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The Topeka state journal. [volume] (Topeka, Kansas) 1892-1980, June 08, 1900, LAST EDITION, Image 6

Image and text provided by Kansas State Historical Society; Topeka, KS

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TOPEKA STATE JOURNAL, FRIDAY EVENING, JUNE 8, 1900.
DOWN GOES RATE.
Kansas Counties Saving SlOO,
000 a Year in Interest.
Bonds Bearing a Low Rate Find
Keady Sale.
WHAT IS NOW OWNED.
Total Indebtedness of Counties
is $0,232,233.44.
Wyandotte Owes Nearly One
Sixth of Whole Amount.
By a refunding of outstanding bonds
each county in Kansas is now saving
about $1.0H0 per year in interest, a total
'lor the whole state of over $100,000 an
nually saved.
When it is considered that not quite
all of the counties have outstanding
bonds which have recently been re
funded this is regarded as a remark
able showing. Eighty-six of the coun
ties have refunded their bonds reducing
the rate of interest in some instances
from 7 and 8 per cent to 3Vi and 5 per
cent.
Last year the average rate of interest
pal l by counties having a bonded debt
was 6 per cent. The average rate of
interest now being paid since the re
funding action was taken is 4 per
cent.
The total bonded debt of Kansas
counties is $6,232.2:13.44.
Wyandotte countyheads the list with
nearly one-sixth of the whole amount,
J1.007.9S0.60. Lyon county is next with
$1"1..'00; Atchison follows with $426,500,
Shawnee being fourth with a total of
$:!2i).f)93. Cowley county is fifth with
J2SS.000.
The fact that Kansas securities are
valuable is demonstrated by the re
funding of bonds. Bonds that were
bearing 6 to 8 per cent interest found
a ready market at Zy2 to 4 per cent
interest.
The bonded indebtedness of the
state is recorded in the office of the
state auditor, George K. Colp. who has
prepared for the biennial report of the
department an official abstract, show
ing the bonded debt, by counties, to be
as follows:
Allen
Andt-rson
Atchison
lSarbi't-
Bancri
Ilrawil
Chase
'hautnurjua .
Cherokee
Chevenne
'l:'rk
Clay
fluid
Coffey
Comanche ....
Cow ley
Crawford
Iec:itur
I'ickiuson
rniiiphan
K.I wards
Klk
Kllis
Kl Is worth
Ford
Franklin
Geary
Graham
Cray
1 roeley
Cree.nwood ..
3i;imer
Harvey
3 1 1 Iceman
Jarksun ......
Jefferson
Jewell
Johnson
Kinsman
Labette
Lane
Leavenworth
Linculu
Linn
t 2"1.30'i
(;u.(M)
4'J'i.L'lU
ffi.HXI
2.951
70.150
50 )
57.550
2o,.;o
200
Cm)
47.0 0
23, 240
37,900
2 0
23S.I.1
47.
3S.2 M)
95.1"))
1,10
40
4. COO
7.; .)
75.:,i;i
14J.i-l0
2.300
35 OO0
l.MHl
2N.I 00
4O0
53. 7' '0
lO.o 0
, (W.OtiO
Mil)
?s :.;
75.500
fif.'-M)
, l"2.7'-0
' 72.3 mj
4.213
2.150
97 51(!
7U.Oi0
84.500
"11O
J. eua n
Lyon 451. 5m0
Jlarlnn
IV 200
Mci'hrson ...
Marshall
jV, eade.
Miami
Miti-hi-ll
M on : turnery ..
Morris
Nemaha
X ens ho
Ness
N.ircon
Osage
Ottawa
1'iuvnvp
Phillips
Pottawatomie
I'ratt
Rawlins
Keno
To-public
1
HiUy
liooks
Bosh
Russell
Fallow
Seduvt-Srk.
Si'Uurcl
Stiav.rncrt
Sheridan
Smith
Stafford
Honiaer
Thomas
Tr.'go
AVabai'.risee ...
Wnlla.;o
"Washington ..
"Wilson
"Woodson
Wyaodotte ....
. 145.4S5
50. 7o0
30)
33,4-0
475
. , 22.it-
9.71
57.2' -0
59.0 K)
.. l'9.5"0
ti'1.510
5. 3-0
.t 2.700
37 0'0
II3.S 2
74,300
22.0O0
1.1 00
.. 3 45.1 -50
9; 0 ' 0
55 (H0
1.000
43.C'0
45, 3" V)
3-1 (1 1.1
.. IM.I'O
79 1 HO
13. 550
.. 32".503
10,700
19.S'iO
17.500
.. '149.49
50.M0
700
.. 10-1.201
II.OOO
4.275
10.500
75.M10
.. i,oo;.o
Total $0,232,233
OVERHAUL PLUMBING.
State House Pipes "Will Be Given
Weeded Attention.
While the state house basement is
cool during the heated term and while
the electric fans are running in the
offices the plumbing will be overhauled
by the employes under the direction of
A. 11. Nooney. state house engineer.
Mr. Nooney has been authorized by
the executive council to buy the neces
sary tools, costing probably $100.
Work will begin as soon as the tools
are purchased.
Expenses of State Institutions.
The expenses at the various state in
stitutions during May were as fol
lows: Kansas City Blind institute.
Topcka Insane asylum
Win held Imbecile asyium....
Atchison Orphans' home
.J1.SS3.48
. 9,663.42
. 1,678.02
.. 2. 827.47
OlatheDeaf and Dumb institute, 3,712.67
Kc.'oit School for Girls 5.467.42
Osawatomie Insane asylum .... .11.623.42
Topeka Reform school 6,245.60
included in the Osawatomie asylum
expense is $2,600 on a new laundry; in
the Peloit school expense, $3,000 on a
ji-w cottage: in the Topeka school, $2,
fioo on a new industrial building.
DENVER, COLORADO SPRINGS.
PUEBLO AND RETURN, $24.
Via the Santa, Ee.
Tickets on sale June 1st; stopover al
lowed at Colorado common points.
PRESTIGE LOST.
Otis Says Aguinaldo No Longer
Has Confidence of His People.
Chicago, June 8. Major General E.
S?. Otis of the United States army ar
rived at 7:20 this morning from San
Francisco and Manila, and left at 10:30
for Washington. Mrs. Otis and daugh
ter arrived in Chicago last night from
New York and the general and his
wife an l daughter spent the hours be
tween trtiins together, the ending of
a separation of two years.
General Otis declined to enter" into a
detailed interview, saying it would not
be consistent with his position as an.
officer to enter into any extended dis
course regarding the situation in the
Philippines before reaching Washing
ton, lie said he was perfectly willing
to talk in a general way, however. The
general was apparently in the best of
health and confirmed his appearance
by raying he had not been ill a day
since he left for the Philippines and at
the piesen'. was enjoying the best of
health.
"I left the Philippine situation in the
best of hands," he said. "The officers
are all able men and well qualified to
cope with the different questions and
situations that may arise. The war is
over This guerilla warfare cannot last
long. To be sure we will have to re
press those people for a number of
years, but there is no organized force
of Filipinos. The depredations that
are now going on are conducted by
robbers and ladrones. The United
Slates troops are now engaged in de
fending the inhabitants of the Philip
pines against robbery and murder com
mitter by their own people. But the
conditions are generally improving, and
in some parts are better than they have
ever been.
"We have 55,000 effective troops under
arms in the Philippines; estimates re
garding the number of inhabitants in
the islands are all wild but the number
is considered to be between six and sev
en million. The great majority of the
people desire peace and wish to again
take up their business pursuits. Busi
ness in Manila has again resumed ac
tivity and the inhabitants are peaceful
ly pursuing their avocations.
"1 do not know where Aguinaldo is. I
never saw him personally. It is possi
ble but not probable that Aguinaldo is
in the Casayan sections of northern Lu
zon. It is a rough, mountainous country
and very sparsely settled. At first he
was regarded by his people as a leader
but of late he is losing prestige and is
not held in such high regard.
"Funston Is now in the Bulacan sec
tion. 1 will say I am not going into
any personalities whatever. The offi
cers in charge are all capable men.
"Stories have been circulated about
depredations -committed by men of our
army, but they have been false. Our
men have been held under close re
straint and have conducted themselves
like soldiers.
"I can't see that the administration
or our distinguished secretary of war
has made any mistakes in this cam
paign. We may have made mistakes
over there, but if so they have been the
result of human liability to comntit
error.
"Official reports of the warfare have
not been exaggerated especially of late.
I am not conversant with the newspaper
reports. Although I received American
newspapers, r had not the time to peruse
them. The censorship has not been rigid
and we assisted the newspaper correspon
dents all we could. Of course some sen
sational telegrams were sent, as it was
very difficult for newspaper men to se
cure correct versions regarding our oper
ations, as they were so extended, but we
helped them wherever we could.
"1 have no idea as to my course after
I reach Washington. I have received no
orders and I simply await the commands
of my superiors.
"My wife and daughter will not accom
pany me to Washington. They will re
turn to New York todav and I will ioin
them later. I was certainly overjoyed to
see them as this is the first time 1 have
aei-n them in two years."
Regarding the situation in China, Gen
eral Otis said:
"I know very little about the Chinese
question. I left Manila early in May be
fore the recent complications in that coun
try had reached the present critical state
ami 1 know very little about it. The sit
uation seems to be diyveloping very gen
erally and all European nations are in
terested in it."
IMPENDING PANIC.
Berlin Overtaken oy Serious
Financial Difficulties.
New York, June 8. The Herald dis
cussing the financial panic in Berlin,
says:
To the best informed men in local
financial circles it would not be sur
prising if any monetary difficulties
should arise in Kurope at the present
time that they should originate in the
German capital. For three years, or
ever since the passage of the Boerse
lavs seeking to regulate speculation
and prohibiting dealings in future, it
has been pointed out that unusual bur
dens had been thrown upon the German
banks, greatly straining their resources
and calling forth many notes of warn
ing, not only from foreign bankers but
also from the minister of finance. The
wave of industrial combination that
sprang up in Kngland and developed
so enormously here was communicated
to Berlin also, and amounted to a veri
table craze. Nearly everything avail
able in a commercial enterprise has
been combined or capitalized under the
leadership apparently of local securi
ties, such as gas, electric light, traction
and iron and steel properties. So great
were the demands made upon the finan
cial institutions that municipalities
have suffered from inability to float
loans at satisfactory figures.
LEEDY A LAWYER.
Ex-Governor Applies to Douglas
County Bar For Admission.
Ex-Governor John W. Leedy will
combine the practice of law with his
mining enterprises, having applied for
admission to the bar in the district
court of Douglas county.
The application was made yesterday
and will be acted upon at once by a
committee of lawyers named for that
purpose.
The governor has been reading law
at odd times for several years.
CHOATE'S HOUSE AFIRE.
Residence of Ambassador to England
Narrowly Escapes Destruction.
London, June 8. Fire was discovered
about midnight in the residence of
ITnited States Ambassador Choate, No.
1 Charlton House Terrace, S. W. The
Hames were confined to the roof and
were easily extinguished. There was
some excitement among the meinbers
of the ambassador's household, but the
firemen soon reassured the inmates.
The tire probably originated in an over
lie ited chimney. Mrs. Choate held a
large reception yesterday afternoon.
BROUGHT TO TER3LS.
State Contractor Scott Compelled to
Observe Eight-Hour Law.
The contractors who have charge of
the construction of the new cottage for
the imbecile asylum at Winfield have
been violating the eight-hour law. B.
P. Scott of the state labor bureau went
to Winfield to investigate the conditions
and found that men driving teams were
compelled to work 18 hours in order to
earn the current wages, $2.50 per day.
The contractors were also paying day
laborers but J1.25 when the ruling price
is $1.50.
The contractors demurred against
compliance with the eight-hour law in
all of its phases but the fear of prose
cution finally brought them to terms
and the law is now being complied
with.
D. Evans, against whom the proceed
ings were to have been brought, is a
sub-contractor on the work.
THE OTHER SIDE.
Democratic Summary of the Appro-
priation by Congress.
Washington, June 8. Representative
Livingstone (Ga.), the ranking minority
member of the house committee on ap
propriations, made the following state
ments as to appropriations from the
standpoint of the minority:
In submitting a statement of the ap
propriations made at this session of the
Fifty-sixth congress, I beg to call to
the attention, of the house and the
country the fact that notwithstanding
the enormous appropriations for 1900
on account of the Spanish-Cuban war,
the army and navy appropriations for
this session are $50,000,000 in excess of
tlfose for the last session. The state
ment I submit shows also that in every
department of the government begin
ning .with the agricultural and ending
with the permanent appropriations, we
have increased at ihis session the
amounts authorized at the last session,
and when to the aggregate we add the
amounts that should have been appro
priated at this session, but w hich have
been deferred for no good reason, or at
least for reasons that need legislation
on the part of those in control, amounts
which must be appropriated at the sec
ond session of this congress, such as
that necessary to complete the Nica
ragua canal (the bill having passed the
house), carrying authorization of an
expenditure of $141,000,000, and also that
usually appropriated for rivers and
harbors, $16,000,000; and for public
buildings and grounds, $3,000,000; for
outstanding claims, estimated at $10.
000,000 if, I say, we add $170,000,000. to
the sum stated in the table, $709,729,
476, we would have a grand total of
$IS79.29,476 for this session alone. And
thus the total shown in the exhibit is
rot quite complete or lair, considering
that such large amounts that must be
met are withheld for the next session.
I submit that, to be fair, we should let
each fiscal year take care of all neces
sary appropriations and not unload this
year on the fiscal year 1902 things that
should be provided for and included in
the fiscal year 1901.
"And I call attention also to the con
stant and gradual increase in the ap
propriations for pensions and likewise to
the legislative, executive and judicial
appropriations. These items could not
have been affected to any great extent
by the Spanish-Cuban war. It shows,
indeed, an increase, as before stated, all
along the line, despite the fact that the
committee on public buildings and
grounds have held back all matters be
fore them and the committee on rivers
and harbors all matter before them,
with two or three exceptions, and all ac
counts and claims have been practically
barred from consideration at this ses
sion." Mr. Livingston, then gives a large ta
ble showing the appropriations for the
years 1897 to 1901 inclusive and contin
ues: "I should be borne in mind that in the
case of the above noted appropriations
for the navy the authorization of the
eight new war ships (two battleships,
three armored cruisers and three pro
tected cruisers) involves an ultimate
expenditure for construction, armor and
armament, of something like $56.000,00o,
not one dollar of w hich is now appropri
ated and does not figure in the navy
item but must be met in future years.
Mhe dominant party attempted to
committ this congress at this session
and doubtless will renew their efforts at
tne coming session to commit the erov
eminent to what is known as the ship
subsidy scheme which involves the sum
01 izo,iiuo,uuo, to be expended through
out a term of years."
NO USE FOR UNIONS.
Radical Resolution Passed by Social
ist Labor Party.
New York, June 8. One of the most im
portant actions of the convention of the
Socialist Labor party was taken last
night when a resolution offered by Daniel
De Leon, editor of The People, the Social
ist Labor party organ, was adopted bv a
vote of 63 to 4. The resolution says that
every member of the Socialist partv. who
is an officer in a. pure and simple British
style union shall either resign his office
in the union, or be expelled from the So
cialist Lnbor party. This resolution was
in the form of an amendment to the ar
ticle in the newly adopted constitution re
lating to membership.
The "pure and simple" union was de
scribed as one in which no politics is al
lowed, and these, it was declared, are
dominated by the capitalistic class.
t
f . W.
It"
-v'
;
At last the naval authorities have purchased the Holland Torpedo Boat, the most successful submarine craft
ever launched. This picture of the formidable creation was taken at Peco.-.ic, Long Island, while the boat was being
overhauled previous to inspection by the Naval Board, It is the best photograph yet obtained o a type of boat
that ia destined to revolutionize naval warfare.
25 WARDSHIPS.
Are Assembled in the Harbor of
Taku.
Americans Land and Re-enforcements
Are Demanded.
Washington, June 8. The following
cablegram was received at the navy
department this afternoon:
"Tong Tu, June 8. June 3rd landed
forces to protect American interests
with consent of China; fifty-six Pekin,
rest Tien Tsin. Nations sent force both
cities. No injury so far. British, Rus
sian", Chinese admirals and twenty war
ships here. Crops likely to fail causing
probably more trouble in the near fu
ture. Our landing force under McCalla
June 5; situation most critical. Russian
force began fighting. I landed 50 more
men; have requested Helena be sent
immediately to protect interests, or ves
sel like her. Consider battalion marines
necessary. Gunboat as base inside. June
6, Tien Tsin Pekin railway cut. Will
act concert naval forces; other
powers protect interests if necessary.
Meeting foreign senior naval officers to
day. Present English, French, German,
Austrian, Italian, Japanese and Ameri
can; arrage for combined action to pro
tect life and property if required. Nine
hundred, men ashore, 2a warships nere.
"KEiiprF.
It is understood that telegraph com
munication is interrupted between Pe
kin and Taku. a fact which will prove
embarrassing to Minister Conger, should
he find it necessary to call upon Ad
miral Kampff for reinforcements.
BRIEF TELEGRAMS.
Paris, June 8. -In consequence of the
disgraceful scenes at the recent bull
fight at Dueil and of the protests of
the public the prefect of the department
of Seine Etoise has decided to issue a
decree prohibiting any fights whatso
ever in that department.
Yokohama, June S. The Korean gov
ernment is making additional arrests
of political suspects and is trying to
get hold of refugees in Japan. It is be
lieved here that torture and execution
await them. The" Japanese cabinet
deadlock is deplored in view of the criti
cal situation in China.
Rome, June S. The Pope has post
poned until Saturday the reception
fixed for today at St. Peter's. His phy
sician, Dr. Lapponi, says the Pope is
not indisposed, but only a little fa
tigued, owing to the reception oil Span
ish pilgrims.
Calcutta, June S. The rate of dis
count of the Bank of Bengal was today
reduced from 5 to 4 per cent.
London, June 8. The statement of
the board of trade for the month of
May shows increases of 2,999,600 pounds
in imports and 1,685,700 pounds in im
ports. Santiago de Cuba, June 8. Colonel
Samuel M. Whiteside, of the Tenth
cavalry, commanding the department
of Santiago and Puerto Principe, has
been recommended by Governor Gen
eral Wood for promotion to the rank
of brigadier general in recognition of
his admirable conduct of the affairs
of this turbulent district and in recog
nition of the importance of the post.
Washington, June 8. The last act of
Secretary Long before departing for
Annapolis last evening was to sign an
order terminating the former order of
suspension in the case of Commander
Todd, chief of the naval hydrographic
office. The officer was relieved from
duty because he had addressed letters
to nersons not in the naval service,
seeking their aid in the struggle they
hydrographic ffice was making to con
trol tne surveys as against the coast
survey.
Baltimore, June 8. "Sport," the ele
phant belonging to Bostwick's menagrie
of wild animals, which was exhibiting
here, was killed last night by hanging.
"Sport" was injured in a railwTay acci
dent several weeks ago and to end his
misery it was deemed best to kill him.
A rope attached to a derrick was made
fast about the neck of the two ton
beast and he was strangled six minutes
after his body left the car in which he
had been nursed since an accident to
his spine occurred several weeks ago.
TODAY'S MARKET REPORT-
Chicago, June 8. WHEAT The excite
ment of yesterday was renewed in the
wheat pit today, the market early ad
vancing within a shade of two cents. The
pit w,os again full to overflowing, many
speculators from other points joining the
regulars in the center of the local com
mercial stage. The all important factor
was the fact that the Northwest was still
without rain. The strength of cables ad
ded to the bullish news column and North
Dakota said wind and sand storms had
done damage in that stato. July opened
with a . fiat advance of lVsc to 114c
TKE HOLLAND TORPEDO BOAT.
."it
' : t-s 1 1 11 's rz !
over yesterdav's close at 71c to
71c. I touched 70&4cc and then
soared to 71c. At this point the
weather bureau prediction of showers and
thunder storms in the northwest combine?!
with profit-taking caused a reaction
which carried July back to 71c. At the
decline the trade was noticeably lighter,
but the market "steadied at that figure
and rallied to 71c. Local receipts wSre
72 cars, two of contract grade. Minneap
olis and Duluth reported 450 cars against
714 last week and 550 a year ago. Argen
tine shipments were moderate, 1,224,000
bushels.
Later July eased to 70c, but the dip
was followed by greater activity and ex
citement than before. The pit was a mass
of struggling, howling men. all wanting
to buy. By leaps and bounds, absorbing
realizing sales without1 a break, the mar
ket advanced. Near the end of the ses
sion the most sensational since the Letter
deal July touched 72e, and closed buoy
ant -2c over yesterday and 4c higher
than Wednesday at 72'(Z34c.
CORN The corn market was quiet, suf
fering early by the great attraction which
its usual standbys had. for the excitement
in wheat. July opened" a shade higher at
BS'ri'jse, toucnen visc and reacted, to
38c Local receipts were 4S4 cars.
Corn, shortly after noon the heaviness
in corn gave away to the influence in
wheat and in an active spurt advanced
without a break, July to 40c. The close
was strong. July lc higher at 40fic.
OATS Oats like com were steadied by
wheat, but trade was rather dull early.
July opened a shade up at 21'Uc arid
sold to 217-81220. Receipts here were 2S5
cars.
PROVISIONS The provisions market
was steadied, helped by wheat and a
steady market at the yards. The demand
was good, but offerings were also fairly
liberal, a combination which resulted in
no material change in prices following the
opening. July pork opened 10c higher at
$11.90, touched $11.77 and then reacted to
$11.85; July lard began the session 5c im
proved at $6.97 and July ribs 2ti5c bet
ter at $6.87.
FLAX Cash: N. W., $1.80: S. W., $1.80;
September. $1.85: October, $1.30.
RYE July, 5514c.
BARLEY 371 42c.
TIMOTHY $2.50.
.... Chicaero Livestock Market.
Chicago, June 8. CATTLE Receipts, 1,
500, including 400. Texans generally steady.
Good to prime steers, $5.10945.75: poor to
medium, $4.505.00: stockers and feeders,
$3.755.00; cows, $3.004.50; heifers, $3.2cV5T
4.80; canners, $2.30$ 3.00; bulls. $3.00i4.3O;
calves, $5.006.75; Texas fed steers, $4.50
5.25; Texas grass steers, $3.754.40; Texas
bulls, $3.203.70.
HOGS Receipts today, 25,000; tomorrow,
20,000; left over, 2.995 ; 5 to 10c higher, clos
ing weak; top $5.25. Mixed and butchers',
$5.O0Ji5.25: good to choice heavy. $5.1.Vfi5.25;
rough heavy, $5.00ti'5.10: light, $5.00rr5.22Ij.;
bulk of sales. S3.15'a5.224.
SHEEP Receipts. 4.000; slow. Good to
choice wethers, Sl.gS'aa.SS: fair to choice
mixed, $4.1055.00; western sheep, $4 G0U
5.25; - yearlings, $5.5iVi5.S5; native lambs.
shorn, $5.006.65; western lambs, shorn.
fb.oimt.iu; spring lamns, i.oo.
Official for yesterday:
RECEIPTS Cattle, 7,841; hogs, 27,4fiS;
sneep, iu.o,y.
SHIPMENTS Cattle, 3,676; hogs, 4,149
sheep, 467.
. Kansas City LivestockMarkefc.
Kansas City. June 8. CATTLE Re
ceipts, 2.500. Market stronger. Native
steers, $3.75u5.3o: Texas steers. $4.05'fi4.s5:
Texas cows. $3. 0014. 00; native cows and
heifers, $2.255j4.80; stockers and feeders
$3.75-55.00: bulls. $2.70fi4.50.
HOGS Receipts, 17.0K). Market strong
to 5 cents higher. Bulk or sales. Jl.tMKao.lKi;
heavv, $4.!i2Mi-5.05; packers. S4..S7V.S5.00;
mixed. $4.SM4.97'4; light. $t.65ft5.00; york
ers. $4. 95 fi 5.00: pigs. $4.G.Vl4.H5.
SHEEP Receipts, 3. WW. Market strong.
Lambs, $4. 25yi.4; muttons, j.oo'at.oo.
Kansas City Produce Market.
Kansas City, Mo., June 8. WHEAT-
July, 6itic: September. 66c. Cash: No.
2 hard, fWi'i.e; No. 3, 60Vt63c; No. 2 red,
67Sc: No. 3. 631 66c.
CORN July, 37I,4c; September, 37t2C
Cash: No. 2 mixed. 3. lc&JV.&c; .No.
white. 3&VtHc; No. 3. 3bc.
OATS No. 2 white, 25c.
RVE No. 2. 52c.
HAY Choice timothy $10.0010.50; choice
prairie. 7.00(iTi.2d.
BUTTER Creamery, 15gl7c; dairy,
fancy, 14c.
fcc.p F"resh. SUe.
Galveston, Texas, June 8. COTTON
unchanged.
Topeka Markets Today.
Topeka, June 8.
CATTLE.
COWS S2.50-G3.75.
DRY LOT STEERS $4.004.5O.
DRY LOT HEIFERS-$4.G0sS4.50.
HOGS.
LIGHT $4.49f?4.60.
MEDIUM AND HEAVY $4.504. 70.
GRAIN.
NO. 2 WHEAT 0S1&5914C.
NO. 2 CORN 33c.
NO. 2 OATS 22V4S23C
HAY $5.00.
, PRODUCE.
EGGS 10 cents.
CHICKENS 6i4 cent.
BUTTER 17c.
Topeka Hide Market
Topeka, June 8.
Based on Chicago and Boston quota
tions. The following are net prices paid
In Topeka this week:
GREEN SALT CURED 74c.
NO. 1 TALLOW 3 1iii.c.
GREEN SALT HALF CURED 654c.
Hew York XJp-Town Gossip.
Furnished by J. C. Goings. Commission
Merchant, 112 East Fifth street, Topeka,
Kan., receiver and shipper of grain.
New York. June 8. The stock market
yesterday was too narrow and dull to pos
sess any significance. It did suggest in
its movements a cessation of liquidation,
although there was no evidence of any
shrinkage of its bearish disposition. The
traders who bought stocks ten days ago
probably sold them at the height of last
week's boom. They now may be willing
and able to cover any short contracts
t i V " j.
' "'-CI
A
which they may have put out or to make
purchasesfor another turn on the bull side
of the market. It is now perfectly .clear
that the political situation in the United
States is a matter of serious consideration
at times, among European financial cir
cles and an hour should certainly strike
for Americans to realize that their inter
ests are associated in the long run with
the factors which make for. disturbance
or. tranquility among European moneyed
men, and old world diplomats. Oneof the
most encouraging phases of "the present
situation is the thorough abandonment by
men interested in the iron and stee! in
dustries of the idea that they can -force
water up hill. It is now admitted that
the Iron markets must go much lower
than the present level of prices.
Market Gossip.
Furnished by J. C. Goings, Commission
Merchant, 112 East Fifth street, Topeka,
Kan.,- receiver and shipper of grain.
Argentine -shipments: ' Wheat. 1,392,000
bushels. -
Chicago receipts: Wheat. 72 cars, graded
2; corn, 4S4 cars, graded 222; oats, -257 care.
graaea jv. ,
umcago: Hogs, 25,000; cattle, l.smu. .
Hogs 5c higher.
No rain in the northwest. -
Light frost at Fergus Falls,- Minnesota.
Kansas Citv receiDts: Wheat. 84 cats.
last year S2; corn, 14 cars, last year 6;
oats. 7 cars, last year 4.
Liverpool: Wheat, id higher; corn, d
lower.
London: Wheat, d higher.
Kansas City: Hogs. 18,000: cattle. 2,900.
Omaha: Hogs. 10.500: cattle, 2.000.
Northwest receints wheat last vear: Du
luth, 200 cars: Minneapolis, 344 cars.
iso ram reportea in tne nortnwest. xne
wheat market will boil today. The bull
fever is on and prices will go much
higher.
Northwest receipts today; wneat.
cars; Minneapolis. 312 cars.
cmcago: intimated nogs lor (jnicagro
tomorrow, 19,000 head.
Buying orders from the northwest are
quite numerous today. This wheat will
sell higher.
The continued absence or rain in tne
northwest is very discouraging news for
the sellers of wheat at these prices.
Total clearances: Wheat ana nour,
000: corn, 3t'4.000.
Closing Eiveroool cables: v neat, o
higher; corn, d lower than yesterday.
Primary receipts: Wheat. 661,000, last
year TSii.000; corn, 506.000, last year, 795.000.
Privileges goon tomorrow: ruts, juiy
wheat. 70rAc: calls, 74c; puts, July corn,
3Sc; calls, 41c.
New York Money Market.
New York, June 8. MONEY Money on
call nominal at li per cent. Prime mer
r!ntiip rvr .ii-?t4 ner cent. Sterling: ex
change strong with actual business in
bankers' bills at Sl.STVi'n'i for demand and
at $4.S5!-'.ftS4 for sixty days: posted rates,
$4.5-5 and $1.8S. Commercial bills, $4.S3?i
(&4.S5.
slLVKK silver cerxmcaies. cwon;, ui
silver. 60c; Mexican dollars, 4iViC
BONDS Government steaay; reiuno
ing 2s. when issued, registered, 103H: cou
pon, 10334; 2s, registered.100: 3s, registered,
100: coupon. 109: new 4s. registered. 1341!:
coupon, 134V4: old 4s, registered, 114V4: cou
pon, 115',4; 5s, registered, 113:4; coupon,
113'.4.
Cotton Market.
New York, June 8. COTTON Spot cot
ton closed ouiet. 11-lCc lower: middling
uplands. 8 13-16c; middling gulf, 9 l-16c.
Sales none.
Butter Market
New York, June 8. BUTTER Unset
tled : creamery, extras, - 16il9c; factory,
14&16C
Sugar Market
New
York. June 8. SUGAR Raw,
steadv strong: refined firm,
COFFEE Steady.
Grain Lettei.
WHEAT Liverpool cables were one-half
pennv higher at the start tms morning
and closed at an advance of over half a
penny for the day, snowing plainly that
their markets are following ours. The
main bull feature was continued cry
weather in the northwest. Every hour
of drouth up there is telling and great
... 1, nlraav lll!tpd from the
drouth, something that has never before 1
nappenea in me sinum
before. This is a severe blow, as the
norhwest could always be counted on to
furnish all the wheat the other countries
were short of. Shipments were liberal,
but the market was so strong and ner
vous that exporters made no new accept
ances. As stated in our letter of yester
day, the bull fever is just coming on and
will have to run its course. "N C w ould
not be at all surprised to see dollar
wheat in the not far distant future and
believe purchases on quick breaks will re
turn enormous profits.
CORN The big-'bull pools have picked
up all the Julv corn they can and the
market is now headed for new territory.
Cash markets are improved and there is
an excellent demand from all points of
the compass, which never lets up for an
instant. v,ii.-
OATS Oats are strong and higher.
There has been good investment buying
aain today. .
PROVISIONS Provisions were stronger
and hisrher. July pork is very near the
J12.M mark and looks like the advance
would steadily continue, in sympathy with
wheat and corn.
This advance in grain is making plenty
of monev for -Bully Old Kansas" and we
are naturally feeling good Jer g
Range ot Prices.
Furnished by J. C. Goings. Commission
Merchant. 112 East Fifth street. Topeka,
Kan., receiver and shipper of grain.
Ohieae-o. June S.
Article.
Open High Low Close Yes.
WHEAT
June ..
July ..
Aug. ..
Cl 1 K N
June ..
July ..
OATS
June ..
July ..
FORK
Ju'e ..
Julv ..
Sept ..
LAUD
June ..
July ..
70?-4 714
70i
71
3v'4
35
7K ra
72- --70
'.3- 7'Hi
71-71'',. 72
71-
S8
40
40
J-
3SU.
3SV2
22
22U- 21- Ts 22fa
11 87
2174
21
11 80
11 J-0
11 S5
f, 92
1 2
6 93
.11 9i)
11 90
11 M
11 90
11 75
11 S2
11 S7
11 90
6 P7
6 17
7 00
6 !i5
6 97
7 00
7 00
6 !i2-0;
6 'Jo
RlliS
June ...
. Julv ...
Sept ...
WHRAT-
.Tlllv . . .
Sept ...
COKN
Julv ...
Sept ...
6 TO
6 5 6 :-o
6 S3
fi S2-S5
6 b2-Sa
6 7
6 S7
6 00
c yo
f, S'.'-'-o 6 SO
KANSAS CITY;.
C3
64
33-4
3li2
G4"i
6ii
37
37-a
3
62' i
Cli
2" '
35-a
Ranges of Prices on Stocks.
Furnshed by J. C. Goings, Commission
Merchant. 112 East Fifth street. Topeka
Kan., receiver and shipper of grain.
New York. June 8.
T 1 '
Op'njKighlLow iCl-se Yes
Stocks
I 1 '
1
114 '115
9i I'O1
91 V 91
34! 31'-.
6i P9
3., 33
127 '12
10fi P'rt
115i:!i
25 1 2.W
71' 72
89'; !"-'-SO
793-4
B3'i! 51
73; 7314
534m 54
84".: 84
129U.1. !"
33; 34
5 "! 5-
2:; 2-
5S I 57
77!-.....
69 I 72
74'fc! 74
57: 59'-.,
7S 78-
12 12
Sugar
People's Gas ..
Am. Tobiocj .
A. S. & W
P. R. T ,
Federal Steel .
C. B. & Q. ...
C, R. I. P
C, M. & St. P..
115'- 11 3 I
19-V
91--I
34V,! 34;
V2V-! 127 I
1 tllsi l'i I
lis 1 115;
254! 25 ,
72i 71
So! 89
i I SO I
5-l 53!
73 1 7'! I
64- 53'-1
K4i M
ISO's! 129'.
31 ! 33.
59 5Ki'-.j
27: 27
5! 5
79! 77
70 I 69
75 i 74
59! 57';
79 I 78
12 I 12
34 v-l
fS I
12-.4
1'tiVl
11SI
72i4l
gSi-i
80 I
73 V.
54i
lij
r.i
Atchison com..
Atchison ptd ..
Manhattan
Western Union
Mo. Pacific
U. Pac. pfd ..
1". Pac. com ..
Atchison adj ..
N. Y. Central..
S. Pac. piu
C. C. C
I f9
c. & o
Reading pfd ..
R. & O
T. C. & I
N. Pac. pfd ..
N. Pac. coin ..
I,. & N
C. & G. W
27;
SWA
7ft4
70
74
79
12
Ex-dividend 1 per cent.
A o
Small ffi I
Sol i
7! '
M$ s
In
- I O
O J
To QefBtfor
TFk People in the
MosrDirecr
Watf Use the
Columns of the
S Journal.
O
o
O
o
o
o
t
IF
o You have JLOst or Found any
o thing make it known through
2, The Stats Journal.
a
II""
s it- s
3
Ton Want to Buy or Sell any.
o
o thing, Rent a Room or Take
Boarders, try a Small Adver-
tisement in The State Journal, o
O
IF
You Want a Situation and Need
o
o Assistance, a Small Advertise-
o
tnent will be Inserted for three
days Without Charge, o
o
o
o
IF
o You Want to Hire a Man, a
o
o Boy or a Woman, an Advertise- j
tnent in This Paper will bring
o
you so many applications that o
you can have your pick qf the
o best.
o
! F i
II o
6
a
For Sale, the easiest, simplest
and cheapest way to bring it
O
before the public is to put a o
little Advertisement
in The
State Journal.
It will be read
o
s
o everywhere in the State of
o
Kansas.
o
o
o
o
O
t
IF
You have anything to Trade,
o
t
whether it is a Bicvcle. a Stove
o
9 or a Piano, tell the people about
it in This Paper, and you will
o
get a Customer.
o
o
IF
O
o
O Vttt fimrj0 m Stork of Goads ia
o
. sell, a little 25-cent Advertise- $
tnent may bring you trade worth o
O
o
o
o
o
o
o
O
O
o
IF
o
You have Removed Your Place
of Business, if you have new
foods or have made any change o
in your business, tell it. Tell it
at the rate of so cents per week
if you don't want to invest
0
o
o
o
o
o
o
s
o
o
o
o
o
t
t
IF
o
o
Money be carefully invested in
Advertising it will pay big re
a
n
turns. A
Small Advertise-
o
in The State Journal
tnent
costs 5 cents line a day.

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