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The Topeka state journal. [volume] (Topeka, Kan.) 1892-1980, June 22, 1900, LAST EDITION, Image 5

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TOPEKA STATE JOURNAIi. FRIDAY EVENING, JUNE 22, 19001
Hen's Trousers
This Sale Means
Eve ry Advantage to
Our Customers!
As Soon as the Merits
of this sale have become fully adver
tised it will surpass any sale held in
recent years See for yourself
At Quick Clearance Prices, j
Serge and Fancy Worsteds and Cheviots
$3.50 to $5 values Sate Price
709 Kana Ave. Antrtaoli St GaetteL
02.95
Tomorrow, Saturday, June 23rd,
we Inaugurate a
99
I!
! 1
IV
iHw clothing Mi
THE OBJECT OF THIS SALE IS to sell out all Seasonable Goods in their season instead of waiting
until July or August and take chances of carrying goods over which is against our rule.
THE PRICES ARE REDUCED SO CHEAP that it's the golden opportunity of the year to buy meri
torious merchandise at ridiculously low prices which are in many instances so cheap that we hesitate to mention for
fear of its seeming exaggerated even if you don't want to buy investigate these extraordinary offers
This Store Can Well Afford to Sell You SI Worth for 50c and 75c
And will do so every time it can it's got the stock to do it with it's got the people's confidence- No hand to mouth
buying and selling at monstrous profits Big buying means minimum prices hence .we do the business.
This Sale is One of Extraordinary Moment to Clothing Buyers TomorrovvComeSee
SUMMER
CLOTHING
included in
This Sale.
lUICK
mm
10 N
CLEARANCE SALE OF BOYS' CLOTHING.
en's Fine Suits
Were $10, $12.50, $14, $15.
Such makes as H. S. & M., or
Hart, Schaffner & Marx, Chi
cago, Schloss Bros. & Co. Bal
timore, etc. such fabrics as
Fine Blue Serges, Fine Pure
Worsteds, Fine Cassimeres
and Cheviots all sizes to fit
all men in This Sale Tomorrow at
(Q)
KNEE PANT SUITS all styles.
$3.50 Boys Suits sals price SI. 65
$3.00 Boys' Suits sale price SI. 95
$.3.50 Boys' Suits sale price, $2.45
$4.00 Boys' Suits sale price S2.95
$5. 6, $7.50 Boys' Suits, sale price$395
Boys' Knee Pants corduroy, double-seat
and knees, worth 75e, tomorrow 39c
LONG PANT SUITS 12 to 19 yrs.
$5. $6.45 Boys' Suits sale price.. $3,95
$7.50 Long Pant Suits sale price.. $4.95
$8.50 Long Pant Suifei sale price.. $6.45
io Long Pant Suits sale price $7.95
Jia Long Pant Suits sale price S8.85
J Off on all Boys' Waists during sale."
QUICK CLEARANCE SALE OF HATS
$3, $3.50 Fine Stiff Hats, all colors, this
season's blocks, sale price $2.25
Palace $2.50 fiats, sale price S1.50
Special $1.90 Stiff and Soft fiats, sale price .$1.25
All $1.50 StiS and Soft fiats, sale price 95c
Men's 50c, 75e Crash Hats, all shapes, tomorrow 19c
MEN'S SUITS-
Were $7.50, $8.75, $9.50.
The best of workmanship and
materials in Fine Serges
Worsteds Cassimeres cut
in latest fashions most won
derful values at this very in
significant price These go in
this sale Tomorrow at
UICK CLEARANCE SALE OF FURNISHING GOODS.
SHIRTS.
MEN'S 50c SOFT NEGLIGEE SHIRTS.
IT.
Q'
sale price
MEN'S 50c UN LAC ND EKED WHITE
SHIKTS, sale price
MEN'S 50c. 75c, NEGLIGEE SHIRTS, de
tached cuffs or collars aud cuffs, sale yr...
MEN'S rUFP BOSOM SHIRTS. In silk or
Madras, fine quality, $1 value, sale pr.....
BOYS' NEGLIGEE SHIRTS, collars and
cufla on. were 50e. sale price
MEN'S FINE NIGHT SHIRTS of N. Y.
mills muslin, with collar or without,
sale price
35c
35c
39c
69c
35c
50c
UNDERWEAR.
MEN'S SUMMER 85e BALBRIGGAN - r
UNDERWEAR at XUC
MEN'S 50c BALBUIGGAN U.iDEli- rj jr
WEAR, sale price QOC
MEN'S Tic BON" BON BALBiilGGAN EL g
UNDERWEAR at OUC
MEN'S $1 FINK BAI.BKIGGAN and Mer- C
" cerizcd Silk Underwear sale price t OC
EN'Ss-L'. ALL SILK UNDERWEAR, OO
HOSE. NECKWEAR.
15c MEN'S HuMr.. now.lOo 25e Nl civu Eau, uow.. i5o
25c M KN'S HOSE, now ISo s' NECKWEAR, uow 35n
60c MEN'S HOSE, now 350 I.D-U of other bargains.
SNAP SHOTS AT HOME NEWS
Julif J. 3. West spent yesterday in
leaven worth.
Kiwht new members have been admitted
to the Y. M. C. A.
Mr. Ford Hovey. of Horton is spending
a ii'W days in Topeka.
Governor Stanley is making speeches in
the short grass country.
Tom McNeal will make a political
speech in Abilene tonight.
President George W. Herrick, of Wash
burn college, is in Chicago.
Congressman Curtis expected to reach
Topeka next Monday afternoon.
It cost live people $1 each to ride heir
bicycles on the MiiewaJks .Friday.
The street force In leveling some of the
uti paved streets with the city grader.
Five blocks of brick sidewalk have been
laid In Martin and Dennis' addition.
Assistant United States Attornev Harry
Bone has returned from Excelsior Springs,
Mo.
The golf links are being mowed and put
in good condition for Saturday's tourna
ment. The Kansas delegation to the national
convention calls on President McKinley
today.
The delegates to- the Epworth league
convention visited the state house in large
number.
Professor F. W. Kills, of Washburn col
lege, and Richard Kbee, are in Buffalo,
New York.
S. J. Hear has returned from Cleveland,
where he attended the national convention
of telephone men.
K05- Hlchey of the state treasurer's of
fice has returned from a visit with his
lather in New Mexico.
Thomas E. Prout, seeretarv of the Y.
M. V. A. in Argentine, spent "Thursday in
Topeka. visiting John Colawell.
The Welsh Choral society will meet for
rehearsal at I. O. U. F. hall, 117 West
txth avenue on Monday evening.
The first flag raised in the city after the
announcement of ITesldont McKinley's
nomination, was at the court house.
R. S. Johnson has returned from a busi
ness trip to Kansas City and St. Joe in
the Interests of the New York Mercantile
company.
Tho Young People's Good Citizenship
Federation wiii hold a public mass meet
ing in the North Topeka Christian church
this evening.
After visiting McKinley the Kansas
delegates to tfie national convention will
Fcatter through the east for visits at their
former homes.
Marshall's band will have the regular
Fourth of July celebration at Garfield
park this year. A balloon ascension will
be of Hie features.
Topeka attorneys are in Emporia taking
depositions in the suit between the Topeka
Milling Co. and Ralston Health Yeast Co.
for infringement of trademark.
Black & Laird, who are building the
auditorium and city building, have se
cured a $75,000 sewer contract in Omaha-
Marshall's band will rive a concert to
night. E. B. Guild has furnished a piano for
the Girls' Industrial school. The school
is now looking for old unused singing
books. Mrs. C K. Holliday has given $1
to the school.
Sheriff Guthrie, of Marshall county, ar
rived Friday and took Murphv, Estelle's
partner, back to Marysvllle. The sheriff
said that Murphy would get the full ex
tent of the law.
There were one or two tin soldiers tear
ing around the state house yesterday.
These tin heroes are the kind that run to
gold lace in time of peace and to the
woods in time of war.
The Kansas Silver Republican conven
tion July 2, in Topeka, will adjourn after
transacting their business here and go
in a body to the national conention of
the party in Kansas City.
A. K. Rodgers and a Topeka newspaper
man made a bet yesterday. Mr. Rodgers
claims that Roosevelt will be nominated
next time for president. The newspaper
man says no. A silk hat is the wager.
One or two clerks in the state house
were violently opposed to the nomination
of Roosevelt for vice president. The na
tional convention probably did not learn
of this in time or a change of program
might have been effected.
Bouquet from Atchison Globe for To
peka: "Every Kansan will rejoice in the
fact that Topeka is getting two rattling
good newspapers: heretofore there has
been too much running to Missouri for
newspapers. The Journal and Capital,
evening and morning, are probably the
best papers in the United States, printed
in a town the size of Topeka."
The Topeka Golf club will hold another
handicap tournament on Saturday after
noon at 4 o'clock. A large entry list is
promised. The tournament is open to all
members. The handicapper will be very
liberal with those who have played but
little. Visitors are welcome. The tour
nament committee is A. F. Sherman. W.
11. Ruff and Hale Hamilton. The prize is
a Harry Vardon driver, given by the Kel
lam Book & Stationery Co.; second prize,
a pair of Musselburg balls.
Special Train for Michigan Democrats
Detroit, Mich., June 22. Chairman
Daniel J. Campau. of the Democratic
state central committee, announces
that the Michigan delegates and alter
nates and their friends will meet in
Chicago and go from there to Kansas
City in a special train over the Chi
casro & Alton. The special will leave
Chicago at 10 p. m., Monday, July 2.
Jolliers Resume Work.
Akron, O., June 22. The jolliers em
ldoyed in the local stoneware plants re
sumed work today after a strike of
five weeks. All the local plants were
closed down during the strike, several
hundred men being out of employment.
A settlement of the difficulties was
reached with the manufacturers 3'es-terday.
HAWAII DELEGATES.
Visiting Republicans to Remain in
United States Until Aug. 1.
Philadelphia, June 22. The Hawaiian
delegation to the Republican national
convention will leave this city today for
New York. The Hawaiians were among
the most popular delegates at the con
vention. Their headquarters were al
ways full of visitors and every time Ha
waii's name was called In the conven
tion there would come forth from the
delegates of the states and territories a.
burst of applause. It was the intention
of Samuel Parker, the chairman of the
delegation, to make a speech seconding
the nomination of Governor RooseVelt
for the vice presidential nomination, but
finding the disposition on the part of the
delegates to be against speech making
he thought it best not to ask for the
floor.
The delegation will remain in New
York for a few days and then will go
to the Maine state convention, having
been invited to attend and hear Senator
Frye make an address. While in Maine
the delegates will spend a few days a1,
the former home, in Bath, of Harold
M. Sewall, who was elected national
committeeman from Hawaii last Tues
day. From New Kngland the delegates
will go to Washington for the purpose
of calling on President McKinley and
on July 21 most of the members will sail
from San Francisco on the steamer Rio
Janeiro for Honolulu.
CHINA MUST PAY.
Relief For Destitute Indians.
I.os Angeles, Cal., June 22. Both the
Santa Fe and Southern Pacific officials
are conferring with Thomas E. Hughes,
a large vineyardist of Fresno, in re
gard to a plan to relieve the destitute
Pimya and Pagos Indians on the Gila
reservation in Arizona. Labor for the
vineyards is difficult to obtain and
Hughes promises to transport the In
dians from Phoenix to Freno at his own
expense.
Delegates For Kansas City.
Tolendo, O.. June 22. The Democratic
congressional convention of the Ninth
district here today selected Negley D.
Cochran and Levi Woister delegates
and M. T. Palmer and E. A. Powers
alternates to the national convention.
Hull Renominated.
Des Moines, la., June 22. Congfess
rnan J. A. T. Hull was renominated to
day by the Republicans of the Seventh
dis'rtct.
Beautiful Straw Hats,
CHOICER STYLES THAN SHOWN ANYWHERE ELSE,
S1.09, $1.59, $2.00, $2.50, to $5.00.
Handsomest Patterns of Manhattan Shirts,
Shown exclusively by us $1.50 and $2.00
Cool Underwear for Hot Weather.
CREPE-DE-SANTE shown exclusively by us.
602
KANSAS AVENUE.
BURG
ZEIS,
A Russian View on the Outcome of
the Trouble.
New York, June 22. H. Rothstein, the
Russian financier, who is said to be
the chief adviser of the Russian finance
minister and who has been in this city
for some days past consulting with
local men of finance about a proposed
Russian loan, will sail for home to
morrow. Mr. Rothstein was asked last
night for an opinion of the probable
outcome of the present troubled con
dition of Chinese affairs.
"To read your papers." he said, "one
miarht thing all China aflame; that the
foreign ambassadors and missionaries
bave been killed and that there is
great trouble.
"As one who knows something of
China, I do not think this is true. I
am convinced that communication w,ill
Be restored In a day or" two and that all
our people will be found unharmed.
The nowers are co-operating as one na
tion and they will qickly restore order.
Of that I have no doubt."
"Will China retain her nationality?"
was asked.
"Why not?" replied Mr.-Rothstein.
"Surely the powers will not want her"
territory. For Russia I can say that
we don't want one foot of Chinese soil.
Why should we want it? Have we not
Siberia? There we have a vast country
rich in mines and with millions of acres
of grain lands. With oui great Sibe
rian railroad we will develop this mag
nificent country. But it will take 100
years. In that time even it can hardly
be scratched.
"I confess there is a great question to
settle. The Chinese are a hard people
to understand. They are intensely
proud. They believe their country is
the greatest in the world. That mis
sionaries should go there and tear down
their ideals and idols and try to set up
what to them are barbarous practices
has aroused them. Some of our mis
sionaries, I am afraid, use small tact.
"China has a vast population. She
now has 450,000,000 people and they in
crease like rats. How can one expect
a strong central government for so
many when there are 150 or more dia
lects spoken.
"I am sure now that the powers re
gret not having taken Russia's advice
of a fortnight since. We said send 10,
000 men with guns. The powers pro
crastinated. The present riots are the
result."
"Will the present Chinese dynasty
survive the present trouble?"
"The empress dowager is a very clev
er little woman. I think she will put
down further insurrection. The emperor
is a fool. The empress alone rules. She
will surely stop any further outbreaks."
"But the Chinese forts fired on the al
lied fleet. Men from Russia and other
countries have been killed in the fight
with the Taku forts. What will Russia
do?"
N "China must pay. If the reports are at
all true China must learn that such
work is wrong. Yes, China must pay.
The indemnity will be very large."
"Will the powers claim money or ter
ritory?" "They will Insist on gold Indemnities.
China will pay in gold."
HANNA'S MOVEMENTS.
Will Spend Summer on the Hudson
Going to Chicago Sept 1.
New York, June 22. A special to the
World from Philadelphia says: Sen
ator Hanna will take a home In the
vicinity of New York for the summer,
probably somewhere on the Hudson
river, or on the Sound. He will stay
there until September 1. coming to the
New York headquarters only two or
three hours a day. Meanwhile Vice
Chairman Payne will get things in
running shape at Chicago for the last
two strenuous months of the cam
paign. Senator Hanna will go out to
Chicago on September 1.
IT SUITS WHITE.
Ambassador to Berlin Comments on
Work of the Convention.
Berlin, June 22. Andrew D. White,
the United States ambassador here, said
to the correspondent of the Associated
Press today, referring to the Philadel
phia convention:
"The renomination of President Mc
Kinley was expected by every thinking
man abroad and at home. It was a due
reward for most eminent services dur
ing one of the most difficult periods in
our history. Of course, like every other
president and especially like Washing
ton, Lincoln, Grant and Cleveland, he
has been bitterly attacked for every
thing he has done, but future historians
will undoubtedly rank him among the
best presidents.
"The nomination of Governor Roose
velt was clearly In obedience to a de
mand by the entire party and highly
as he is prized as governor he is sure
to render service both during the elec
tion and as vice president. While hold
ing that office, he can continue to exer
cise the most happy influence upon Am
erican politics. He certainly ought to
accept the nomination.
"The platform is what was expected
and allowing for some minor differences
of opinion, as there always are regard
ing party platforms, it will aid in the
certain triumph of the Republican
party."
$24,000 A YEAR.
Salaries of Teachers in Havana Are
High.
Havana, June 22. The postal frauds
have rather swamped the scandal ex
isting in the university, which has been
the milking ground for some of the
best known men in Cuba, who as un
der professors received $24,000 a year
each. There were 72 of these profes
sors and 24 assistants, some of them
having no classes at all and others
only one or two students. Many of the
professors drew government salaries.
When this was called to General
Wood's attention he immediately in
augurated reforms, which resulted in
cutting down the list to 46, including
assistants, which is enough, consider
ing that there are only 450 students.
For instance, instruction In Greek was
divided into three parts, history, gram
mar and literature; it is now combined
under one professor of Greek.
Expelled From Transvaal.
Amsterdam, June 22. The Nether
lands Railway company of South Africa
has received official notification of the
expulsion from the Transvaal of 1.400
of its employes with their families The
Dutch consul at Lorenzo Marques tele
graphs that a proclamation has been is sued
to the effect that the company's
officials, who refuse to do British mili
tary transport work will be sent to Eur
ope via East London, Cape Colony.
Meeting of the Commercial Club.
An ad.lourned meetins of the Com
mercial club will be held on Monday
evening. June 25, at 8 o'clock', to con
sider the waterworks iuestion. The
mayor, city council and city attorney
have been invited to be present. Every
member of the club who can do so is
urged to attend. M. C. HOLMAN,
President.
Bean the The Kind Yon Hava Always Boagfa
CA.S?OnXA.
Bean tfeo 7 11:8 Kini YDuHaw!ways Bong
S'gnatore
Eeara the
The Kind You Have Always Bongli
D. B. HILL LEADS.
With Hearst a Close Second in Favor
For Bryan's Running Mate..
Philadelphia, June 22. The North
American publishes the result of a can
vass of the editors of prominent news
papers throughout the United States as
to the probable running mate of Bryan
in view of the selection of Theodore
Roosevelt by the Republicans as the
vice presidential candidate. The tabu
lated vote shows a decided preference
for David B. Hill, but no man has a
clear majority.
Another favorite is William R.Hearst,
editor of the New York Journal and Ad
vertiser. He is almost as strong as Hill.
Admiral Dewey finds little favor.
After the Alpha.
Washington, June 22. Assistant Sec
retary Spalding in speaking today of the
report that the British steamer Alpha
had landed freight and passengers at
Cape Nome on May 25, in violation of
law and had since escaped capture by
the United States steamer Albatross,
said that he had telegraphed for a re
port on the doings of the Alpha, and if
it developed that she had landed a car
go and passengers at Nome as reported,
she would be seized at once on her re
appearance in American waters.
Discharged For Lack of Evidence.
Denver, June 22. Mr. and Mrs. D. A.
Lewis and Mr. and Mrs. Harry Rock
well, formerly of Hot Springs, Ark., who
were arrested in this city on the charge
of using the mails to defraud were dis
charged by United States Commissioner
Hinsdale, no evidence being offered to
prove the charges.
Remember the Concert To-Night
At Garfield Park by Marshall's band, 3
o'clock.
Get Your
Shoes
Tomorrow
at the
"Quick" Clear
ance Sals
which begins at the
PALACE
Clothing Co.
All $3.50 Tan Shoes
$2.90
Oxfords excepted
during this sale
at
$5 Tan Shoes in Russia
Calf and Vici Kid T (f
Clapp's finest shoes jSj If
during this sale at '
$3 Tan and Black Shoes
All leathers nobby
toes during this
sale.
$1.95
PRICES REDUCED ON
ALL BOYS' SHOES.
THE STAR GROCERY.
E. MONTGOMERY, Prop..
(Successor to J. S. Sproat.)
Telephone 35 a. 11a East Sixth Street.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
Mail Orders Shippjd Promptly.
Summer Drinks
.15
.20
.25
bottle Hires' Root Beer . .
I bottle Juniper Ade
I bottle Thompson's Cherry
Phosphate
I pkg. Shredded Biscuit 10
I pkg.Granola 10
1 pkg. Grape-Nut .11
7 cans Eagle Milk $1.00
2 cans St. Charles' Cream. . . .25
2 lbs. Ginger Snaps .15
9 bars Silk Soap 25
7 bars Jaxson Soap .... .25
12 bars Rex Soap .25
1 doz. Mason Quart Jars 55
2 doz. Eggs. 15
Wolffs Capital Hams II
California Hams .03
Honey Cured Bacon 10
White Lard, per lb 03 h
3 lb. pail C. C. Lard 28
5 lb. pail C. C. Lard.. 45
IOIb.pailCC.Lard 85
2 gal. Cider Vinegar 25
I lb. Price's Baking Powder.. .33
I lb. Jack Frost Baking Powder .15
I pail White Fish 45
14 lbs. Bulk Oats .25
20 lbs Sal Soda 25
FLOUR Is on the advance now is
the time to lay in a supply before it
goes still higher. We are in a posi
tion to save you money. Get our
prices before buying.
EVERYBODY READS THE STATE JOURNAL.

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