
of which thero is one or more in every
building. In short, the people whose ap
petites are a first consideration can make
a visit to the fair an expensive undertak
ing, while others can be satisfactorily
served at little cost. After a day or so at
tho fair most people who must economize
will prefer to satisfy their appetites on a
sandwich or two ana expend their money
for a wheel-chair and attendant. These
are furnished at 75 cents an hour, and are a
great comfort to the weary.
The varying phases of the woman's con
gress have absorbed tbe attention of femi
nine Chicago this week. The congress has
been highly successful in point of attend
ance and in the manner in which the pro
gramme was carried out, and tbe originat
ors and managers are greatly elated. Much
masculine wit and sarcasm has been aimed
at tbe crowd of women who bombarded
the doors of the Art Palace, where the con
gress is held, on Wednesday and held a
scrapping match with tbe policemen, but
it is very evident from all accounts that
these were Chicago women, drawn to the
place merely by curiosity to see the act
resses who were to speak, and were not the
progressive and representative women of
the world who are holding the congress.
These were on hand early, and had secured
seatsbefore it became necessary toclose the
doors. This incident was a mere episode,
however, and only goes to show how great
were tbe attractions atlorded. All things
considered, the women have reason to be
proud of the manner in which they have
inaugurated the world's fair series of con
grosses. ATHLETICS IN WOMEN'S COLI.F.OES.
Games of English GirU at Girton and Their
National liable or Hiding.
New York Bun.
The opening of the Woman's College atb
letio grounds next autumn will mark a
new departcre in Amerioan institutions of
learning for women. Tbe physical director
of tbe college has spent some time in Eng
land studying the games in vogue among
English girls, and says that one
of the most interesting sights at
Girton or Isownham colleges is the
athletio ground, where girls enter into ill
sorts of healthful sports, such as crickst
(6lightly modified), golf, hockey, archery,
tennis and fives. The colleges have their
regular sport days, when guests are invited
to witness contests, just as in men's col
leges. The girls enter into these
games with tbe boys, too. as in
tennis. The outdoor exercise is kept
up all the year round, and its ben
eficial effects are shown in the fresh
bright faces of tbe girls, their powers of
pbysioal endurance and their defiance of
the weather, which seems most surprising
to American visitors. Thousands of En
glish girls and women may be seen riding
horseback in tbe early morning, while the
games that our girls would deem proper
only for their growing brothers tre quite
the thing in England. Just now all Eng
land is running to "golf," a game played in
a large grass-covered space with tiny balls
and odd little hooks or clubs, by
means of which the ball is propelled
over the ground. Hockey is another pop
ular game with the girls, though it is some
what rough. It is played on a smooth,
level rectangle, with tbe players divided
into two groups occupying tbe two ends of
tbe ground. A stick with a thick Knotted
end is used to knook the ball from the op
ponent's end of the line. English girls
play cricket, too. and all sorts of
games that send them tearing ex
citedly over the fields, and. besides
these, they turn the rivers Into play
grounds, too, where they fish and sail,
row and swim. This novel idea of the
Baltimore College in making gymnasium
work a regular course in the school, and a
compulsory exercise to the students, is one
which commends itself to other institu
tions for women. It will be rather odd if
the college woman, of whom it has befn
promised that close attention to study
would undermine her health, should be the
apostle of tbe new religion of hygiene to
all womankind as she now bids fair to be
come with her gymnasium and athletio
chio.
mm I S
At tbe Wrong; Shop.
Harper's Weekly.
A worthy gentleman, a staid bachelor,
who died last week, was the hero of a par
ticularly delightful tale, which possibly
has not yet got into print lie was sitting
in his office in Twenty-third street oneday
when a very respectable-seeming woman
came in and sat down. He turned to her
and bowed, when ehe said that she had thus
and so tbe matter with her.
He expressed polite regret, and she went
on with a prompt category of symptoms
and ill efiects. together with information
as to what had been attempted so far for
her relief. He said he was very sorry to
learn of her ailment, and wished that he
could do anything to abate it.
"But can't yon!" she asked with visible
astonishment.
"1 think not." he said. "Why don't you
see a physician!''
She started to her feet. "Why, isn't this
the dispensary!''
"No. madam. The dispensary is on tbe
other corner. This is the National Academy
ot Design."
THE JEWS AND THEIR FOES
A Vigorous Defense of a Much Abnsed
but Patient and Sturdy Kaceof People.
The Rothschilds Juisb, Benjamin, 2!&J&rca
Ad&m, Disraeli and Sarah Bernhardt' Ufa
Work Loyally lo Kindred and Friends.
Special Correspondence of the Pcn!ar Journal.
New Yokk, May 17, As a nation we
count ourselves very liberal. We make a
great mistake. As a nation we are not
broad in our ideas, and we lack considera
tion. We form ourselves into little cliques
and wo say, "This is tho law, and every
thing not done according to this law shall
not be considered." Then we go out into
the world and we behavo like the pride of
tbe barnyard we crow because somebody
else has laid an egg.' Lacking national re
ligion, we seem to regard it as a duty every
now and then to attack somebody' faith,
and the result is that we prove to the
world at large that this is a free country
only in impudence and Ignorance. People
who have thought much, or have anything
to think with, agree that it is the right ol
every man to believe as he wubes, to livt
up to that belief, and people who know
realize that those men who have a faith,
and who live up to that faith, make tb
best citizens in the world.
Yesterday in oar own free coantryitu
possible that the Catholics were attacked,
to-morrow it may be the Protestants, and
day after to-morrow it may be the Jews.
The lass have been the people who have
suffered the most, became, having big
brains, they have clang to their faith and
detied persecution, no matter how severe
it was. They have, more than any
other people in the world, been
forced to suffer indignities. At one
time they wore a badge telling of their
belief; at another, although they might
trade in a country, a country where they
were violently persecuted, they could not
leave it and carry either jewels or gold with
them. Only a fow weeks ugo a Jewish
gentleman, as you all know, was black
balled at a club in New York. A gentle
mau. whose father had gladly given of his
great wealth at the time of the war. and
the objection made against him was, not
that he was illiterate, not that he
was bad-munnered, not that he was
i drunkard, not that he was a roue,
but simply that he was a Jew. When
I read about it. I said to myself: "Thank
goodness. I was born down boutb, whets
tbe Jews, when they are gentlemen, when
they are well educated and well born, aro
appreciated." 1 remembered that a Jew
was tbe brain of the Confederacy; 1 remem
bered tbe old Jewish families in Kichmond
and Charleston, and . I remembered that s
distinguished Jew, Mendez Cohen, laid out
the city of Baltimore, iiut I never rely en
tirely on what I think myself, so I asked
tbe cleverest man 1 knew what he thought
about it.
And he said: "If they keep on this coun
try will be as narrow as itussia and as bit
terns Germany." And then he reminded
me that while the Jews were not larmers
nor soldiers, the were essentially students
and financiers. The Kothschilds. who ere
ated their great fortune by being honora
ble to tbe man who believed in them, never
ask whether you are a Protestant or a Jew
if you are in need of money. And this
family, all over the world, has
built hospitals for the sick, nurseries
for little children and retreats -for
old people, and the question of your coming
or going is never made one of faith. That
vou are in need of kindness, of a shelter;
that yon are sick and poor is enough. Some
of the greatest doctors have been Jews.
Tbe editor of tbe best-known medical jour
nal inexistence the Lancet Larsest Hart,
is a Jew, and it is his wife who is bringing
to this country and exhibiting at the
world's fair the Irish village, with a view
of promoting the sale of Irish lace and so
helping the poverty-stricken peasants cf
Ireland.
CHARITABLE AND HOME-LOVINO.
Great diplomates have been Jews Die
raoli'a name telling of the race from which
he came and of which he never ceased to
be proud. It is said that Mme. Adam is a
Jewess, certainly Sarah Bernhardt is. At
for the great musicians who have been
Jews, you can count all over yoar fingers,
come back, count again, and even
then you will not have gotten the
names of alL The Jews are an honest
people; they live well, and invariably pay
their debts. In some charitable work con
nected with a Catholio maternity. 1 have
met a number of Jews, and it has never
been necessary to ask them for a peonyt
they have invariably said to me; "You
have something to do with the Baby's
Home, haven't youf Put this in for me."
And "this," nine times out of ten, was a
good round sum; or, when tho Jews give,
they give gladly and liberally.
Among the French people, almost with
out exception, the cleverest writers and
the cleverest painters are of Jewish birth,
and though at first it may seem strange,
few Gentiles have been able to paint tho
"Madonna and Child" as has the Jew. Do
you know whyf Because there are no peo
ple who have the same respect for women,
and wlio are so tender toward them. The
mother is the queen, and to her and for hei
is giveu every possible consideration.
In Kngland the Jows have so intermar
ried with the nobility that they have lost
something of their distinctive raoe traits,
bat the kindliness, the motherliuess and
the respect shown to tbe older people nevei
seems to fade away. Tha Spanish Jew is
an aristocrat, proud of his birth, proud of
his faith, and only counting as on equal
terms with him his mueh proouer brother
tho Portuguese. He delights in tracing
back his ancestry until it is possible you
laugh, as I did, and force one of them to
confess that no matter how far back he
may go he eventually reaches Adam aad
Kve, and we have some claim on them.
JF.WS AS AMKUICAX CITIZEN'S.
The subject to me (and I am sure to yon)
is worth thinking about, because we ars
always proclaiming our liberality, oar will
ingness to meet every min on the demo
cratic plane, and our ganging men by theii
brains. If this were true we should heat
no nonsense about Jew or gentile. The ig
norant says: "The Jew doesn't accent
Christ." Neither, my friend, does the
Unitarian, or the Hicksite Quaker.
And tben, too, yoa mast remeinbei
that Christ Himself was a Jew, a f aot that
seems to be forgotten by a great many peo
ple. Who are you. my neighbor, that yoa
should say what a man should and what s
man should not b6heve? Who are yoa
that you should dictate a form of religion,
aud bay. let every man follow thia? Yoa
answer me in a roundabout way, and say
that the Jews are dirty. Well, suppose you
had come from Poland or ltuaaia. wretched
If poor, with a family to support, and that
over there even cleanliness costs some
thing? 1 have taken the trouble to co in
the Jewish, tbe Italian and the Chinene
.quarters in New lork. I never want
to go again, nut 1 will tell you thiw; th
Italians are much dirtier than the Jotri.aLd
both Chinese and Italians have but one
desire that is, to make enough money to
go home and live comfortably there while
the Jew wishes to stay, to become a good
eitlzen and to umkb his children Ameri
cans. An old woman, who could speak
neither English, German nor French, tola
tbe interpreter who was with me that she
had great pride in her grandson,
because, though he was only ten rears
old. he could write au American letter!
hhe was certain that he would be a credit
to the country where ho was living.
Further inquiry proved that they were all
saving money to send him to college and
that they hoped to make a doctor of him.
I never heard such an expression among
the Italians or the Chinese. It was always
a rapturous story of how near tbey were
to the getting money enough to so home.
They didn't care one jot for the country la
which it had been made, cor the people

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