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Iowa news. [volume] (Dubuque, Upper Mississippi Lead Mines, Wisconsin Territory) 1837-1841, August 26, 1837, Image 1

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1ST
BUM..., 'I'LUWW
VOL. I.
OFFERS
I
mm
THE IOWA NEWS,
IS PUBLISHED WEEKLY, BY
CORIELL,, KING & RUSSELL.
TERMS OF ADVERTISING
For one Square, tat insertion, $1 00
Each aubscqiicnt insertion, fiO
A liberal deduction will be made to yearly ad
vertisers.
Q^~AI1 advertisements sent to this office for in
sertion, without the number of insertions marked
hereon, will, at the option of the Edilor?, fee con
tinued till ordered out, and charged accordingly.
O^-Letters to the Editors must be
i
rosT-rAiD.
ALEX'R. W. MKRi£GlB,
Attorney at Law,
DAVENPORT, W TERRITORY,
WILL
attend to the business of his profession
lit the Supreme and District courts of the
Territory.
JOHN TURNEY,
Attorney and Counsellor at tow,
GALENA, ILLINOIS.
T. S. WILSOA,
ATTORNEY AT I.WV ANI SOLICITOR IN CHANCERY
DU BUQUE, (W. T.)
his professional services to the citi­
zens of DuBuque and the adjacent counties
»I vVisconsin tcrfitory. lie will also regularly at
tend courts in Jo Daviess county, Illinois.
November 16, Iti.'Jti.—J8-tf
P. II. Engte,
JMornty at Law and Solicitor in Chancery,
OFFERS his professional services to the cit
izens of Du BUQUE, DES MOINE and IOWA
counties.
July 27, 1830. 12—tf
Clias. $. Hempstead,
ATTORNEY AT LAW, GALENA, ILL.
1X7ILL continue to practice in the several
courts in IOWA and Du BUQUE counties
VV. T. Office on Bench street, adjoining
dwelling, in Galena.
August 17, 1830. Stlfl
William W. €oriell,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
DU BUQUE, W. T.
Du Buquc, June 3,1837.
DR. JOEL C. WAL KER,
LATE OK CIHCLKVILLE, OHIO,
Fort nndison, Lee Comity, W. T.
A
•RENDERS his services to the citizens o
Du Buque and vicinity, in all the branch
es of MEDICINE, SURGERY, and MIDWIFERY.
He may be found at all times at the Du Buoue
Hotel, when not professionally engaged.
Du Buque, June 8, 183(i. 5—tf
Doctor John Stoddard,
RETURNS
his sincere thanks to the citizens
of Du Buque, for the liberal share of pub
lic patronage which he has received, and takes
this opportunity of informing thern, that he in
tends a permanent residence in DU BUQUE, June 3, 1837.
and hopes, from skill and attention, to merit a
continuance of tho patronage he has already re
ceived.
To prevent misunderstandings, and silence
false reports, he herewith presents a list of his
charo-es for medicine and professional services,
by which-he has heretofore been, and will here
after be, governed.
Visits in town by day, 1 dollar, by night, 2
dollars: ex officio services, one dollar per hour:
obstetrical services
and attendance from 10 dol
lars to 50, as the case inay be. Consultations
with other physicians fee 10 dollars, adding
mileage when in the country, in all eases in
the day, 1 dollar, in the night, double.
The fees in surgical cases, will be regulated
according to the importance of the case. Me
dicines, Emetics, and Cathartics simple, 25
cents, compound one dollar Febrifuge pulver
ized, simple, 12 1-2 cts., compound 25 cents
to one dollar Tonics, pulverized, 25 cents per
dose Tincture from 50 to75 cts. per oz. Epis
pastic from 50 cts. to one dollar, all other me
dicines in proportion.
Those laboring under Cronic diseases of the
Liver, Dyspepsia, Scroflula, King's Evil,
White Swelling, Rheumatisms, and particu
larly Females laboring under Uterine diseases,
may possibly derive benefit by consultation and
advising with doctor JOHN STODDARD.
Du Buque, May 11, 183G. ltf
Provisions, Groceries,
THEsubscriber
has received by late arrivals, in
addition to his former «t ck of Goods, a large
and general assortment of Provisions, Groceries,
Liquors, Dry Goods, Hard-ware, llollow-ware,
Queens-ware Boots, Shoes, Caps, and a variety
of Clothing, suitable for thc season, which he will
cell 011 moderate terms at his store in Peru, fcr
cash, mineral, or lead.
I M. W. POWERS.
Peru, Nov. 23, 1836. 2D-tf
32."
HAS
on hand a well selected assortment
of FALL AND WINTER GOODS,
consisting in part of
Ready-made Clothing
Calicoes, Fancy Goods,
Hard-Ware, Groceries,
Boots, Shoes, Tin Ware,
And a general supply of Goods calculated to
suit the wants of the inhabitants of the mining
country. All of which he will sell very low
for cash or lead.
Nor. 3, 1836 30-tf
CORN.
SACKS Corn, received per
Falton, and for sale by
June 10,1837.
SCOTT k TAYLOR.
SUPER37I^WERRALL
IRISH LINENS, for sale by
J«« k GRA
GRAHAM.
JOB PRINTING.
THE office of the 'IOWA NEWS' being well sup
plied with Job Type, the proprietors are prepared
to cxecute on the cWiwat notice all kinds of
Ulaftt, an# JFanr®
JOB PRINTING,
SUCH AS
Blanks of all kind*. BMls of Lading1,
Business and Vl«ltini{ Cards*,
Ball Tickets, Labels Ac.
(^"Orders from a distance must be accompanied
with the cash, or some responsible reference given.
DR. WARSAW'S
^"^ELEBR ATED Remedy for the cure of Ague
July l:"—7-ay
I4i HriM,IIV
1
and Fever, Chills and Fever, Cake in the
side, and
many Other
THE
!""vel
at
c0l,s't'cr.a',!e exl".
onvenience to those whti
'W:
A LL persons indebted to the concern of John
1\ Ke
gan &Co. are hereby notified to come for
ward and settle their accounts by note or other-
BL A STING POWDER.
S UST received 10 Kegs Blasting l'owder, by j]«
HEMI'STEAD &, LOU1MIEK,
June 15, 1837.
NO'JJCR
ALL
persons indebtw to the estate of Hosoa
T. Camp, decease.!, rue requested to make
immediate payment to the undersigned and those
having claims against "aid estate are hereby notifi
ed to present them.
,.IV„V
Tll
By order of the Hm.nl.
E. LOCK WOOD, Tieriident.
Juno 3, 1837. i-tf
NEW SPRING & SUMMER
Wassortment
O'FERRALL &, GRAHAM.
1-tf
NOTICE.
LIJ
THOSE indebted to th firm of John Rc
gan & Co., are requested to cotnc forward and loga was safe not an arrow
settle their accounts.
March 8,1837. 11
CORN MEAL.
SACKS Corn Meal, received per s.
/u\3 Fulton, and for sale low for cash by
June 10,18.17. SCOTT & TAYLOR.
BOOTS «TSHOES.
A
LARGE Hssorlment of Coarse and
Hoot?, coarse and fine shoes,ladieb' and chil
drens' shoes of all description, of a superior quali
ty, for sale by E. LOCK WOOD.
June 24. ltf
EMBOSSED CASS1NETTS.
RECEIVED
per S. B. Smelter, 5 cases Em­
bossed Cassinetts, a new and fashionable ar
ticle for gentleinens' pantaloons, which will bo sold
cheap, by O'FERRALL St, GRAHAM.
June 3, 1837. 1-tf
PAINTED MUSLINS.
PIECES of fashionable Painted Muslin,
for ladies iiimms. dresses, just ree'd and
for sale by O'FERRALL &, GRAHAM.
10
June 3. 1-fj
NEW GOODS.
Ea
Ac,
LOCK WOOD is now opening in thc New
Store, opposite his old stand, on 'Main St.
a large and well selected assortment of SPRING
AND SUMMER GOODS, just ryeivod from
New York and Philadelphia, to whfth he invites
thc attention of customers.
June 10. 2-tf
NOTICE,
To persons wishing to purchase properly in Du
Buque.
are now in market, 75 LOTS, imme-
rpHERE a
1 diately in front of thc Town, and situated
on the bank of the Mississippi River. The sit-
propeS, are
Mxion.
to those who will make improvements,
further information, apply to
Y.
NOTICE
ducted underthe firm of J. H.&. W. L. Lockwood through
and all persons having unsettled accounts with me, i |one
are requested to settle the same by note oroth^erwise. i
JITHT
THE PIASA.
AN INDIAN TRADITION OF ILLINOIS.
No part of the United States can vie, in wild
and romantic scenery, with the bluffs of Illi-
wa te r'
8^ re a8 per
n e
n icu
1
a
'r w-i U 'of"
oc k
'r
«,
ea^e»
a
a.n*
'}.s.e'
iaaa*
u"'
for the accommodation of Trav
and Families.
No trouble nor
it a house of comfc
will favor hinwwilh
ed with tho variei
with the choicest o
cxMtM
lts
Stoic. June 17. 3-3m the language of the Illinois, "The bird that de-
sn'00t1'1 a".^
i
will be spared to render i
'5 "|"v rea'i i figure represents, was called by the Indians,
e ers, ai( eis, u I'he Piasa,"—and from this is derived the
nam' of,t,hc slrcam-
asa s
FANNING Sc CO,
NOTICE.
F. K. O'FERRALL, Adm'r.
SARAH CAMP, Adm'r.
June 24,1837. 4-tf
Miners' Bank ol' Du Kuqiie.
NOIICLISeach
„,,,,pr
st}" cu{rent
concealment another warrior was to stand1,1
HEULBx CiIVl^M, hat loity open view, asa victim for the Piasn, which
dollars on *huro of the Capital Stock of tliey must shoot the inslant that he pounced
the Miners' Uank of Du Hu(|iic, will be required
to be paid, to the President and Directors of said
Bank at their office in the town of Du Buque,
on the second Monday in October next—fifty per
ccnt. of said instalment to be paid in specie.
Upon
IOWA lEWS.
PRINTED AND 1*1.BL1SIIKD WEEKLY, BIT CORIELL, KING 4: Kl'SSELL, MAIN STREET, $3 PER ANXUM IF PAID IX ADVANCE, OR $4 AI^HE EWD OF THE YEAR.
4=
perpendicular wall ot rock ri 1
ses to the height of some hundred feet. Ge-
nerally on the opposite shore, is a level bottom isl «7 ."
among all the tribes of the
va'|cy»0'
wise, and those having any demands against us, from that time he would prey upon nothing that intends coming into the iutorior:
will present them for settlement. As we are clo- ielse.—He w as as artful as he was powerful Items of travelliuo expenses from N. York
sing up business, we hope our friends willAttend to |—would dart suddenly and unexpectedly upon (0 Illinois—.
this without further notice.
an
litude for the space of a whole moon, and pray- 1
ed to the great spirit, the master of life, that
he would protect his children Iron, the I lasa.
On the last mght of h.s fast the great spirit ap-
peared to him in a dream, and directed him to
j,js prev When the chief awoke in thc
he thanked the Great Spirit, return-
morning,
ed to his tribe, and told them his dream.—Tho
warriors were quickly selected, and placed in
ambush as directed. Owatoga offered himself
as tho victim. He was willing todicforhii
tribe. Placing himself in open view of the
bluff, lie soon saw thc Piasa perdu 1 on the
cliff eyeing his prey. Owatoga drew up his
i manly form to its utmost height, and placing
E arc now receiving a large and handsome his feet firmly upon the earth, began to chaunt
of Spring and Summer GOODS, tho death song of thc warrior. A moment af
to which we would respectfully invite the atten- iter, the Piasa rose into the air, and, swill as
lion of those who want rhcap Goods.
tho thunderbolt, darted down upon thc chief
Scarcely had he reached his victim, when ev-
theonposiU
Ions of the bird had touched him.
is the
for its
I the figure
line is still
inaccessible
was made, I leave it for others to determine.
Even at this day, an Indian never passes that
spot in his canoe without firing his gun at tho
figuro of thc bird. The marks of balls on the
rocks almost innumerablc.—Not a great while
since I was induced to visit the bluffs below
the mouth of the Illinois river, and above that
of the Piasa. My curiosity was principally
directed to thc examination of the cave connect
ed with the above tradition, as one of those to
which the bird had carried its human victims.
Preceded by an intelligent guide who carried
a spade, I set out on rny oxcursion. The cave
was extremely difficult «cce»». and at^ one
rock, and thc unpe
8m00
K. O'FERRALL.
Du Buque, May 11, 1836. ltf
iuoj tM »wvw* Q| WIIIUII liaiUIJf ICS* IUOII .w
J. H. LOCKWOOD.
Prairie du Chien, Oct. 4th. 1836. 2!)-tf
1 boat
STEUBENvlLLE JEANS.
be sold low for readr oav. bv
June 3. W ^#®AtL & GRAHAM.
touching thi mouth of'
rocK, ana mo uppn ci.
in«r cou be more impressive than the view
from the entrance of the eavern.-The Missis-! Jj
U,C1

l„el, oyer TOr hoads,
WIUcn,
was seaiou a oaiu oa-ie. »«.«-.
sound or 8ign 0f
18 HEREBY GIVEN, that I have u» heigi^—the shape of the cave was irregular, ^Gja^ WaJlsT^Mv^oesTiwr^
associated in business my brother W. L. but as far as I could judge, the bottom o 'aim leaf Hats Straw Bonnets- Silks* Ribbon?
Lockwood, and the business in future will be con-i average 20 by 30 feet. The floor of the cave y0o!eii
i4~ u"'~ mM«
I.I u o n c_ i. TN only bones. The remains of thousands i
1
ani
for what
Pur*
Pose»
DU BUQUE, UPPER MISSISSIPPI LEAD MINES, WISCONSIN TERRITORY, SATURDAY, AUGUST 26,1837. NO. 13.
from the Emigrant and"01d Countryman
i ^MIGRATION TO TIIE WEST,
Thejollowing communication is from a gen
I tlemaWbf influence snd re?
r»eri?.bi!
ity, who efTY!"1
U 1 gratedtoliltn^is"m7n\'7ea79T?o'aVd''foun7ed
one 0fShe
ls opln,0,is
a»d
or prairie, of several miles' width e*t.-ndinp jentll'e^ to
some attention on the part of those !on [®co.d in the office of the Secretary of Mate
of these ranges commcnces at Alton, and ex- j9e,vcs Passion and a home in the far west,
lends, with a few intervals, for many miles a- ALBION, Illinois, June 17, 1837.
long the left bank of the Mississippi and Uli- To the Jailor of the Emigrant Sc Old Countryman.
nois rivers. In descendiug the river to Alton,
the traveller will observe, between that town
Vasthumbers of poor emigrants from Eu
rope, pairing into Now York, who have not
diseases of the West India trough which a small stream discharges its ately tflcr arrival, bring great distress upon Whitestown, During the, tour tlurtj'torse's
Islands, and similar diseases of tlie United States V Mississippi. hat stream is the!.i9felvef, and impose an intolerable burthen shoes wefe found to be loose, but throVgli the
—Price $1 25 per bottle, for at WM. MYERS'S *"e
now
Subscribers have just opened that large jbluff, at an elevation which 110 human artcan imuch in want of agricultural laboi as ever, [who on being inquired of for his charge, said
and commodious house at the corner ol Main reach, is cut the figure of an enormous bird, The port for landing should be changed. New that the new shoes were a satisfactory compen
and O'Conncll St.eets. The house has been im- with its wings extended. The bird which this York has enough of her own poor, and the nd- I sation for the services of the horses."
Thc
!jaccnt
(The
at
1
Many thousand moons before the arrivals of
the pale faces, when the great Magalonix and
0f
Indian, bear him off to one of the caves in
July 29. JOHN RtiOAN &, CO. 1 the bluff and devour him. Hundreds of war-j
riors attempted for years to destroy him, but
without success. "VVhole villages were near-
y depopulated, and consternation spread thro' 1
ill the tribes of the Illinois. At length, Owa
toga, a Chief whose famo extended as a war
rior, even beyond the great lake, separating I
himself from the rest of his tribe, fasted in so-
select twenty of his warrior s, each armed with j|
a bow and pointed arrows, and
111 a designated spot. Near the place of their
niediately
existed a bird of such dimensions that he could '|'|10 following estimate of expenses from New
easily carry off in his talons, a full grown York to Illinois, will at once shew thc mis
deer. Having obtained a taste of human flesh,
°^t'le I'1"10'8.a narrow ravine, the menAs of getting into the country immedi- a horse from Mr. White, the first aeltler at
tradition of the Pi- !cr from Illinois, Indiana, and Missouri, when 'five years AYO an UIISUUUI.™
llis table will be deck- "PPerMississippi, nnd those who have inhabit- land. There are many districts in thc interior by a people who had only just began to rise
he season, and his bar jhe
st(!a|llbolll Tho pri(
aoross
Nt!W Ur
o(., mi tg uro Slll!kient,
not even'the ta- i "!"«\ial P0!"1.^
th«fn cora
f'
hire one of the
smaller class of steamboats and ascend the
Will ash, to ount Cariiiol or to Graysvillc.
'Phis will at once bring the laborers into the
heart of the country where their services are
required at the least possible expense. Tho
cheapness of land and provisions, will, at a
glance, convince any observer that this is the
country for a poor man, a poor woman, a poor
boy, and a poor girl. It is the poor of Eng
land that wuild be serviceable here, the. farm
ing poor. This country is not in a suitable
condition to receive city poor, or those that
look for employment in large manufactories
for support. Workers in wood, iron, and leath
er are all wanted. Besides tho w ants of the
country, the rail road from the falls of the O-
v..iew
im The Mas- i ^m'l0r
a
er of life, in admiration of the nol le deed of raimentlPabundancc.-Benc
Owatoga. had hr over him an invisible shield, i
if ,1 •,! n: I volent associations that aid the indigent in
»»*»m
'«onuy «|tlingc
If
v
the cave, we succeeded in entering tt. No^
th asa lake. The landscape present- Wc of llEztiiiAi! Ji. Galena, «uu(lry
For ed the same wild aspect as it did before it had mckagcs of Goods, sold for and on account of
yet met thc eye of the white man- 'hom it may concern, being damaged on the voy
The roof of the cavern was vaulted, the top 'ro" York to Galena, on board the brig
of which was hardly less than twenty-five feet comprising generally the following
igh its vthole extentwasa massofhuman
ce|j,er
country
country
Wl" ,l' n,:iliy
be a
i[uhl8lrious ort wil cver want
Orleans for the towns of Graysvillo and Mount
C'armel on the Wabash. Albion is ten miles
from Graysvillc and eighteen from Mt. f'ar
mel. Its vicinity is healthy and pleasant, some
four or
sided
n i a y e a n s w e n e y a e a e i n o o a
ble and independent circumstances. Hero is
an opening for ten thousand farm laborers and
mechanics. The mechanics most wanted are
wheelrights, rough carpentersa, shoemakers
and blacksmiths. If emigrants come, in par-
of of eycn a h(jr
point of our l'[®8r^HS' jc emigration of parties of four or five hundrod
of more than 150 feet on the face of^the bl ff.
with barely room to sustain one foot, the un
broken wall towered above me, while below
waMh. After a ,„
8
,dre(1
j. ft
,fa
3y8temat
lhc wholeof a
steamboat,
river. By.be fetro.r,, March, o. Apr.1. But.f.nyahould j—."r--
aidof alongnoleUced on tho projecting^,6 PreMcd hyneccss.ty to comc earlier, let
Li
,ey Winter, they can-
th^'wintcr8month8( but
"v that exist in this country from a want of a suf-
1
e
...
jjfe was near us-a Sabbath
in kan/iaonta ond muxt.hpcomp th» nrin. ..I, .. .i.xj in ann Irom tnence
nation is handsome, and muntbecome the prin- stillness rested upon the scene—-not a cloud in v #Hr.r.lnsinff tho advancc ot the
efpal part of .he town. As the owners of the hea.em-noi a b,«a.h of air wa. ..irring I""1 ,a|nd,thf,
for .he im|»,o,emen. ol i^fkVaS M?«i,,ippi lay belore u., elm. r«.ndlr to g»r.
the town, Lots can be had on reasonable terms |and
ail(|
aepth they extend, I am unable to decide~-but losiery Gloves Twist Setving Silk Thread
we dug to the depth of three or four feet in ev- Buttons a sat of Surveyor's Instruments
ery quarter of the cavern, and still we found ^f^Jofa, B«d.Siead and Centre Table a
The remains of thousands must
whom,
1118
'n'P088,b,e
t0
Ijectnre. a drunke« man in Fraucc.
they wilfbe ready Porla"1
that exists in some places from too
•ins' bT,,j«!idistress :s,i WHCK^''
—luirh over our heads, a sinuile cedar hung its f, i flcctipn upon the future wniou
"»fe"
that »«i.t in'.bi™ couniry bom a wa„. ofa nr. Im
y°" ^rHuuS
ea«'»r" ,l«'
"f Atneriea, are
»i«g
(jloathini* B.oad
nfhnman 8*
a«siinere»
skulls and other bones were mingled to-,n« l'rinu Muslins Shirtings' Sheetings Siik
er in the uttermost confusion. 'Io what aid^ Cotton Handkerchiefs Cotton and Woo!
Sattinets Flannels Drillings Lin-
Groceries, Wines, and Brandy:
w
Thomas Jefferson said he never saw
FACTS FOR THE PEOPLE AND THE WKST TEN
YEARS HENCE.
FoRTY-FrVE YEARS
JSow York than lie was in England or Ire- then inhabited by various tribes of Indians)
the Illinois,'and is.brielly this: ,,f America that can take all the surplus labour from their impoverished condition, caused by
nm .... .1 1
Europe. The Southern district "of Illinois
a]OIM., Can
Mastodon, whose bones are now dug up, were iicr,. (|„,y should land at New Orleans, and im
still livingin tho land of the green prairies, there
take tcjis of thousands. To get
proceed by steamboat to Illinois,
ta|{C 0fany
poor man landing it Now York,
From N. York to Albany by steainbort
Albany to Schenectady, rail road
Schenectady tn Hufl'alo, canal, 335/
miles 1 l-2cts )iariiiile, and meal
liuflalo toClcaveland—dock, not lound,
C'leavoland to Portsmouth on the Ohioi
350 uule«
3clspr mile provisions included)
i
i
50c
8,37
2,50
10,50
4
Portsmouth to Mt Vernon orShawnectown
$-28, 871
When at New Orleans thc passpnger has
only to transfer himself from the ship to the
.e
ol n fteck pa8sa r(! from
New Or,oa|js iSlliiW|ll)( l0Wn is
„K,
.r,ie
oceau
jH perhaps a little
inan8
eal them
Ul
8|
,s
an to New York if a
cllartcro(1
„IC
UllIl.rcilcc )s
j|(1 whe||
not great. II
.u
N(
,u. ,)rli
a if mim
AGO.—"In tlio
of
most flourishing settlements in that whole state of New York west of
Ontario, whidirthe*comprised the
name is Indian, and signified, in upon the inhabitants of the cit^. A law is whole journey of a month, no person was found or the "ary suggestions of calculating, self-
vours men." Near the mouth of that stream, iy unless the captain gives security for their Whitestown, the gentleman took the horse give utterance t0 their thoughts, and to feel 19
IT i-'16
perpendicular face of the maintenance. Tho inlerior of America is as jlirst to the blacksmith and then to Mr. White, to give form anu-,Xpres
1
passed to prevent their landing in the ci- who could make new ones. Oil relurniug to protecting viterest.—For them to think is to
country is overdone with laborers. The I The above facts show at a glance what has
indigent laborer is in point of fact, farth- been accomplished (in a country which forty-
the troubles of a colonial war, with a limited
We have tho vast fertile prairies of the west
all ready for the plough, which, fifteen years
ago,
were the Indians' hunting grounds.
°We have numerous lines ol J'trry-bouts, to
which will soon be. added steam ships, con
stantly playing across tho Atlantic to populous
Europe. Through tliein wehvive a tremendous
stream of emigration, coming like a Hood up
on our shores, and entering the very heart of
the wild, fertile west.—Besides, wo have an
onergetie, enterprising population of our own,
I of fifteen millions, pushing their fortunes, in
commerce, manufactures, agriculture, and all
I the arts and embellishments of civilized life.
Whatever depression there may bo at this
time, or whatever may be their causes, they
must bo temporary the country must and will
rise and her growth for the next ten years
will be looked upon by future generations as
astonishing mirjclo of tho age. Tho growth
of thc lar west, will, doubtless, advance in a
the simple reason alone, that
diversified with prairie and
proportioned to thc wants
no wilderness stands to im
half a generation as was
the ease in New Vork forty-live years since.
The general uvennns* of tho almost limitless
west, forms almost a natural rail-road and
... ... will facilitate every work of international irn
five hundred English families have rc-
roveinunt
in its neighborhood for many years. Ma- mines of metals and coals are inex
ny who were poor, and destitute of all pecu-
hau,liblc and tlltiir river8
lh lh
wfind jn & fow iyg
es(
,ft|,e
wc
iri wiu bc on„
not expect to got more than their support dur- in tho train of agricultural
BEAUTIFUL
yeaij
Lticd,
„f
.i..„ miracles of the future.
thc
next ,m
To thoso who have seen and taken a correct
vjew 0fthe
far west, there opens a field of re-
i floctuni upon the future which they hardly dare
«hould he
er
»t they
.ten years in
tonished worldt it
W1"
SIM1LK.—BY
179'2,
or thereabouts, a mortgage was taken the
and
Wnged to Oliver Phelps. The mortgage is
are therefore y»-
rity was supposed to be liardly adequate to so
jlargeasum. Lest tho settlers in that tract
should be alarmed, however, it is proper to
state that the mortgage was long ago cancelled.
"About the same .time, a gentleman having
occasion to travel among the Indians, procured
a horse from Mr.
population, and a still more limited knowledge
of the vast resources of this vast country.
Tho rise of this State, and particularly the
interior, was slow comparatively, until the in
troduction of steam upon our waters, and the
completion of our great canal—and before the tender beauties of the one, or tho scorching
great lakes were alive with thc sail-craft and jrays of the mid-day's sun cause them to shri-
steamboats which now fill thc harbors upon
their shoes. It is needless to craw a picture
of what this state now is, it is too familiar to
all [classes. Grtat and populous cities and
towns have risen up, forming the centres of
vast tradi! and commerce. We read of four
thousand emigrants leaving one port on lake
Eric this season, in a single day, for a great
city a thousand miles beyond this territory—
which was mortgaged for the paltry sum of
sixteen thousand dollars and we see that iden
tical city -(Chicago) increasing her tonnage
from seven hundred to sixty thousand, in tlur
ty-six months.
In our own State, the past fifteen yenrsliavc
... uu uw. mi, pasi uuLt 1
accomplished tho greater part of this change, ,lgrcd
Ihe question must arise in tho mind ol eve- ,brha
ry reflecting man- -what change will be effect
cd in the great west during lhc next ton years?
Every element of prosperity has quadrupled,
even during the past fifteen years—wo have a
thousand auxiliaries now which were unknown
or inactive then. We have canals and roads
penetrating tho heart of our -ountry. We have
steam ships upon our great lakes, doubling in
number every year.
F.
Lest tho settlers in that tract ing and shooting forth, while their physical
charms are growing into that state of matured
grace and perfect fulness which is to cause them
to be loved and admired. Their feelings are
in all their freshness, unscathed by the chilling
influence of disappointed hopes or unrequited
affection, manifest themselves with an ardor
unchecked by tho dictates of jealous prudence.
H. DAVIDGE.
We never behold young and lovely females
tending flowers, that we are not struck with
the great appropriateness of the association.
Pure arid untainted by the vices of the world,
they are tho proper guardians, and fitting pro
tectors of the emblems of the loveliness and
virtues of which they are the living deposito
ries. In the springtide of existence, their mo
ral and intellectual endowments are just buiM-
ijon
u a
an unsubdued wilderness,
to their emotions,
u i e e s s s i u i i y u n o n s i o u s o e
possibility of iniscon.»ruction, and fearless,
because unsuspicious, ol'J|.nati)rec] misappre
hensions. In the flower maj be seen the ex
quisite tints of their own
fairnts and
beauty
—in the natural tastefulncss of the airanirement
of its leaves and spreading shoots, unblems
of their own heaven-born graces.—Whils# like
thorn they arc lovely beyond expression, liVe
them they must bloom for the appointed sea
son, and like them decline into the sear and
yellow leaf of existence. To both the term
of being is short tenn, and exposed to infinite
vicissitudes. The breath of the north wind
may era long scatter before it the young and
1 and fall, to be trodden under foot, whilftt
of the other, all the charms and building prtl
mise may bo destroyed by thc inhuman whifc
per of a censorious world, or the blighting in
fluences of passions unrestrained. Fair and
fragile alike, it is proper they should accom
pany one another, and happy is it for her wbo
learns from such companionship, how exqui
sitely beautiful and how unspeakably delicate
is female loveliness, which, to be preserved
must be guarded with more than a miser's care.
From thc Burlington Gazelle.
,k/ HARVEST.
/four farmers have nearly, if not quite, finished
(hoir,„lrvt,stsJ
The wheat and rye aro "ripened,
ail(, Jnilcl, ami lhe
)g
,il
oats will soon be.
lv.(. bon„ very fme? nnci tha weathor
)|)3
tor gatlie.ing them extremely 1'avorablo. 'J'hia U
tliu fanner's holy-day, or carnival season. Now
tlioy may "thanks to Ceres and Pales.puy," and
sing tho old harvest-homo song—
"Our hay is movved, ami ourtforn it isreap-d.
Our barns will be full, and our hovols heapd
Come, my boys, come,
t'omn, my boys, come,
And merrily roar out harvest home."
"'Taking all things into consideration, parhaps
this country is not equalled as an agricultural one^'
An experienced firmer, not long since from Penn­
sylvania
drawn dir.closing tho advancc ot" the ensuing
the far western States to the as- (their dignity, as we connect our hap*
i .-in tv.a» i pjjjggg with their virtue. This, there
fore, is a law of eternal justice
cannot degrade women without hin|^
self falling into degradation he cannot
raise them without becoming bettef.
rnalitu is more strange and startling than/Wio».
(N. Y. Express.
3 I can always tell a man who will live
if to a good old age unless an epidemic
''carries him off the stage. He is easy,
fj quiet, takes the world as it goes—if
disappointed, cheerfully begins again,
'and.keeps ori essaying. Such men
!J(don't die,inthestrict senseofthe word.
They wear out as a piece of machinery
and then
does—and then their race is over.
What a superb book is that of Cicero
told us the oil.or day, that with E(,°d
seed, (his was not good the last fail,) a favorable
season, and such attention as a good Lancaster
county farmer usually gives to his wheat crops, he
believes ho could raise 40, if not '15 bushels of
wheat to tho acre in this county. This is proba
bly not an exagoration and yet it would soem al
most increrlible to the bust wheat growers (n
Pennsylvania, where, perhaps, the largest aijd
best crops of that grain aro grown in the Union.
Another farmer near town expects about 60Ql
biis'nulsof corn, a yield of 30 or 65 bushels to t|»»
acre, nnd he says he did not cultivate it with any
thin" like care. Another informs us that from orie
of hts fields he expects IU0 bu3hsls to the acre~
but that field he cultivated with care. OthcrgrainV
Buch as rye, buckwheat, &,c. uHo yield abundantly
and as for potatoes, they cannot be excelled in
quality or quantity. 'Our productions, too, com
mand a fair price. The immense number of em
igrants constantly coming and settling among us,
and thc extensive mining region abovn, funiisliea
a ready market fur our surplus productuMs." The
mining region will, probably, fbt many year=, bs
homo or domestic market for many of our products
and tho Mississippi, and other rivors, afford Us
ample opportunity of finding our way to any of
the lower markets. Farmers of Pennsylvania,
and elsewhere in thc old States road this—and
then remember that this land, which yields Jo
abundantly, can be purchased for a fourth, an
eighth,
of thousands of
miles are teeming with the beauties and luxu
riance of nature. These must and will soon
be peopled, and peopled too, during thc next
ten years, beyond tho wildest predictions of
the present day. We live in an age of labor
saving machines, which are now doing more
than the public arc generally aware of in tho
advance of America. This lever, of itself, will
raise our country fifty years in ten. Already
are they adapting machines to thocjlture of the
westorn prairies. Wilson's mowing and grain
cutting machine, by horse power, IH this year
introduction into Illinois, and it will be to the
,vh,t .ho eotlon
he soulh Tho slcam
plough to
or even a tenth less than what a rood bf
youis cost yon and that it is not only fertile
thoextrem.-, but it isalso well watered, well tim
bered, and has an abundance of rock foi buildirtff
purposes. There is also no lack of water poiveror
privilege. Taxes ara so light that they may b»
said1 to bo merely nominal, and the country is
healthy and growing with a rapidity unparalleled.
The average price of our products may be put
down ot the following Wheat, $1 per bushel
rye, 50 cenH com. 50 oats, 33 potatoes, '15
and other thing? in proportion.)
WOMEN'S INFLUENCE--WhatevermAJr
be the customs laws of a country, the
women of it decide the morals. Free»
or subjugated, they reign, because they
hold possession of our passions. But
this influence is more or less salutary
according to
the degreeofesteem whiejk
is granted to them. Whether theyigei
our idols or companions, courtezans,
slaves or beasts of burdens, the reaction
is complete, and they make us such a»
th^y are themselves. It seems as^iC
nature connected our intelligence wii
prove inconteatiblv that jpmess with their virtue
Let us cast our eyes over ihe globe,
and observe those two great divisions
of the human race, the East and tlj«
West. One half of the ancient wor\d
remains without progress, without
thought and under the load of a barbar
ouscivilization women there arQ»t?v^.
The other half advances towards frei§-
and
de Senectute! Every old man lOVed and honored. V
read it once a WQelu—^PortlaocI A«v. i tit-
jjght the women thero«fc*

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