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New Orleans daily crescent. ([New Orleans, La.]) 1851-1866, September 10, 1866, Morning, Image 4

Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015753/1866-09-10/ed-1/seq-4/

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=R ATE OF LOUISIANA.
_; .er n o. an r.retr.
s...- r MCi N.. 3f0.._ o? eBsR ri? .
- .'v|'a pe
e ie i.' ut aersa to
asomale.i on the umen pages
eoeas. . f luba very
e eea Son iLtcvebgoo4 Sut,
. ..bf ebs the
d as ". w o e ns rto aotnster
e. ueier .ciaania per W
-tauehrsed to the omoer of
Vie' .'oiiipeaiy 'for 14te
e oers of the steamship Morga have
ldlyY furithibee *titii'la s L'Texas papers.
oe are algs indebted tov4hh officers of the
tea~mer Rapidan for Galveston papers of the
ao ers of ,the steamship Matagorda;
Ils i .hed late the eveintg yesterday,
v8'ei iud atiough to send us Galveston
f u thWtlh and Roueton of the 7th.
Ho 1 Lsrw. -Something called a
a e, i omittee of the Rbpublican
tyof Loisitana has recently held a meet
' g 3 ' to +-so we are informed by the
S eat which meeting resolutions
aetsbatleg the President to msain
law #s lie, ,Orleana. As sccord.l
r -e to maintaied tp order
Sthey n .~. rigoras suppression
and riotersof Ithe 30th of
. d ro punishe ,_ eihey
- + sesnot-puaashment to be
o"d satiefy them They de
t:hpfat 'motsenths of' bth h people of Louisi
a pe tt N bettiotbersi of theanith orif
las, and ad cthe h langig process wonldbe
very apt' to leave the State mth just about the
" it l be f the P radicals if
a`thus g e .iddaef tie monimente of he
b outvote of Kentuckh, at nthin lte
t ,a s atf }t $ )iv '95,979; for
c satas m.jority d7,944:
ss to ountles-Lether aneid Perry- ano
E Theyotes Wkhan the
anfatesp 4iq iand Breathitf
e soufcn iqf eainof 3inforvalitiese
t~e
vt nM. o ý1
- e. at J :·· e ,Od-~- - . ·over
ipi ofethe g fossi
t bi~·· e i both more delicate
ýº a ,. nt jsl, 25 onnte,
hirda~~~~ ape .p 't iied
r qi.Thlq ,eae
o£ ge -
weesthsa ý+a kn g
two %M O vAý, iiethegra
the ah~z..tba R both ore dlicat
> 6 !; ,ý Aii rd-stil ou
'4m: w The 4 lpI`Z'nr:
tlf'd I t nd4 Ohio,
i.w
t~~dEfEM " Atlanta to
the . 'iUp~ion of a few
h bean put-in ·tbor
4e s,4grba apitaeof.ovjera
qzeatnhuas; d-prosf
hf ra ir a
Ui Qa hundlred and
s re:the
eand asell
r daring thae r~tg item, anto
usitl tte ooluds`'nai
$"0 ngjh$s in;:Var
4 #b t fey so fondly cafl
rt . tie adWlinistratison are
bt we certailyI
o bc iee hnposg4dby the'
moo gk+Oq p la the Presi.
danl ` J .aveprosotme,"
'an i~g~af evc'tdt ilarto. that
k+*?'°8S" whichiray t
ar
ROBSH HA .SfAHN
Of all the wonders 'omprised in the history
of the human race there are perhaps none
that transcend t'Aose which signalize the an
nals of Israel., Fkom the days in which Abra
ham took auto wife his step-sister, and on the
plains rf 'Tr, in the contemplation of the mar
velt' of the universe, burst the bonds of idola
tty and acknowledged the one God, to these
days, in which the nillions of his descendants
are sactteredthroughout the world, aliens from
N; their promised land, and as thout a country to
call their own, proodigy has followed miracle
- and miracle prodigy until the human mind
seemis scarcely able to compass them. And
notthe leastnotable of these miracles is the
'xistenee, evtei now, of this wonderful race,
to after bondages and .persecutions, sufferings
and punishments, wrongs and oppressions,
nl, aughterings and spoliations, such as the
chronicles of no other nation record. There
they'tre!-now, as in the tents of the Father
of the Faitl, as in Egypt and in Baby
lon, as in temple of Solomon and in
the synagogues of Chorazin, Bethsaida and
bf Capernaum, as in the private recesses of the
to Eastern ghettoes, and of the Jtidenstrllisse of
later days,--alas, how late!--there they are,
ve proclaiming now, as then, the great shibbo
leth of their faith, "Hear O! Israel! the Lord
he oumr God is one God!" and now, as then, con
he forming, as far as practicable, with the rites
and ceremonies ordained by Moses.
, Interesting all of these cannot but be to the
Y, reflective mind ; most of them are of impres
on sivesolgmnity; and many of them are of af
feeting sigqifictnce. Not a few of them in
a volve curious scientific facts and questions;
an andparticularly is this the case in relation to
t-. the divisions of time and the dependent regn
fe lation of fasts and festivals, Our hours,
a our days, our weeks, our months, our
n_ years, are not the same as those of the
d- *Hebews, although these be all meas
. ured by the * motions of the earth
orin relation to the leavenly bodies. Of the di
vision of hours into minutes nothing was
known to them. As the civil day com nences
to with usatrp 4night, the astronomical at noon,
r and ado with some people the day commences
w veith the rising of the sun, so with the Jews
n the day conaences with the setting of the
sun. They understand 4t to have thus com
'y menced at 'the creation, according to the
be Scriptnral statement, "And the Evening and
a the Morning were the first day." This does
!s- not alter the length of the day ; but, from the
si- system of designating any portion of the day
ri or night by ia term signifying both the night
b and the day, it led to the counting of a part
he of one day, withthewhole following night, and
to a part of the next day, as three days and three
ce nights. The division of the day into twenty
f fopr hours was not known to the ancient
, Jews. The period of daylight was dtided by
e them only by the rising, culminating and set
ting of thesun. ..Noother division is found in
the Old Testament. At a later period they
divided it like the Romans, into four parts,
Se onsisting of three hours. These hours,
wever; were not, ];ke ours, always equal.
t Each of thesm was the twelfth part of the
' time the sn was above the horizon. So that
if this in wintj Ni'as inse hours of our time,
each of their hours would be but forty-five
of our minutes. If in summer daylight
Jased fifteen of oua hours, each of their .
Swould be equal to an hour And ditee
intes of our 'time, These unequal hours f
are tehnia ycsled lled "temporaryhours." Iu
Ji4a rthe dpys throughout the year were I
nearly of equal length, however ; and so the
".temporary hours" -were not of as different a
lengths as we have suppoged them, for, the r
ke of ,ill.etration.
v. A ees -or vespers the Jews distinguished
two. Onecommencedat noonand terminated i
t at the setting of the sun; the second com- I
a, menced at the latter peridd. The time in- t
eTuded between the two was spoken of as be- o
tween the two vespers.
l. The night-that is the period from sunset y
n suinrise-Lamong the Hebrews was dliided I
into four parts called "watches," each of themin
is Jstig ,three temporary hours. The first e
wn t itCh spoken of in Lamentations as "' thi o
' begitifinhgf thrnwatehes'" the second watch I
to is called "the middle watgh," in the book of p
Judges ; the third watch apears to have had C
no other epitht ; the fourh was called " the v
marting'watch."
. The 'Jewish week consisted, of seven days c
, including the Sabbath; but they had no eother
a4 designations ;than those of their order rom E
e the, Sabbath--firt, second, third, etc. The t
1ft ellifi~. 'Jewe, at a later day, gave the name s
y p9f i's: roscraai gnifying " prephration "-to i
the day, before the Sabbath. The laws
Sobliged thesrews to so complete an abstinence o
from :labor on the Sabbath, that they were ii
a prohibited rom preparing food to esl "or'even
; froirligtitig re for any purpose. Another tl
farn for the day before the Sabbath, not used y
,o byt~IeHellenists, was the Vesper of thewSab- b
hsth; This copumenced at the ninth hour- -;
three temporary hours after noon, that is,
i T1' 'then set about preparing whatever n
woki necessary for the Sabbath, so is to finish I
before upset; and if they had a journey to g
mtke they contrived it so as not to have to a
travel after aunseto ~ Besides this week of a
days, the Hebrews had a week of years, A a:
period of seven years, the last of which was ,
,alled aSabbatical year, and a week of weeks fc
o of years, a period of forty-nine years, the last ,
r of which tas.calledthe Great Sabbatical year, to
or the yeas of Jubilee. The Sabbatical year, hi
v says Milman, "was another remarkable in- J1
1-stedce of. departure from every rule of politi- ~
cal wisdom, in reliance upon divine provi- to
Sdenoce. The whole land was to lie fallow ; the lb
t whole people were given up to legalized idle- te
a ness. All danger of famine was to b3 pre- T;
l yented by the supernaturally abundant har- be
vest of the sixth year; but it is even more th
remarkable, that serious evils did not ensue
from this check on the national industry." d
Spontaneous productions were common pro- th
party. Of the Grand Sabbatical year, or year wi
of Jubilee, we will speak presently. M
Of months the Jews had like ourselves two tri
kinds; but they were both lunar. One of ne
these consisted of the period elapsing be- lif
tweeanthe departure of the moon from a par
ticular point in the heavens and her return to is
it. This was called "the periodic month," ris
and is equivalent to our "tropical month," or ral
our".i, sidereal miro'th "-there -being a differ- H
once of only some seven seconds between go,
tbhese: It consisted of twenty-s'en days, att
i bhouis, arid forty three minutes, nearly. sys
XThe othr montlawas measured by the space off
elapsing between two conseoutive conjuac- the
i~ons of the sun and moon, and consisted of it i
twenty nine days, twelve houirs, forty-four cer
minute aa id some seooada. Thi' was the by
month in general use.. To allow for the odd ma
hours and minutes, the months were made wil
to consistalternately of twenty-nine and thirty the
days,..the Sanhedrim origibalIy regdlating hay
them. The month was not calculated from sun
the period of'the actual conjunction of the ago
ssu and doOnea but from that pg the latter'a prs;
bepoming visible after it, and hence the ap
Selication of the Thrase "new moon." shich
is a misnomer :s now applied among us. In
order to discover this period, trusty otbsevers
were sent to the neighboring mountains to
observe it; and on seeing the crescent, they
hastened, even on the sabbath, to inform the
Sanhedrim, and the people were notified of
it by the blowing of trumpets, while they
cried out "The festival of new moon! the
s festival of new moon! " This festival is based
upon the command in Numbers, e. 28 v.11-15.
e that a burnt offering shall be made in the
Sbeginning of the months. It seldom hap
d posed that in the serene climate of Judea the
d moon was obscured by clouds; when it did,
e the Sanhed-im decided when the month com
menced.
s The Jews had both a solar and a lunar year.
The synodic month which comnprised the
0 autumnal equinox originally commenced the
Syear. Bnubfter the departure from Egypt,
r oses ordained that in memory of the pesiod
- of the deliverance, which was the spring, with
the month comprising the vernal equinox,
d should commence a year, which is called the
e sacred er ecclesiastical year, as the former is
,f called the civil year. The months had at.
no other designation than that of their
first, second, third, etc., except tha e
d vernal equinox, called Abib (green corn-ear),
and that of the autumnal equinox, calledEtha
nun (in reference to the ten penitential days
commencing it). About the time of the cap
a tivity they were named Nisan (formerly Abib,
and answering to parts of March and April,)
f Iyar, Sivan, Tamuz, Ab, Elnul, Tisri, (formerly
Ethanun, and answering to parts of Septem
ber and October.) Marchesvan, Kitslen, TeLbt,
s Shabet, and Adar. These twelve months,
however, comprise but three hundred and
fifty-ounr days, or more than eleven days less
than the solar year; so that after three years
ethe close of the lunar year would arrive more
than a month before that of the solar year.
To correct this, a thirteenth month, called
embolismic or intercalary, .was added every
third year. This was named Veadar.
Other forms of anunal commencements ob
served by the Jews were that of Elul, (the
sixth month, answering to parts of August aud
September,)fcom which, account was taken of
all cattle brought forth, in order to regulate
the tithes to be paid oh them; and that of
Shabet, (the eleventh month, answering to
pl arts of January and February,) from which
was dated the period, within:three years from
which it was prohibited to eat the fruait of
y trees then being planted.
t et another hind of yearly period observed
I by the Israelites, as already observed, was the
Jubilee, or Grand Sabbatical year. As the
Sabbatical year consisted of a week of years,
or seven years, so this consisted of a week of
weeks of years, or seven times seven-that is,
forty-nine years. The ordinance for this n :11
be found in the twenty-fifth chapter of Le
viticus, from the eighth verse. In this year
all debts were cancelled, all property which
hadbeed sold or alienated was gratuitously re
stored to the original owner, and all slaves were
manumitted. "All the estates," says Milman,
"were to revert to their original owners, all
burdens and alienations ceased, and the whole
land returned to the same state in which it
stood at the first partition. A singular agra
rian law, which maintained the general
equality, and effectually prevented the accu
mulation of lIge masses of property in one
family, to the danger of the national inde
pendence and the establishment of a great
landed oligarchy."
Tn +hiv " 5t-+..l n ++,,. 4d,,:o,.«ý ,r a"._
ae In this-iketch of the divisions of time
at among the Israelites, it is to be observed that
in neither scientific exactness nor critical deter
minatidn on disputed points is pretended to. r
d Adeqluateness for popular purposes-is all that
ad is aimed at, with the object of illustrating how
1- much more may be involved in a question at
a- tracting so little attention as a Jewish festival
a- ordinarily does among us. It was suggested
by the fact that with the setting of the sun
at yesterday cdmmenced the great festival of
d Rosh Hashanah, or the Feast of Trumpets,
as ushering in the civil year 5627 of the Jewish
at era. The former name signifies "Beginning
if of the Year," equivalent in name to our New
h Year's Day. It is called the Feast of Trum
>f pets, pr- excellence, to distinguish it from osh
d Chodesh, as the first of every other month
oe was called, on which also, as has been seen,
trumpets were blown. Its observance is thus
ps commanded :
or "And the Lord spake unto Moses, saying
m Speak unto the children of Israel, saying : In t
to the seventh month, in the first of the month, i
to shallye have a Sabbath, a memorial of blow
o ing of trumpets, an holy convocation. Ye
w shall do no servile work; but ye shall offer an
e offering, made by fire, unto the Lord."-Levit
e icus, chapter 23, verses 23-25.
" And in the seventh month, on the first of
r the month; ye shall have a holy convocation;
d ye shall do no servile work; it is a day of it
blowing of trumpets unto yo."--Numbers,
- Ihipter 29, 1st veire:
S4, The five verses following that last quoted
r may be refened to for particulars of the offer
Ssinge commande dto bema e.' Next to 0om -
KIippur; `the =gret Day of Atondihent,-which
Soccurs on the tenth day after it, Rosh Hash
anah is considered the most solemn holiday
a of the year, especially as commencing the
"Ten Days of Repentence," closing with the
former holiday; and as being the day on
which the creation of the world was comple
ted; that on which the sacrifice of Isaac by I
his father took place'; and that on which the
MIessiah will come. The feast is also called
"Yonm Hadin," or Day of Judgment, for the
teachings of the Rabbis say that on that day a
the.Almighty reviews the career of every crea- a-,
ture, meting out its fate for the next year. "']
The belief was that on this day the good and
bad deeds of each individual were balanced in -
the three books : one the book of life in which
good acts were entered; one the book of
death, in which evil deeds were recorded ; and
the third the boob of the middle state, in
which indifferent actions were inscribed.
Maimodides says that the blowing of the
a trumpets is symbolic of the awaking of sin
ners to repentance and to the leading of a new
life.
The hearing of the sound of the trumpets eoie
is obligatory on every Israelite, and at thel"
rising of the sun to-day, the blowing of the e:.
ram's-horn, or Shopharl, as it is called in a,,r
Hebrew, will commence in each of the synay- A
gogues of the city, and the faithful will be in eel
attendance. In the English and German syr
synagogues they usually appear in shrouds to c,
offer their prayers; but this is not done among -
the Spanish and Portuguese. Jews. Whether
it is among the Polish Jews or not, we are not P,
certain. The holiday is further particularized
by'congratulations among friends, differences
made up among enemies, and general good
will prevailing. The festival will last two days,
that is, till sunset-or more accurately, per- ans
haps, till starlight-to-morrow evening. At Boa
sunset this evening the congregation will t )
again assemble, and, commencing with
praeyer go throouh religious services, Ty
i morrow till noon the same. The Shopliar will
again be sounded ill tie mornriin'g, end no ortho
dox israelite will partake of any food before
havring hc.erd that tone, wlch - to rerilnd
him that ctod e it itn jud-gment, and that tlh;
same voice s.:11 anounee the last judgment.
'The twenty--t'st and twenty-second bhapters
i of Geneis, reciting the birth andl sacritice of
SIsaac, will be recited, together with the first
I chapter of Samuel; and appropliate sermons
Swill be preached. Again in the evening, the
re"gious services will he repeated; and so the
t festival ofl Rosh Hashanah will close. Those
- of our renders who may have an opportunity
1;t find an early mor.iing visit to the syna
gogue, as we have intimated, equally interest
ing, iteressive, and significant.
The ram's-horn is blown every moning
doring the ten penitential days, and on the
evening closing Tom Kipper-, the last of them.
During a violent thunder storm, which pre
nailed at St. Lould a few .ights ago, the bells
and gongs of the hook and ladder house, and
all the other engine houses, were violently
rung by the electric fluid which passed along
the telegraph wire. The" bell of the first
Presbyterian church, corner of 14th and Lo
cust streets, gave out several peals from the
sanme cause.
It is beateved that the governor of Georgia
intends to suspend the collection of State
taxes for the present year, on account of the
impoverished condition of the people,
The Philadelphia Prees has a column en
titled "letter box," which it devotes to
r answers to corresponts. From a lot of twad
dle in this column we clip the following:
Jilli --,lthoueo.lil lo leeyr is above medioc
rity it nwill uot -nit our cohlunia.
Ala=, poor J-ulia! were you so inexpeti
enced as to think that anything "above me
diocrity" could ever find a placeo in the
coh inns of the Philadelphia Prc-s ?
A gamester of Chicago, named George Trus
sell, one of the onriers of the famous horse
Dexter, was shot and instantly killed, in that
city, on the 4th inst.. by his mistress.
The French newspapers limit themselves to
f two lines daily ovel the Atlantic cable. They
get only the price of gold and cotton.
Louisaille has voted down the proposition
for a subscription by the city of S100,00t to
complete the Shelby Branch c Railroad.
HALL or MISSIssare STEAM eFIns Crs'e No. 2,
Te cilicers anr members of Mississippi S.euon Fire Com
pan" No. . are ilerey- notified to isremhle at .te Engine
ouse, eon MONDAY. the 1th in.t., sit ohek A. v.
hlly- eq uiped, to paythe last adl tr:buto of respect to ou
late member RICr.aD ROONEY.
Tile Fire DepOrtment in general are respectfully invited to
attend. F. . EARIIART, Secretary.
On Srnday morning. Fept. t hi at 3o o'caotk, ROBERT,
non of John and IIliet Clark, aged i years.
in the seentyithird year of his age, on Sundnay ernin, at
4 o'cloeck, Rev. J. J.M ULiMN, Founder and caestor of St.
Patrik's Church, in ts city.
His remains will be exposed In this church until 4 o'clock,
and all his old parishioners and frieds are invited to assist at
his funerl at that hour, and at High MIass at 9 o'clock a. Y.
tole .Iloody's Fractional Display.
ra Being determined to reduce my larg stok of
.u Gentlemen's Furalshing Goods,
te- -.
tat MOODY'S CELEBRATED SHIRTS,
I will on and atter MONDAY, devote one window to a display
ie of SUMMER STOCK, ay article iC hlich willa b sohl at the
.at price marked, 25. 5) or ;5c. each, wthout regard to cosi ,
r- real vlu, a tle goads must be so to make roo for NEW
O. FALL SrOCK, NOW ARRIVING.
at S. X. MOODY,
1W Great Shirt ]Empor'luil,
d Pianos I
,of 1 ..1 S.II A.Il RIV _AL.
8, -
ah
"55I the u t Aler.;. ed h - i re "1,i g., l a . u, y ,,
u- i. of rrst .'1..,. !'r;, ,*, . e ed b,- aim ia "pc,,,, ,, [,, "rei
ltt ebrebel t;, ed. " t A" l P·ltuo,." Iru tel' ,a'tret Srtiha
ern Al,nnlutucty of KNAB. k t;O. BaLLtbnn'et, vii.
The FYdil rand the ~rland Upright, 5 s tyes o" Rl/llare
, liano, tro ite ptlminett tiae lata oit taerbt -carved, raog u
i price from g atto $suo'.
Frromn N,l' ,e Nln'3 & Clara :i Upright at S(0t 3
styles of Syn Ire., h"m ,I$.Wg) t, $8t " 7.
P `tn il. R ll n t Ba]lco!: 3 t lles of Squarcs, Irotn $S ) t)
[' oll l (;allitd : The a rhI Granda, at g tS 'tnrclle "o0 i
tl a'.Oto $V.-: ltarlor F r,',,th - i rt t1 , oi 5J,'
ro t.nt a ait l,,v tOare, a cordb ai rc.lurmeno te Weaata il
hlale a woledcrtl brilllancy and ru iet t t. tonbe, a ,rt lo e
ID l on cl' m.c:,iakli aml rhxltez le· ;all I,., :ty of fin "I l, that
l m re bade them, here-l-r kuo •r t uly "" I.'avoritas.
it- 'iuat dd IuIpIon monthly p)ymellfnt.,
Ue.tier' ;rud 5,·lhlx, .uH,,lie it, x''lctlv hle F ct rp Whole.
-,le liatel, De¢rigptivu Price ki-l,.eld by a'pllie.ttb,~a to,
oA. E. BL. CKtAR,
of 167 Canal street.
; Carpet Itarehonseý
of 17 ................. OHARTRES STREET ............ ... 17
We have in store a Large Assortment of CARPETING ot
at l ltid and qualititst t FLO OIL (t LOT. . o0 atl wtdtta
and tuaaittes" Mtting, iCheckeras, Wtlite and F'a . oa
Ittiutg, ', L ' ll g, lat\ , Tabale ad Piano Coersa,
Witdo w Shades, Laca Cur.,,ina Wadrsted Curtains, Cornie"
wnd lns, etca, at reduced prices.
A. BER)USSEAU & CO.,
Importers and Dealers. Wholesale and RetaiL
oh Do rone Want
ANYSV SIGN'S PAINTED TO-DAY C
. W. E. UNIACKE ?
I Particnlar attention pail to SCRIP SIGNS.
v l Re-Opcling
-or Tmm
a COMMERCJAL EXCHANGE AND NEWS ROOM,
113 COMaltIN STREET,
e Opposite St. Charle, ltel. New Orleans, La.
f uOacrtiber, are crdiatlly invtIed to attend the re.penain of
thilt EatlFiaa Nea w, 'a,,ln STii ORDIaY EVENING. at.1.
temt ,or 5:. L, n which x' ccllm caredl of member, hip will be
prgeutalaedalr anaaeoaared -term
Memrubers of tile lemss (:Club are also invited to he present.
EDWIN E. OVERALL.
The Great Southern Remedy.
BILLING'S CARMINATIVE AND ASTRINGENT SYRUP.
tOR ASIAIIC C.IOLERA, CHRONIC DIARRIIEA,
CHOLEA., ,IOROUS, DIARRHEA,
DYTSESTERY,
And all Dliseases of the lBowrel.
Thizpreparationis uowellknown througlhot the Southern
aountry, that it is nnecesaary tti give a detailed aeoaoat of its
meorits. It is au aat and wgll tried artica and the taestimuoia l tha
conutinully coming in are auuncient evidence of its being a s.ure of
and speedy cure for all diean.gs of the bowels, At thin plrtieu at
lar time, when we may expect at any day that great scourge, a a
Asiatic ChOlera, opon ai, Sraa petott and family haould be
prl,\ided with a remedy at band which can be taken at once,
and thereby check the disteaa in it. first stages. Billing'a
Syrup ias a safe and certain remdy. Beware of imitatiaus
Call for BILLING'S SYRUP, c ad get Io other.
Sold by all Druggist. S
S Olice of
PH(iENIX INSURANCE COMPANY, 71'
I1 Camp Street.
The ratet of I'temuum to In trange are redu.edl by tt I Eq
uaati.iltad to coa'i~m to tho New Tariff establisheid biy the
Boad f Unaerwtriteta to take etfeat fromthe1g Ist i. I
Diiou'..t in liot f acrip to be the citat r. ate titil
I'. R. FELL, Agent.
Ottoet staFttrity, Atlantic and Harmony
trvwanst Colpanies,
J. .1. . Iraselmaan .ý Co.,
WILL. ENHIBIT 01
2IONfDA Y,ISI+:FTYflnfI1"'.1 10', 1500,
A Fplendid A..drtment of
FALL AND WINTER DRY GOODS,
JdST ARRIVED.
The chicf attraction is
S lres Goods,
Of which there is an endle.s variety, including a large lot of
DELANES, AT 23 CENTS PER YARD.
A great variety of
Mononing Goods,
Including five cases of Black and White
ENOLISII PRINTS, AT 15 CENTS PER YARD.
A lage stock of
White Goods.
Including One Hundred Pieces of
ENGLISH LONG CLOTH,
At $6 50 pe ppieceof p0 yards.
An immense stock of
llandkerehleb,
t Including2 dozen Gents' Linen Cambric, at $3 er dozer,
100 .. Ladies' Hem Stitchrd, at S 5 per dozs.
SA Sio asortment of
Gloves,
Including a lot of Ladies' nd Misses'
d LACE MITTS AT 75 CENTS PER PAIR.
C A splendid aSCortmCnt of
UHosiery,
Inclndinr n rx -;lleut maki.le of
LADIES WIIITE COTTON HOSE, AT$S PER DOZEN.
An extensive stack of
Dlomestles,
Including a speria,,r, fHil )ard wide,
WHITE SIIIRTING, AT 3O CENTS PER YARD.
A cati"c
Inens,
Includin; !iChr v :n'ticlo ,
IRISI LINEN, AT i1 CENTS PER YARD.
LAdies', Gent,', and I,'lidren';
lorti.,iol Undernhitrt,.
CLOTIS, .CAS.IiEIIEES, TWEEDS,
JEANS. C,'VTIONADES, ETC.
CLOAKS, SITAWLS. B.ALI!ORAL SKIRCTS,
BI ANKIETS. QUIILTS, MCOSQUITO BARS,
IFLA.NNELS RUGS. OIL CL'LiHC'S,
,TOWELS, NATPEINS, ETC., ET('.
OA ,we vili ie :ely r.l ,", cra lci f," r,;,, ln -i e et the
EXTENSIVE ADDITIONS (C' I)MPLITED,
ALL GOODS WILL BE SOLD VERY LOW.
t O 56...............~llagalue Street ....-.......506
:CRNER R'F ST. ANDREW,
To Sltippers of Cotton.
Owh C to tihe great inCnvnientCce andl delay, brolght n,.Iut
by shippers of cotton employing draymcn ,ver whbom we have
no control, we tihe ndersigned COTTON PRESS PRO
PRIETOBS l*,rey agree to chlarge ,n and nifter this date.)
t TEN CENTS PER BALE LAICOR, on all cotton shipped
from our respective Preses, by drayl,,nn not employed by us:
SR. 3. PASTEUR & CO, Fire 'rCof ('otton PreC.
SAM. BOYD & CO., Shiplsrs san Union CCtonC Presse
xnd l.ndespnd-, Yard.
1TlS. MI. SIMMONS, Crescent City and Alabama Cotton
Pressce.
E. K. BRYANT, LnoiitaNaC Cotton Press.
J. V. CIAEROY, LeCee SFet
IRVINE, KOPMAN k I'. O trChan s'Cotton Prest
GAUTIER, ALLAIN t O.', Peuu' .
C. N. PASTEURE. Ctoper's"
S. IIAYWTARD. Orleos "
NP. M: ABBAT, I'lanters`'
Ii. PFASSIMAN, Fatsmat's
LANE & BERAN. Virginia
ISAAC RANDOLPH. Pelican "
IIILLMAN BONIZANO, Vicksburg
STANLEY CO., C('ommerCll s
IG. SZCEIANSKI, Stmon1ki' Nehw .,
KAUSLER A CO., Frerest street
WILL WREN, sis ItoCI "
J C. VAN WICKLE. Wood's
E. GASCET, DE LISLE A CO., Sotthern ..
AYMAR WATIRS & CO., Factors'
RICHIARD TERHELL, Freret's
F. J. IIERRON, Star
A. R. READING. Readl.n
Ae( Orlea, Septembe tr tut,1.:.
A Card.
IATYERS'S HOTEL-MISSISSIPPI CITY.
The proprietors of this popular Establishment, known as
Barnes's Iote!, respectfully aounm ce to its numerons patrons
W that it will be kept ap and kept open, n all itRsummer com
pletuae sD, daring tile wholeyear.
Thie Hote. i now well flled by fi ladirdie and fne gtlemren,
<wh o t threon Bail Rioom to the pleasing maaic cf a well
relectd Band.
The table is abund lnly sanpplid with all that New Orleans
lr lic,;inippi a,,rd., and tle ar i. kept rifre hed with the
hest lignmr' and with ire h- e Derv n- 1.a'.
.1 Sure Cure for Cholera.
N to Imil .hOli,! le writhrot r bottle oi ANTI-C tOLERA
SI'RIh ii.i', ih oe ,ir tB,, I ... , ,,kr n the ft n-eir, rle of
Diarrhi,· will choetk itr N, ire~ l the P i.lomnl of forty.
ns ot 1..r r~ i..- -- i Iii r-.-! vve-ul.tih. R eti l prln '
$1 andi iiS,^r bitlt]. Prepared Iiu ii .t-y
lilt. A. A. JONES
; At NAi i Frt ltriet.tlwpan L onlipna Rndl FI;rcr.
, A'atiouna Express
--Asn
TRLNAiTYSPOfTA'rION COIIPANY,
3 tving com pleted the lnecessary anrralgements, is now pae
pared to forward
Express Matter, Valuables and Freight,
Of evaery 'ieripiian. on the New Orleaa, Jackson and Great
lNsNrilern Raloraid, to
JACKSO ., CANTON,
--Mnd-
A.LL WAY STATIONS.
t Also to VIKSBURO., and all points on the Mi.essippi,
Southern and Selma and .leridiun Rnilroade. Will Ibrfrd,
le as heret.ure, t, all pouits oa the Mobile ani Ohio Railroad,
--Andl to
SAVANNAH, CHIARLESTON,
- RICHMOND, WASIIINGTON,
IBALTIMOCRE, PHILADELPHIIA,
17 AND NEW YORK,
of Vita Montgomery, Atlanta and Augusta, Ga.
oflice of the Coarpaiy r enloved to 113 GRAVIER STREET,
a few doors above Si. Charles street.
J. G. CAMPBELL, Agent.
PIIIL. STOCKTON, Aiistant Superintendent, etc.
Cash Alttances
--MAD ONE-
' CONSIGNMENTS OF COTTON AND MERCHANDISE
GUION & CO.. Liverpool;
WILLIbAMS GOUION, New York; or to Ourselves.
SIBLEY, GUION & CO.,
3t and 3S Carondele street.
&. Sure Cure for the Cholera.
GREY MJACICET BITTERS
Ilave prer a e.nrilate r i, in all cases of ASIATIC
Fior .-e by all the princeip.i Dr .girrs and Wholesale iro
cor,, ;:.d arli halatlid 1,y the i aailrUturTr
BARNETIT & LION, e
R o n 5 i ti ravier street.
Gray's Petraoleun Stove,
-roR SALE AT
No. 106 CAMP STREET, (UP STAIRS,)
The most nsefnl Invention of the ago. Will cook anything
that any otherStove will in the most perfect manner. Throws
off hardly any outward ieat. Makes no smoke, dust, soot, or
ashes. The cooking qualities will be exhibited daily, betwaee
I and 2 Pe. . eat li CAMP STREET, SIP STAIRS.
Trie-- IP'ine-- 'iae.
SPARKLING AND STILL CATAWBA,
Fromn the celebrated Malnufactory of
ZIMMERMAN & CO., Suneessors to LONGWORTIH
ZIMME T.,CINCINNATI, 01110.
--TRrsS WIsEs AR
Equal to Any and Are Surpassed by None. Fr,
Tle Trade. Hotels and Private Families supplied in qa. pn
JNO. W. NORRIS A& CO.,
No, 52 Canal street, New Orleans,
S91iAgEtS for t she Sotha.
IPautace ( C(o.,
CA ...... CANAL STREET ....... .
Slocomb Bulldlng,
IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS,
ARE RECBITINO DAILY, 'AND OFFEB FOR SALE,
BY TUB
PIECE OR PACKAGE,
A COMPLETE ASSORTMENT
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC GOODS,
FALL STOCIi,
CLOTHS,
CASSIMIERES,
DOESEINS,
TWEEDS,
SATINETS,
KENTUCKY JEANS,
HERSEYS,
FLANNELS,
BLEACHED AND BROWN .ISLINS,
S.EETINOS,
DRILLS,
IICEINGS,
STIFPES,
DENISS,
CRASH,
ETC., ETC.,
OUR STOCK OP
DRESS GOOQD
om
En, Embraces a GREAT VARIETY OF GOODS thaOt ar tess
usHpied to he
nam
the
SOUTIIHERN MARKET,
* INCLUDING ALWATS
THE LATEST AND NEWEST STYL.ES
-or
t FRENCH, ENGLISH AND AMERICAN
rd, FRaNCYr aRElfIsS :raIce,
-nvz-
K, PRINTS,
a. DE LAINES,
PRINTED JACONETS,
ORGANDIES,
CHAILLIES, pi
MOZAMBIQUES,
FANCY LINENS,
LAWNS, ETC.
-IN
FULRNISfIING GOODS
We have to ofer a Complete Stock o C
B(
HOSIERY,
CLOVES,
SUSPENDERS,
CRAVATS,
SCARFS,
TIES.
SILK, LINEN and COTTON HANDKERCHIEFS,
PAPER and LINEN COLLARS,
COTTON and WOOL OVER and UNDERSHIRTS,
.. LINEN, JEAN and MUSLIN DRAWERS.
roc
We would invite the attention of the Trade generally to our
LARGE STOCK OF
BOOTS, SHOES AND H]ATS,
From our own and the best Northern facrlees, which we are
prepred to offer at manufacturers' prices, in store,
D1, 9N and 95 Common street,
SLOCOMB BUILDING,
Inrlaltion
-To
Photographers and Horticulturists of Louisiana
-FOR
CONTRIBUTIONS
--To TIn
PARIS UNIVERSAL EXHIBITION.
The Imperial Commi.sion of the Paris Universal Eahlbltlo
propose to form a
DIORAMA VYil¶ITAL,
in tie Palace Garden for the elsbiltion of Drawings, nd
especially Photographic Pictures, of remarkable, curluous, use
ful and interestlng vegetation, of which living specimens cas
not e obtained. Also, pictures of the altuation, lsndape
or scenery, and where t ohe are produced.
I call the attention u[ Photographers and lortisulturlsts,
and those who take an interest In the Botasy of the State of
Louisiansa, to prepare such PLANTS and SAMPLES OF
VEGETATION as are natives of this State It the manner set r
forth in the Circular of Monsieur LE PLAY, Imperalu Com
mlealoner of the Paris Universal Exhibitioan.
Professors of the New Orleans Academy of Selenes, Pro
fessors of Drawing, and heads of ilsltitutions of leaming
where Drawing is taught, are likewiseo respectfully lInvltd o
ceoperate in furtherace of the enterprise.
EIDWARD GOTTHEIL,
State Commssioner Paris Universal Exhlibtion, 181'.
Circular.
The imperlal commissh,a, in organizing tlhe ExpositOll o
living v.+gctable prludU"t= ih the park of the Champ do Mars,
deris t repl--lt, as far as s.ibleh, stch plants as cannot
ise esalihstesl hen-e, tlisin, Istlt their less ehsisiens coMnpleto
nd in their sssssssssfs.stsslblsor su issblst sf tihe s - dls
t ss: trouht ls-r rl.,5e s.uny. It 5rrps, e stherefore, to
etasli~l in tile c rden d5 , ted to internl imd ex l.illon o"
Inl Ilr 1 ,,l" e li d . vthiL it Iu · !r· ti , t : e i: mp tiiie
th1e ,':·t " ,l . 1 .,· II ( h l , .., ' .I , . . ., will thas ho
li, ,,· i . r,,: t l : .. TI ,,e l p ' I,, .`! \ t, I ,: · ,+ . eat In].
Ilolcarad .ssociattioin.
At au me:in, ..':he iav.m :. !:el,1 i L,. he y, t., . f1 "1oPwin;,
E. F SIfII lDT. P'ro,-olut
J. 3 VANDANERRIFF, I: V Pre!e
CIIAS. II. NO.LF, 2d
JOHN F CALDWELL Scrr
WM. L. BI'BfB1SoN, Tre.,t.rer.
B. DA SILVA. Dirctr irt Dtrict.
S B DILLARD. c, S,,::l
R. L. ROBERTSIN "" Thlrl "
A. J. 'ANDE. H FF " F, H urtI
J. F. CALOWELL,
New O1leen , A,,,,-,. 1,6. M ecretvry.
Paris
,, UNIVERSAL EXHIBITION.-1867.
NOTICE.
Having been appointed by his Excelleny Gor. Wells, Aget
and Commissioner to represent the Interest of the State of
Louisiana at the UNIVERSAL EXHIBITION at Parts, in
1567, I respectfuly inform all residents of this State desirous
of echblitiv Machinery or Produce, etc., at the cboye Eepo
sition, that I will impart all information within my reach, mad
, facilitate thoforwarding of packages to the place of destlnc
ation. if addreced on thescbject through PoIetfficelbOx H12,
New Orleas."
EDWARD GOTTHEIL,
Agent and Representative
Paris Universal Exposition, 16'.
Post Office .Aotice.
Until further notice the Malls at the New Orleans Post Ofic
will be clsed as follows :
Mails North, East and Wes. elose daily at 2 p. x., via N. 0.,
Jack-on, and . N. R. R.
Mitls for Bay St. L. .ui, Payr Christian, Miscleesppl City,
Mobile, Selma, Mo tgBmery and Atl.nit,l lose daily at
11 a. c.
yBrashecr, ere., v4cia pelousas Railrad, dally, except Sundays,
at G ,,'cirkc .t. u,
Galveston, IndianlIs and Southern yn,.l Western Texas Malls,
by Morgan steamer, Wednesdays. Fridays and Sundays,
at7a. x.
Mails fr Natchez, Baton Runge, etc., by Atlanlic and Mlssis
U yppi temer-, uii ;', eryepe Surda: _ .t" 3 r. B.
Coast Naill, forall l,t ()l; eqrs ,e L p ti.e r.,er as Bayou
Sara, by tenamer Lliurice, on c .Bel, 4.,: t 9 i. x., and
Saturday. a T d ryyl .
Malla flr .orthestern Tex.c y and Red River, triweekly, at 3
o'ch,-k e. u.
Mais fer Ouachlita River, Wednes.dp:, and Saturdays. at
OF1' 'E tOURS--OpI B .y., IeP. y. The Gen.
cral Delvry 'nd h.rchauth ' Delivery fli be kec;t upe until
'bUNDAYS -O.ce opens 9 A. M , and closes 12 V.
R. IW. TALIAFERRO,
i'.,ytmayter.
The .Iechaetics' atnd .Igrictltatrat
FAIR ASSOCIATION OF LOUISIANA.
At a Special Meeting of the Bolrd of Direetors, held at the
yechaclc' Insttuce t, ,ie 1th iinst,. It iw, yinann y ry "
iolled-Tbat tie eirst c RAN D S iH R o" tihi Asoccatioc sheall
take place on tile ir N (rolu, eety of Now Oreing , corn
sensing on the 20th November enuling.
Inventors muulhctnrers, s orieullf rt stI sk ra srs and
other i, froany portion of thne lltci States, deirou of being
epreseted ic tcis ilndutriai l exlhbitin c,n ol-u full ic.
ycrm tion by addressgc the officers of tyl c syc clat,,n.
1. N. MARKS, President.
LUTIIER tOLMES, Secretary and Treasurer.
UC. H. SLOChye, Chaylcyymn Of the CUymitey cn Fisle
Late Laws of Loe19siana.
THE (ACTS OF THE LAST REGULAR AND EXTRA
SESSION OF THE STATE LEGISLATURE, are lus$
publileS in pamphlet form and can be had of
BLOOMFIELD & STEEL,
106 Camp ctreet.
THOS. L. WRITE,
106 Canal street
JAS. A. GRESIIAI,.
92 Camp street.
W. F. GOLDTHWAITE,
97 Royal street.
Rooms and Board.
A Family, or a ftew Sllo (;Gutlemen can o',tliu :COOL and
COMFORTABLY FURNISIIED APARTMENTS, and
BOARD, on rea-onable leoms, with a family "Lere tbere 'or
no childrou, by early appli.,blOu at
No. 213 JULIA STREET,
Between Barolone aulo Dryadeo streets.
Late Statutes of Louisiana.
We hae nowoanhand for sale, full bound or in paper,
THE STATUTES OF LOUISIANA,
Adopted during the extra session of December, 1865, and the
recent session of 156.
BLOOQIFIELD & STEEL,
Law Bookeelter and Stationers,
No. 106 Camp Stre..
1. JI. Thlonmpson,
AGENT OF THE
NEW ORMLEANS CRESCENT
GENERAL NEWSPAPER AND ADVERTISING AGENT
NO. 14 WALL RTREET. NEW YORK,
James B. Thompsont,
M.IERCHANT TAILOR,
No. 147 Fulton street,
SeW YORK,

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