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The Topeka state journal. (Topeka, Kan.) 1892-1980, June 16, 1894, NIGHT EDITION, Image 6

Image and text provided by Kansas State Historical Society; Topeka, KS

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STATE JOTJRX AI SATURDAY EVESTCtfG.. JUNE 16. 1894.
e
The Kind of
medicine
you need is the
old reliable tonic arid
blood-purifier,
ii liM
SARSAFARI LLA
it
can have
no substitute.
Cures others,
will cure you
fa
Everything
IX THE 1R1 ME
At
A.J. Arnold & Son
NORTH TOPEKA.
A fall lino of t
Homeopathic Medicines. ;
Ktabli-ahd 170.
tSEI3SS3331Z3
jU JF. LANNAlf !
KiNLEY & LAHNAH,
ICANTJFACTCBERS OT
Carriages, Phaetons,
Buggies,
Spring Wagons, Etc.
S273p90ial orders and repairing
promptly cttendad. to.
424 ASD 428 JACKSON ST.,
TOPEKA, KANSAS.
Deer Park Oakland
On the Crest of tlie Allegbanies.
LIVE Jl. Jt O. It. It.)
Season Opens June 23il, 1894.
Rates, $00, $75 and $90 a month, accord
ing to location. Address
GEORGE D. DeSIIIELDS, Manager,
Cumberland, 3Hd., up to June 10; after
that date either Deer Park or Oakland,
Garrett county, lid.
EflBOSBB T THK HlQHIST McDICJIL. AUTHORITIES.
' i'SffEhTHOLlNHMS
1 JVjf 'nf . iMHAtKa will cure you. A
J Stewoodeiiiil boon to sufferers
I "isrf f'l Tircm Cold, SoreTkroat,
I Jf - -, " ET lurnza. Broachltli,
S S7s or -. Y JPITVjEK. Afnrda
jgt' Sf Mimfriiate relief. A n efficient
rcme'lT. convenient to carry
In pocket, ready to ue on first indication of cold,
t'.atlanrd I, an XliTe-ftm Pernaaeat Cnre.
flatiaf action (ronranteed or money refunded. Price,
eta. Trial f roe at Druggist. Registered -mail,
60 cents. fi. 0. CtSIiAN, Mix., I tree &i ws, Mick., D. S. A.
fJSFHTUm Tn "ireat and safest remedy for
men I MUL all akin diaases. Ecteaia. ltch.Salt
Rhenra. old 8orea. Burna, 'ut. Woaderfal rem
4t for PICKS. Price. eta. rnic n a mm
flats or by miiii prepaid. AdrtrefsansbOTe. DHUm
St. Denis Hotel.
Ivuvavuai nil u uuuiuuu u xa)
(Opposite Grace Church.)
HEW YORK.
ROQHS $1.00 PE1 DAT AID UPWARD.
The most centrally located hotel tn the city,
conducted on the European plan, at moderate
iprices. Kecentiy enlarged ly a new and hand
some addition that doubles 1U former capacity.
The new f llnins Room is one of the finest
specimens of Coiooial Deooratioa in this couo-
WM. TAYLOR.
Ccisplsxiaa Present
1 DR. HEBRA'S
vim a mm
..w-.. V. ........ .V
Removes Freekl.t, Pimple. L.
t-jnbarn aud Tan, and rt .fir-"-
tores the skia to its origi- mgr'
nal frefcunesa, producing a " cV a X?
dear and Healthy coxn-
ile xion. Krroerior to all face
preparations and perfectly harmless. At all
oruesuts, or mailed for 50c ta. Send for Circular,
' VIOLA 8KIM SOAP i aiaa.lr lacoaaarabto a. a
akta portrrins unequale tor tb. toilet, ud without a
rival fat the aitfwj. Jkbwiut.iv.ar. tvxl q.in..ly Baa4a
" - At drnitatga. Prior 25 Cento.
G. C. PITTNER db CO.. Toledo. O.
Omaha, Neta May 5, 1891.
To "Whom it May Concern:
I have Buffered for years with neural
gic headache and Krause's Headache
Capslues is the only remedy that has
done me any good. Would recommend
them to all similarly affected.
Chas. Passot,
716 N. 16th street
Sold by all druggists.
For Hoarseness, Chronic Sore Throat,
Bronchitis and severe throat troubles,
Cubeb Cough Cure is always sure. The
active principle of Cubeb cannot be gain
eaid. All druggists and physicians will
testify to its healing properties and suc
cessful action on the mucous membrane.
Sold by Rowley Bros.
De Witt's Sarsaparilla is prepared for
cleansing the blood from impurities and
disease. It does this and more. It builds
Tip and strengthens constitutions lm pared
by disease. It recommends itself. J. K
iloneaa
WOMAN'S W0ELD.
MISS JAMES SMITH OF BARNARD AND
i OTHER COLLEGE PRESIDENTS.
The Revolt of the Iang; liters A Woman
Garlnfe Inspector Women In the Paris
Salon Women as Sugar Producers.
j jDeath of at Woman Veteran.
The appointment of MiSs James Smith
to tho position of president cf Barnard
calls attention to the fact that the day
is past When a college presidency was
as much a masculine prerogative as the
presidency of the United States. " Al
most all the women's colleges started
out with the inherited conviction that
a man must be at their head. Vassar
and Smith are the only ones which still
have a man "at the heafl. of the faculty.
Dr. James M. Taylor has been for many
years president of ' 'Vafcsar. Dr. Clark
Seelyo has tten president of Smith since
its foundation, but with these two ex
ceptions all the leading women's col
leges are governed by women.
At "Wellesley Miss Alice Freeman for
years showed tho world how admirably
a woman could be president of a col
lege. When she showed also that it was
possible for her to leave the dear de
lights of educational rulership and to
marry, Miss Helen Schafer took her
place. So far since the death of Miss
Schafer Wellesley has been president
less. Harvard annex, marked as has been
its dependence upon its masculine neigh
bor in some respects, has called a wom
an to its presidential elixir, Miss Agnes
Irwin of Philadelphia. Miss Irwin does
not even represent, as Miss Smith of
Barnard does, the most advanced and
radical views of the" day on woman's
education. She is not herself a college
bred woman, but a teacher of experience
and high reputation. She belongs dis
tinctively to tho school which believes
in combining scholarship with that
vague something known as "womanli
ness. " Miss Smith is, on the other hand,
a representative of the new school. She
is a fellow of Chicago university and
represents the strenuously scholastic
ideal.
Bryn Mawr, under the direction of
its dean, Miss Carey Thomas, has done
such excellent work as few institutions
in the country have . done. As a recog
nition of her services she has been call
ed to the presidency of the college. So
that, with the exception of Vassar and
Smith, all the leading colleges of the
east for tho .instruction of women not
only havo women as their presidents,
but are demonstrating that there are
few positions in the world that women
are more fitted to adorn than that of
president. New York World.
The Kevolt of the Ianglitera.
Why cannot mothers and daughters,
like any two other women, enjoy them
eelves alongside without driving each
other crazy? If people's brains are not
of a size, their tastes not of a kind,
they can live their separate lives with
out evil speaking, lying and slander
ing, can't they? No, history says, not
in one house. "Two in a house" must
entirely sympathize or one must rule.
And the head of the house cannot bo
the daughter. Funny enough, and most
inconclusive, are the explanations given
in the recent racy discussion a most
useful discussion, too, for if it has put
revolt into the heads of a few unrevok
ing daughters, who were still benight
edly honoring and obeying, it has been
a ray of comfort to many a puzzled par
ent and a glorious illumination to many
an innocent young eligible. Some peo
ple say the mothers are too strict, and
Barbara, with her latchkey and her
Zola, has their full sympathy. Others
say the mothers are too lax and try to
drive into hideous marriage the shy, re
fined Virginia, who only asks, as she as
a right to ask, whether the man she is
expected to love has "a past to bury. "
In my opinion, the mothers have very
little to do with the matter at alL
Many girls at a certain age seem to like
a grievance, and when they feel bored
at home hunt around for an excuse and
mistake it for a reason. They are sure
to find something that will serve and
most likely in the handiest target
mamma. She is usually most innocent.
But when this unfortunate parent real
ly does enter into the question of revolt
ing daughterhood, Mrs. Fitzroy Stew
art hit tho right nail on the head it
is the pretty parent. She actually is, in
a manner, in her daughter's way,
though not knowing it and not wishing
it. There is not the slightest doubt that
the daughter is oftener jealous of the
mother than the mother of the daugh
ter. . I know scores of cases. "Give us
back," cries one kind of jealous daugh
ter, "the portly, dowdy mother of old.
She was not very wide awake. She no
ticed nothing but the key basket, and
that is how it ought to be. She has had
her day." That is the note of jealousy,
the tocsin of war, "she has had her
day." Nineteenth Century.
A Woman Garbage Inspector.
An interesting development of wom
an's growth in affairs is exemplified by
the recent appointment of a woman for
garbage inspector in Chicago. She re
ceived this distinction through the so
licitation of the Municipal Order league,
and the ladies report the city officials as
being in perfect sympathy with the new
order of things. Women have certainly
become desperately in earnest in their
interest in public matters when they
can deliberately seek an employment
which must neessarily be so very repul
sive. The experiment bids fair to suc
ceed, however, as the woman who has
undertaken this new line of work is am
ply fitted for the place. She has perfect
health and a flow of spirits that can
overcome all the depressing effects of
her occupation. Her appearance is com
manding and her dress simple. She has
taken up the work seriously and allows
nothing to interfere with her business.
She is obliged to know how to detect
any flaw in the wagons which convey
the- garbago to the lake and see that
they meet the requirements of the law.
::-
mm
a"SSte-'
A;"" B-tVa V IB I -f Nil
) fli tm'JWiW
1 ft CIV ;.. HS.'.aV vrvftv '.-"".'.x - u x-v
CARRIACE AND HOME TOILET.
The drsea on the right is of Nile preen c re pon, plain on the skirt and with harness
trimmings of biscuit ribbon and metal buttons.- The figure on the left is a carriage
costume of ligfet barege in biscuit, with black waved lines. The corsage is trimmed
with Spanish lace and the wide bertha cape of green faille L covered with lace.
There is a pink parasol with laoe ruffla.
Und that they are loaded properly, as
Well as understanding the condition oi
the contents.
No means of conveyance has as yet
been provided for her, and she gets
about her work as best she can, diving
down into alleys to inspect suspicious
boxes of refuse and walking miles in
tho course of the day. She is required,
too, to inspect the dumping ground,
which is at the foot of Chicago avenue,
directly on the lake front. One of the
members of the league declares that the
ladies have no desire to interfere with
the men in their work, and that they
are willing that men should hold the
balance of power, but in beautifying
and cleansing the city there is plenty
for them to do.
In a matter of scientific cleanliness
women ought to succeed, and there is
hope for Chicago now that they have
taken an interest in its sanitary condi
tion. Chicago News.
Women In the I'aris Salon.
Over a hundred women have oil paint
ings hung on the walls of the salon of
the Champs Elysee in Paris this year,
and almost as many more show water
colors and pastels. Curiously enough,
the first four names in the catalogue are
feminine. Mile. Abbema heading the
list, as usual. This artist entitles her
picture "Place de la Concorde," but it
is something more than a view of this
fine esplanade, with its fountains in the
background against the brown of win
try trees and the Dorio mansions on the
right hand. In front is a young woman
in a plush cape, sable tie and brown
hat, carrying a bunch of southern wall
flowers and mimosa. Great prominence
is given to this figure, the surrounding
scene being rather the adjunct of a well
executed study of physiognomy and tex
tures. Miss Abbat's name stands next,
an American artist, and her small por
trait of a man with black hair and mus
tache is most clever. Mile. Abran ex
cels in the painting of wild beasts. Her
tigers are studied from nature in the
Jardin des Plantes, but she has sur
rounded them with the tanglod grass of
their native jungle. Mile. Achille Fould
is also an artist of distinction. She has
painted a very beautiful girl attired in
rich oriental garb a harmonious blend
ing of brilliant hues very agreeable to
look upon. Paris Journal.
Women as Sugfar Producers.
A surprisingly large number of wom
en are engaged in sugar production in
Louisiana. The senate executive docu
ment No. 61 gives a list of persons pro
ducing sugar and the amount of bounty
received thereon. No fewer than 100
.women appear on the list, either as in
dividual operators or as members of sug"
ar producing firms, and . their business
compares in magnitude very favorably
with that of the men. Mrs. Elizabeth
Harris received from the government in
the year 1891-2 a bounty of $39,684 on
the sugar she produced, and in the year
1892-3 it had increased to 50, 369. The
business women m the sugar industry
are not all married women and widows.
Miss Belle S. Brooks produced enough
Sugar to entitle her to a bounty of 15,
256 in the year 1891-2, and misses are
numerous among the partners in the
firms. Some partnerships are composed
entirely of women. The firm of Ware
& Baker, which collected $18, 118 toun
ty in one year, is composed of Mary E.
Ware and Elizabeth E. Baker. Some
times a woman is the senior partner.
The firm of Wheadon & Weems is com
posed of Mrs. Floretta Wheadon and
Mr. Ii. B. Weems, and that of Troxler
& Co., is composed of Mrs. A. Troxler
and Mr. S. Waguespack. Pittsburg
Chronicle-Telegraph.
Death of a Woman Veteran.
There died recently at Dunkirk, N.
Y. , a woman who was recognized as
one of the veterans of the civil war.
Mrs. Sarah Sinfield enlisted with her
husband in Company E of the Third
Excelsior regiment, afterward the Seventy-second
New York, in 1861 and
served through the war. Mrs. Sinfield
and her husband were allowed a tent
. on . iir
5 IfSS Hf
apart from the oiheis, and she did wash
ing and mending instead of carrying a
musket. When battles were raging, she
helped care for the wounded. She had
the respect of all the soldiers. When
her husband was wounded at Gettys
burg in 1863, she went to the hospital
with him and after that served as an
army nurse, for which she has drawn a
pension for some years. She lived to be
74 and was'a familiar figure marching
with her husband, William Sinfield,
and the old battleflag in the ranks of
the G. A. R. on Decoration day. The
Grand Army post attended her funeral,
and the tattered old battleflag of her
regiment, which she had seen borne into
many a desperate conflict, was" carried
in the. procession. Buffalo Letter.
She Had Pluck.
Mrs. J.Wilson of 3118 Dearborn street
made one of the neatest catches on rec
ord at an early hour the other morning.
Mrs. Wilson had just returned from a
party and was sitting in her room, with
the light turned down, when she heard
a noise close to her window. Slightly
tnrning her head, she Saw a pair cf
huge feet incased in tan shoes hanging
from the roof of the house. Without
saying a word Mrs. Wilson hid herself
behind the curtains and waited for the
owner of the feet to make his appear
ance. She had not long to wait, for sud
denly the window was opened, and a
black head was shoved in. This was
what Mrs. Wilson was waiting for.
Quickly seizing the sash, sho brought it
down on the intended burglar's head,
pinning him securely between the sash
and the sill. She then dispatched her
daughter for an officer, who placed the
fellow under arrest. Chicago Dispatch.
Why Woman Suffrage Makes Slow Progress.
But the failure of the attempts to ex
tend suffrage to women by constitution
al amendment shows that popular in
terest was not aroused sufficiently to
create a demand for the reform by the
voters at the polls. It is true that only
the men of the community were able to
tote upon the question, tat neverthe
less it seems to be true that when a ma
jority of the women of a community
desire and demand the ballot it will bo
given them by the votes of the men.
This was the case in Colorado, where,
at the general election of 1893, the male
electors of the state by a handsome ma
jority voted in favor of the law extend
ing full suffrage to women. The women
of Colorado, by their action at the
spring elections of 1894, have proved
that they intend to make full use of the
power extended to them. Mary A.
Greene in Forum.
No Compulsion.
There are some women in New York
city who are actively opposing woman
suffrage upon the singular ground that
they do not want it. That it is their
duty to aid in correct legislation for the
community seems never to have entered
their heads. They say they do not want
to vote. Nobody will compel them to,
even under woman suffrage. There is
no compulsion about it. We know of
men who- do not want to vote and do
not do it. Men who stay away from the
polls are not run after by the constable,
nor would the women be. But why
should women who do want to vote, and
who consider it their duty to use their
influence for the well regulation of so
ciety, be' forbidden the opportunity to
do bo? Salem (Mass. ) Observer.
Short Sighted.
Crimsonbeak Don't you see that very
red epot over there?
Bacon You evidently can't see any far
ther than your nose. Yonkers Statesman.
Aqaeous,
, "Them'si my sediments," said the hy
drant water as it went through the filter
and came out on the other side. "I hope I
make myself clear." Chicago Tribune.
. ;.."' A Long Search.
Tom The happiest marriages are said
to be those of opposite characteristics.
jerryTi,at's why I'm looking for a girl,
with money. Hallo.
,""""""J."""""""."....."ajaajiaaaa"j-"aaam-iiaiaai
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiniiiiiiiififrrii iirrim nirrrri
WESTERN
FOUNDRY AND
ESTABLISHED 187S.
rORMRRLT
Topefca Foundry 0 Machine Works,
ESTABLISHED 1868.
S, L. COFRATT, Proprietor.
1IANTJFACTURES OF STEAM ENGINES, MILL MACHINERY,
SHAFTING, PULLEYS, GEARINGS, FITTINGS, ETO.
Write for Prices. TOPEHLA, HAS.
fejigyiiyriiifiiiiiiiririif fisiiiiiiiiiiif iiiiiiiiifiiiiiiiiii'
E. E WOOLGER, Mgr. "
IAETOS arid ORCAGS
813 XXAETSA3 AVENTjE.
IT you wish to buy or rent a first class new or second-hand Piapto or Oboar.
upon the mobt favorable terms, call upon ua.
We have secured the services of a first class riAiro poljbhbr and kkpaixbb
and are prepared to repolish all kinds of musical instruments, furniture, etc
REPAIRING SGLI CITED.
All Bnslss Branrb.es.
ICO ADDITIONAL CHARGE FOB BOOKKEEPING AND PENMANSHIP IN
CONNECTION WITH SliOKlliANI) COUIIHK.
Special attention to Gr:tle S iiillea.
SO Writins Leuoaa $2.00.
XiiTioCTAX. Stasias.
ft V ..
JTlreit-ciaa Livery. Boarders a specialty.
Talaskana 46. J. C. GILCHRIST,
VOA Jaokaaa Street. Frav'n
ARTHUR. MASSE1T,
Practical Horss-Shoer
213 WEST FIFTH ST.,
TOPEKA, KANSAS.
Eerses with diseased feet skilfully treated,
Crack: and road shoeing; a specialty.
TOPEKA.
TRANSFER
iTTTiraiii ""'TTTY.
S09 JR.aa. Ave. Tele. S0-
P. P. BACON, Prop.
FP.EI.CH TISSUE PAPER!
XBE LARGEST UKI IX THE CITT.
AXX. CHINA AND ART MATERIAL.
COMPLETE HEWS DEPARTMENT.
S3 I&AMSAS -A.VJK.
CAPITAL
COAL YARD,
112 WEST FOURTH ST.
Osage Coal 3.4S per ton.
Cut prices on all Coal and Wood orders.
Grant's Jersey Bull is Ideated here.
Come in and see me if you waat cheap prices
on Coal or Wood.
I. W. B. GRANT.
WENT 1'OUBTH ST.
s.
sik?' y',::Z s.
.yV k f .
MACHINE WORKS
J
TOPEKA
STEf.1
LAUN
Largest and most complete
in tlie State.
SHIRT FACTOBY i?OJ?eere
we repair our customers sliirts
Phone 153.
625 Jackson St.
GQIIROM
Shorthand and Typewrltine-
L. H. STRICKLCR,
621 and S23 Julnojr at., Xvvaka, Kansas.
SOX.ID
THROUGH
TRAMS
most
Kansas City St Joseph
TO
ST. LOUIS, CHICAGO,
0MAH1, PEORIi,
ST. PAUL, EMHSAPOLIS
OKLT ONI CHIA'GB OW CAES TO Till
Atlantic Coast.
TEE BEST LIKE FOR
Hew "STorlc, Philadelphia.
Bonton, Washington.
AND AU. POIXIg
HOETH and EAST.
i D. O. IVES,
FaiMnfar Ajrent, Sc. Tisala
VI9&W003 ARD HIGHLAND PASZ
STT RAILWAY.
Trains will leave Monroe Street Station weelc
dava for Viiif wood as follows: 6:45,8:19, 11:51,
1:50, 3:07, 4:4. 5:41.
. Trains will leave Vinewood for Monroe street
at 7:5, 9:59, 1L':30. 2:30, 3:47, 5:04, 6:4.
8UNDAV 1BAIN.
Leave Monroe street 8:02, 9:19, 10:36, 11:51,
1:50. 8:07, 4:24, 5:41.
Leave Vinewood 8:42, 9:50, 11:16, 12:30, 2:30.
:47. 6:04. 6:34.
Extra Sunday trains will be run according to
company orders. Pocket edition time table wil .
be utaued in nous future.
Emm eoLs
FLORIST
ICornar EJmwood and Willow Avaaua
Potwia Place,
TOPEKA, KANSAS.
Grow and sells plants. Makes a ape.
ialtv of cut flowers. Does all kinds of
Aoral work ia a first-class manner.
For tlie X.adies.
Have yon handsome paper and envelopes for
correspondence? ld you ever try Hake's -put
Up in neat boxes White Kose, Chamois Siuu
and Velvet brands, ruled and unruled'
(--SFiBeautif ul French and Crepe Tissue, all
ijy colors, for shades, ornaments, etc.
JIT TflVIVC tTtg ami Stationery.
. H. d U2 JLSa 6crJ KAS. AVE.
Gsfarrli Pmifm
f Relieves Catarrh and Cold
7 m tne Head Inatttady by
one application.
Vuras Haaa woises mt
ncaEUFKS.
Can r .tit.
laott HanaM Ter.pl., Ckleair..
rial treatmentorsampie irrm
Bold dy arugeuu, two.
ARCHITECT.
JOSEPH MARSHALL,
Architect and Superintendent,
J004, KANSAS AVKNUE.
It cures blood and skin disorders. It
does thJs quickly and permanently. Is
there any good reason why you should
not use De Witt's Sarsaparilla? It reco
meuda itself. J. K. Jones.
BROS.
mm

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