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The Indianapolis journal. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1867-1904, November 04, 1900, Part One, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015679/1900-11-04/ed-1/seq-1/

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iVOL. L-NO. 308.
INDIANAPOLIS, SUNDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 4, 1900-TWENTY PAGES.
rRlCE FIVE CENTS.
PAHA ESTABLISHED liM.
v J IUI
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Pages 1 to 8
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ATROCIOUS LIE
THE HENDERSON STORY DENOUNCED
AT AVAR R E PA RT 31 E X T
Sat a Particle of Ranis for the Sentb
ncl's Outrngenus Marnier on
Aiuprlcan Soldiers.
WANTON, ' BRAZEN UNTRUTH
THAT WAS FABRICATED IX THE "LE
VEE" SIICET'S FAKB 31 ILL.
Olnnila I One of the Dest-Governed
Citle in the World Said
Colonel AVard Yesterday.
CHINESE WOMEN ARE BARRED
THE SAMC AS TIICA' ARE AT PORTS
IX THE C.MTED STATUS
Alle Falsehood Similar to Lies
Circulated by the "Anntles" in
Efforts to Help Bryan.
PROBABLE CASE OF FORGERY
AOTIIING LIKE THE SENTINEL'S
CHARGES IX ORIGINAL. LETTER.
II Contents Slade Pnbllc "from 3Iem
or" AVhnt Neighbor of the
Hendersons Say.
Special to the Indianapolis Journal.
WASHINGTON, Nov. 3.-The alleged let
ter purporting to have been written by
Prijate Henderson, Company II, Thirty
second United States A'oluntecrs, published
in the Indianapolis Sentinel, was shown to
the officials of the War Department by
the Journal correspondent to-day. They
smiled wearily as they denounced the thins
as an atrocious campaign lie. It is by no
xnean3 the iirst time similar statements
from various sources have been brought to
their attention. The Anti-Imperial League,
so-called. ha3 been especially fertile in in
venting and active in promulgating these
fal3e statements. They have been denied
time and again, only, however, to spring
up elsewhere in a new or modified form.
This Sentinel-Henderson fabrication is sim
ply the latest output of the Democratic
fake mill. It makes Henderson, or who
ever concocted his alleged letter, out as a
more wanton and brazea fabricator of false
statements than usuaL Naturally hi-) viW
Inventions And a suitable channel of com
munication to the public in an open cam
palgn sewer like the Sentinel.
Unfortunately for Henderson, or whoever
really wrote the alleged letter and forged
his name, he makes the speciflc statement
that "about the same time we came here
last October there were brought here from
China about eight hundred of the lowest
typo of Chinese women and they were in
stalled in houses, some for the officers aud
some for private soldiers " There is abso
lutely no truth In that statement. It la a
lie out of the whole cloth, and very dirty
and rotten cloth at that. Not a score of
Chinese women have been allowed to land
at Manila, or elsewhere in the Philippines
since American occupation there, and the
few that have been had to pass a rigid
custom-house investigation, the same as
though they had sought to land at a port
in the United States. Had "eight hundred
of the lowest type of Chinese women" been
admitted to Manila or to any other place
or places In the Philippines a year ago, as
that alleged letter says, the American peo
pl; would not have had to wait to learn of
It from a private letter from a private sol
dier. The newspaper correspondents there
would have made the world ring with the
infamy of IL As it is, the Infamy attaches
to the slanderer of the American army, of
ficcrs and enlisted men alike, and the
smlrcher of their good name.
The statement that these loose Chinese
women pay a tax, .or license, to ply their
trade is a falsehood growing out of the
first, as are the remaining statements.
According to the Sentinel, Private Hen
dcrson has in previous letters "hinted at
things which he said he did not like to
put in for fear the officers would not let
the letter go through." If Henderson
wrote that to his mother, as the Sentinel
ceclarcs, he must be a heartless, as well
as a fool, lUr. No officer or anyone else
ever sees the private letters written by the
enlisted men. No such thing as censorship
e!srs or ever did in the American army
ever the private letters written by or to
the officers and soldiers of that army. Now,
if Henderson would lie to his mother with
t cut an object it is plain ho would lie for
campaign effect.
The statement that "at night the streets
ere a mass of howling, drunken, half-naked
women and American soldiers," was fully
cuswered by Lieutenant Boyle, in the Jour
nal. His statements that no one is allowed
on the street after n o'clock at night with
out a. pass Is corroborated by Colonel
AVard. who was chief of staff to the late
General Lawton, and who is now on duty
hrc. He denounced the so-called Hender
son letter as a campaign fake. "Manila."
h. said, "is a city of more than half a
million people, and is one of tfca best gov
erned cities in the world. As Well governed
Washington, for instance," he added
emphatically.
LETTER AVAS FORGED.
Henderson Said Nothing Ahont the
Matter Printed in the Sentinel.
Special to the Indianapolis Journal.
. CLINTON, Ind., Nov. S. A representative
of the Clinton Republican drove out to the
Henderson home, near St. Bernice, this
morning, to learn the particulars of the
letter reported to have been received from
Custer Henderson, in the Philippine army.
Mrs. Henderson reports the alleged letter
from her son as having been mislaid be
fore the contents were given from memory
ty her husband. Ab. Henderson, the father
of the boy. There arc neighbors, however,
who know about the letter. Charles Jones
lives near. Mr. Jones is an ardent Demo
crat and a subscriber of the Sentinel. Mrs.
Jones saw the letter from Custer Hender
scn i pen which the article in the Sentinel
was bated. She is indignant at the nisrep
rt sentatlon made. She declares there is not
a single word in the Sentinel that was in
Custer Henderson's letter. She declares,
further, that there was not a word of com
plaint In the boy's letter except about his
rations, which he said were sometimes not
fit to eat.
Dr. Lownsdale lives in St. Eernlce, not
tar from the Henderson home. Mrs. Lowns
dale has taken a friendly interest in a
daughter in the Henderson family, .whose
condition she pitied on account of her pit
iable home surroundings. This girl and
her mother both spoke to Dr. and Mrs.
Lownsdale about having received the let
ter from Custer, the first for several
months. They complained because he had
only wrlten a few words and had not told
anything of the situation in the Philippines.
They said, however, that he was better
satisfied with affairs than at first.
AGUINALDO DEAD.
Reiteration of the Report that the
Tagalo Leader AVas Killed.
SAN DIEGO, Cal., Nov. 3. James C.
Hussey, of National City, has received a
letter from James Thompson, a private
of Company C, Twenty-seventh United
States Infantry, written while he was in
the hospital at Manila and dated Septem
ber, In which the writer says that a young
Filipino occupying a bed next to him in the
hospital stated that Aguinaido was really
shot dead, as reported some time ago, but
that it was to be kept quiet for political
reasons.
JONES THE BRAGGART
EXTRAVAGANT ASSERTIOXS RA THE
ARKAXSAS DULLDOZER.
Election of Bryan and Stevenson
Claimed by a Majority That, Jones
Says, AA'HI Be "Ample."
INDIANA, ILLINOIS AND OHIO
NEAV A'ORIC AXD NEAV JERSEY PUT
IX THE RR VAX COLU3IX.
Address Ined by the Populist Na
tional Committee in Line -with
Jones's Frand Statement.
CHICAGO, Nov. 3. Chairman Jones, of
the national Democratic committee, fur
nished the Associated Press to-night with
tho following statement covering the out
look from his standpoint:
"The fight is won. Bryan and Stevenson
will be elected. The Democratic majority
In the Electoral College will be ample. The
Democrats will hold all the States they
carried in h''. with the possibe exception
of Wyominj AVe will also carry New
York, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland,
West Virginia. Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio
and Illinois. The chairman of the state
committee of California has just wired me
that we will carry that State by 10,000 ma
jority. "In a general way, I should say that
there will be somewhat of a falling off of
Bryan's strength compared with 1S3 west
of the Mississippi, and that east of the
Mississippi he will make overwhelming
gains.
"Tho campaign has been spirited from the
start. The Democrats were somewhat han
dicapped for want of funds, while the Re
publican?, as four years ago, had more
money than they could use. The Repub
licans have endeavored to intimidate labor
ing m?n and alarm business men, but not
with the fierce oppression they brought to
bear in 1S'.G. It is my opinion that intimi
dation has been a failure this year, and
that both workingmen and business men
will vote according to the dictates of con
science. Of course, the trusts, the great
aggregations of combined capital, the seek
ers for franchises in Porto Rico and the
Philippines, the promoters and exploiters,
generally have spared no effort and will
spare no effort to re-elect McKinley.
"It is my firm belief, however, that the
electorate cannot be debauched this year
to a sufficient extent to throttle the public
will. The country is aroused as it has not
been since the days preceding the civil war.
The existence of the form of government
established by the fathers is at stake.
Whether the trusts shall govern the coun
try or the country' regulate the trusts must
be decided. It will be found when the
votes are counted that the people have de
termined with emphasis that the Republic
must be preserved, that the power of the
trusts must be curbed, that the man is to
be considered before the dollar, and that
the voice of the people cannot be sup
pressed by attempted intimidation or cor
ruption. "The States that will vote for Bryan will
show that the people have confidence in
him from the Atlantic to the Pacific, and
from the northernmost to the southernmost
boundaries of the Republic.
"JAMES K. JONES."
Stone Like Jones.
NEW YORK, Nov. l-A'ice-Chairmar AY.
J. Stone, of the Democratic national com
mittee, and in charge of the Eastern head
quarters, declined to give any table to
night, saying that all tabulated statements
were issued in Chicago. He said, however:
"I feel confident that AViiliam Jennings
Bryan will be elected President of tho
United States. The sentiment in favor of
Bryan has been increasing during the past
two weeks, and is still increasing. I bise
my statements on reports from this State,
New Jersey, Maryland, West A'irginia, In
diana and other doubtful States. From
sources of information that are absolutely
reliable I feel confident in asserting that
New York State will go Democratic by
over 25,000 plurality. AVIth thj solid South,
New York and Indiana, and with tho West
ern States that are sure for Bryan, he will
be triumphantly elected. It Is useless to
go into the matter of figures, and as It Is
not my province to make a tabulated state
ment, I refrain from doing so. I am gclng
around a good deal among the people,
making speeches and hearing what Is
(CONTINUED ON THIRD PAGE.) .
PARADE IN RAI
XEAV A'ORIC REPUBLICAN HOSTS
MARCH, DESPITE COLD DRIZZLE.
Thonsands Pass In Review Before
Governor Roosevelt, B. B. Odell
and Other Party Leaders
NO LACK OF ENTHUSIASM
CHEERS FOR "TEDDY" AXD CHEERS
ALL ALOXG THE LIXE.
Nothing to Indicate There Aas Any
Basis for Insulting Declara
tions on Bryan Banners
DESPICABLE CR0KER' TACTICS
EFFORT TO MAKE IT APPEAR THE
MARCHERS AVE RE COERCED.
Over 87,000 Men in Line Message from
Governor Roosevelt to Pres
ident McKinley.
NEW YORK. Nov. 3. Through streets
made slushy by a continuous fall cf rain,
which, though not a downpour, was suf
ficient" to dampen the clothing, though not
the spirits of the marchers, the parade of
the Business Men's Republican and Sound
Money Association passed from Bowling
Green to Fortieth street to-day. The man
agers of the parade express the liveliest
satisfaction that tho showing made was
such a magnificent one, and their senti
ments may be best voiced by the following
telegram which Governor Roosevelt sent
to President McKinley at Canton after the
last marcher had passed the Governor's
reviewing stand:
"In epite of the unfavorable weather, the
Sound Money parade was an even more
magnificent demonstration than four years
ago. The aroused civic honesty and busi
ness Intelligence of the Nation are be
hind you.
"THEODORE ROOSEVELT."
A count of the number of men in line
was made at the reviewing stand near
the Fifth Avenue Hotel. This count shows
that thero were 87,615 in the parade. The
parads was noteworthy for the dispatch
with which the different associations
formed into line in the lower part of the
city and tho quickness which which they
dropped out of line. At Fortieth street
the disbandment was particularly worthy
of praise. The different bodies marched
first east, then west on Fortieth street,
leaving always a clear road for -the fol
lowing club.
Tho cold rain, which most of the time
drove directly into the faces of the march
ers, did not seem to dampen the enthu
siasm one whit or lessen the number in
line. With full ranks the different . or
ganizations assembled at their respective
rendezvous prepared for a long wet march.
Flags flew just as gaily and cheers were
as readily given as if the sun were shining.
The police were in perfect command of
the great- throngs in all parts of the lines
of march, and at no time was there the
slightest crowding or trouble of any de
scription. In. falling In, in the downtown
districts, as soon as one street was cleared
the police surrounded tho er.d of tho line
a:d moved up slowly to the next street,
thus allowing that street to become
cleared. This method was followed along
the line until AVorth street was reached,
and the last organization was in Hue.
STOOD MANY HOURS IN LINE.
The head of the parade reached the re
viewing stand at 10:55 o'clock, and the last
man passed thero in review at 5:43 o'clock.
The parade was led by a squad of mounted
policemen, which reached the disbanding
point at Fortieth street and Fifth avenue
at 11:18 o'clock. Two minutes later tho
first platoon, or division of tho Dry Goods
Republican Club, which had the honor of
heading the parade proper, reached For
tieth street, swung west Into that thor
oughfare, and disbanded at Seventh ave
nue. Nearly seven hours later the last division
of tho parade reached tho point of disband
ment, dnd at six minutes after G o'clock
the big demonstration was officially said
to be over.
Tho crowds In the lower part of the city
began to gather early, and all along
Broadway, clear up to Worth street, from
where the parade was to move, thousands
massed on the sidewalk and waited in he
drizzling rain and cold, raw wind, for the
formation to move.
Shortly after 10 o'clock the head of the
parade, at which rode Governor Roosevelt,
moved up the line of march. When the ie
viewing stand was reached, at the Worth
monument, the Governor's carriage was
halted, and he took his place on the stand,
where he reviewed the ranks of marchers.
For seven hours Governor Roosevelt stood
on the stand, with head uncovered for
nearly all of the time, and greeted the
marchers as they filed past by the thou
sand. For each division of Organization
Governor Roosevelt had a wcrd of praise
or acknowledgment; from each he was
given a cheer and greetings, both formal
and impromptu. There was no shelter over
the reviewing stand, and the steady drizzle
of rain made the seven hours a terrific
strain upon anyone. Through it all Gov
ernor Roosevelt's smllo never left his facB,
and although his clothing was wet and his
hair glistened with water as he stood, hat
In hand, he showed no ill effects of the
arduous task at the end.
There were thirty-eight organizations, or
divisions of the parade, each organization
being commanded by a marshal, who had
under him marshals of subdivisions and
captains of companies. There were over a
hundred bands in the parade, the Twenty
second Regiment Band leading. Nearly all
the prominent bands in the city were In
the line, and there were Innumerable drum
corps. A score of bands was needed to fur
nish the music for the AVhoIesale Dry
Goods Republican Club alone, which con
sisted of sixteen sections of about 1.C00 men
each, marching in companies of sixteen file
front, 100 companies to the division.
ORGANIZATIONS THAT PARADED,
In tho Wholesale Dry Goods Republican
Club the following organizations Joined, In
the parade with a( total number of men, so
far as could be estimated, of Zi.ZZZ: The
AVhoIesale Dry Goods Republican Club, 11,
643; Ladies' Garment Association, 1,100;
Clothiers' Legion, 1,700; Merchant Tailors'
Sound-money League, C00; central dry
goods division, 6,500; Haberdashers' Asso
ciation, 750.
The following organizations had, by com
putation, the following number of men in
line: Millinery Sound-money Association,
L500; Hat Trade Association, 2,000; the pa
per and associated trades, 4.C50; New York
Florists' Sound-money Club, 2,800; Eastern
Business Men's Association, C50; Coal Trade
Sound-money Club, 500; Lumberman's
Sound-money Club, 1.275; Produce and
Maritime Sound-money League, 3,000; Hide
aud Leather Sound-money Club. 2,200;
architectural division, 500; shoe trade or
ganization, 1,500; the Coffeo Exchange and
Lower AVall-Etreet Business Men's Sound
money Club. 1,250; Columbia University Mc
Kinley and Roosevelt Club, 450; Custom
house Brokers Sound-money Club, ?50; the
Ieaf Tobacco Trade Sound-money Club,
1,025; the Bankers' and Brokers' Republic
an and Sound-money Club, 7.S50; the Brook
lyn Bankers' and Brokers' Sound-money
Club, 725; Lawyers' Sound-money Club, 2,
02ö; New York Law School Sound-money
Club. 250: McKinley and Roosevelt Insur
ance Club, 2,400; the Real Estate Sound- I
money Club, 3,000; publishers and adver
tisers' division, 1,370; Machinery and Metal
Trades Association, 3,750; Jewelers' McKin
ley and Roosevelt Club, 4.1CQ; the Drug,
Chemical, Paint, A'arnish and Oil Associa
tion, 3,275; Manufacturers and Dealers In
Supplies for Steam," Water and Gas Sound
money Club, 2,300; Electrical Industries As
sociation, 3,500; South Money League, man
ufacturers of confectionery, 350; Pottery,
Glass, Brass and Lamp Association, 800;
AVest'Side Business Men's McKinley and
Roosevelt Club, 2,700; harness-and saddlery
trade, 500; hardware and metal trades, L250;
Commercial Travelers' McKinley and
Roosevelt Club, 260, and the United Italians
(CONTINUED ON SEVENTH PAGE.)
DISASTER IN A MINE
FRIGHTFUL EXPLOSION IN A AVE ST
rIRGIXIA COLLIERY
Gas Ignited by a Blast in n Pit of the
Southern Coal Company at
Berrysburg.
AT LEAST TWELVE MEN DEAD
AXD THE LOSS OF LIFE, IT IS SAID,
31 AY REACH TWENTY.
Other Miners Fatally Injured Mules
Killed nt Mouth of the Pit Cars
Blown Forty Feet.
PHILLIPPI, AV. Ara.. Nov. 3. The worst
explosion in th rii -:teryf Barbour, county
occurred this morning at 1 o'clock at tho
mines of the Southern Coal and Transpor
tation Company, at Berrysburg, six miles
from this place. As a result these are dead:
OLLIE MARKS, pit boss.
ANDREW J. BLACKWELL.
ALBERT BROWN.
LAWRENCE DUNCAN.
PACK ADAMS.
,And seven others whoso name3 arc not
obtainable.
The Injured are Will Marks and James
Jackson, both of whom will die.
The explosion was so great that mules
were killed at the mouth of tho mines and
cars were blown forty feet from the track.
One man was blown in two at the loins and
his body thrown against a pile of lumber
at the mouth of the mine. Tho night shift
went on duty at 7 o'clock. Everything went
on smoothly until about midnight, when
the explosion occurred. The dead wero mu
tilated beyond description, and the scene
was calculated to mako tho strongest heart
faint. The explosion was probably the re
sult of an accidental discharge of dyna
mite, caused, perhaps, by tho concussion
of a blast. The property loss is light. No
blame can be attached to the officials of
the company. A coroner's inquest will be
held to-morrow, at which time additional
facts as to the cause of the explosion may
be obtained. Operations will bo resumed
at tho mines on Monday morning.
The report of the explosion was so great
that two men were found fifty feet from the
mouth of tho mine. An hour after the ex
plosion hundreds had visited the mine. The
call for relief brought every physician in
Phlllppl to the scene. The sight was a
most horrible one. Strewn along the main
channel and about the opening were the
arms, legs, hands and other portions of the
bodies of the dead miners. Fathers and
mothers were frantically hunting for sons,
and a.3 fast as a body was recovered they
would glance at it, and, recognizing it,
would give hysterical screams. The hotel
has been turned into a hospital and those
still alive when brougnt out were taken
there. There is a great deal of comment
about the cause of the explosion. The au
thorities refused to discuss the matter fur
ther than to say it was caused by an ex
cessive charge of powder being used. The
miners insist that it was caused by fire
damp. The mine was recently inspected
and pronounced to be in good condition.
John W. Green, who was in the mine at
the time of the explosion and escaped in
Jury, gives the following account of it: "I
went Into the mine at7:30 and went to room
No. 1. I had been at work an hour or so
when I smelled black damp. I noticed my
lamp would flicker. I went to the mine
boss and told him about it. He laughed
and said it was all right. I went back to
work and about midnight heard a terrific
noise, which knocked me down and put out
my lamp. I was stunned for a moment,
and then realized what had happened. I
was close to the entrance and crawled over
the bodies of two men."
As the work of removing the dead goes on
things look worse. Four more have been
brought out during the last hour, and the
searchers report that a dozen are yet In
the mine. Most of those brought out are
mutilated beyond description. A most pa
thetic incident. was that of James Smith.
He ran away from his home in Preston
county last week, and after tramping it
for a few days applied for work at the
mine yesterday evening. Last night was
his first trip into the mines. He was a
young man about twenty years of age,
well educated and highly connected. The
mines of Berrysburg have only been opened
a short time. They have had a great deal
of trouble. First the mines were flooded,
and then the men struck. Last week the
stables were set on fire and twenty-six
horses burned. Now comes the explosion
Colonel B. F. Berry, the mine owner, ar
rived hero this morning, but refused to dis-
(CONTINUED ON OEVENT1I PAGE.)
HEEL 294
HEXRY C. PAYNE'S ESTIMATE OF
THE ELECTORAL VOTE.
His A'ievr of the Probable Result of
the Balloting for President and
Vice President on Tuesday,
GIVES BRYAN 112 VOTES SURE
AXD SAYS HE PROBABLY WILL SE
CURE TAVEXTA'-SEA'EX MORE.
McKinley AVI11 Certainly Get 294, and
May Carry Enough Other States
to Make His Total 30S
0UTL00K TOR NEXT HOUSE
CHAIRMAN BIBCOCK'S ST ATEM EXT
OF PROBABILITIES.
He Believes the Republican A'ote in
the Lower House of the Fifty
Seventh Congress AVill Be 200.
CHICAGO, Nov. 3.-Henry C. Tayne,
chairman of the executive committee of the
national Republican committee, furnished
the Associated Press to-night with the fol
lowing statement giving the outlook Tues
day from tho Republican standpoint:
"Our latest advices from New York are
conclusive that the State will give a large
majority for McKinley. Local conditions in
Greater New York, well known to the
country, will increase Mr. Bryan's vote In
the metropolis, but we believe that a ma
jority for McKinley In the State Is a most
conservative estimate.
"Early in the campaign there may have
been some question as to the result in
Maryland. Mr. Bryan's visit to that State
proved Injurious to his cause, and there
has been, in the last three weeks, a great
revival of feeling among sound-money
Democrats, especially in Baltimore, which
presages a majority for McKinley of be
tween 5,000 and 10,000.
"As to Ohio, while there may be some
losses In Cuyahoga county and Cleveland,
and perhaps one or two of the other larger
cities, this will be more than made up in
the rural districts of tho State. AVe predict
with the greatest confidence a larger ma
jority in the State than was given In 1S0Ö.
"Undoubtedly Indiana has been the great
battle ground in the States of the Middle
AVest. Every vote has been thoroughly
contested. The Republicans will' suffer
losses In a few ftf the larger cities,.-but
there will be gains among the farmers and
the first voters of the young men. Devel
opments show that the young men of the
State are almost unanimously supporting
McKinley and Roosevelt. It is understood
in Indiana that the majority for the Re
publican ticket will be in excess of 20,000.
"In the Rocky Mountain States, those
that four years ago went almost solidly
for free silver, there has been a revolution
In public sentiment, and it will not be sur
prising if all or nearly all of them reverse
their position of four years ago. It is as
certain as anything can be that Kansas,
Av'yoming, South Dakota and AVashington
will be carried by the Republicans by de
cisive majorities, and the States of Ne
braska, Utah and Nevada are more likely
to give their votes to McKinley than to
Bryan.
"Tho results of the campaign indicate
clearly that the administration of President
McKinley will be sustained by the people
and that he will secure a larger vote than
in 1S0G, both in the popular and in the Elec
toral College."
Mr. Tayne gave out ' the following de
tailed estimate:
Safely Republican.
California 3
Connecticut
Delaware 3
Illinois 21
Indiana 1
Iowa 13
Kansas 10
Kentucky 13
Maine 6
Maryland
Massachusetts 15
Michigan 1
Minnesota t
New Hampshire 4
New Jersey 13
New York 16
North Dakota :i
Ohio T3
Oregon 4
Pennsylvania ,. 22
Rhode Island.. 4
South Dakota 4
Vermont 4
Washington 4
West Virginia 6
Wisconsin I... 22
Wyoming 3
Total ....Üsl
Probably Republican.
Nebraka 8
Nevada a
Utah 3
Total 11
Democratic.
Alabama
Arkansas
.... n
&
4
13
North Carolina 11
South Carolina i s
Tennessee 12
Texas 1
A'irginia 12
Total Hi
Florida
Georpia ...
Louisiana
Mississippi
8
9
Probably Democratic.
Colorado j Montana 3
liaho 3 4 ,
Missouri IT Total 27
"In this list Kentucky is put down as
safely Republican.' The popular vote will
show a majority of not less than 30,000 for
McKinley. The only doubt surrounding the
casting of the electoral vote is that raised
by the question whether the Democrats,
acting under the provisions of the infamous
Goebel law, will be able to steal it.
"H. C. PAYNE."
Mr. Manley's Statement.
NEW YORK, Nov. 3. In the line of the
foreshadowing result of next Tuesday's
election, Joseph II. Manley, vice chairman
of the Republican national committee, said
to-night:
"The tide is in our favor. McKinley will
get the largest electoral vote ever cast for
any President. For the past two weeks
the trend in our favor has increased to
such an extent that it has made success
doubly assured. McKinley will carry the
following States:
California 9
Delaware
Indiana 1
Kansas 10
Maine ?
Massachusetts !
Minnesota
New Jersey 10
North Dakota 3
Oregon
Rhode Island 4
Vermont 4
West Virginia 6
Wyoming 3
Illinois T4
Iowa 13
Kentucky 3J
Maryland 8
Michigan It
New Hampshire...... 4
New York "6
Ohio 23
Pennsylvania 22
South Dakota 4
Wisconsin 12
Washington 4
Total 234
Connecticut
,
"We will probably, carry Nebraska,
with eight votes, and Utah, with five votes,
a total of eleven, and may possibly carry
Colorado, four votes, axiy7.evada, 3 votes,
a total of seven. . This wiil leave Mr. Bry
an only 143 electoral votes. No one who has
studied the situation and has watched the
developments in the campaign caa fail to
see how the tide has been setting towards
McKinley."
THC NI2XT CONGRESS.
Mr. Bnbcock Expects the Election of
Fully SOO Republicans.
CHICAGO, Nov. -Representative Bab
cock, chairman of the Republican congres
sional campaign committee, gave the Asso
ciated Press to-night the following state
ment covering the expectations of the Re
publicans as to the next House of Repre
sentatives: "The congressional campaign has reached
a point where the only question is the size
of the Republican majority. In my state
ment given to the press the 27th I said the
Republican membership would not be less
than 1S7. This number I considered at the
time as sure beyond any reasonable doubt.
Since then conditions have continued to Im
prove. The Croker and Jones advice to
Democrats suggesting fraud by the Repub
licans has done us much good, for no one
can point to a single instance where a Re
publican member has been elected by fraud
either In the votes cast or In the count
after they were cast, while the majority
of Democratic representation in the House
comes from districts where the Republican
vote Is driven from the polls by the shot
gun, or if in many caseä it Is cast, it is
counted for the Democratic candidate and
the will of the people defeated. This cry of
wolf coming from the party that stands
sponsor for fraud of the worst type will
be resented at the polls. And I have every
reason to believe that fully 200 Republicans
will be elected to the Fifty-sventh Con
gress. JOSEPH AV. BABCOCK."
SEVEN PERSONS INJURED.
Trolley Car Accidents In South Chi
cago In AA'hich Passengers Suffered.
CHICAGO, Nov. 3. Two accidents oc
curred in South Chicago last night, in both
of which passengers of street cars were
severely injured. In one case a trolley car
collided with an Illinois Central suburban
train at Seventy-ninth street and Railroad
avenue, injuring four persons. In the other
accident, in which three persons were hurt,
two trolley cars collided at Ninetieth street
and Commercial avenue.
Injured at Seventy-ninth Ftreet: Ira
Isham, motorraan, internal injuries, may
prove fatal; Mrs. Ella Euson, her son Sid
ney, aged slx4 and Mrs. Kate Eurry.
Injured at Ninetieth street: Hans Nich
olson, Alfred Boswell, Frank Slester.
CROKER SEES KO
CAXXOT FIGURE OUT A. PLURALITY
FOR HIS ''DEAR FRIEND."
Now Renlizes He Cannot Keep His
Promise to Carry the Empire
State for AV. J. Bryan.
20,000 IN GREATER NEW YORK
IS ALL THE PLURALITY THE TA3I
MANY BOSS REALLY EXPECTS.
"The Old 3Inn Knorrs He's Beat an
Expression Used by Some of
Croker'a Followers.
CHICAGO, Nov. 3. Telegraphing from
New York to the Record, AV. E. Curtis
says: "Mr. Croker practically gave up tho
fight for the presidency this afternoon.
After receiving reports from the Tammany
leaders in all the election districts In
Greater New A'ork on the result of their
final canvass the best he could do was to
figure out 31,000 majority for. Bryan in New
A'ork proper, 2,200 in Queens and 1,500 in
Richmond counties, while the reports from
Brooklyn showed a probable Republican
majority of 15,000 in Kings. I have these
figures from unquestioned authority, al
though Mr. Croker himself refused to
verify them and said they were 'all rot.'
He would give no figures himself, nor
would he tell the result of the canvass as
reported to him, nor would he make any
estimates as to the result of the flection,
as he is accistomcd to do on the Friday
proceeding election day every year. In
explanation of this departure from his
usual custom Mr. Croker said to the re
porters that it was Impossible to make
an accurate canvass this year because so
many people refused to tell how they are
going to vote for fear of losing their Jobs.
' 'Just think of tho terrorism und intimi
dation he said. 'There was never any
thing like it. People are so afraid of the
trusts that they dare not tell their nearest
friends how they are going to vote. They
keep quiet. It's no wonder. Suppose you
and I were working for a trust. Suppose
somebody came along and asked us how
we were going to vote. AVould we tell
them? Not much. AVould we dare tell
them that we Intend to vote for Bryan?
Not much. AVe wouldn't dare to. AVhen a
man comes along and asks you who you
arc going to vote for, who knows who sent
him? AVho told hlra to find out? The
trusts. So he keeps his mouth shut, and
we can't make a canvass because people
won't talk, so there won't be any estimate
this year. But I know who they are going
to vote for without their telling. Half the
men who walk in that Republican parade
to-morrow will vote for Bryan. I have had
letters from half of them and they told me
so.
"Mr. Croker is said to have shown a
great deal of temper over the reports, and
the Tammany leaders have not suffered
such a 'roasting since they can remember.
He told them that New York city proper
must not show less than C6.000 majority on
Tuesday, which is 6,000 more than it gave
A'an AVyck. But even If he gets that and
the saoje majorities A'an AVyck received in
Queens and Richmond In 1SSS ho will have
only 71,000, from which mu3t be deducted
whatever Republican majority 13 given In
Brooklyn. It Is considered that Brooklyn
will go Republican. Scarcely anybody
doubts It The local Democratic leaders
over there admit that the Republican
presidential ticket will have 5,090 more
votes than Bryan and Stevenson, but the
Republicans claim 18,000 or 20.COO, and many
of them even more. Allowing Brooklyn
10,000 Republican majority,- whl:h Is a very
moderate estimate, Croker's own figures
carry Bryan to th3 Bronx with only Cl.
000 majority to be overcome Dy the Repub
licans In the rest of the State, which !s
certainly good for 100,000. Croker allows
McKinley from 60,000 to 73,000 majority in
the upper counties.
"That 'the old man knows he's beat,' as
the boys around Tammany Hall t,ay, is
shown by other evidence than his lost tem
per and his reckless talking. According to
custom, county chairmen from the Interior
(CONX1NUUD Oli tUVENTU PAGE.)"
HOPE
HE'S ALL RIGHT
M'KINLEA" SEEMS CERTAIN OF RE
ELECTION ON TUESDAY".
Republicans Confident of nig Major
Ity In Electoral College and of
Carrying the House.
0TJTI00K IN ALL THE STATES
FORECASTS THAT SHOW DEMOCRAT!
ARE 3IAKI.AG E1G CLAIMS.
Dut Arc Not So Sanguine of Electing
Brjnn as Their Opponents Are
of Electing McKinley.
FEATURES OF THE CAMPi
AA'IIICH practically; closed a
LAST NIGHT'S 31 E ETI N GS.
Silent A'ote Said to no AVorrylns; th
Managers of Both Lending
Parties In New A'ork
INTEREST IN EMPIRE STATE
AVIIERE THE HRA ANITES ARE CEN
TERING MOST OF THEIR HOPES.
VleiTi of R. D. Odell, Republican Can
didate for Governor, nnd the
Democratic Slanugers.
NEW YORK, Nov. 3. The Republicans
practically brought the presidential cam
paign of 1900 to a close to-day with a largo
parade, conducted under the auspices of
the Business Men's Republican and Sound
Money Association. At most of the Tam
many Hall clubs in the city final rallies
were also held by the Democrats, but these
meetings were arranged for members of
the organization only, and, so far as the
general public is concerned. Interest cen
tered in tho spectacular events furnished
by the Republicans. The cold rain and th
damp streets interfered with the presence
of crowds as large as had been expected
at the Republican parade, and to some ex
tent probably disarranged the plans for lo
cal parades and district mass meetings
scheduled in the various Tammany Hall
districts In the borough of Manhattan.
Generally speaking, however, tho Demo
cratic campaign here may be said to have
been brought to a close last Monaay night,
when William J. Bryan, after making thir
ty speeches up the State during the day,
addressed a large mass meeting held under
the auspices of the Hebrew Democratic or
ganizations on the East Side of the city,
afterwards speaking to seven mass meet
ings In Brooklyn and leaving for the AVest
on tho midnight train. Since that tims
there have been tho usual pre-election gath
erings at which Democratic speakers of
state and national prominence have ad
dressed representative audiences, but pub
lic interest has centered more upon Mr.
Bryan's movements in the West than upon
any Democratic gatherings laid ' In this
State fclnce Mr. Bryan closed his campaign
here.
On the Republican side the two mn most
in the public eye have been Governor.
Theodore Roosevelt and Senator Chauncey
M. Depew. These two leading Republicans
have visited nearly all of the larg eitles
and towns of the State. Fairly good weath
er has prevailed as a general thing until
to-day, and the Interest In tho campaign
and the attendance upon the rallies? may
be said to have equaled, if they did not
exceed, the attendance and interest' iu the
campaign of four years ago.
A A'IGOROUS CAMPAIGN.
The campaign has been conducted witli
unusual vigor on both sides und rarely,
if ever, has more work been done in tl;U
city and State by the leaders of the Re
publican and Democratic organizations. Aa
indicating the rivalry that has existed it
may be mentioned that after Mr. Bryan's
speech at Madison Square Garden tho Re
publicans strained every nerve to give
Governor Roosevelt, if possible, u more
flattering reception upon the occasion of
his return from his tour through the Wnsl.
The Democrats retaliated by try ing to out
do the Republicans upon the occasion tf
Mr. Bryan's second vUit to the city, when
he again spoKe at Madison Square Garden
under the au-rlces of the National Asso
ciation of Democratic Club. Since then the
Republicans have been doing all in their
power to make the parade of the bu?ine--s
men and the Sound Money Association a
great success and to make the occasion
more of an ovation for Governor Roosevelt
than the Democrats gave their standard
bearer when he was in the city.
As an Indication of the character of the
rallies and the speakers It might be men
tioned that for the Democrats ex-Senator
Hill closed the campaign In Buffalo to
day; Bourke Cockran spoke at Albany,
while John B. Stanchfleld, the Democratic
nominee for Governor, spoke at Middle
town, and several other points up . the
State. For the Republicans Senator Depew
addressed a larse audience at Walton and,
also spoke at several other New A'ork
State points. J. Sloat Fassett closed tha
campaign at ElmJra. Governor RooevtIt.
after addressing a meeting at the Product
Exchange to-day, reviewed the parade.
Both sides will Indulge in a breathing spell
from now until next Tuesday. Governor
Roosevelt was expected to address lata
to-night or early Monday night two fac
tions of BrooKlyn which Mr. Bryan failed
to viflt. but It was finally decided thai
his tour had been so extended and his en
gagements so numerous during the ps.it
month that it would rot bo fair to hlra
to ask hlra to make any speeches except
those scheduled a month Rgo. However,
he has agreed to address his friends and
neighbors at his home. Oyster Baj Long
Island, on Monday night, and Repub'Icans
are expecting that this will develop Into
one of the roost Interesting rallies of tht
campaign.
Leaders on both sides are greatly Inter
ested In the possibilities In what is termed
the silent vote es well as the political
alignment o first voters and new voters.
Estimates concerning the x oslbl political
'tctlon of Ellsat er teeret votes Je vsiu-
J

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