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The Indianapolis journal. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1867-1904, November 05, 1900, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015679/1900-11-05/ed-1/seq-1/

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IMBIANAFOLI
OnTTTTTD TT A TT
WCKKLY ESTAHUSJIED 1822. YHT T ."VO Qf()
DAILY ESTABLISHED 1SS0. J ' KJ la, JlT11 V. OUi.
2
INDIANAPOLIS, MONDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 5, 1900.-'
PRICE 2 CENTS. EVERYWHERE.
V
FINAL FIGURES
REPUBLICAN COMMITTEE'S FORE
CAST OF THE SITUATION.
Twenty-night Mitte, Casting; 291
Electoral Voten, Schedaled as
Certain for 31 r. McKinley.
THE' PEOPLE DO NOT FORGET
THEY REME3IBER FOLD YEARS OF
PROSPERITY AFTER SORROW.
Therefore They Will Cast Their Vote
for the Candidate Representing
Sound American Statesmanship.
JONES SEEMS TO BE PLEASED
LOOKS OVER THE fi ROUND AND
FACES CONDITIONS CHEERFULLY.
Chicago Headquarters of Both Par
ties Are Deserted, Committee
men Having Gone to Vote
VERY QUIET DAY AT CANTON
THE PRESIDENT'S LAST SUNDAY AT
HOME FOR S03IE TIME.
Will Cio to Washington on Wednes
day Gave r nor Roosevelt Spends
the Sabbath at Oyster Bay.
NEW YORK, Nov. 4. The Republican
national committee gave out to-day the
following final official statement:
"On the eve of election, the Republican
rational committee's forecast of the result,
based on absolutely authentic and unim
peachable figures and facts, differs from Its
previous forecasts only In Increasing the
magnitude of the triumph which Tuesday
will bring to the cause of national honor
and prosperity. All the sources of the
committee's information, including- many
who are unwilling witnesses, concur in in
dlcating tha conclusion that Tuesday's
election will prove a veritable landslide
for McKinley, and seal the doom of Bryan
and Bryanlsao forever.
"The prirao causo of this irresistible and
overwhelming popular revolt against the
Bryan Populist ticket is perfectly obvious.
It consists In the desiro of the people to
maintain the prosperity which they hava
enjoyed, and now enjoy, under the policies
of the McKinley administration, and lu
their well-grounded fear of public calamity
In case Bryan were to be elected.
"The laboring mar, his wife and chll
dren remember the poverty, misery and
despair which shrouded their lives in the
black year3 previous to McKlnley's in
auguration, and they remember with
gratitude the relief which has come to
them sinco then, with abundant employ
ment and largely Increased wages. Ihey
listen now to Bryan's invitations to throw
away their advantage, but they respect
fully decline them.
"The business men of the United States
remember what harpened to them tn those
same dark years, and they know what the
practical result of the election of 1XH hos
been, in reference to the rehabilitation and
prosperity of all lines of commercial enter
prise during the past four years. They cor
rectly regard the proposition to indorse
Byan and his free silver and free trade
theories as nothing short of insanity.
"The farmera are not likely to forget the
evil days when they were reduced to bank
ruptcy and almost to beggary, and now
with mortgages lifted, their farm products
bringing greatly increased prices and their
homes filled with comfort and Joy they do
not propose to charge their conditions at
the behest of the false prophet of lsys and
the anarchical agitation of 1900.
"All who have remunerative work to do,
ell who have wages paid them and who
have a business to protect and develop,
all who have money deposited in savings
banks or Invested In homes of their own
have been confronted with a threat to re
duce tho value of their prosperity by one
half and have been asked to ratify this
suicidal proposition by their votes.
"As they constitute the great mass of
the American people and as they are sane,
sensible and honorablo men the over
whelming majority for McKinley and
against Bryan which Tuesday will record Is
thus accounted for.
"The rcople know that tho country has
prospered under McKinley, that wages
have risen to a higher rate than ever be
fore, that employment is abundant for all,
that tho savings of labor have increased
half a billion dollars, that commercial pros,
perity has been universal and commercial
honor safeguarded against tho advocates
ot repudiation, and so they naturally have
decided to re-elect him and continue the
present conditions of prosperity and safety.
"Tne committee's final forecast claims at
least the following States for McKinley:
California 9
Cot necticut C
Delaware 3
Illinois 21
Indiana 15
Iowa 13
Kansas 10
Kentucky 13
Maine 6
Maryland 8
Ma5sachusetts 15
Michigan II
Minnesota , 9
New Hampshire 4
New Jersey ., 10
New York s;
North Dakota 3
Ohl 2
Oregon 4
Pennsylvania S"J
Rhode Island 4
South Dakota 4
Vermont 4
Washington 4
West Virginia c
Wisconsin 12,
Wyoming 3
Total , 201
The statement is eigned by Cornelius N.
Ellss. Joseph IL Manley, Nathan P.. Scott.
Frederick S. Glbba and Franklin Murphy.
PRACTICALLY DESERTED.
Doth Headquarters at ChicagoMr.
llaniin's Statement.
CHICAGO, Nov. 4. National political
headquarters were practically detcrted to
day. The members of the managing com
mittees who were in the city dropped
politics and spent the day in pleasure.
Senator J. K. Jones, chairman of the
Democratic committee, however, was the
exception. He remained In hl3 room scan
ning the field again. The outlook seemed
to please him, for he said he was more
certain 'that ever that William Jennings
Bryan would be elected.
Senator Hanna spent tho day carriage
riding. He declared that he had nothing
to add to what he had said for weeks past:
That President McKinley would get more
electoral votes than he did in 1SÜG. The
national committeemen of both parties,
who have been In Chicago during the cam
paign, will go to their several homes to
vote. Most of them will return immediate
ly to Chicago to be here when the returns
come In. Senator Hanna will vote in Cleve
land, Vice Chairman Payne In Milwaukee
and Secretary Heath In Munclc. It is Sena
tor Hanna's intention, after voting, to go
to Canton and spend the day with the
President. He will return to Cleveland In
the evening, however, to receive the re
turns. Senator Jone, chairman of the Demo
cratic national committee, Executive Com
mitteeman Johnson and Secretary Welsh
will remain here, not being able to go home
to vote and get back in timo to participate
in the headquarters functions election
night.
LAST SCX DAY AT HOME.
The President Will Leave for Wash
ington on Wednesday.
CANTON, Nov. .-President McKlnley's
last Sunday In Canton for eomo time to
come, was very similar to the other Sun
days of tho summer vacation spent here.
Ho took Mrs. McKinley for her usual
morning drive and then attended service
at tho First M. E. Church. During the
afternoon they took another drive. There
wero quite a number of callers during the
day.
Preparations for receiving tho election
news at the house are completed. Tele
graph and telephone wires have been
strung In numbers sufficient to quickly
handle all the returns. Monday will be
largely devoted to packing up and pre
paring for tho return to Washington on
Wednesday.
Senator Hanna is expected here Tuesday.
-
AT OYSTER BAY.
Governor Roosevelt' Rest After the
Arduous Campaign Journey.
NEW YORK, Nov. 4. Governor Roose
velt spent a quiet day at his Oyster Bay
CCONTINUED ON SECOND PAGE.)
FOR LAW AND ORDER
CARDINAL GIBBONS PREACHES A
STRONG SERMON AT BALTIMORE.
He Takes a Stand Strongly Against
the Propaganda of Jones, Croker
anil Carter Harrison.
PERPETUITY OF THE REPUBLIC
HIS EMINENCE FEELS SIRE IT WILL
BE MAINTAINED.
Our Institutions in No Danger So Long
as the People Are Inspired by
Sentiments of Patriotism.
BALTIMORE, Nov. 4. Cardinal Gibbons
took occasion, at high mass to-day, to say
a few words on the subject of the coming
election in I1I3 regular monthly sermon to
his congregation at the cathedral. The
cardinal never takes any active part In
politics, rarely if ever casting his ballot
but to those who are fortunate enough
to be in his confidence, he does not hesi
tate to express himself freely upon the
Issues Involved in the present contest
He takes the position that there need be
no alarm on the part of any one over the
result of the coming election and assert?
that there Is nothing In the situation to
warrant the belief that the election of
either candidate will, In any wise, seriously
affect the future welfare and prosperity
of the American Republic.
His sermon was based on the verse In
Matthew xxii. "Render unto Caesar the
things that aro Caesar's, and unto God
the things that aro God's. In part he
said:
"Juvery man in the commonwealth leads
a dual life a private life under the shad
ow of the home, and a public life under
tho aegis of the state. As a father, hus
band or son, he owes certain duties to God
as well as to the family; as a citizen, he
contracts certain obligations to his coun
try. These civic virtues are all comprised
under the generic name of patriotism.
"Patriotism implies, of course, not only
a love for one's country, but also an at
tachment to its laws, Institutions and gov
ernment, filial admiration for its heroes,
Its statesmen and men of genius and
Christian philanthropy, who have con
tributed to their country's renown by the
valor of their arms, the wisdom of their
counsel, by their literary fame, or by their
public benefactions. It includes also an
ardent zeal for tho maintenance of thosu
sacred principles which secure to tho citl
zen freedom ot conscience and an earnest
determination to consecrate his talents and
his life. If necessary, pro arls et focls, in
defense of altar and fireside, of God and
fatherland. ,
"Next to religion, patriotism has inspired
the most heroic deeds of courage and self
sacrifice. History, both sacred and pro
fane, abounds with examples of sublimo
fortitude endured by men, and women, too,
for their country's sake. Gideon, with three
hundred picked men, attacks and routs the
numerous army of the Mldlanitcs and frees
his country from a foreign yoke. I might
mention Deborah, the prophetess and Judge
of Israel, who conquered the King of Ca
naan and his trray. I might also mei.tion
Judith, who at the risk of being consigned
to a shameful captivity, when her people
were oppressed, goes alone into the enemy's
lines, enters the tent of Holoferness and
strikes off his head. The Assyrians are put
to flight and Israel is rescued from a pow
erful enemy. When Judith returns home
the people slnrj canticles vt praise to her
honor and the high rrlest and ciders extol
her, raying Thou art the glory of Jeru
salem, thou art the Joy of Israel, thou art
the honor of on. people.' "
TAUGHT BY CHRIST.
After referring to the intense patriotism
of the ancient Greeks and Romans, and the
heroic deed performed under Its ln?pira
(CONTIN UED ON FIFTH PAGE..
LINER INJURED
A 31 ER I CAN SHIP ST. PALL STRUCK A
SID3IERGED DERELICT.
Collision Smashed a Propeller, Broke
the Shaft and -Made a Wreck
of the Starboard Engine.
ENTERED POET AT HALF SPEED
SHIP LEAKING BADLY AND WILL BE
LA IL LP SIX .MONTHS.
Most Serion. Accident of the Vessel's
History, lint No Great Excite
ment Followed It.
VESSELS ASHORE IN THE ELBE
TWO IG STEAMERS DELAYED IX
LEAVING FOR NEW YORK.
American Finhlug Schooner Sunk Off
Gloucester and Crerr Taken to
Ireland One Man Drowned.
NEW YORK. Nov. A. The American line
steamer St. Paul limped Into port this
morning under her port engine, after having
Incurred the most serious experience of
her career. On Oct. 21 the St. Paul struck
a supposed submerged wreck, carrying
away the starboard propeller, causing the
engines to race so fiercely that the shaft
broke and all connections snapped. The
starboard engines were so severely wrecked
that they are useless and it will take six
months to replace them with a new set.
The after outboard shaft tubing was car
ried away. The ship is leaking considerably.
When the accident occurred the cabin
passengers were greatly excited, but they
were soon restored to quiet by the prompt
report that the steamer was in no danger.
The wind was blowing heavily from the
northwest, with a high cross sea.
The engineers examined the breaks and
disconnected the starboard engines and the
St. Paul proceeded on her voyage under the
port engine at a reduced speed.
The St. Paul left Southampton and Cher
bourg Oct. 27, with a full cargo, SIS cabin
passengers and 243 in the steerage. About
8 o'clock on the evening of Wednesday
last, while seme of the saloon passengers
were still at dinner and other passengers
promenading, a sudden shock was felt all
over the ship, although It was not suffi
ciently severe to cause a panic. Tho en
gines were stopped In a few seconds after
the shock, but It is said that during that
brief time the whirling machinery, free of
the weight of the propeller, wrought havoc
In the engine room, which the officials of
the steamship refused to allow anyone to
enter. .
James A. Wright, second vice-president
of tho International Navigation Company,
which controls the American line, was a
passenger on the steamship, having gone
abroad In October to bring back his fam
ily. He said: "I wa3 smoking in my state
room when I felt a slight tremor through
out the ship. I thought that probably her
head had fallen away a few points, and
that she had In consequence shipped a big
sea. The shock was so slight that the
average passenger did not apprehend that
anything unusual bad occurred. I went
below to find out what was the matter. I
found that the ship had lost her starboard
propeller, together with part of her tall
shaft, and had otherwise damaged her ma
chinery. "Captain Roberts and Chief Engineer
John Hunter are under the impression that
we struck a derelict. We were running at
full speed at the time, but were not over
taxing' her engines or driving her. Chief
Engineer Hunter, at the moment of the
accident, happened to be passing through
the pantry and immediately turned tho
emergency valve, thus shutting off the
steam. About the same time the assistant
engineer happened to be in the vicinity
of the tail -haft when the propeller struck
something mid dropped off, carrying with
lc a portion of the tail shaft, which broke
just inside the stern of the ship. The gov
erning machinery worked splendidly, and
tho engines were brought to a full stop In
ten seconds.
"The St. Paul will leave on Tuedav for
the Cramps' shipyard, Philadelphia, where
the necessary repairs will be made. Mean
time the Friestand, which sails on Wedn 23
day for Antwerp, will take the St. Paul's
passengers, malls and freight to South
ampton." Samuel Bettle, the acting manager of the
American line, said to-day, after consulta
tion with Chief Engineer Hunter: "At six
minutes after S o'clock, Wednesday even
ing, while the ship was running under most
favorable conditions, although pitching
and rolling n good deal, the St. Taul'a pro
peller probably struck a derelict. Tho tall
shaft broke just Inside the ship, the ex
treme end of the propeller dropped Into
tho sea, and serious damage was done to
the starboard engine, which was stopped
within ten seconds. None of the crew was
injured, anl there was no excitement
among the passengers, many of whom re
mained undisturbed at dinner, unaware
that an accident had occurred. The ship
had a succession of strong headwinds and
seas throughout, but it was not through
driving her that she lost her tail-end shaft,
propeller ani stern tubing."
One of the engineers of the St. Paul made
the following statement to-day: "It will
take live months to repair the damage,
which is to the extent of from $250,000 to
$300,000. Tho starboard engine Is a wreck.
Four of the tlx cylinders are completely
wrecked, two piston rods are beut, cne
connecting rod Is bent and the starboard
engine idiaft is sprung six Inches. The
starboard engine is wrecked beyond re
pair." LANDED AT Ql'EENSTOWN.
Crevr of n Schooner Sunk Off Glouces
ter One 3Ian Drowned.
QUEKNSTOWN, Nov. 4.-The Cunard
liner Saxonia, Captain Fritchard. frotn
Boston Oct. 27, which arrived here thi
morning, brought fifteen members of the
crew of the fishing schooner Mary Mos
quito, which the Saxony sank off Glouces
ter, the day of tier departure. One member
of the crew was drowned. The Cunarder
was not damaged.
Dr. Bond, of Chelsea, Mass., one of the
Saxonia's passengers, made the following
statement regarding the accident: "We
were proceeding at reduced speed in the
fog and blowing the whistle when, about
6 p. m., tho lookout man reported a sail
ahead. The engines were stopped, but the
steamer's sway carried her into the Mary
Mosquito, making a tig opening amldship
and flooding the schooner.
"By this time all the Saxonia's passen
gers were on deck. The scene was one of
great commotion, while appalling shouts
proceeded from the schooner, whose crew,
however, worked vigorously and got out
two boats. Into these fifteen of the crew
scrambled and put off from the fast sink
ing vessel.
"At the moment of the collision the Sax
onia lowered three lifeboats and scattered
lifebelts. Fortunately the sea was smooth.
Twenty minutes later a dory came along
side with ten men, and a lifeboat of the
Saxonia with five, four of whom had been
rescued from a sinking dory and the other
of whom had fallen into the sea and nar
rowly escaped drowning. All the men are
Portuguese." j
Dig Liners Aground in the Elbe.
HAMBURG, Nov. 4. The Hamburg.
American line steamers Feurst Bismarck,
bound from this port for New York via
Southampton and Cherbourg, and thi
Pretoria from here, bound to New York by
way cf Boulogne and Plymouth, both went
aground while passing down the Elbe at
Schulau, about thirteen miles lrom here.
Assistance has been sent from here to
help the stranded vassels off.
AT HIS 0W8 FENCES
3IR. BRYAN WILL TAKE A VERY
CRITICAL LOOK TO-DAY.
He Will Make a Day's Flying Trip
Through Nebraska In the Interest
of the Paramount Ego.
TALKS OF FRAUD AND COERCION
SAYS THEY HOODED HIM OF VIC
TORY FOUR YEARS AGO.
Bat the People Arc Too Alert for It
to Re Effective Now lias n Word
to Sny About Trusts.
LINCOLN, Neb., Nov. 4. W. J. Bryan
and Mrs. Bryan arrived at their home in
this city this evening, coming direct from
Chicago. They were driven to their resi
dence, where Mr. Bryan will remain until
to-morrow morning, when he will start
on a flying trip through Nebraska, de
voting the last of the campaign to his
own State. Mr. and Mrs. Bryan found a
large number of their friends at the depot.
Many ot them escorted him to his resi
dence, and still others wero found there
awaiting his arrival.
The trip from. Chicago was comparative
ly quiet. Mr. Bryan slept during the en
tire forenoon. He did not take any break
fast, nor did he make his appearance until
after 12, o'clock. He had Just arisen when
the train reached Crrston, la., where
there was' quite a strong dem
onstration in his honor. Several
hundred people had congregated at
the depot and there were calls for a
speech. Mr. Bryan told the people, how
ever, that he never made speeches on Sun
day, but he shook hands with most of
those present before the train started.
There were similar crowds at Villlsca,
Red Oak and Pacific Junction, and when,
late In the afternoon, ' the train rolled
across the long bridge over the Missouri
and landed the national candidate In his
own State, at the town of Plattsmouth.
there was a still stronger demonstration.
The crowd was large, and there were many
calls for Br. Bryan. He declined, as at
other places, to speak there, and the train
did not remain at a standstill long enough
to afford opportunity to personally greet
many persons. Mr. Bryan was met at
Omaha by a number of his personal
friends.
During the day Mr. Bryan was asked for
a statement as to tho probablo outcome
of the election. In reply, he said: "The
fight has been made and won. Money
and coercion robbed us of a victory in lSy-5,
but I believe they will bo powerless to
change the result this time. The people
are In earnest, and very few can bo bought.
Our organization is much better than it
was In 1S96 and therefore there Is less
danger of fraud. So far, attempts at in
timidation have been rare, this year, where
they were very common in 1S96, and even
where Intimidation has been attempted it
lias angered the employes rather than co
erced them."
DOESN'T WANT IT.
Mr. Bryan's attention was called to the
address by Charles R. Flint and others who
claim to be Democrats, but urge Demo
crats to vote the Republican ticket. Mr.
Bryan said that he was very glad to find
that Mr. Flint was supporting Mr. Mc
Kinley, and added: "Mr. Flint is the lead
ing member of the rubber goods manu
facturing company, and is also connected
with the starch trust. He has been he
most conspicuous defender of the trust
principle in the United States, having made
a speech at Boston in May, lSOD. and an
other at Chicago recently, on that subject.
I am glad to have all trust magnates sup
port the Republican ticket, for if I am
elected they will not be visiting the White
House and asking favors in return for
campaign support.
"Our appeal is to the people who suffer
from the trusts, not to the monopolists
who profit by them. Next to imperialism
and militarism, the trust question has done
more than any other question to convince
the plain people that the Republican party
is entirely given over to,thc control of or
ganized wealth. Imperialism exploits
abroad, while private monopoly plunders
at home, and tho large arrny advocated
by the Republican party is intended to
support the system of spoliation at home
and abroad."
When Mr. Bryan reached Lincoln to
night he had been absent from I1I3 home
for about live and a half weeks, having
left this city on the 27th of September.
During that t.'me ho had traveled about
9,000 miles pnd has made about SO
speeches. Previous to entering upon this
tour, and since tho campaign has begun,
he had made at least 1,000 speeches, and
had traveled about 7,000 miles, making
about 16.0 miles traveled and l,oj
(CONTINUED ON SECOND PAGE.)
CAUSTIC REPLY
PROF. SCHURMAN ANSWERS THE
LETTER TO SEXTO LOPEZ.
Points Out that the Filipino Agrees
with Every Contention Advanced
by the Philippine Commission.
IGNORANCE OF THE ISLANDERS
TLAYED UPON DY THE AMBITIOUS
TAGALOG CHIEFTAINS.
Incapability of the People to Accep
tably Govern - Themselves AL
nilttcd In Effect by the Envoy.
HOPE LIES IN AMERICAN RULE
ONLY" THUS CAN THE NATIVES WORK
OUT THEIR DESTINY.
Some Recent Insurgent Activities
Soldiers Lured to an Ambush
by Music and Slain.
BUFFALO. N. Y., Nov. 4.-Prof. Jacob
Gould Schurmann, who passed through this
city this afternoon, en route from the West
to Ithaca, handed the Associated Press the
following reply to an open letter addressed
to him by Mr. Sixto Lopez:
"Mr. Sixto Lopez's open letter of the 3d
Inst., addressed to me, although I have not
yet seen It except in the newspapers, is a
gratifying proof of the correctness of the
report of the Philippine commission. Mr.
Lopez, by his declarations, confirms all I
have said of the promising educational pos
sibilities In the Philippines, and of the ad
mirable character of the educated Filipinos,
few though they arc, who may be taken as
a type and promise of the future. Nor does
Mr. Lopez deny that the masses of the In
habitants of the Philippine Islands, of all
tribes and races, are uneducated and very
ignorant. Furthermore, by silent acquies
cence In the report of our commission, Mr.
Lopez acknowledged that the majority of
the Filipinos either desire American sov
ereignty, as is the case with the men of
education and property, or acquiesce in it,
or are Indifferent to it, and that the de
mand for independence originated with the
ambitious Tagalog Insurgent leaders, who
havo diffused It with fire and sword, aided
by atrocious misrepresentations of the aims
and purposes of the United States. Lastly,
Mr. Lopez does not question the finding of
our commission that the inhabitants of the
Philippine islands are marked by great
racial and tribal differences, by Immense
varieties of social conditions, which range
all the way from the civilization of Manila
down through all phases of barbarism to
the naked savages of Mindanao and north
ern Luzon; by a bewildering multiplicity of
languages, which are mutually unintel
ligible; by dense Ignorance on the part of
the masses of the people; by the absence
of union and concert and the utter lack of
the idea and sentiment of nationality, and
by the absolute inexperience of all classes
in the affairs of government, which Spain
always kept in Spanish "hands.
"And the consequent deduction to be
drawn from all this is equally indisputable;
nor does Mr. Lopez seek to dispute It,
namely that the various and diversified
peoples of the Philippine islands are at the
present time incapable of being considered
as a nation; they are utterly unfit to accept
sovereignty over the archipelago, even if
the American 1 eople wished to Invest them
with It; nor have they any hope of ever be
coming a free and self-governing nation,
except in the continuance of American sov
ereignty over them and in tne peace, pros
perity and ever-increasing liberty of self
government which the American flag guar
antees them.
"Pull down our flag and you leave the
Philippines a prey to Internal feuds and do
mestic insurrections which would quickly
beget anarchy. This would necessitate the
intervention of foreign powers for the pro
tection of the lives and property of their
subjects. Of course, the islands would
eventually be divided up among them and
the Filipinos would exchange the free In
stitutions and home rule which the Amer
ican people desire as soon as possible, and
in the largest degree practicable, to bestow
upon them for the genuine imperialism of
old-world emperors, kings and czars. It is
the mission of our republic to save the Fili
pinos, who In general are most promising,
estimable and even lovable peoples, from
that cruel fate u d to train them up to the
use of free institutions and the noble work
of self-governmont. Just as quickly and as
generously as they or any portion of them
can be induced to exercise a civic function
so arduous ani so unaccustomed."
INSURGENT ACTIVITIES.
Soldiers Lnred to nn Ambush with
Music and Slain.
MANILA, Nov. 4. Last week was de
voted to active scouting. The insurgents,
having failed to crush sl single garrison,
are now experiencing a reaction.
Lieutenants Wilson and Dorrity, of the
Forty-fifth Volunteer Infantry, destroyed
large storeä of rice, four granaries and a
barracks near Bato.
Captain Atkinson, with thirty-four men
of the Thirty-seventh Volunteer Infantry,
attacked 190 insurgents under Colonel Val
encia, recovering two American prisoners
and capturing a considerable quantity of
ammunition and supplies.
A native orchestra lured the United States
troops from their quarters near Dagupan.
while the insurgents attacked the rear,
killing two Americans and wounding three.
To-day Senor Buencamlno, representing
the principal ex-insurgents in Manila, re
quested Judge Taft to forward to Wash
ington a signed expression of their loyalty
There is considerable excitement over the
approaching presidential election and con
siderable betting on the result
SOUTH SEA TROUBLES.
German Warship Shells a Village in
the Admiralty Group.
VICTORIA. B. C.. Nov. 4. The German
corvette Moewe, according to advices from
the South seas, has reached Sydney and
reportt that she was called on to quell a-
tribal war on one of the Admiralty islands.
Word was received by her commander that
a section of fighters armed with rifles from
a pirat3 had butchered 150 natives, and
the Moewe went to the scene. Arriving
off the village, a landing party consisting
of 120 Germans put off under four officers
and opened fire on the rebellious natives.
The latter made a stubborn stand and re
turned the fire of the landing party. Their
aim was bad and only three casualties re
fculted, six of the natives being shot down.
Eventually the expedition returned to the
warship, which steamed close into the
beach and shelled the village with de
structive results.
BBBBMMBBMiSBSBBSBSSBSBBBBSBlBBSSSSBBBSMBSBSBBBSSB
ELECTRIC CARS COLLIDED.
Eleven Persons Injured, Several from
Lnwrenceburff, Ind.
CINCINNATI. Nov. 4. Two electric cars
on tho Cincinnati, Lawrenceburg &. Aurora
Electric Railway collided to-day near
Cleves, O., owing to a misunderstanding of
orders. The cars were wrecked and eleven
persons injured, some seriously, but none
fatally.
The Injured.
GEORGE LYONS, motorman, severely
hurt abcut the hip and thigh. 1
WILLIAM KELLOGG, motorman, left
leg wrenched about the hip Joint.
MRS. V. W. HUBER, Lawrenceburg.
Ind.. teeth knocked out.
MRS. CHARLES LITTLE. Lawrence
burg, gash across the Jaw.
JOSEPH WEST, conductor on C, L. & A.
line, bruised about the head.
Charles Little and V. W. Huber, both of
Lawrenceburg. Ind.; Miss Deila Anderson,
whose home is In Leesburg. O.;. Charles
Hannan, of Cincinnati; William Best, an
employe of the Cincinnati, Lawrenceburg
& Aurora Railway, and Conductor Martin,
of the same company, were all bruised and
badly shaken up.
KILLED IN A WRECK.
Two Men on a Southern Pacific
Freight, Near Keswic, Cal.
REDDING, Cal.. Nov. 4.-In the wreck of
a Southern Pacific freight train near Kes-
wic to-day two men were killed and three
others injured.
The Dead.
UNKNOWN MAN.
A. L. BRYAN. Denver, Col.
The Injured.
JAMES HART, Charter Oak. la., leg
amputated.
B. WOODRUFF. Ashland, Ore., com
pound fracture leg.
CHARLES ALEXANDER, of Ohio, ankle
sprained.
All were riding on a flat car loaded with
lumber. The axle of the car broke and five
cars were plied up in confusion.
STATUE TO CARNOT
UNVEILED BY PRESIDENT LOUBET
AT LYONS, FRANCE.
Socialists Had Threatened a Demon
stration, but Did Not Make It, and
Much Enthusiasm Prevailed.
MANY ARRESTS OF CARHSTS
SPAIN IS MAKING A CLEAN SWEEP
IN THE PROVINCES.
Poor Egyptian Cotton Crop Antl
Jewlsh Feellnir in France Budget
of New from Russia.
LYONS, France, Nov. 4. No disorders
marked the ceremony of unveiling of the
monument to the late President Carnot
tc-day cr the luncheon tendered to Presl
dent Loubet by the Chamber of Commerce,
which followed the unveiling, although the
Socialist committee had posted bills calling
on their followers to make the demonstra
tion in protest against the Chamber of
Commerce, which is regarded by them as
clerical and reactionary. M. Loubet was
greeted with overwhelming acclamation,
although occasionally along the route cries
of "Vive la Soclala revolution!" were
heard, mingled with denunciations of the
clerical party. A few group? were dis
persed by the police, but nothing i
x.ature of any organized demonstration de
veloped. Thero was an Imposing mobilization of
troops along the routo to the monument.
Cavalry, infantry and artillery were massed
at the crossroads and In the squares, ren
dering another Carnot assassination Im
possible. The President's carriage was
Furrounded by mounted guards. The entire
city was hung with flags and the crowd
was immense. M. Waldeck-Rousseau, the
premier, M. Lanessan, minister of marine,
and M. Millerand, minister of commerce,
participated in the procession, which con
sisted of forty carriages, and M. Waldeck
Rousseau and M. Millerand were warmly
cheered on their arrival at the Place de la
Republlque, where the statue stands. M.
Loubet sat in the tribune, surrounded by
the ministers, the mayor of Lyons and
other municipal functionaries.
The statue having been unveiled, the
mayor spoke of the glorious traditions of
the Carnot family and recalled the fact
that Sadi Carnot had repressed Boulanger
ism. M. Waldeck-Rousseau eulogized Car
not's personal qualities and his devitlon to
the democratic principles. Cheers followed
his declaration that "The adversaries of
the republic against whom Carnot strug
gled a decade ago have not yet disarmed,
and only yesterday the government had to
defend the republic against them."
The procession was then reformed and
proceeded to tho prefecture, where the of
ficial programme took place. Replying to
an address of homage by Cardinal Pierre
Hector Coullle, archbishop of Lyons, M.
Loubet said:
"I must seize this opportunity to de
molish the myth that the government is
the enemy of any religion, worship or be
lief whatsoever. The government takes too
high a stand not to respect all and to en
force respect for all.
"I am sure that the clergy on their side
will understand this and will make it un
derstood by all Catholics. Thlg understand
ing must have as a basis a loyal and com
plete observance of the laws of the coun
try'. I rn convinced that the social peace
which you desire will become stronger and
stronger for the welfare of the country
and Its institutions, which the country on
every occasion declares a firm intention to
maintain."
Responding to an address by the Gov
ernor of the department, General Ducheane,
M. Ixubet said: "The government, as well
as myself, has alwa y ftrlven to dissipate
, (CONTINUED ON SECOND PAGTe
LATER CLAIMS
REVISED ESTIMATES OF THE SITU
ATION IX VARIOUS STATUS,
Great Interest Attaches to Several
Ohio Districts, In Which Results
Probably Will De Close.
CONDITIONS. IN CONNECTICUT
REPUBLICANS CONFIDENT AND DESL
OCH ATS PROFESS OPTIMISM
Situation Unchanged Iu PeunsylTa
nln, with the Chief Interest Cen
tered In Joe Slblcys District.
MARYLAND REPUBLICAN CLAI1IS
ELEVEN THOUSAND THE MAJORITY
FIGURED IN THE STATE.
Republicans Are More Hopeful In,
Missouri, and .Yow Say They Will
Carry Doth Tickets Through.
EXPECT TO CARRY TENNESSEE
REPUBLICANS SAY IT IS SAFE FOR
TI1EIK TICKET.
Frauds Alleged In West Virginia
Fights on Congreslonal Tickets
Mukc Mnny States Interesting.
CINCINNATI, Nov. 4.-On the eve of the
election charges are made of false registra
tion in Cincinnati aad other Ohio ciUes.
While the last census gave Cincinnati a
population of 225,000 its registration is S1.SS3
and a citizens committee has been organiz
ing to-day for systematic work with detec
tives for arrests on Tuesday. It is alleged
also that colonizations have been made In
some of the close congressional districts.
Ohio has now fifteen Republican and sir
Democratic representatives. Tho Repub
licans are trying hard to gain a representa
tive in the Third district, where N. F.
Bickley, (Dem.) and R. M. Ncvin, (Rep.)
are the candidates, and this Is one of the
districts in which charges of fraud aro
made on both sides. In the Fifteenth and
Twentieth districts the Democrats aro
hoping to make gains. In the Fifteenth
district Representative Van Voorhis, (Rep.)
who is running for the fifth term, is opposed
by L. W. Ellenwood, (Dem.) and the Re
publicans have some factional trouble but
the re-election of Van Voorhis Is generally
conceded. In tho Twentieth Uktrlct, Rep
resentative Phillips is an Independent can
didate against Jacob A. Beldlcr, (Pep.)
who defeated Phillips for renomination,
and the Democrats therefore hope to elect
II. D. Harrington. On account of the
active work of Mayor Jones, of Toledo,
there Is some talk of Negley D. Cochran,
(Dem.) defeating Representative Southard,
(Rep.) In the Ninth district, but the Jones
vote Is such an uncertain element this
year in Ohio, that It is not cutting much
of a figure in the estimates.
In the Twelfth district, Emmett Tomp
kins, (Rep.) Is making a hard fight to de
feat John J. Lentz (Dem.), and on account
of the action of Lentz against the adminis
tration in the last Congress, rpeclal In
terest Is being taken In this district. It
Is currently reported that National Chair
man Hanna and State Chairman Dick havo
given special attention to the Twelfth
district.
While both State committees will recelvo
returns In Columbus on Tuesday night.
Canton also will be a point of interest,
since President McKinley has decided to
remain there to receive returns and not
start back to Washington until Wedneyday.
Four years ago the pilgrimages to Canton
made it the center of attraction, as Colonel
Bryan was then on the road the same in
this year. The President has L-cn In'
Canton during much of this campaign, but
he refused to do any campaigning even In
receiving visiting delegations. It Is under
stood that there may be a dlstingUshe!
party with him on Tuesday night and If ha
is re-elected the tour on his return to
Washington the next day will be eventful
at Canton as well as elsewhere.
DOWN IX JERSEY.
State Prnctl rally Conceded by Rem
ocrnls The Congresloual Fights.
NEW YORK, Nov. 4. The campaign in
New Jersey practically closed last night
with meetings In every town and Hty of
any Elze In tho State. The Republicans
claim that McKinley will carry th State
by a good majority. Though the Stale is
practically conceded to the Republicans,
both parties will make a hard fight for
their legislative and congressional candi
dates. The Republicans are counting on
electing six of the eight representatives.
Salmon, in the Fourth, and McDermott, in
the Seventh, are the only two that are con
ceded to the Democrat?.
The Democrats, however, thtnk their can
didate In the Third district, James J. Ber
gen, will defeat Benjamin F. HowelL They
also hope to win in the Fifth district, where
they believe the personal iopularity of
their candidate, John Johnson, will make
him a winner over Reprcnentatlve Stewart.
Of tho tight state senators to be elected
tho Republicans Fay they will elect fuur
and possibly five. The Democrats claim six
sure, and possibly a. neventh.
- .
REVISING THE FIGURES.
Connecticut Leaders Modify Their
Previous Statements Somewhat.
NEW HAVEN. Corn.. No; 4.-CohnectI-cut's
day of rest was one of great activity
among the r"lltlcul workers ot the State.
The fact that the campaign virtually
closed last niücht did not deter tho leaders
from occupying this day with almot in
cessant work, and the political fences In
every city, town, borough, village anl
lamlet were examined with the greater
care, and repairs effected where necessary.
Serenity pcrmcattcl the atmosphere of
the Republican headquarter, while th
claims of the Democrats Indicated a crow-

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