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The Indianapolis journal. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1867-1904, September 06, 1897, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015679/1897-09-06/ed-1/seq-5/

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Scrofula
In its thousands of forms is the most ter
rible affliction of the human race. Salt
rheum, sores, eruptions, boils, all humors,
swellings, etc., originate in its foul taint,
and are cured by the great and only True
Blood Purifier, Hood’s Sarsaparilla. The
advanced theory of today that tuber
culosis, or consumption, is curable by
proper nutrition, care and purifying tho
blood, finds confirmation in the experi
jence of many who have been cured by
Hood’s Sarsaparilla
Hood’s Pills cure sick headache. 25c.
BRIDE ONLY ONE MY.
Pretty lowan Deserted and a Matri
monial Club Broken 1 p.
WEBSTER CITY. Ja., Sept. s.—The mar
riape of pretty Minnie Laughlin at Alden
Friday night, and her cruel desertion by
her husband yesterday morning, has broken
up a band of six young ladies that has
been in existence for as many months, all
engaged in the laudable work of getting
husbands. Minnie Laughlin is eighteen,
and the belle <*f Hardin county. Her father
is a prosperous merchant in Alden, just
over the line from here. East night she
was a bride and to-day she is a widow. The
large circle of friends she has are offering
sympathy for what little good it will do.
The man/' who so cruelly wronged her
was a blacksmith, Fred Grund, with Ring
-1 ling Brothers' circus, and left them only
when he received a letter through a matri
monial agency of Chicago in answer to
a personal he had inserted under the head
ing, “Wanted—A wife.” He was known
among his associates and in the world of
showmen as “Dutch Fred,” and was a
ponderous fellow, with a laughing, jolly
way that made him a favorite when he left
tent life and settled down in Alden last
December. While at the Ringling winter
quarters he inserted an advertisement in a
matrimonial paper that found its way to
the little lowa town. A half dozen young
ladies had just a week before formed an
organization in a spirit of fun to look after
such advertisements. The notice: stated the
advertiser had been connected with The
Ring lings for a number of years, and was
in receipt of a handsome salary.
It was Miss Laughlin who answered it,
because the girls were going to take turns.
As soon as Grund received the answer he
was so impressed that ho at once offend
his resignation to the Ringlings and left
for Alden. He saw the. town and he saw
Miss Laughlin, and liked them both so well
Se bought a blacksmith shop and settled
own. He became personally acquainted
with the young lady, and the course of true
love ran smooth. Cards were issued for the
wedding last night, and it was witnessed by
a multitude of friends. Both the bride and
groom, together with relatives, were in the
best of spirits.
This morning when Fred Grund arose he
left the house before breakfast, and, going
to the business part of town, entered an
attorney’s office and wrote a number of
letters, which were mailed at the post
office. The letters were to friends and to
his bride. In all of them he said he was
going away, and it would be useless to fol
low him for the purpose of making him live
in Alden or with his wife, and he would
never do it. While Mrs. Grund is heart
broken over the cruel desertion, she will
not listen to her father sending officers
after the ex-circus man, and declares in
tears that she is through with him foreviv.
During the wedding festivities matri
monial papers were in evidence in the
hands of the other young ladies, and they
were all building castles in the air; but
now they have destroyed all evidence that
will remind them of Minnie's fateful mar
riage. The association went to pieces to
day.
CHILDREN AUCTIONED OFF.
Unique Sermon Without a Preacher
hy the Saltation Army,
NEW YORK. Sept. s.—Ten children, live
boys and five girls, were sold at auction
last night by the Salvation Army at Prohi
bition Park, Staten island. The auction
was under the direction of Brigadier Hal
pin. When the residents of the island heard
of this visions of orphans and friendless
children being sold to the highest bidder for
the profit of the Salvation Army arose, and
they became so exercised that the brigadier
was visited by a committee of women,
who demanded to know how he dared defy
the laws of New York as well as every law
of common humanity by actually selling
children.
“Are these children to be forcibly taken
from the*r parents and sold or have they
any pan *.s at all?" asked one of the visi
tors. 7 > brigadier explained as best he
could and the women finally departed only
half satisfied. The sale was about the “most
unique” thing clone'tyy the Salvation Army
for a long time.
“The children sold are all children of well
to-do and affectionate parents, who did not
object to their sale, for they were sold to
Jesus. That is modern slavery that all of
us willingly bear. We had an auction block
and an auctioneer. The children were
brought in and placed on the block. Then
the bidding began. First there was Self
Ease, dressed in all the frills of indulgence.
He made a hid for the children, offering a
life of indolence and selfishness. Indiffer
ence to the sorrows of others and a gen
erally comfortable life. Then Wealth cafne
dressed as a banker, carrying a bag of gold.
He promised the children wealth all their
lives. After him came Fame, offering
worldly glory; then Art, Fashion and Edu
cation, each offering brilliant careers. Bast
of all came Christianity, simply dressed in
white, and she offered love for God and
man. Os course, she got the children. She
was the highest bidder, and the children
were turned over to Christianity. Thus we
delivered a sermon without a preacher.
After the auction we had a prayer meeting
and the congress adjourned,” said Colonel
Brewer.
Picnic Ground, for Girls.
Minneapolis Tribune.
Oh, girls; you just ought to start for the
Klondike at once. It’s perfectly delightful
wading about in the ice water with your
rubber boots buckled up about your necks;
and n< matter how old and homely any of
you a -> there will be some perfectly lovely
man to treat you politely if you haven’t
a place to stop or a bite to eat.
Mr*. 'Winslow’* Soothing Syrup
Has been used over fifty years by millions
of mothers for their children while teething
with perfect success. It soothes the child,
softens the gums, allays pain, cures wind
colic, regulutes the bowels, and is the best
remedy for diarrhea, whether arising from
teething or other cause*. For sale by drug
gists in every part of the world. Be sure
and ask lor Mrs. Winslow’s Soothing Syrup,
25 cents a bottle.
Don't hesitate between Glenn's Sulphur
Soap and any ointment or lotion that may
have been '•'commended to you for diseases
of the skin, sores, abrasions or complex
ional blemishes. There is nothing like the
first-named article in such cases. Sold by
all druggists.
Hill's Hair and Whisker Dye, Black or
Brown. 50c.
ITCHING
DISEASES
Instant Relief for torturing, disfiguring, itching, burn
ing, and scaly (kin anri scalp discaieß with low or hair, la
warm hath with Cvticuka Soar, a single application
cf CiTicna (ointment), and a full dose of Ccticcka
Besolvxx r, greatest of blood purifier* and Uuinor cures
(Qtlcura
rtold throneuout Ui worn. I* otter it, A nn C, four.. Sol*
op*.. Button, mr "How to CureltchingSkin Utteawi," free.
RED ROUGH HANDS Ue Vjr' ’afWtWJUMAft 1-
KEEPING UP THE CLIP

AVERAGES SHOW THAT THE HOME
TEAM IS PLAYING FAST BALL.
Belter Ilian They Were a Week Ago,
in Spite of tlie Defeats—(oliiinhn*
Take* the Saint* Down the Line.
Colombo* .... s—St. Paul 1
Grand Kapid*..lff— Kan*n* City...lO
.Milwaukee ... lift—Detroit
Game* Scheduled for To-Day.
—Western League.—
Minneapolis at Indianapolis.
St. Paul at Columbus.
•Kansas City at Grand Rapids.
Milwaukee at Detroit.
—National League.—
Cincinnati at Boston.
Pittsburg at Baltimore.
Chicago at Brooklyn.
St. Louis at New Y'ork.
•Cleveland at Philadelphia.
Louisville at Washington.
•No afternoon game at Grand Rapids and
no morning game at Philadelphia. At ail
other places morning and afternoon games.
Standing of the C!tilt*.
—Western League.—
Clubs. Played. Won. Ist. Pet.
Indianapolis 113 81 32 .717
Columbus 117 75 42 .fill
St. Paul 121 7K 45 .623
Milwaukee 113 72 47 .605
Detroit 120 62 58 .517
Minneapolis 122 40 82 .328
Grand Rapids 118 35 83 .297
Kansas City 126 37 *B9 .294
—National League.—
Clubs. Played. Won. Lost. Pet.
Baltimore 108 76 32 .704
Boston 112 78 34 .696
New York 108 69 39 .639
Cincinnati 108 63 45 .583
Cleveland 108 56 52 .519
Chicago 112 50 62 .446
Brooklyn 11l 49 62 .441
Philadelphia 112 49 63 .438
Louisville 112 49 63 .438
Pittsburg 108 47 61 .435
Washington 106 46 60 .434
St. Louis 112 27 85 . 241

AVERAGES ARE BETTER.
Team Playing Good Bull in Spite of
Three Defeat*.
Notwithstanding the three defeats at the
hands of St. Paul, the averages of the home
team crept up a little. They did not play
such bad ball, but the despised Saints had
a heap of luck in the fact that their hits
were timely and the errors of the home
team costly. Gray, Motz and 'Wood are all
tied with a batting average of .332. Mc-
Carthy and McFarland both went off sev
eral points. The team average for batting
is .310 and for fielding .936. The figures are
as follows:
—Batting.—
Games. A.B. Hits. P.C't.
McCarthy 63 265 96 .362
McFarland 109 455 159 .349
Gray W 2 437 145 ..‘132
Motz 115 464 154 . 332
Wood 74 313 104 .332
Knhoe 73 290 88 . 303
Hogriever 109 455 137 . 300
Stewart 11l 449 129 .287
Goar 34 114 32 .281
Phillips 42 140 40 . 28b
Flynn 104 412 106 .257
Foreman 42 131 30 . 228
Knau 7 24 5 .208
—Fielding.—
Chances Ac- Er-
Games. cepted. rors. P.C’t.
Foreman 42 91 2 .978
Goar 34 89 2 .977
Motz 115 1.223 31 .975
Wood 72 349 16 .956
Phillips 42 126 9 .933
McCarthy 63 124 7 .946
McFarland 109 267 2) .933
Kahoe. c 53 245 16 .939
Hogriever 109 218 .16 .931
Flynn. If 42 86 7 .924
Stewart 11l 610 49 .911
Gray, 3 arid 2 102 307 34 .900
Flynn, s 62 212 53 .876
Knau 7 29 5 . 853
Ivahoe, 3, sand 2.. 19 72 13 . 847
“Pete’’ Garvey, King of Ball Plnyer*.
A wonderful ball player is “Pete” Gar
vey. He is playing with the Sullivan (Ind.)
club, but ought to be holding down first
base for one of the big league teams. No
"phenom” pitcher was ever known to fool
"Pete,” and no wildly thrown ball from an
excited shotstop ever went by him into
the bleachers. “Pete” is a modern Hercules.
Besides being very tall, he is so strong
that when he hits the ball it goes out of
sight. It is not at the bat, however, that
"Pete” performs his greatest wonders.
When a ball, either thrown or hit, comes
within twelve feet of first base, “Pete” sim
ply digs his big toe into the bag. stretches
himself double his length, pulls in the ball
and the runner is out. How the feat is
performed is not known, but it is taken
tor granted that “Pete” has not only a rub
ber neck but also a rubber body. Seriously
speaking, Garvey is a great player and
deserves unstinted praise for his work.
Here is what one of his friends at Sulli
van, in writing to the Journal, says:
"One of the most remarkable characters
that played baseball this season was 'Pete'
Garvey, the famous first baseman of the
Sulivan Baseball Club. Garvey was once
a leader in the National League. He was
known as 'King' Garvey, champion of first
basemen. At the bat he was a picture.
Tall, well-built and strong as a lion, he
would stand motionless, holding the bat in
an almost horizontal position near and in
front of his right shoulder, awaiting the
delivery of the ball. And wait he would,
for no angles or curves could fool ‘Pete.’ He
was always able to tell when the ball left
the pitcher’s hand whether it was going
over the plate and nothing could induce
him to strike unless the ball was ‘right.’
But whdff he did baste the pig-skin how
it traveled. Everybody in the outfield
would scramble for it and no one seemed
to know when or where it would stop. His
great work, however, was at first base. No
balls ever passed him. No difference how
high nor how low they were 'Pete’ always
got them. Sometimes he seemed to stretch
himself almost double his length to get a
ball that was thrown short, but the big
toe of his right foot never left the base.
If baseball cemeteries were kept by clubs
that went against the Sullivan team in the
season of 1897 they would all be filled with
victims who 'died at first base’ by the hand
of 'King' Garvey.”
Game* Tli! Moriiing anti Afternoon.
The Millers are here and will play the
leaders this morning at 10 o’clock and this
afternoon at 3 o’clock. Goar and Phillips
will do the pitching for Indianapolis, while
Fhillipi and Herman are likely to be on the
slab for Minneapolis. Flynn is going to be
at his old place, and Watkins’s men will
present a solid front for the lirst time in
two weeks. A Sunday’s rest has put them
in tine fettle for the work this week, which
will be a lively one, as the four games
with the Millers will be followed by two at
Columbus and two here with Detroit—all
before next Sunday.
Ha*y Victory for Brewers.
MI LAVA l KEE, M is.. Sept. s.—The Tigers
were easy to-day and the Brewers had no
trouble in winning. Terry pitched a great
game, while Thomas was knocked out of
the box in the second inning and substi
tuted by Wadsworth, who fared little bet
ter. Score:
R. H. E.
Milwaukee.. 130 2 1302 *—l2 16 2
Detroit 0000020 0 0— 2 6 4
Batteries Terry and Speer; Thomas,
Wadsworth and McCauley.
“Homer” for Hobs* in Tenth.
GRAND RAPIDS. Mich., Sept. s.—Rig
John Ganze! won the game to-day for the
home team by making a home run in the
tenth inning. Score:
R. 11. E.
G. Rapids 2 4 0 0 2 0 1 0 1 3-13 14 4
Kan. City 50121001 0 o—lo 14 4
Batteries Barnett. Pappaluu and
Twinehatn; Pardee and Raftert.
I'iiKllbtle Saints Beaten.
COLUMBUS, 0.. Sfpt. 3.—The Senators
played the Saints to-day and won in easy
style, though the locals were outbatted.
Attendance, 3,000. Sec re:
R. 11. E.
Columbus ..1 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 o—s 4 2
St. Paul 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o—l 9 4
Batteries—Rettger and Buckley; Phyle
and Spies.
The Giants Won,
Special 10 the Indianapolis Journal.
ELKHART, lnd.. Sept. 5.--The Rake
Shore & Michigan Southern Railway
brought here to-day fifteen carloads of ex
cursionists from Whiting. Ind.. and inter
THE 'INDIANAPOLIS JOURNAL, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1897.
mediate points, as well as a large number
of people from the East, the occasion being
a match game of ball between the Colored
Page Fence Giants, of Adrian. Mich., and
the Whiting Greys. The game resulted 10
to 7 in favor of the Giants.
Montpelier Globe* Defeated.
Special to the Indianapolis Journal.
HARTFORD CITY. Ind., Sept. s.—The
Reds of this city defeated the Montpelier
Globes here to-day. Score:
Hartford City 2 0 2 2 2 0 6 1 2—17
Montpelier 0 3 0 33 0 1 0 3—13
Batteries—Berry and Gilhorn; Hull and
Reed.
Hen wood. 17; Carbon, 11.
Special to the Indianapolis Journal.
CARBON. Ind.. Sept. s.—The Benwoods
defeated the Carbon baseball club to-day
by a score of 17 to 11. Batteries —Carbon,
Wilton and Morgan; Benwood, Cummick
and Warrick.
Ingalls Hustler* Defeated.
Special to the Indianapolis Journal.
INGALLS, Ind., Sept. s.—The Hustlers, of
this place, were defeated to-day, the first
time, by the Pendleton Grays, by a score of
12 to 10.
Bed* Find a Victim.
At Providence, R. I.— R- H. E.
Cincinnati ....3 3 2 0 1 0 1 4 *—l4 24 4
Pawtucket ...0 001210^2 —8 17 3
Batteries —Dwyer and f*eitz; McCafferty,
Barlow and News.
Miller* Shut Out.
At Fort Wayne, Ind. — R. H. E.
Fort Wayne 00001000 3—4 11 2
Minneapolis.. 00000000 o—o 2 2
Batteries—Herr and O'Meara; Herman
and Mili'er.
Interstate League.
At Dayton, O.— R- H. E.
Dayton 20080000 I—9 14 2
Springfield.... 00010000 o—l 6 4
Batteries—Brown and Greenwald; Madden
and Vetter.
At Toledo, O.— R- H. E.
Toledo 00220740 3—lß 19 6
Youngstown. 00120020 0— 5 8 4
Batfcries—Kelb and Myers; Relating and
Zinram.
Eastern League.
Syracuse, 10; Toronto, 3.
Buffalo, 18; Springfield, 18. Game called
cn account of darkness.
Baseball Notes.
At the Coburn-street Star grounds yes
terday tho State-avenue club defeated the
Coburn-street Stars 9 to 0.
Providence, 17; Wilkesbarre, 2.
DEATH RATE IS HIGH.
500 Victims of Epidemic Disease*
Last Mont it in One Cuban Town.
HAVANA, Sept. s.—During the month of
August five hundred persons died in Guines
from epidemic diseases. All of the victims,
with one exception, wore Cubans. The rate
of mortality among the refugees is very
great and the same is true regarding the
troops. The mortality due to yellow fever,
malaria and dysentery is excessive. It is
estimated that thirty-seven out of every
one thousand sick soldiers in the hospitals
throughout the island die. It is stated that
from twenty to twenty-six deaths occur
on each trip of the steamers which carry
sick and disabled troops from Cuba to
Spain. The bodies of those who dio en
route are thown overboard. Three deaths
occurred on one of these steamers recently
before she left port.
Captain General Weyler returned to Ha
vana greatly disgusted because of the er
roneous interpretation of his edict referring
to the gathering of cattle, large numbers
of oxen and cows having been slaughtered
in consequence of the misunderstanding of
his orders. During his recent tour General
Weyler deposed the mayors of several
towns and sent various military command
ers to Cabanas Castle. At Guines and
other towns he caused the release from cus
tody of a number of merchants and recon
centrados who had been falsely accused.
Captain General Weyler has issued an or
der prohibiting the planting of tobacco
within the boundaries of the military cul
tivated zone. He declares that if the recon
centrados die from hunger the mayors of
the towns will be to blame for their deaths
because of their negligence in carrying out
his instructions.
Lee Will Return to Cuba..
WASHINGTON, Sept. s—Assistant Sec
retary Day, of the State Department, who
returned to Washington to-day, was asked
whether or not it was true, as reported,
that Consul General Lee, now on his way
to the United States, woujd not return to
Havana when his vacation is over. Judge
Day replied that the regular thirty days’
annual leave had been granted to Consul
General Lee, and that so far as he was
aware there was no reason to suppose that
the consul general would not return to Ha
vana when the thirty days had expired.
The understanding here is that Consul Gen
eral Lee’s visit to the United States at this
time is purely on personal business, al
though it is probable his presence here wid
be taken advantage of by the officials for
consultation with him regarding affairs in
Cuba. He is expected to return to Havana
about the Ist of October.
GIRL BOOTBLACK.
She la Shininsr Shoes for Money to
Carry Her Through Vassar.
DENVER, Col., Sept. s.—Miss Lu Verne
Hall, one of the cleverest young girls in
the class of ’97 of the East Denver High
School, and historian of her class, has
opened up a bootblacking establishment on
Sixteenth street in order to raise enough
money to enter Vassar College in the fall.
The salutatorian of the class of ’97 is the
cashier, and a half dozen schoolboy friends
will assist as shoeblacks. When bus.ness
is rushing thte young woman who opened
the establishment, when not engaged in
pen work for a newspaper, is attending
stricfly to business. Speaking of her en
terprise, Miss Hall said: "After I thought
out the plan I took S7O out of what I had
saved from my newspaper work and
bought all the equipments for my stand.
When all this was done I asked the salu
tatorian of our class if she w'ould help me.
She consented at once and now she is
cashier. Then I snoke to som'e boys and
they were delighted to come and help me.
I will be the happiest girl in the world if
I can go to Vassar this fall.”
RED-HOT AEROLITE.
It Fell Near Candor, N. Y., and Went
Six Feet Into the Earth.
BINGHAMTON. N. Y„ Sept. s.—An
aerolite fell from the sky in the shape of a
ball of fire at Candor. The ball penetrated
the earth to a depth of six feet or more
and steam poured from the hole in vol
umes. Dr. R. W. St. Clair employed men
to dig it out. It is in the shape of a ball,
weighs two pounds and fourteen ounces
and measures one foot and three inches in
circumference. It is composed of white
and yellow' stones, very brilliant and vary
ing in size. All the stones are square,
with smooth surface and us clearly cut
as if made by a workman. They are of
various colors and have a close resem
blance to diamonds. Dr. St. Clair has sent
it to Yale College for examination.
NEWS IN SUNDAY’S JOURNAL.
Two negresses were sentenced to the rock
pile at Jefferson City, Mo.
Electrician O. L. Gnrron was killed by
hiccoughs at Lexington, Ky.
Mrs. Nellie Reno, the snake charmer, died
from a bite by her pet rattler at Clay City,
Illinois.
Mrs. J. H. Owen, harassed by bill col
lectors drowned herself in the river at
Arkadelphia, Ark.
A Denver & Rio Grande express train
.was held up near Folsom. N. M., and $13,000
secured by masked robbers.
The injunction case of John G. Woods
against Postmaster General Gary was con
tinued until next Saturday.
At Charter Oak Park Alcidalla won the
2:10 trot; Ananias. 2:11 pace; Alrich, 2:21
trot, William Penn, free-for-all.
William Botts. of Louisville, who married
the wealthy widow' of Capt. William Irwin,
is in jail at New' York on the charge of
uttering a worthless check.
The prosecution in the Luetgert case will
partly supply the link now missing in the
corpus delicti by putting in evidence part
of the skull and some of the teeth of the
victim.
Baseball Saturday—Western League: St.
Paul 6. Indianapolis 3; Indianapolis 4, St.
Paul 2; Columbus 6. Minneapolis 0; Colum
bus lb. Minneapolis 4; Detroit 7, Kansas
City 1; Kansas City 9, Detroit 7. National
League: Boston 7, Cincinnati 6; Cleveland
7, Philadelphia 5; Washington 7, Louisville
7: Brooklyn 7, Chicago 3; Baltimore 7, Pitts
burg 2: New York SL St Louis &
THAT LIFE OF BONAPARTE
Mr. Goodwin’* Reason* for Thinking
p It Wa* Written by Lemanouiki.
To the Editor of the Indianapolis Journal:
There can be no doubt that Count, not
Colonel, John Lemanouski was the
author of the “Life of Bonaparte,” pub
lished at Salem, Ind., in 1818, and credited
to “A Citizen of the United States.” When
I was pastor of the Methodist Church in
Evansville, in 1849, he was my guest for
two or three days, and a most charming
and welcome guest he was. He came un
announced, but by the liberal distribution
of dodgers he had a large audience in my
church that very night to hear his lecture
on Napoleon, and a stiff larger the next
two nights. He was eloquent in the true
sense of the word, mixing into the sketches
of Napoleon only enough personal incident
to elicit one’s interest in tho story. This
book contains all of these stories, and,
naturally enough, much else besides, while
lacking much detail that would more be
come a popular lecture than a skeleton
history such as this. The similarity in the
book’s account of the divorce of Josephine,
the campaign in Egypt and the retreat
from Moscow, and the fuller account in
the lectures, would be impossible on any
other theory than that the same person
was the author of both. And it is not dif
ficult to account for his anxiety
at that time to conceal his
identity. He was a political refugee, for
whose capture a large reward had been
offered. At that period the safety of such,
within our borders, was not as jvell assured
as now; besides, he had only made his
declaration of intention and had not re
ceived his naturalization papers. How he
came to have his book printed at Salem
need be no wonder, when we consider what
Salem was in 1818, and what the art of
book making was. At that period, next to
Brookville, Salem was the most important
town in Indiana not on the Ohio or Wa
bash river, and each owed its importance
to the same facts. Brookville was within
ten miles of the boundary which separated
civilization from the Indians on the east,
and Salem not greatly, more or less on the
south. All interior Indiana was yet in pos
session of the Indians. The “new pur
chase’’ was made in October, 1813, and the
Indians had three years in which to vacate.
The count had probably floated down the
Ohio to Louisville, for there were no steam
boats then; and, to get in retreat, had gone
to Salem, where he wrote this took. Nor
is there much to wonder at that it was
published in Salem. The Salem printing
office was about as well equipped for such
a job as any Philadelphia office, except as
to size, and to be a "printer” in those days
meant much more than now. The
printer then was compositor, proof
reader, pressman and binder. He
would set type awhile and then
take a “pull” at the press, or read proof,
or bind the “job” if it had to be bound,
and in all this the offices in Philadelphia
had no precedence over an office in Salem,
for steam had not learned how to do the
work; it was the same in large offices and
small, with the same slow process of inking
the forms by “nigger heads” in the hands
of the “devil.” as that useful person, the
boy of all work, was irreverently called, the
roller not yet having been invented; hence
a small book could be printed as well at
Salem as anywhere, especially when it was
in the hands of such men as “Patrick and
Booth.” To the modern reader the imprint
"Patrick & Booth” suggests a pretentious
establishment with its host of employes and
divisions and subdivisions of labor. There
was nothing of the kind at Salem. The
probabilities are that the office was an un
plastered upper room not more than sixteen
to eighteen feet square, warmed in winter
by a log fire, and its contents consisted of
two stands, one small stone, a small press
and a table, and that Patrick and Booth
were the only "hands” in the office except
the printer’s devil, and that when not set
ting the "latest news from Europe,” at
least three months old, or the “latest from
Washington,” not less than ten days old,
with not a word about any
thing or anybody in Salem or
Indiana even, they were at work
on Napoleon Bonaparte, either at the case
or the press, and that it took six months
to get it out, having done the binding in
the same office and by the same hands, for
binding a book was as much a part of the
trade of a printer eighty years ago as paint
ing was a part of chair making. I was per
sonally acquainted .with both Mr. Patrick
and Mr. Booth twenty to twenty-five years
later, when they were beginning to age,
and from their methods at fifty I can easily
imagine that they would have undertaken to
print an edition of the Bible at thirty if
anybody had wanted them to.
The Journal wonders how the copy got
from Knightstown to Salem. There was
no Knightstown in 1818. The Delaware In
dians owned and occupied that vicinity
then, and it was three vears before the
surveyor had prepared it for settlement ana
three or four years later that movers, in
droves, passed through Brookville, going to
the Blue river or the Flatrock specifically
or to the r.ew purchase generally, including
Indianapolis. The solution to the questions
started by the discovery of this little book
is that Count Lemanouski hastened to
the hiding of the West as rapidly as pos
sible on reaching America and there wrote
this book, and that the energetic young
men, printers and binders, printed it for
him and he sold it while lecturing.
Indianapolis, Sept. 5. T. A. GOODWIN.
More About LemitnouMki.
To the Editor of the Indianapolis Journal:
I have been greatly interested In the
various things you have published concern
ing Colonel Lemanouski, as the name has
been familiar to me from my earliest child
hood. His daughter, a Mrs. Diston, lived
across the street from my parents in Cin
cinnati, 0., in 1850. or perhaps a year or
two earlier, and they were well acquainted
with her. Her father occasionally visited
her there and both my father and mother
saw him, though they do not remember
having had any conversation with him. My
father says Colonel Lemanouski was a
preacher, and lived, he thinks, in Clark
county, Indiana. My mother disliked him
because she imagined he had not been good
to his children, of whom there w'ere three.
When a widower, well along, in years, he
married an Indiana woman. One of his
daughters married, at the home of her sis
ter in Cincinnati, a silversmith named Hill,
and she may very probably be living yet.
Mrs. Diston was married when little more
than a child. Her husband w'as a steamboat
painter. He was a drinking man and abused
her so that she afterwards left him. She
w'ent to Louisville, w'here mv parents were
then living, and was for a time ray moth
er’s nurse. She was a very beautiful woman
and attracted a great deal of attention. She
was divorced from her husband and aft
erwards was known as Mrs. Lemanou
ski. Compelled to depend upon herself l’or
a livelihood, her health soon gave way and
she was reduced to great straits. * Her
father then came to her aid and took her
to_ his home in Indiana, where she died in
1851 or 1852. A son of Colonel Lemanouski
a worthy young man, once called on my
mother in Louisville. Verv likelv some of
Colonel Lemanouski’s descendants are
living in Indiana or Ohio, and might be able
to give definite information concerning the
history of Napoleon.
MARY E. CARD WILL.
New Albany, Ind., Sept. 5.
Mr. McClnng'* Recollections.
To the Editor of the Indianapolis Journal:
The discussion relating to Colonel Le
manouski and his supposed "Life of Na
poleon” has awakened recollections of the
colonel In my early youth. It is hard to
remember dates, but it was. perhaps, fifty
or more years ago that the colonel was a
frequent visitor at New Albany, if not an
actual resident of Floyd county, and I dis
tinctly remember his tall, commanding
form and broken speech. He was often in
the law office of my uncle. James Collins,
who became warmly attached to him. and
they would converse by the hour on Na
poleon and his wars, the colonel relating
his personal experiences. If anything was
said of the “Life of Napeolen.” written by
the colonel, or supposed to be, it has left
only a ghost of an impression, though I am
strongly impressed that the colon’el at dif
ferent times produced and read from both
books and manuscript. I think he was a
persistent writer. There are yet old citi
zens of New Albany who should rem’ember
the colonel, and I would refer the matter
to Genera! Packard and his New Albany
Tribune for investigation. Mr. Collins and
the immediate members of his family ai'e
dead, but there may lx* other old citizens
who had some knowledge of the facts I
have related. J H. M’CLUNG.
Shelbyville. Ind., Sept. 5.
Weather Prediction.
Irl Hicks.
There is no reason to fear anything out
of the ordinary this September. Upon the
whole, we think it will be a warm and dry
month over most parts of the country.
Some vicious storms will strike, but pru
dent readers will foresee them.
Synonomou* Term*.
San Francisco Post.
When a man goes into bankruptcy these
days his friends simply say that "he is now
on a silver basis."
NOTICE OF CHANGE
—OF-
Precinct
Boundaries
—IN—
The City of Indianapolis,
Marion County, State
of Indiana.
Notice is hereby given that
at a meeting of the Common
Council of the City of In
dianapolis, in Marion County,
State of Indiana, held in the
Council Chamber, in the City
of Indianapolis, on Monday,
May 20, 1897, the following
changes, divisions and con
solidations were made in the
several voting precincts in
the several Wards, of the
City of Indianapolis, Marion
County, State of Indiana, and
the boundaries fixed as fol
lows:
General Ordinance No. 46,
1897.
An Fixing <l>e Boundaries
of thejfotlng Precincts in the City
of IndJnnapolis, Ind.
Whereas, By reason of the annexation of
new territory to the City of Indianapolis
from time to time since fixing' the bounda
ries of the voting precincts in said city
heretofore made, it is made necessary and
is deemed necessary to change and read
just the boundaries of the voting precincts
in said city; therefore,
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Common
Council of the City of Indianapolis, Indi
ana, That the said City of Indianapolis be
and the same is hereby divided into one
hundred and ninety-five (195) voting pre
cincts, numbered as hereinafter described,
and designated by the following boundaries,
to-wit:
PRECINCTS OF THE FIRST WARD.
First Precinct of First Ward.
Commencing at the northeast comer of
section twenty-eight (28), township sixteen
(16) north, range four (4) east; thence West
with the section line dividing sections
twenty-one (21) and twenty-eight (28), town
ship sixteen (16) north, range four (4) east
and the center line of Schofield street to
the center line of Shade street; thence
south with the center line of Shade street
to the center line of Pendleton pike; thence
northeast with the center line of Pendle
ton pike to the northeast corner of section
twenty-eight (28), township sixteen (16)
north, range four (4) east, the place of be
ginning, shall constitute thfe First Precinct
of the First Ward.
Second Precinct of First Word.
Commencing with the center line of
Schofield street at the intersection with the
center line of Shade street; thence south
with the center line of Shade street to the
center line of Pendleton pike; th'ence south
west with the center line of Pendleton pike
to the center line of Rural street; thence
north with the center line of Rural street
to the center line of Twenty-fifth street
(formerly Brinkman street); thence east
with the center line of Twenty-fifth street
(formerly Brinkman street) to the center
line of Morris street; thence north with the
center line of Morris, street to the center
line of Schofield street; thence Vast with
the center line of Schofield street to the
center line of Shade street, the place of be
ginning. shall constitute the Second Pre
cinct of the First Ward.
Third Precinet of First Ward.
Commencing with the center line of Thir
tieth street (formerly Manchester street) at
tho intersection with the center line of Line
street: thence south with the center line
of Line street to the center line of
Twenty-fifth street (formerly Seventeenth
street); thence east with the center line of
Twenty-fifth street (formerly Seventeenth
street) to the center line of Rural street;
thence south with the center line of Rural
strVet to the center line of Lawrence street;
thence west with the center line of Law
rence street to the center line of Beech
street; thence southwestwardly with the
center line of Beech street to the center
line of Graham street; thence northwest
wardly with the Venter line of Graham
street to the center line of Hillside avenue;
thence southwestwardly with the center
line of Hillside av’enue to the center line
of Pickens street: thence north with the
center line of Pickens street to the cen
ter line of Twenty-first street (formerly
Twelfth street); thence west with the cen
ter line of Twenty-first street (formerly
Twelfth street) to the center line of Rals
ton avenue (formerly Harrison avenue);
thence north with the center line of Rals
ton avenue (formerly Harrison avenue) to
th'e center line of Thirtieth street (formerly
Twenty-second street); thence east with the
center lin’e of Thirtieth street (formerly
Twenty-second street) to the center line of
Line street, the place of beginning, shall
constitute the Third Precinct of the First
Ward.
Fourth Precinct of First Word.
Commencing with the center line of Thir
tieth stretet (formerly Twenty-second
street) at the intersection with the center
line of Ralston avenue (formerly Harrison
avenue); thence south with th’e center line
of Ralston avenue (formerly Harrison ave
nue) to the center line of Twenty-first
street (formerly Twelfth street); thence
east with the center line of Twenty-first
street (formerly Twelfth street) to the cen
ter line of Pickens street; thence south
with the center line of Pickens street to
the center line of Nineteenth street (for
merly Ninth street); thence west with the
center line of Nineteenth street (formerly
Ninth street) to the center line of Columbia
avenu’e; thence north with the center line
of Columbia avenue to the center line of
Twenty-first street (formerly Twelfth
street); thence west with the center line
of Twenty-first street (formerly Twelfth
street) to the center line of Cornell avenue;
thence north with the center line of Cor
nell avenue to the center line of Twenty
third street (formerly Fifteenth street);
thence east with the center lin’e of Twen
ty-third street (formerly Fifteenth street)
to the center line of the right-of-way of
th’e Lake Erie & Western Railroad Com
pany; thence northeastwardly with the
center line of the right-of-way of the Lake
Erie & Western Railroad Company to the
center line of Thirtieth street (formerly
Twenty-second street): thence east with
th’e center line of Thirtieth street (former
ly Twenty-second street) to the center line
of Ralston avenue (formerly Harrison ave
nue). the place of beginning, shall con
stitute the Fourth Precinct of tire First
Ward.
Fifth Precinet of First Ward.
Commencing with the center line of
Twenty-first street (formerly Twelfth
street) at the intersection with the venter
line of Columbia avenue; thence south with
the center line of Columbia avenue to the
Venter line of Nineteenth street (formerly
Ninth street); thence west with the center
line of Nineteenth street (formerly Ninth
street) to the Venter line of Cornell avenue;
thence north with the center line of Cor
nell avenue to the center line of Twenty
first street (formerly Twelfth street);
thence east with the center line of Twenty
first street (formerly Twelfth street) to the
center lint? of Columbia avenue, the place
of beginning, shall constitute the Fifth
Precinct of the First Ward.
Sixth Precinct of First Ward.
Commencing with the center line of Nine
teenth street (formerly Ninth stivet) at the
intersection with the. center line of New
man street: thence south with the center
line of Newman street to the center line of
Sixteenth street (formerly Seventh sin -n;
thence west with the center line of Six
teenth street (formerly Seventh street) to
the center line of Cornvll avenue; thence
north with the center line of Cornell ave
nue to the center line of Nineteenth street
(formerly Ninth street): thence east with
the center line of Nineteenth street (for
merly Ninth street) to the center line of
Newman street, the place of beginning,
shall constitute the Sixth precinct of the
First Ward.
Seventh Precinct of First Ward.
Commencing with the center line of Nine
teenth street (formerly Ninth street) at the
intersection with the Venter line of Hillside
avenue; thence southwest and south with
the center line of Hillside avenue and Com
merce avenue (formerly Orange avenue) to
the tenter line of Massachusetts avenue;
thence southwestwardly with the center
line of Massachusetts avenue to a point
extended southeast with the center line of
Martindale avenue (formerly Beeler street);
thence northwestwardly with said line and
the center line of Martindale avenu’e (for
merly Beeler street) to the center line of
Hillside avenue; thence southwestwardly
with the center line of Hillside avenue to
the center line of Martindale avenue (for
merly Betder street); thence north with the
center line of Marti..dale avenue (formerly
Beeler street) to the center line of Six'-
tventh street (formerlv Seventh street);
thence east with the center line of Six
teenth street (formeny Seventh street) to
the center lin’e of Newman street: thence
north with the center line of Newman street
to the center line of Nineteenth street (for
merly Ninth street); thence east with the
center line af Nineteenth street (formerly
Ninth street! to the center line of Hillside
av'enue, the place of beginning, shall con
stitute the Seventh Precinct of the First
W ard.
I'ighth Precinct of First Ward.
Commencing with the center line of Law
rence street at the intersection with the
center line of Rural street; thence south
with the center line of Rural street to the
center line of Brookside avenue; thence
southwestwardly with the center line of
Brookside avenue to the center line of
Commerce avenue (formerly Orange ave
ni je); t hence northwestwardly and north
with the center line of Commerce avenue
(formerly Orange avenue) and with the
center line of Hillside avenue to the cen
ter line of Graham street; thence south
eastwardly with the center line of Graham
street to the center line of Beech street;
thence northeastwardly with the center line
of Beech street to the center line of Law
rence street; thence east and northeast
wardly with the center line of Lawrence
street to the center line of Rural street,
the place of beginning, shall constitute the
Eighth Precinct of the First Ward.
Ninth Precinct of Flrtit Ward.
Commencing with the center line of
Pendleton pike at the intersection with
the east line of the right-of-way of the
Belt Railroad & Stock Yards Company;
thence south with the east line of the
right-of-way of the Belt Railroad & Stock
lards Company to the center line of Tenth
street (formerly Clifford avenue); thence
west wfith the center line of Tenth street
(formerly Clifford avenue) to the center
line of Rural street: thence north with the
center line of Rural street to the center
line of the Pendleton pike; thence north
east with the center line of Pendleton pike
to the east line of the right-of-way of the
Belt Railroad & Stock Yards Company, the
place of beginning, shall constitute the
Ninth Precinct of the First Ward.
Tenth Precinct of First Ward.
Commencing with the center line of
Brookside avenue at the intersection with
the center line of Rural street: thence
south with the center line of Rural street
to the center line of Tenth street (formerly
Clifford avenue): thence west with the cen
ter line of Tenth street (formerly Clifford
avenue) to the center line of Jefferson
street; thence north with the center line
of Jefferson street to the center line of
Commerce avenue (formerly Orange ave
nue): thence west and northwest with the
center line of Commerce avenue (formerly
Orange avenue) to the center line of
Brookside avenue: thence northeastwardly
with the center line of Brookside avenue
to the center line of Rural street, the place
of beginning, shall constitute the Tenth
Precinct of the First Ward.
Eleventh Precinct of First Ward.
Commencing with the center line of Com
merce avenue (formerly Orange avenue) at
the intersection with the center line of Jef
ferson street: thence south with the cen
ter line of Jefferson street to the center
line of Tenth street (formerly Clifford ave
nue): thence west with the center lino of
Tenth street (formerly Clifford avenue) to
the center line of Newman street; thence
north and northwestwardly with the cen
ter line of Newman street to the center
line of Massachusetts avenue: thence
northeast with Sflne center line of Massa
chusetts avenue to the center line of Com
merce avenue (formerly Orange avenue):
thence southeast and east with the center
line of Commerce avenue (formerly Orange
avenue) to the center line of Jefferson
street, the place of beginning, shall consti
tute the Eleventh Precinct of the First
Ward.
Twelfth Precinct of First Word.
'Commencing with the center line of Mas
sachusetts avenue at the intersection with
the center line of Newman street; thence
southeast and south with the center line of
Newman street to the center line of Tenth
street (formerly Clifford avenue): thence
west with the center line of Tenth street
(formerly Clifford avenue) to the center
line of Massachusetts avenue; thence
northeastwardly with the center line of
Massachusetts avenue to the center line of
Newman street, the place of beginning,
shall constitute the Twelfth Precinct of
the First Ward.
Thirteenth Precinet of First Ward.
Commencing with the center line of Six
teenth street (formerly Seventh street) at
the intersection with the center line of
Martindale avenue (formerly Beeler
street): thence south with the center line
of Martindale avenue (formerly Beeler
street) to the center line of Hillside ave
nue; thence northeastwardly with the cen
ter line of Hillside avenue to the center
line of Martindale avenue (formerly Beeler
street): thence southeastwardly with the
center line of Martindale avenue (formerly
Beeler street) and the line extended south
east to the center line of Massachusetts
avenue; thence southwestwardly with the
center line of Massachusetts avenue to the
center line of Columbia avenue (formerly
Barrow street); thence northwestwardly
with the center line of Columbia avenue
(formerlv Barrow street) to the center line
of Malott avenue; thence southwestwardly
with the center line of Malott avenue to
the center line of Yandes street: thence
north with the center line of Yandes street
to the center line of Sixteenth street (for
merly Seventh street): thence east with the
center line of Sixteenth street (formerly
Seventh street) to the center line of Mar
tindale avenue (formerly Beeler street), the
place of beginning, shall constitute the
Thirteenth Precinct of the First Ward.
Fourteenth Precinct of First W ord.
Commencing with the center line of Six
teenth street (formerly Seventh street) at
the intersection with the center line of
Yandes street; thenefe south with the cen
ter line of Yandes street to the center line
of Malott avenue: thence northeastwardly
with th’e center line of Malott avenue to
the center line of Columbia avenue (for
merly Barrow street); thence southeast
wardly with the center line of Columbia
avenue (formerly Barrow street) to the cen
ter line of Massachusetts avenue: thence
southwestwardly with the center line of
Massachusetts avenue to the ctenter line
of Cornell avenue; thence north with the
center line of Cornell avenue to the cent’ r
line of Sixteentli street (formerly Seventh
street); th'ence east with the center line of
Sixteenth street (formerly Seventh street)
to the center line of Yandes street, th’e
place of beginning, shall constitute the
Fourteenth Precinct of the First Ward.
PRECINCTS OF’ THE SECOND WARD.
First Precinet of Second Ward.
Commencing with the cent’ r line of Thir
tieth street (formerly Twenty-second
street) at the Intersection with the center
line of the right-of-way of the Lake Erie
& Western Railroad Company; thence
southwestwardly with the center Une of
the right-of-way of the Lake Erte & West
ern Railroad Company to the center Une of
Twenty-third street (formerly Fifteenth
street); thence West with the center line
of Twenty-third street (formerly Fifteenth
street) to the center Une of Cornell
a Venue; thence south with the center line
of Cornell avenue to the center line of
Twenty-second street (formerly Fourteenth
street; thence west with the center line of
Twenty-second street (formerly Fourteenth
street) to the center Une of College avenue;
thence north with the center line of Col
lege avenue and the Une extended north to
the south bank of Fall creek; thence north
eastwardly following the meanderirfgs of
the south bank of Fall creek to the center
line of Thirtieth street (formerly Twenty
second street); thence east with the center
Une of Thirtieth street) (formerly Twenty
second street) to the center line of the
right-of-wav of tho Lake Erie & Western
Railroad Company, the place of beginning,
shall constitute the First Precinct of the
Second Ward.
Second Precinet of Second Ward.
Commencing with the center line of
Twenty-second street (formerly Fourteenth
street) at the intersection with the center
Une of Cornell av'enue: thence south with
the center line of Cornell avenue to the cvn
ter Une of Twenty-first street (formerly
Twelfth street); thenfe west with the, cen
ter line of Twenty-first street (formerly
Twelfth street) to the center line of Col
lege avenue; thence south with the center
lino of College avenue to the center line of
Twentieth street (formerly Tenth street);
thence west with the center Une of Twen
tieth street (formerly Tenth street) to the
confer line of Ruckle street; thence north
with the center Une of Ruckle street to
the center Une of Twenty-first street (for
merly Twelfth street); thence east with
the center line of Twenty-first street (for
merly Twelfth street) to the center line of
Park avVnue; thence north with the cen
ter line of Park avenue to the center lino
of Sutherland avenue (formerly Bedford
avenu’e); thence west with the center lino
of Sutherland avenue (formerly Bedford
.avenue) to the center line of Central ave
nue: thence north with the Center line of
Central avenue to the south bank of Fall
creek; thence northeastwardly following
the moanderings of the south bank of Fall
cre'ek to a point extended north from the
center of College avenue; thence south with
said line and the center line of College ave
nue to the center line of Twenty-second
street (formerly Fourteenth street);
thence east with the center line of Twenty
second stre’et (formerly Fourteenth street)
to the center line of Cornell avenue, the
place of beginning, shall constitute the Sec
ond Precinct of the Second Ward.
Third Precinet of Second Ward.
Commencing with the south bank of Fall
creek at the intersection with the center
line of Central avenue; thence south with
the center line of Central avenue to the
center line of Sutherland avenue (formerly
Bedford aven>>*>); thence east with the Cen
ter line of Sutherland avenue (formerly
Bedford avenue) to the center line of Park
avenue; thence south with the center line
of Park avenue to the center lin’e of Twen
ty-first street (formerly Twelfth street);
thence west with the center line of Twen
ty-first street (formerly Twelfth street) to
the center line of Ruckle street; thenco
south with the center line of Ruckle street
to the center line of Sevent’eenth street
(formerly Eighth street); thence west with
the center line of Seventeenth street (for
merly Eighth street) to the center line of
Alabama street; thence north with the cen
ter line of Alabama street to the center
line of Twenty-second street (formerly
Fourteenth street); thence vast with the
center line of Twenty-second street (for
merly Fourteenth street) to th’a center line
of Alabama street: thence north with the
center line of Alabama street to the south
bank of Fail creek: th’ence east following
the meanderings of the south bank of Fall
creek to the center line of Central avenue,
the place of beginning, shall constitute the
Third Precinct of the Second Ward.
Fourth Precinct of Second Wnrd.
Commencing with the center line of
Twentieth street (formerly Tenth street)
at the intersection with the center line of
College avenue; thence south with the cen
ter line of College avenue to the center
line of Sixteenth street (formerly Seventh
street); thence west with the center line of
Sixteenth street (formerly Seventh street)
to the center line of Broadway; thence
north with the center line of Broadway
to the center line of Seventeenth street
(formerly Eighth street); thence west with
the center line of Seventeenth street (for
merly Eighth street) to the center line of
Ruckle street; thence north with the cen
ter line of Ruckle street to the center line
of Twentieth street (formerly Tenth
street); thence east with the center iine of
Twentieth street (formerly Tenth street) to
the center line of College avenue, the place
of beginning, shall constitute the Fourth
Precinct of the Second Ward.
Fifth Precinet of Second Ward.
Commencing with the center line of
Twenty-first street (formerly Twelfth
street) at the Intersection with the center
line of Cornell avenue; thence south with
the center line of Cornell avenue to the
center line of Nineteenth street (formerly
Ninth street); thence west with the center
line of Nineteenth street (formerly Ninth
street) to the center line of College ave
nue: thence north with the center line of
College avenue to the center line of Twen
ty-first street (formerly Twelfth street);
thence east with the center line of Twen
ty-first street (formerly Twelfth street) to
the center line of Cornell avenue, the place
of beginning, shall constitute the Fifth Pre
cinct of the Second Ward.
Sixth Precinct of Second Word.
Commencing with the center line of Nine
teenth street (formerly Ninth street) at
the intersection with the center line of Cor
nell avenue; thence south with the center
line of Cornell avenue to the center line of
Sixteenth street (formerly Seventh street);
thence west with the center line of Six
teenth street (formerly Seventh street) to
the center line of College avenue; thence
north with the center line of College ave
nue to the center line of Nineteenth street
(formerly Ninth street); thence east with
the center line of Nineteenth street (for
merly Ninth street) to the center line of
Cornell avenue, the place of beginning,
shall constitute the Sixth Precinct of tho
Second Ward.
Seventh Preelnet *f Seenml Ward.
Commencing with the center line of Six
teenth street (formerly Seventh street) at
the intersection with the center line of
Cornell avenue; thence south with the cen
ter line of Cornell avenue to the center
line of Thirteenth street (formerly Home
avenue); thence vest with the center line
of Thirteenth street (formerly Home ave
nue) to the center line of College avenue;
thence north with the center line of Col
lege avenue to the center line of Sixteentli
street (formerly Seventh street); thenca
east with the center line of Sixteenth street
(formerly Seventh street) to the center Une
of Cornell avenue, the place of beginning,
shall constitute the Seventh Precinct of the
Second Ward.
Eighth Precinet of Second Word.
Commencing with the center line of Six
teenth street (formerly Seventh street) at
the intersection with the center line of Col
lege avenue; thence south with the centep
line of College avenue to the center line
of Eleventh street (formerly Christian av
enue); thence west with the center line of
Eleventh street (formerly Christian ave
nue) to the center line of Park avenue;
thence north with the center line of Bark
avenue to the center line of Fifteenth
street (formerly Lincoln avenue): thence
east with the center line of I ifteenth street
(formerly Lincoln avenue) to the renter line
of Broadway; thence north with the center
line of Broadway to the center line of Six
teenth street (formerly Seventh s ’ r 'c,J'
thenee east with the center line of Slx
teenth street (formerly Seventh street) to
the center line of College avenue, the place
of beginning, shall constitute the Eighth
Precinct of the Second Ward.
N'lntli Precinet of Second Wnrd.
Commencing with center line of Sev
enteenth street (formerly Eighth street) at
the intersection with the center line of
Broadway; thence south with the center
line of Broadway to the center line of I- if
teenth street (formerly Lincoln avenue);
thence west with the center Une of rU
teenth street (formerly Lincoln avenue) to
the center line of Central avenue; thence
north with the center Une of Central ave
nue to the center line of Fifteenth street
(formerly Sixth street); thence west with
the center line of Fifteenth‘street (former
ly Sixth street) to the center line of Ala
bama street; thence north with the center
line of Alabama street to the center Une
of Seventeenth street (formerly Eighth
street): thence east with the center Une of
Seventeenth street (formerly Eighth street)
to the center line of Broadway the p ace
of beginning, shall constitute the Ninth
Precinct of the Second Ward.
Tenth Precinct of Second Wnrd.
Commencing with the center Une of Fif
teenth street (formerly Uncolo avenue) at
the intersection with the center line of
Park avenue; thence south with the center
Une of Park avenue to the center Une of
Eleventh street (formerlv Christian ave
nue)- thence west with the center Une of
Eleventh street (formerlv Christian ave
nue) to the center line of Central avenue;
thence south with the center line of Cen
tral avenue to the center line of rort
Wayne avenue; thence southwestwardly
with the center Une of Fort Wayne ave
nue to the center line of New Jersey street;
thence, north with the oenter line of New
Jersey street to the center Une of It nth
street (formerly St. Mary street): thenee
west with the center line of Tenth street
(former’v St. Mary street) to the center
Une of Alabama street: thence north with
the center line of Alabama street to tho
center line of Fifteenth street (formerly
Sixth street); thence east with the
line of Fifteenth street (formerly Sixth
street) to the center Une of Central avenue;
thence south with the center line of Cen
tral avenue to the renter line of Fifteenth
street (formerlv Lincoln avenue); thence
east with the center line of Fifteenth street
(formerlv Lincoln avenue) to tin- centep
line of Park avenue, the plaae of begln
ning, shall constitute the Tenth I recinet
of the Second Ward.
Eleventh Precinct of Sc eon and Ward.
Commencing with the center line of Tenth
street (formerly Cherry street) at the in
tersection with the center Une of East
street thence south with the renter Ino
of Fast street to the center line of St. ( lair
street; thence west with the center line of
St Clair street to the center Une °f Ala
bama street; thence north wlth the oenter
line of Alabama street to the center line
St TMth iJiSrt (formerly *. Mry
thence east with the renter line of Tenth
street (formerly St. Mary street) to the
center line of New Jersey street, thence
south with the center line of New Jersjs y
street to the center line of tort
avenue: thence northeastwardly ItH the
renter Une of Fort Wayne avenue to the
center line of Tenth street (formerly Cher
ry street); thence east with the center line
of Tenth street (formerly Cherry street) to
the center line of East street, the blare of
beginning, shall constitute the Eleventh
Precinct of the Second Ward.
Twelfth Precinct of Second Ward.
Commencing with the center Une of Elev
enth street (formerly Christian avenue) at
the Intersection with the center line of
Broadway; thence south with the renter
line of Broadway to the center line of St.
Clair street; thence west with the center
line of St. Clair street to the center Une
of East street; thence north with the cen
ter line of East street to the center line of
Tenth street (formerly Cherry street);
thenee west with the center line of lentil
street (formerly Cherry street) to the cen
ter line of Fort Wayne avenue, thence
northeastwardly with the center line or
F<rt Wayne avenue to the center Une of
Central avenue; thence north with the cen
ter line qf Central avenue to the eeutei
5

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