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New Orleans daily crescent. [volume] ([New Orleans, La.]) 1851-1866, September 29, 1866, Morning, Image 1

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The Yeew Orleans' Crescent
HOOKI A.TD JOB3
PRINTING ESTABLISHMENT,
94 CAMP STREET.
J. O. NI.OCN, Proprietor.
The Crescent Job Establishment
WITH THE LATEST AND MOST IMPROVED
STYLES OF PRESSES,
The Celebrated Manufaotories
-or
Messrs. R. HOE & Co., and GEO. P. GORDON,
And with all the various tylea and design, of
TYPE, BORDERS, ORNAMENTS, CUTS, ETC.,
From the well know foundries of
E. JOHNSON & CO., PHILASELPHIA, AND
JAMES CONNER'S SONS, NEW YORK'
J prepared to execute everyLdemrption of
BOOK AND JOB PRINTING,
-14 A eees- A
quit
sup]
UNSURPASSED BY ANY OTHER ESTABLISHMENT &
the
IN THIE SOUTH.
Plee
tait
alle
COMMERCIAL AND MERCANTILE par
the
PRINTING, th
£t2
-sacaes- tat
her
PROMISSORY NOTES, hol
DRUGGISTS' LABELS, ree
DRAY RECEIPTS,
BANK CHECKS,
BILLS OF FARE, CONTACTS, est
BALL TICKETS, epi
PROGRAMMSFB,
AUCTION BILLS, for
RAND BILLS, lie
BILLS LADING. anR
ENVELOPES, me
BILL HEADS,
CATALOGUES, Ch
MORTGAGES, del
CIBRCULABS, p
HEADINGS,
INVOICES, col
DEEDS,
CARDS.
--And-
PSo
EVERY OTHER VARIETY OF BLANKS aS
inS
KNOWN TO TRADE OR COMMERCE shy
thi
tie
BOOE DE PAR A·1T r W. a].
Di
We are prepared to
Ft
aS
PRINT AND BIND
se
Ina Superior Style, .
in
AMPHLETS, r
BOOKS, h.
BRIEFS, tl
CASH BOOKS, b
DAY BOOKS, a
LEDGERS,
ETC., ETO.
Of al sze sand style of typography or binding to Sait the
taste of the most faastdious.
STEA1,MBOAT PRINTING.t
Especlal'atteanton given to printing
STEAMBOAT BILLS,
BILLS OF FARE,
MANIFESTS, ETC
Plain or In any Number of Colors.
RULING AND BINDING
Executed with dispatch, and in the most workmanlike manner.
All work warranted to give satisahction.
Orders attended to with dispatch.
SPrices reasonable.
Crescent Book and Job Establishment,
No. It CAMPISTREET,
Between Natchez andePoydras,
SNew Orleans.
NEW ORLEANS DAILY CRESCENT.
THIS CRESCENT IS PUBLISED AVLY (Suday: Exeptedl AND EHKLY, BY J. O. NIXON. No. 94 VAMP BTMTEET. TERMS-.DAILY, 610: WEEKLY4l5 PER Y IAR.
VOLUME XVI. SATURDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 29, 1866. NUMBER 40.
rm~; ~~ --J- .-;-n , :.ff ...1-...:. ;-:. ,,-: ___------ ---I -
,tm Orleans !aily ( far lte . ht
OFFIUIAL JOURNAL h.old
-or- tlie
THE STATE OF LOUISIANA. Be
beet
SATURDAY MORNING. SEPTEMBER 20, 186i. atel
hoc
sloe
Bo1stl gntelligtine. ,o
Funeral of Capt. Brewer. vas
Capt. Sam. Brewer was buried yesterday. His ea k
remains were deposited in the tomb of the fire sill
department, and were followed by a large proces- po
sion. Some two or three hundred of the police
force turned out, with Major Manning at their
head. After them came deputations from the A
various fire companies of the city; next Columbia tna0
Fire Company No. 5, of which deceased was fore- We
man, and the train terminated with a lengthy col- Oro
umn of carriages, filled with citizens. The re- lur:
spect paid to the memory of this truly good citi- Ord
zen bespeaks the estimation in which public and the
private virtue is held by the people of New and
Orleans. ref
reg
A Bad Occurrence. ay
The remains of Captain Simmons J. Shaw, a thi
gentleman widelyknown and universally esteemed, coo
have been brought to this city from Alexandria Alt
and will be interred to-day, from St. Patrick's liet
Church, the funeral ceremonies at half-past 10 l
o'clock this morning.
Captain Shaw was a son of the late John I. adE
Shaw, Esq., of the well known banking house of rot
Benoist, Shaw & Co. Captain Shaw having, in I
common with many others who served in tile Con- oc
federate army to the close of the war, sulkfred in fro
fortune, sought to retrieve himself in pecuniary An
circumstances by cultivatidg the soil. Ite became Th
a partner of Mr. J. F. Wood in working a planta- col
tion in lapides parish. The plantation being sit.
uated in a part.of the parish where there was a very on
sparse white Iopulation, and alargely preponder- me
ating negro population, he sought to imlpres, upon
Mrs. Wood the necessity of being expertin the use
of the pistol. While instructing her in the use of eh
the weapon, she went into tile yard to practice, artid
he, coming in a direction diferent from that she a
had reason to expect him, a ball from her pistol' it
hit him and proved fatal. do
Although a coroner's inquest resulted in aci
quitting her of all blame, the lady is, as might bic St
suppo'ed, most unhappy to think, that even acci ce
T dentally, it was her misfortune to be the cause ol the
the death of so estimable a gentleman.
Another Charge Againlst Dreyfus.
Another affidavit was made yesterday, before
Recorder Ahern, charging N. Dreyfus with ob
taiinig goods upon the same representations
alleged to have been made in purchasing frorl
E parties who had previously prosecuted him. We a
have not been pernmitted to see the affidavit, n an
therefore do not know the name of the firm comn- a
plaining. We have been informed, however, thit
the amount of the bill was, in round numbers,
$2000. In this connection, as well as in relation
to other cases, we shall have something to say
hereafter, in regard to recorders' clerks witn
holding from representatives of the press public
records.
The Catholic Counneil.
Archbishop Odin, the venerable, learned and
0. exemrlary prelate, who presides over this archi
episcopal see, and Bishop Martin, the estimable
Bishop of Louisiana, departed on Wednesday lest
for Baltimore, to attend the Council of the Cattio- sO
lic Church, convened by direction of the Poi e,
and over which Archbishop Spalding, of Bacti
more, is to preside.
This will be the second Council of the Cathdlic
Church held on the American continent, and the
is deliberations of the body will be of the highest
public interest.
Among the subjects which, it is understood, will
come before the council, will be the condition of
the negro, arising from his changed status. The
' imprggement of the race, by intellectual, religious
and tMral culture, and its relation to the white
population, will be discussed, and doubtless the
ability and wisdom usually distmlguishing the con
ferences of the church, on- all questions concern
ing public order and the peace of nations, will be
shown in the conclusions of the influential body
that is to pass on these eminently important gqes
tions.
Unweleome Guests.
At a christening ceremony which took place" in
2. a private family, on Union (?) street, in the Fourth
District, Thursday evening, the guests assemnbled t
were suddenly disturbed by the entrance of a
party of rowdies and blackguards, who proceeded
to break the plates, furniture, etc., and to ipter
ropt the festivities generally. This razzia istsup
posed to have been made by a party who go
about asking themselves to such entertaintimnts,
and who, upon being refused to be allowtid to I
dance with the ordinary guests, revenge them
selves in this manner. During the melde, a man
whose name we have not learned was badly cut
in the leg. None of the parties to the above out
rage have as yet been discovered. It is ain be
hoped that justice will show herself, in giving
them their due, as little backward as they have
been in attending assemblies to which they were
not invited.
A Charlvarl. ab
Amorous youth looks with a cold and jealous stn
eye upon the espousals of beauty and age, and O(
when Cupid's arrows have been tipped with gold, of
the unsuccessful rivals sometimes attempt to ex- lo
act from happy Dives a tax in kind. This, we in
believe, is the origin and object of charivaris, and lao
a marriage on Claiborne street, night before last, re
gave its upholders an opportunity to make known au
their views.
A bachelor, who was accused of being old, di
married a young lady who was certainly very cl
pretty, and the matter was resented as an affront hb
by the young men of the neighborhood who had te
been left out in the cold. The sheet-irol band so
was revived in honor of the occasion, but the a
attempt miscarried, and the entertainmei soont b0
fell through. The police interfered, and sartici- t
pants narrowly escaped arrest. o
Coroner ,'s In qu ests.| d
The coroner held yesterday inquests upon the
following bodies:
Upon the body of Joseph Darroche. of Ielgium.
aged 52 years, found dead at the St. Josceph Ay
lum, of consumption.
Upon the body of Petit Jacques Augnate, 45
years old, of cholera. I
Figaro In Troule. t
We recently gazed with some curiosity and pity I
at a queer looking stranger, with a foreisn make
up, whom we saw a day or two since, just arrived I
in this city, and the contents of whose pockets
amounted to a pair of curling and pressing irons. 1
He was arrested and carried to the Third District
Recorder's Court, upon tie charge of vagrancy,
and his generally disordered appearancee and
swollen face served to confirnm the chirge. He
had been taken in the act of going fromn door to I
door, and had been too intoxicated, or sltoke Eng
lish too badly, to give a good account of his ob
ject, and in consequence his visits had brought
him to grief. He was ordered to the loskup, and
requested to hand in his irons. There ans some
thing rather pathetic in the way he redeived the
order. "He hesitated a moment, shrugged his (lt
shloulders, as much as to say that he had lost
eerything else-what was the use of trying to
held on to them?-aud then quietly followed
tlie officer in charge.
But on this trialyesterday he showed that he had p
been assaulted and pretty badly used up immedi
ately upon his arrival; that lie had imbibed too
much in consequence, and that while going from
house to house to get custom, as is usual in his
eative country, his motives had been nlisunder- D
stood. His plea was so successful that his case
vas dismissed and his irons restored, and for his
sake, we hope that corkscrew tresses will become
still more common than they are even at present
u pon ourstreets.
Various Items.
Among the late appointments made by the C
mayor to the police is one deserving special notice.
We refer to the appointment of Lieutenant John
.roley, who, in consequence of wounds received
luring the war, is unable to follow any of the
ordinary avocations of life. He was an officer of
the Eleventh Louisiana, at the battle of Belmont,
and lost a hand there. Though thus disabled he
refused to leave the service, and, being with his
regiment at the battle of Shiloh, he lost on that
day, all of his remaining hand but a thumb. In
this crippled condition the gallant gentleman is of
course unfit for ordinary police duty, hbut Recorder a
AAhern has found a place in his office, in which the
lieutenant can render services to the public ade
quate to the compensation he receives.
The house of Mr. McDonell, at No. 166 Esplan.- '
ade street, was entered night before last and
robbed of a fine saddle.
The alarm of fire between eleven and twelve
o'clock yesterday was caused by sparks falling
from the chimney on the roof of the house No. l1
Annunciation street, and setting fire to the shingles.
The flames were extinguished without damage of
consequence to the premises.
About the same hour the burning of a chimney
on Franklia street brought out the fire depart
ment without occasion for their services.
Mortuary Reporwts..
The subjoined table presents the dealol from
cholera and other diseases, together with a class-1
tication. with reference to color. reported to the
Board of Health, since t hexicter.c: of cholera
in the city became an estailishedPlcct. Thirtable
does not include the intermeot- feom the lMarine
tiospital, which, being under nmlitary control, are
not reported to the board. Fromn the 5th to the
'Sth Angu-t the board has no retur:s from the
cemeteries. The first daily report was made to
the board on the e th August. Tait, and all the
succeeding daily reports shorw the intermentsa up
to 6 oclobk of the morning of the dlay the report
nmay Ibe dated:
Ag a Ie....... 1 -
a.U2ncStl...O. 0 -- -4 4 -- I -- 7 tool
A .. i 1...... 27 15 0 1 16 1 5 4t
.. 12...... 27 11 1 t 2 25 1 0 1
to 0.... 0 1 a - lo 21 n 2 t e
S.. 1...... 26 17 1O - 147 1 -- 42
. 12...... 7 12 9l 3- 26 ^I 6 49
• . 8...... 21 n/ 5t- 11 S8 - 54
. 9...... N1 11 [ 9 3129 17 1 - 357
,. 27..... I81 4 8 - 31 81 8 ii 43
.. ....... 2 1t ! 3 15 - 595 1 i 54
. 1 t...... 2 1 9 . 1i 1 2 ill 51 i 37
.2i....|.. 27 66 - c 1 r I
24..... 15 4 2 2 2 12 3 S 7
20...... 16 15n s 2t i 1t 8 t o
. 2 . ...... I 1 8 8 U 1 0 1 9
S c o..t... t a1 n 2 I 6t 1 12 I 47
I2...... L1 5 -0 ..0 c
3 t......o 5 a c 13 0 6 34
n o.....a 9 2 2 7 19 5 5 I 7 4
..9... 11L i01 6 11 lo
.. 13... IS o n 2 n 2
• lq... 19 8 80 1 _,1 17 5 0
I 9 b... 159 7 5 311215 0 53.5
. ).. 13 " 16 1 26 35 1 4
o 7 3... 7 1 9 1 15 . 10 1 -0
.o21... o 4 i 1 to8 1 4 Tl
ic 8... 10 7 4 1 2 t1 7 1 30
0 to , is o ,. 1 4 n o 1 5 t
14... 16 7 4 5 19 6 . 41
a o11 to 4I"0 1 6 I
.. 6... 1 6 2 0 2 3. 0 15 8 , 43
.. 27.... 30 7 3 1 11 6 511n, '
Fie deaths . from yllow fever o repooed
yesterday.
Secorders' Court.. real
FIRST DISrRICT.-The case of John McKinley, line
accused of being concerned in the larceny of the anti
I sam of about $5000, the joint property of Dr. bMer- nut
cier ond Mr. 1,. 0. La Neuodlte, roo an anrmir ill
I the room of the latter in Dr. Mercier's hospital, e
appointed for examination before Recorder Ahern net
yesterday, was continued to Tuesday next, and fift
I the bail of the accused was fixed at $3000. len
The case of P. K. O'Connor, accused by Mrs.
Ellen Curry of threatening her with personal vio
lence was dismissed, the prosecntrix failing to ap- ha
pear. o
The examination, which was to have taken
a place yesterday, of F. J. Gillert, a barber at the
corner of sMagnolia and New iBasin streets, for em
bezzling provisions and fruits of the value of three
n hundred and twenty-one dollars, entrusted to him SEI
it to be sold for account of Charles Furman, was de
ferred to the 8th of next month. The accused
was arraigned on another charge, that of striking
Adolphe Lange, of the Social Retreat, near Salg
g nolia bridge on the New Canal, with a club, on Ge
e the 26th inst. Pleading not guilty, the case was
Sset for examination also on the 0th prox.
A charge against Wiliamts, colored, of stealing
a gold watch valued at f$l. and jewelry worth
about d53, from the premises of another colored
woman, named Caroline Mitchell, on Melpomene
is street, was fixed for examination on the 6th of TC
id October.
S, Sarah Purcell was brought to the bar, accused
of striking Sarah Doran in her domicil, No. 30
DIryades street, with a pitcher and wounding her
re in the neck, withlintent to hill, on Wedesday night
2d last. The prisoner pleaded not guilty, and was fr
it, remanded for examination.
n Te charge against Jack Reily, for an assault eOh
and battery on the person of G. M. Frederick, on K;
a steamer, at the New Basin,on the 21st inst., was we
d, dismissed, the prosecutor tailing to answer. fo
S An examination of the case of H. Eikel.
Scllrged with maliciously causing his dog to bite a
boy named Felix F. Walter, son of Nicholas Wal- g
ad ter, residing at No. 32n Tclloupitoulus street, re- I
ad sulted in the prosecution being di ,-issed. T
lie The sane disposition was miade of ai charge
against rs. Maria stl,binson, ot an a-sault at le
on battery on Mrs. Mary Kane, in a house in wnhich
ci theywere joist teantls, No. Io FIllocher ,treeat.
on the 31st of August lact. Thie accused wlile f
in the parisll prison, was taken with cholera and
died.
Henry Jeter, negro, arrested for a etty theft, n
dle nSasnllol Lewis, niore, acld Join Alleo, found
sleeping on tie strect,- t,rloe ,S .i.nce o to tie
m. Workiloue for six iontcs : hlebes Clark, colored,
as a sus -iclous clharacter. an, d Jo lseth i'al-in and
-cimon I Pet ier, e lo l'el ' , t t,(,l steaoc ling a
lat fronm the slicoh e 1r. ]i . In . I nl'l, an, oc I'o"
45 dras street, were sent to the 1torl.ii,,.e oit itny
days.
SEco0n ]ISTRICT.-3]I'. aI:td fIr-. Pt-er ShaL-br,
and T. W.1)o31e. for breach of tie peace, were ,
-ceo -t,) Dicrt t I ee pea',e hdi.
nl le. Jatle, for slapelei e tnce of Philonmcne
(yordon, colotreod, wae : lined 52 l1, or to:o days' oue
ed o iosodnineyt,
cett John lavis and Jamnes 'Lane, for e!eillng upon
c. tie levee, land C(hallces Alidorf, tcr viegrun, were
seit sat to the Workilouse ftr nllety days.
STUItD I)ISTRICT.-Flenm Walker, colored, for
Sassault and battery, unol)on Ferdiald strelet, with a
ad danogerous weapon, lined 10.i
He Francois and William, both'colored. for passing
to countereit money, we released ono bail.
n- Jck Trainer, a Workhouse bird, was sent to Iis
ob- home for thirty days.
ght FIsn.-Messrs. W. H. Henning & Co. announce
and that they have just received by the steamer Con
cordia from Boston, a large assortmenteof'mackerel,
me- codfish, herrings, salmon and halhbut. Their stand
the is 95 and 97 Camp street.
TELEGRAPHIC DISPATCHES ha
yo
.Wi
op
.IOM MEXICO TIA SAN FRANCISCO. Th
ltn
ed
DEFEAT OF THE IMPERIALISTS. o
GARRISON AT UREZ CUT TO PIECES,g
ba
QGTAYA&ma ,AB m a.A... o a eO
1P
AUSTRIAN GENERAL KILLED re
_IAZATLAN TO BE EVACUATED. R
Sonora in Possession of the Liberals.
THE BATTLE NEAR MAZATLAN.
SAN FRANCISco, Sept. 29.-News from Mazat
lan. Mexico, is to the effect that the Imperialists a
and the men of war had left ouayamas to the t
Liberals. f
A fight had occurred near Mazatlan. The
French lost three hundred and the Liberals two a
hundred and fifty in killed and wounded.
The garrison of Imperialists at Urez was cut to
pieces on the fourth instant by Martinez, no quar- e
ter being shown.
Gen. Lamberg, an Austrian commander, was e
killed in an engagement at Guadaloupe, on the s
ame dayv.
Mazatlan would probably be evacuated by the s
e French in October.
Sonora was in undisturbed possession by the I
Liberals.
SSa. FRaNcisco, Sept. 29.-A letter received
e here, dated September 21, giving an account of
Corona's recent operations at Palos Pintos, near
Mazatlan, says seven hundred and fifty men, under I
the command of Colonels Grenadie and Marti
nez, attacked the French position from the rear,
dismounting one piece of artillery and exploding 1
the Imperialists' magazine. The French, thus cut I
off from Mazatlan, made two desperate charges,
under Captain Delata,. and succeeded in rescuing
their cannon.
An imperial battalidn called Cassadores soon
after arrived, and drove off the Liberal forces.
Both parties exhibited the utmost bravery.
Especial praise is awarded to Capt. Delatka for
his obstinate defense.
GREAT STORM OFF NEWFOUNDLAND
4 SHIPWRECKS---G(REAT LOSS OF LIFE.
T
NEWFOUNDLAND TELEGRAPHIC LINES STILL DOWN, Fer
cor
PonT-ar-BasgUE, N. F., Sept. 28.-A fearful bet
gale of wind prevailed on Saturday last on the aps
Eastern coast of Newfoundland. A great many ac
wrecks are reported.
A French frigate was lost at St. Pierre. Several
coasters were wrecked, and over one hundred and
fifty dead bodies were picked up at St. Pierre on INI
Sunday, of persons lost from different vessels. No
further particulars.
Asrr BAY, September 28.-There are as yet no H1
advices from Europe by the cable. The New
foundland lines are still prostrated, but we learn
that communication is expected every hour to be
restored. Not many persons understand that the
lines in Newfoundland pass throughadenseforest,
and in one case for a continuous distance of two
hundred and fifty miles. Stations are established
every fifty miles, and in case of a freshet it becomes fail
necesgary inumaking repairs, to make a detour of suc
fifty miles into the interior to get across the swol
len streams. The public are unable to understand are
why breaks are not sooner repaired, but one who er
has tried a journey, such as the Newfoundland
woods offer, can readily comprehend the delay. to
bay
fat
SECRETARY HARLAN CHARGED WITH FRAUD! Pr
she
Gen. Dix Commissioned as Naval Officer, ho
New York. ve
the
-n---- St.
f TO BE APPOINTED MINISTER TO FRANCE. ba
E,
r 23
t WASusNGTON, Sept. 28.-The Union charges
s fraud on ex-Secretary Harlan in tile matter of 14
t eight hundred thousand acres of reserve lands in lir
n Kansas belonging to the Cherokee Indians, which 30
s were sold to the Connecticut Emigration Company, P
for one dollar per acre, payable in nine years in in. at
a stallments. The Cherokees paid a half millionin qt
I. gold for these lands thirty-one years ago, and the
Union says they are worth three or four millions. w
The sale was made by Harlan the day before he at
left the interior department.
S WAasutIm or, Sept. 28.--Gen. Dixis here, and, gi
t to day, received his commission as naval officer 41
for New York. It is said he will holdit fora r
short time, resign, and then accept the position of a
ft, minister to France. B
Santa Anna Determined to Aid Against L
v the Empire.
r,
ae Thud. Stevens reas that Delpreelation of 8
lie the Secnrliles Must Follow the 1
a- Pi reslaent's Polley.
New YORK, September 23.-General Santa
for Anna hus addressed a reply to Minister Romero,
in which he takes the leaders of the present re
sng publican government in Mexico to task for re
fusing to receive his services against the empire.
his Hte declares that their refusal will not doter him
- from doinghis best in'behalf of his country. Itow
oce he means to do this and will preserve harmony
on- among the defenders of the republic, as he avers
rel,
Ind himself anxious to do, is not stated.
Thad. Stevens, in reply to a letter askiang what
effect the success of the President's policy would
have on national seoerities, says: 'In answer to
your inquiry, ' what effect the President's views citj
will have on the national securities?' I am of the pat
opinion that its effect would be very injurioas tie
The President contends that the body of men act- a h
ing as a Congress has no constitational power, and are
can do no valid acts in the absence of the exclad- ist
ed States. The Congress that anth9rizsd the war HI
debt, and lard the internal duties to pay it, were
composed of precisely the same number of bor
representatives from the osme itates as the
present. If it should be decided That these Con I
gresse had no constitutlonal existence, then the
5-20's,10-40's and 7-30's, and the legal tendergreen- e
backs, will have been issued without authority, (t
and would be worthless. Whethef they w.ald bD
ever "be redeemed would depend on what the
President would consider a cons.tttional Congress ar
after the admission of the rebel representatites, Sa
when the condition of the debts of bothbellige- 4S
rents would be considered." en
sts
REVENUE CUTTERS TO BE SOLD;--OTERS.
TO BE BUILT,
be
CHOLERA IN MEIEPHIS. w
------ J1
WAsonrsToo, Sept. 28.-Congress, at the late
session, authorized the secretary of the treasury as
to sell such of the revenue cutters as are not
adapted to the service. T
The department will, accordingly, soon dispose s
at public sale, of six of the steamers, which were I
being built in a manner more suited for war than y
for civil service.
There will then remain nineteen revenue b,
steamers, six of which are on the lakes, and nine ei
sailing vessels. -
The number of the latter is to be increased by rs
eight, proposals for the building of which have rs
been invited. Sailing vessels only are to be oi
-s employed where they can render the requisite cl
service, while their use will very materially de
crease the expenses; as bets-een them and r
steamers. fs
The receipts of customs at the ports of Boston, c.
c New York and Baltimore, for the week ending
September 22d, were as follows: Boston $311,- v
000 71. New York $2,399,395 46. Baltimore 1
118.88 43. it
ir The receipts at New Orleans from the 8th to the g
135th instant, were $177,181 04. tl
i- lEMPHIS, September 28.--Forty-six new cases n
r, of cholera, and thirty-four deaths within twenty
g four hours, an increase of one over yesterday's a
at report.
Important Fenian Iovements Expected.,
THE LATE GEN. LEADBETTER'S EFFECTS.
NEw YOaR, Sept. 28.-Arrived, steamersTripoli,
from Liverpool, and Grenada, from Chaleston. -
Stephens's Fe.hian headquarters yesterday was
all bustle and activity. Important negotiations are
pending to astonish the brotherhood.
E. A nolle prosequ has been entered inthe case of I
President Roberts, and the case has been dis
missed.
The flaw discovered in the indictment of the
N, Fenians at Erie will necessntatidtletr discharge.
An Ottowa special denies that the Fenians are
concentrating on the frontier.
ROCHSTEBn, N. Y., September 27.--Gen. D. Lead.
ful better, late of the Confederate army, who died of
the apoplexy at Clifton, Canada West, last night, left
ly a considerable sum of money and valuable effects.
ral
INTERESTING GENERAL INTELLIGENCE.
No
no HOM1.E MIARKETS-RIVER NEWS.
Etc., Etc., Etc.
the
TORONTO, C. W., September 28.-Theprovincial ,
fair closed to-day. The exhibition was a great th
success. as
A large number of the recently arrived troops pI
are on the way to their destination on the west
ern peninsula.
A number of the Canadian ministry are in le
town.
LOUIStVILLE, Sept. 28.-Sales 122 hhds. of to
bacco at unchanged rates. Flour, superfine $9 ; t
fancy $14 75. Mixed corn in bulk 78c. Oats 4Sc. tc
Prime wheat $2 75. Pork, $32 25 for mess. Bacon as
shoulders 16o.; clear sides 20Sc. Lard in tierces bt
lole. Whisky $2 33. bi
The river is falling fast with 13 feet of steam- n1
boatwater on the falls. .
The running races at the Woodlawn course, ad- w
vertised for October 8th, have been postponed to w
the 15th, on account of the postponement of the b
St. Louis Laclede races.
MOBILE, Sept. 28.-Cotton--Sales to-day 500 in
bales; middling 35c., firm. Sales for the week at
3400 bales. Receipts for the week, 1600 bales. a'
Exports forthe week 3888 bales. Stock in port, o
23,000 bales.
NEw YORK, Sept. 28-Evening.-Gold closed at it
1453. Coupons of '81, i1i4; do. of '64, 109; Caro- t
lina 6's 654. Cotton closed firm, with sales of
3000 bales, at 38e.d40c. Flour and wheat dull. t
Pork firmer at $33. Lard heavy. Sugar steady v
at [email protected] Coffee quiet and :firm. Naval stores a
quiet.
NEw YORK, September 28,1 p. M.-Flour and I1
wheat dull. Pork a shade better at $33. Lard quiet t
at [email protected]
CINCIN.ATI, Sept. 28.-Flour unchanged and t
firm; superfine $10 [email protected]; trade brands $11 503
$15. Wheat rather quiet at $2 [email protected] 80. .No. 1
red corn quiet at [email protected] No. 1 sats,drooping at
[email protected])45c. Rye scarce and firmer at $1 [email protected] 15.
Barley $1 [email protected] 05. Whisky $2 33. Provisions 2
are generally dull but not lower. Mess pork
$32 25. Bulk [email protected]®c. Bacon 16O ) 204c.
Lard lower at 17fc. Flaxseed declined to $2 80.
Cotton active and higher; middling advanced to
iec. Gold 1444.
ST. Louts, September 28.-Flour quiet and
steady. Wheat buoyant and active; the best
grades are higher; prime $2 [email protected]( 2 65. Corn
iirm and unchanged. Oats lower at [email protected]
Mesas Pork heavy at $33 50.. Bacon lower; clear
sides [email protected]; clear ribbed dides 19c. Lard
dull: choice Kentucky 20c.321jc. Whisky firm
and unchanged.
Va ossonus, Sept. 23.-Passed up, Julia at 9 last
0night and Southerner at 4 r. m.
Passed down, Mississ:ppi at 4 A. M., and Grey
r- Eagle at 6 P. M.
R. River rising.
Passengers per steamship Concordia, from
Boston:
r r Ed Cotwle and nwife, S mnel F Glenn, Roart Brown,
Miss A Brown, Mrs A4 BOmen -IjUs F frown, J suunlgano
F solssrs, G k i GlmsonsJ J ynJ Faxo.n RJY.l.
trey, 1 Mooney, a t iade la itanagan, F J tetson,
at J'sC Kln".
Team t Int getltfee. Si
A Houston contemporary says: Galveton was a
city with a future, when Houston wan a grass-.
patch. That must have been when Gnleston was
the stamping ground of Lattea and Irs pirates. e
When we frlst aw the plate there w*i not half
a dosen houses in it; the deer fed cpon what
are now popnlous portioneof that cityr and. the
island seemed almost as snlitry as Crus.e's, while Ti
Houston numberedher house by hundreds ad chol
her people by thoua.sd-"wo or tree at least1 cm
This city and the~disgust of odr Houston egh- aeg
bore forittook their rise about thesme time. a
i tfto. - pres
I•nhtlp.-The .Austin laefigse+ e eepsethat A
twnlarue parties of indlaqa are p .pa eiatiheg :in Was
Sea fiuba and adjoinitg eounties., ·ovleng -see
bemied Ileceiosore indrifogofrmoet of the horses, post
dhl7ý ttret a t cattle t iM i
to 0 h~0 gthealog o or-geAdromvs re a tw-pu Gi
tied"are id to number aboult aevea.l= fi U thin
ean. tre sireadsngerrar in every d ereett flo. hs
re uetonermeromu for the settlers to esht tnos
saceesefGll ea. A e aad oel'ni eteen I ih
rerieenreontlgy bg art a drwa* o o t eiko ear a
snt plase aErath county clle u ght
ehed._ fihieuwi one. Itidla wpsa . ae. t the
stock they were derlitg b W tne Meveed. foi
Tice Baat Antonio kd gcc e H4li- Ho-te
ln retn neiola ,pintr Hre Des it
asld eras abund~ H , dud o lt hos
madhe anatta tflpan his i tadb
hut aeonden'-eff, not- 1lg apeuýsn .
apt: Davis, ked by . t e..Wm t es
was found nearsi'e ee tthoe it teig 'flght tyf
mangled. There seemse 1€teftyi' otf e .sa.od
uptthe country still, but we'ets.llig of bfu6 j
Jackets."-i-[I". ,n
Scoespoudent of the Galove. ne. sa writes I
as follows, regarding the cotfn sblrp iet
The writer returned yesterday ftoos a visit to G
Fort Bend county, and was on r overltmp hntations.
The prospect is nbout as feollows, from actual o
servations and fron the most relinblte intormatioo
I could obtain: The best worked pýaintlons W#il
yield one bale of five hundred pot u tot four
acres, if the next forty days prove at all pro5
pitious. Plantations pIorly worked will not do Pt
better thana half Of this: The top crop and an
every green thing on the branch and stalks are pc
gone that the cotton cr6p yielded 0 little before Ti
the worm came andthe rain setin su heavily. The
remaining bolls that the worm could not afet Lc
rotted trom their nearness to the gound, leaving m,
only the advanted middle bols to realize what to
crop may be made. An average thrcugt the coun- tt
ties tributary to Houston and Galveston may be
put down at one bale to five or si nacres, which sa
I result is contingeatnpon average, food weather of
from now until the first of TNovesber. All the th
cotton will be open in ten or fifteen ,lays, and ho
picked out by the last of Outober., The estimate
of 70,000 bales to go forward from hore and Gal- tie
vesiton this season is a fair one; and, very favora- so.
tlle weather from now on for six weeks might ran di(
i. aPiLATiVe. enate Chaober,fept. I4, t866. l
Senate met pursuant to adjournmect, Prayer by re
the chaplain. Rollcalled--quorumjpresent. Jour- fir
s nal of yesterday read and adopted. r
The. following message was received from his
excellency the governor, and upon mnotiit of Sen- se
ator MIcDade, was taken up and fend: hit
STaTE or TExAS, Exenrtrj c llvPaTsYus-ta, 1
Austin, Sept. 3,18,66. i
G entlemen of t4e Senate:
I regret to inform you that on the night of, the Ct
'7th inst. the townof Brenham eins set on fire,
which resulted. in the destructipn of. a large
amount of property. Fropa 'infotsationreeeived a
through gentle hen of the highest respectability, t
based upon the sworn statehntens of citizens of C
unquestioned veracity, there tsns. doubt o the
fact that thefire wptae work 01 UnitedB States P
soldiers statisned fit t vicinity ol the- twn. As p
soon as; Ireuetved Ifitifirlcation 'Of tbsh lanng, A
knowi.gtmt O W tglit- had left aleeqston, I
toletegra pi'ed'to utj. Lathrop, stti Hueloen, that I
SWished.him to go a oe to Bheatnao and inveti
;s gato the whole eihir, and also equested him to.
communicate my disepatc.tto the nommandling offi
cer at Galveston. Iwans prompteyanswered by
of Maj. Lath.op add Lieunt. Qot..Msan Of' Galveston. A
SThe latter. was expected to go to Brenham on I
Monday's train, butt learn .tsrce was no eosnec
tion, and he failed do reachr there. I doubt not,
he owever, thathis athehe beforehe ti'e. .
e whonweretthe euf rer' bythe re. And-in re
spouse to their request I woa idrecommend-tht
your honorable body appoint a joint conamiltqt
td- whose duty it shall be to pyoeee4 at once toBren
of ham, with authorityto takete'imony as to thl
oft origin of the fire, the amounomtiof propertlyl de
stroyed and the value of the same,in order that
the whole subject maybe laid before the anthor
ties of the general government. As soonas I
was informed of the occurrenue, kno.iw 'the ep.
citenent likely to be aroused, and fearing imprt
lB. dente on the part of thounghtlesa persons. I' i.
rected that the sheriff should summons a sofficiet
number of discreet persons to aid the civil au
thoritiea in preserving order. t am much gratified
'w. that the citizens of Brenham haee acted with prn
dencetant propriety. Such a eourse of conduct
will insure a speedy investigateon and a redress,
as fr as it is possible, of wroags committed.
I have every cbnfidence that, the commanding
officers of this district and in this military depart
ment will see that jostice is dole onur people. and
that those under their command who violate the
ist laws shall not go unpunished.i I will requeattlhe
removal of this Companoy from Brenham, and ask
cat that such of the parties bchargd with the burning
as car be inentified, shall bib delivered to the
pa 'proper authorities for trial.
proper authorities for trial. er
J. W THROt5KXOOTON,
S overorr of Texu. Of
The following memorial is signed by abont forty wi
leading citizens, and is followed by a statement of thi
losses, which we give : mc
To his execllteny J. W. Thmestmtor5n. Governor of Tean :
The memorial of the untdesigned, citizens of r
the town of Brenham, in the gounty of Washing
ton, and State of Texas, respectfully shows:
That on the night of the 7th inst., a large
amount of property, situated In Brenham, owned Ohs
by them, the description and ralue of which will on
be found in the annexed stote;nent, was fired and no
utterly destroyed by a party of federal soldiers
stationed here.
Your memorialists show thii act of incendiarism
was done not by irresponsible privates alone, hut 4
with the full knowledge, acd vs your memorialists hs
believe, by the- express orders of the federal m
officer commanding the troop, and the post; and
that since its. ommisaio he has justified the act
in retaliation, as he alleges, or an assault upon at
some of his-men by other citizens of Brenha.m re
and your memorialists show that this officer has W
taken no steps for the arrest ar'punishment of the so
offenders, .
Yosr memoriallsts show that they are law abid- t
n citizena,deply interested in the stability of is
the government,candin the puace and quiet of the th
communty:in which they olive that they were in
nowise concbrned in the alleged assaultl upon
the federal soldiers, and than they had uttered no 1
word and done no art to pro-oke this vwanton de- di
struction of property. "
Wherefore, your memoriavlets request yEpr ex- f
cellency to lay the matter Ibefore thehonorable d
1 legislature now in session., With the view to ob- t
tltaing an investigation of the facts connected sW
with the destruction of thed property, that they
nmay be presented in the au1hetic and authorita- w
Live form to his excellency, the President of the'l
m United States, in order talin they may obtain re- it
dress for the destruction a1' their property, and f
the community for the outra!ge which it has sus
t tained, i
J. A. Rondle, Emil Nedmann, J. T. Norris, c
Norris & toNease, Compton Bros., J. B. Camp- h
bell. 1. Hellman, D. Gotllyb, J. P. Prossley, N. s
B. Rot; Morris Guns, Mima Crompler, Sumuel
Guns, Sam Levinson, J. L. Watkins & Co., Louis
i. IIellman, McGasry &: Rol, ]). IL. MlGary, Francis
o I). Allen, V. Little, of Southl Carolina, per C. R. js
Breodlove, agent; ;I. . .,.ins, Chas. Stevenson,
Henury Ludlow, John Stevenson, H. P. Allen, J.
SB. Wilhins, A. Boyle. -
It STATEMEVNT OF TUH OWNER!WlIP, CHARACTERaAND
a VALUE OIF PROIERTY DsrvcSROYED BY FIRE 1N
]IRENO.k.A ON TIE NIOGHT O SEITEMBER 7THi.
Comipston Brotlhers, gene-ul stock of merchan
Sdise, with a book of accounsts and 0otes, oestiuted
d at $25,000; H. IIellman, aeneral stock of mler
s chalidise, valued at$20,00t John B. Wilkins,stock
of general merchandise, v'lued at $9000; D. Got
lieb, stock oft general merchandise, valued at
at £2000 ; Louis Iteillan, ftsrulture and household
goods, valued at 0;00; lor-ris Guns, stock ofE
y clothing notes, etc., valued at $130- J. L. Wt- I
khins & Co., stock of drugsl accounts, books and
notes, valued at $15,000; Slaim Gans, stock of gen
eral merhanlisoe, valued at G00t; Franis D. Al. I
len, stock of books, stationery and aceunts,i
m vstlued $5000; Emile Nermann, stock of books
and stationery, valuted at 125t0; N. F. Campbell,
stock ofsaddiesandssddle Inaterial..valuedat 00; i
Pressley & tnRoff, building burred, bar furniture
i, sd fixtures. valued at fivw thoosand dollars; J.
B. Ceampbell, stock of li.'aors, bar furniture,
bmlding and 0t threse vulu, ' d daliars;
book accountd, Valte four 'th n
dllarn;: V. Little & Co., one b hild b ld,
awe hundred daia 't. c ale
olget tc te, v tal o e n donyhiilhars* ars
The Sn Antonio ok smoadl Ire port i
halerot ragiag in tosud soll an the Mn
trevsson, `trunis ck15 &sdfn andiei ua dt
so hndred dwilh Sith Ci
deaor is-se
value at
very dog is l * , , i,-+
t o eo iD r
I. Sdrin Anoion e pa 111iy seome
methMoanostreilh.1 h ua
hlaies ragenn istg .,.. tred a
puil f. It bas'eok.H so m ` tpeis rate
oeda.Thei iiit a uB ia'te'ape } dhbattssia
iberwalabsi Ajeh ,.s.. s
tantrder t haet tin Ieolt, is oe fa- n re
Godaenas Etn pailse andrdlalsuprpore.
thmse of oars leas to who lhw
L ati;au r as. for Mr..eu
mre sodas nde9r ha ar, a of nar -
eaulisc io sall Whoi ptraiLe the.~H hIa nag
oeft beht uenan ar. otsul is l toge--;ar
ther to bear tiseasrb asi p-te.eotpe by thore
hnou, enshiad eei pte1er of heng a gen
tiean op hmih rank commercially as well as
oiranlyd ca leuete y it i not haasidos opme
udiet fur them aaareer of sacels It wil he seen
the the ar of ~ Ljeni r i aundrD. Oliver, far
meriy ha? Caslrn rrl h rat beent adid to' the
fr1m. There amreO'w" more aaOrteae gentiemen
ir en ghieneds e a0 neas men. Whpe %n pebi r
service he wao tithI repect and ersteem fb all ge
tIIeand to of high rerankvdsl commeria as wiretll
his integrity ac feuetlfl disc ot haarg e o anted
thf he n fa s iarer ofl osish he has entered,
wet tre same tha ense qiniliers wit govern his
cond the osme a sdlias bf-poth.
a s~fiua ute ale chb. ore u.rtsay, hetween tile
housr eo l. .toniless ot, 'ep Murphy'ste on St.
hamser pahtrespec and e 0te} ofl allpo b
i tfalesr ;teli gner O mhl rmg oif lace. andvis
Pou ydsaasste -e itei , boan the surort- "
ppailthed, lsea tout atodl .ce .s Jnth berse,
Tahpe le housre aeahat th eb aesa loe ahbe m
mene t and , -d s b -ins." a, of ,ned
te l w ar;a andiludutdyr ;-r There gillbe
aTee samtio o Ilen iad w p today, bntit en toshe
ShArs of lik tLhenar *f*marept'hyll , on et.
Charles theinehis to n hsro l 4s lgenehlc ahnd
Poily odtisuer ras sha anot pe sbr
etpass for themetreeseteossr aI ie be
all twho namten Mest rt larndeO',D Oag ..ib,frt
tsle rte.this ay th e.,rha' do adnd dde.al the
wra Tpilye husm se am orea 4 eolra i.av Imen
o linn d.ruggis.W.. n ·
eethr ic e oit pfgere ope a g o o al e.M
eitnheritoy au taosaeatd r d eisc argeo ' duyad-oi
ate bwstli lithi eais niredh feeoe, a it~ tedae
ae sae tisth d aat thoe etqauiheas al l gsvter h
c onduc t the sameaes at yooorte.
led eaaiasgt, T'sa l
Sminte It.res e aropestr 'a;Tred are wll e.Eu
t setulon wh lvussc u in thp ptanr a elof thead'
theof let. 'ofie eena .Hwever, o -
Csh a ave Bti el mtieti Uteaid-ratltue and..toul
lt e baood ist ertlse 4Plobrso a. Ot't er tambls
pas ser ashdrider, anxri. tasteo il thrioe) beat.
t ethe mtorn ienestet .or oecrloat:iornsde lt
ri fAll to attend nor. t apanla d cepi tb o rtS-eatr
I- sale theisi day, a shat, feshay d sead tetio mese
m Etchanghet sheid. tast ita laepgt dita rhate
twill die found in onr eattin colplnaty sfahoia
class, eithernt a taloaerlie to pr t con ditio b etLo
d thes ae twill he s givenof theat heer pe tinhot t
s Dave Bidwell manrits the pubtit. Tl plae p
of nrexteaspre tobercae. . e Bemthing t
'- 'drink, something 16 est, and atlenty ohealthn
t ammement sasd ercise to assist the dig.stioun'
ed these are thgipptatiofe s that he *s aid odirg
taill louto his and the publios. = The h ltce
na nextstdoorato4the A acdemy.
next door to saecademy.
ReaODvn.-Tbhilt ,well known. w sCarkgiend
jeweler Mr. H. l.ams, who for.so.oain~y-s
has been one of otr landmartsE ,, aqd; .o~h e.
measaured the flighlof thjpe asannobn , pi*w
person as he his in bis ,qlooklsJd1t w bhr ;1
aboutnto show the changes tht,Tlse-'simes by
removing his store to No. ill, Oar.edealt street.
We take a pleasure inwrit}jo a,.prgraph about
so worthy a citizen, and whether as ajeweler or
reconstrnctioniat of .cloeolt, nA watchee, he
is worthy in every:repect of the conpdence of
the public.
Pnalsanv You TEmn-Dr,. F. H. Knspp, No.
179 Canal street, who Prek as a e atar beet.
dentists,.announees elsewher:tIhat hie 1attiltt be.
found at his office, in.tb.ppiatice of tlE varioea
deplartments of his prpfessi~n. Eveij style at,
teeth, from the vnlcauitbhaae, to thosawhich are
set in gold and platina, so rakets according to the
wishes of his patronsianilhe bestoirs tunieal at-.
tention upon the preserva~ion of then.atural teeth.
It is the surest way of preserving the'health and
faculties, to pay tinely 'attentinotu.lhese pearly
ornaments, andperhaps. no bettel: dentist.n the
city could be found, by those aho have need of
his skill and services. His ofice is at 179 Canal
Istreet.
A Southorn paper takens the New Orleans
journals to task for calling Butler. 'Ar thief,
coward, liar, and scouid'el," as a wholly unu
necessary waste of inr; and quietly adds :
S" Some things should be taken for gqlnted."
Fou NP : Yonx.-,The soltennlsh George
SCranmwell. Capt. V ih, sates at S o'clock this
tmotting with a full freight, S62,100 in specie
k and a number opassengets.
CIorros..CRoo Tht wo parsgcap..whch are
appepded are from the Baton Rouge Advocate of
t- lthe Sth :
'd 0ops in Eas a.d Bt'est Fliiana..--We ore
1- informed by reliable athofiity that there will not
1- be a half crop made in these two parlaisaes, That
i. is wbere planters ealchlated on one ltadred bales
they willhrd realize forty, n
II, otwithstanding the rainy, damp and in every
; respect unfavorable weather therapid opnin of
re the bolls caused by therav8gos5 of t0e wrm, nas
J. enabled planters to pick out a solnddible qaan~
e, tity of cotton.

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