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The Topeka state journal. [volume] (Topeka, Kansas) 1892-1980, June 22, 1900, LAST EDITION, Image 6

Image and text provided by Kansas State Historical Society; Topeka, KS

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016014/1900-06-22/ed-1/seq-6/

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TOPEKA STATE JOURNAL, FRIDAY EVENING, JUNE 22, 1900.
S!5,000 Mor
:
We must sell it get rid of this surplus if prices
them Come see for yourself some of the big bargains
order to get them out of our store.
Tomorrow--
20 Per Cent. Discount
ON ALL
BOYS' and (1IIIME.VS CLOTHIAG
(EXCEPT WASH CLOTHING.)
Boys' Summer Coat QRC
and Vest fcivl
SOTS' -WASH STTXTS-
100 Suits OQC
Ages 3 to 10 &
White, Striped and Fancy RiflC
Wash Suits JU
53 STYLES -WASH SUITS
to select from, in Pique, Duck, Stripes,
Fran?y.r...60c -52.50
EOTS' "WASH rAiTTS
15o 20o 25c and 50s
0
4
0
Boys'
Shirt and
Blouse
Waists,
25
Boys'
Fast Color
Black
Hose,
9o
Boys'
Collars,
all
kinds,
lQo
BERGEN CASE ARGUED.
Judge West Presents the Case
to Judge Hook.
The people of Kansas are deeply inter
ested in the motion made by Judge J. S.
West, assistant attorney general, to
have the federal court set aside the or
der declaring a part of the Kansas pro
hibitory law invalid.
This motion which is the first step in
the appeal to be taken to the United
States supreme court by the attorney
general was argued in Leavenworth
yesterday.
The decision in which Judge Hook de
clared a part of the prohibitory law un
constitutional was rendered in the case
iC William Bergen, the solicitor for the
Kansas City liquor house who while
taking orders for private delivery was
arrested and convicted of violating the
law by a justice of the peace.
The prisoner who had been sentenced
o jii ' "- " :- it i .,1,11 -, ,m r
J to jail sousht relief in a habeas corpus
j.niceeding in the federal court. He was
discharged and that portion of the pro
hibit.. ry law under which he was con-
vleted held unconstitutional by Judge
i Hook upon the ground that it interfered
I with interstate commerce.
i Judge West on the part of the state
claims:
j First That Bergen should have ap-
pealcl to the district court of Franklin
! county.
I Second That the case was one which
: ehould have been heard upon its merits
: in the state courts:
Thid That it was not within the
! Jurisdiction of the federal court,
j Fourth That while the federal court
j Iliad jurisdiction to examine into the
; cause of Hergen's restraint the rule re-
cently laid down by the United States
j supreme court is that he should not
i have been discharged but should have
j been relegated to the state court,
j Fifth That the case should have gone
! to the United States supreme court up-
on a writ of error and not by the short
! process of habeas corpus.
VANDERBILT CO JIES HOME.
Brings Col. and Mrs. John Jacob Astor
i With Him on the Valiant
New Tork, June 22. W. K. Vander
b'.lt's steam yacht Valiant arrived at
quarantine at 9 o'clock last night from
jiuwe. r-Mie saiieu irom that port on
I June 11. This is a very creditable trip,
1 the yacht having made an average
3 speed of 14.21 knots.
j n board the Valiant are W. K. Van-
! (lerbtlt. Colonel and Mrs. John Jacob
Astor and W. S. Hoyt. The voiase
j Mus a very pleasant one and all are
1 reported well. The Valiant was met at
quarantine by the New York Central
i railroad tug Chauncey M. Depew, hav
ing on board Mr. Pollock of the marine
department of the railroad. Although
! t'ie health officer passed the Valiant
i the yacht remained at anchor during
! the night and will come up to the city
this morning, when Mr. Vanderbilt
and his guests will come ashore. The
; Valiant sailed from this port on Janu-
! ni-y X, with Mr. Vanderbilt and W. S.
Hoyt on board, bound for the Mediter
; ran can. She made a fairly good run
across the Atlantic and touched first
j ft Gibraltar. Since then the yacht has
1 vK-ited Monte Carlo. Nice, Cannes, Mar
seilles and other ports and in the spring
; went to Southampton. Mr. Vander
bilt spent a short time in Kngland and
; France and then crossed for home on
; the yacht.
LOCAL MENTION.
: J. F. Hull, proprietor of the Hull
Flove company, is seriously sick with
congestion of the brain at Christ hos
pital. Frank Jennings, E. P. Hutchings
; nl H. D. Barrett each paid a dollar
j today for riding on the sidewalks. Vio-
j laters of the bicycle ordinance take as
s much apace on the police register as do
i plain drunks.
H. O. Bising. special agent, returned
i this morning from Kudora where he
stablished a free rural delivery route
twenty-five miles in length. The route
j will supply 1.200 people.
Cupi.l overworked himself Wednesday
and as a. result no marriage licenses
were issued Thursday or today.
A meeting will be held at room 6,
! Office block, on Tuesday evening to or
ganize a Republican club for the First
precinct of the Fifth ward and elect
delegates to the Republican state
league.
It will require a month to get through
with all the court cases in the district
court after the jury cases have been
i heard.
1 The last meeting of the current term
will be held by Topeka Post No. 71 Sat-
mday night, at which time the by-laws
will be finally revised.
Cures croup, sore throat, pulmonary
troubles Monarch over pain of every
BOIL Dr. Thomas' Eclectric Oil.
n
r
.Black or Hiue this in
cludes all Fancy Wor
sted Suits of our finest
and best makes
For the day only. ...
Boys'
Striped
Jersey
Sweaters,
45o
Boys'
Fine
Blouse
Waists,
50o
Men's
Bleached
Drill
Drawers,
25
Tomorrow
Men's Blue
Serge Coats
and Vests. .
THE HANCOCK SAILS.
Left Manila on the 19th For San
Francisco.
Washington, June 22. Quartermaster
General Ludington has received a cable
message from Colonel Miller, quarter
master at Manila, saying that the
transport Hancock, which, had been un
avoidably detained by continuance of
storm, had sailed on the 19th inst., for
San Francisco, and that the transport
Warren w hich had been ordered south
by the major general commanding
would sail from Manila for San Fran
cisco on the 1st.
It is understood here that the move
ment of the regiment to Manila from
Tarlae, Conception and other stations
on the Manila and Dagupan railway,
has been delayed by the prevalence of
severe storms in the interior.
ATTEMPT TO ItOJB A BANK.
Three Men Work Inside, While Three
Others Keep Watch.
Ashtabula, Ohio, June 22. Six men
attempted to rob the First National
bank of Conneautville, Pa., late last
night. Three went into the bank and
three remained outside on guard. The
outer door of the vault was blown open
and the combination knob of the inner
door broken off. The robbers worked
there until 3 o'clock this morning, when
they became alarmed and left.
Dr. A. L. Dennis passed the bank
while the robbers were at work. The
three on the outside knocked him down,
and tied him and at the point of a re
volver made nun Keep quiet. Alter
the robbers fled he gave the alarni.
The thieves stole two norses and two
buggies in which to escape. They were
tracked to Ashtabula county, but have
not yet been caught. Had they suc
ceeded in opening the safe door they
would have secured $30,000.
TOOK ALL BUT SHOES.
Tramp Takes Clothing From Boy,Who
Wanders Naked in the Woods.
St. Louis, Mo., June 22. James Fin
ing, 19 years old, living at 2S10 Gamble
street, was found wandering about at
tired only in a pair of shoes on the
Laughlin farm in the country this
morning. He said he had started to
walk from his home to Kansas City
and that he had fallen in with a tramp,
who first beat him with a club and then
robbed him of every stitch of clothing
he had on, leaving him only his shoes.
Fining is the son of Peter t . h ming,
janitor of the Missouri Medical colllege.
Fining hid in the woods, hoping yet
fearing to meet some person. Clarence
Campbell, foreman of the Laughlin
farm, found Fining and furnished him
with an old coat and a pair of trousers
and took him to Clayton. Peter Fining,
the father, was notified and he went
to Clayton and took his son home.
LSE HOES FOR WEAPONS.
Battle Between Four Ohio Farmers,
All Over a Dog.
Pomeroy, Ohio, June 22. Curt and
Frank Davis and Ross and Lang Holli
day, all residing at Dexter, this county,
fought a terrific battle late last evening
with hoes. Two of the participants in
the battle received wounds which, the
physicians say, will result fatally.
A dog belonging to Davis was the
cause of all the trouble. Some time ago
one of the Hollidays killed the dog,
claiming that it had killed a lot of sheep
belonging to him. There was no trouble,
however. until yesterday afternoon. when
the four men met in the road. Each had
a hoe. One of the party made some re
mark as they met and in a short time
all four were quarreling. Then one of
the party used his hoe and all four
started to hammer away at one another.
The result was that all were badly in
jured and physicians who were called
say that the Davis boys cannot survive.
Preacher May Die.
Hopkinsville, Ky., June 22. Owing to
the physical condition of Rev.Dr. W. K.
Piner, the examining trial of James
Dudley Ware, charged with shooting
the minister w ith intent to kill was con
tinued until July 5.
No Races at Pearia.
Peoria, III., June 22. The national cir
cuit horse races to have been held in
this city, commencing the 10th of July,
have, been declared off on account of
lack of entries. Entries closed last
week, but it was believed then that
there were enough applications en route
to justify an attempt to hold the meet.
Pressmen Adjourn.
Milwaukee, Wis., June 22. The Inter
national Printing Pressmen and Assist
ants union adjourned sine die today.
ROCK ISLAND ROUTE.
Special Excursion.
To Colorado and utan. June 21st; one
fare plus $2.00 for the round trip; final
return umil ucu aiau
$3 15
Clothing
are an inducement to the people we- "will make
we are now offering in Men's and Boys' Suits in
100 MEN'S SUITS,
Tomorrow, III. 50
These we have selected from
Odds and Ends in Men's Suits ev
ery suit worth double the money.
Something good to wear. An ele
gant all-wool suit. Something good,
stylish, well made and perfect fit
ting. These suits
are worth a great
deal more money,
but we want to sell
them for
$g 50
TOMORROW
Any of the $20.00 or $25.00 Suits except
I
mi o on
I rJi m u
Men's
Embroidr'd
Night
Shirts,
45c
Men's
Summer
Suspenders
12c
Men's
Fine
Pajamas,
$1.00
Tomorrow
Men's Scriveners
Elastic Seam
Drawers
TIEN TSIN BOFilLARDED.
(Continued from First Page.)
in Admiral Kempff's dispatches has led
the war department to make an extra
effort to hurry forward the Ninth regi
ment from uLzon to Taku. It was
supposed by General MacArthur on
the receipt of the original order to send
these troops to China, that owing to the
break in railway communication be
tween Tarlac, the headquarters of the
Ninth and' Manila, and the prevalence
in the harbor of a typhoon, it would
probably not be possible for the troops
to get away before the 24th instant.
The war department is now determin
ed that this movement shall be hasten
ed, if it is possible to do so, and has in
structed Gen. MacArthur in such fash
ion as to warrant the belief here that
the troops will be on their way to China
not later than tomorrow evening, thus
saving one or two days on the original
calculations.
There is also good reiison to believe
that the authorities wril dispatch at
least one other regiment from Manila to
China with the least possible delay in
order that the United States may be in
a better position to assist the allied
forces in protecting the lives and pro
perty of foreigners.
The United States consulate at Tien
Tsin which late news advices reported
to have been destroyed is situated far
up on the Meadows road which runs up
from the Pel Ho directly through the
center of the town. It is far removed
from any of the other consulates and
practically isolated from all other build
ings. This fact might explain the re
port of its destruction before the rest
of the foreign consulates were molested.
The Japanese and Russian consulates
are close together on the Meadows road
nearer the river. Away off by them
selves farther up the Pei Ho stand the
British and French buildings in close
proximity to each other. The American
consulate is, or was (as the case may
be) one of the most imposing and sub
stantial buildings in the town. A re
cent census of Tien Tsin shows the for
eign population to be about 1.000 per
sons, including 110 Americans. Thus the
report from Japanese sources that 1,500
foreigners at Tien Tsin had been mas-
sacrea, wouia seem to be untrue or
grossly exaggerated in point of num
bers.
Every foreigner within the citv boun
dary would have to be killed to bring
tne total up to anywhere near that
number.
CEREMONY BY PHONE.
Marriage Performed With Contracting
Parties Many Miles Apart.
Princeton, Ind., June 22. Miss Katie
Cline, at Patoka, four miles north of
this city, made her marriage vows at
noon today in a telephone booth.
Hymen's altar in this case being the
telephone apparatus. Her lover was at
Stanton, Tenn., some distance south of
Nashville, and the ceremony was per
formed over the long distance telephone,
Rev. Thomas C. Danks, a venerable
minister, officiating. The groom was
Robert Lockhart. The wedding was set
for today, but for some reason the
groom could not come to Patoka, and
he made arrangements for a telephone
wedding. Clerk Stewart sent the license
to Patoka and arrangd for the minister.
Promptly at noon the young couple
were at the telephones and in a short
time were legally husband and wife.
Mrs. Lockhart will Join her husband in
a few days.
Books In Bad Shape.
Des Moines, la., June 22. The Music
Teachers' National association conven
tion closed this afternoon. Richmond.
Va., is the only candidate for next
year's convention, but the matter was
left undecided. The secretary and
treasurer's books were reported to be
in unsatisfactory shape, and a com
mittee was appointed to investigate and
report in a month.
American Consulate at Tien
Than We Should
Have Right Now.
HEN'S AND BOYS' SHIRTS.
We have the stock to please you.
Boys' Shirts
25c to $1.00
Men's Shirts
25c to S2.50
i
A good Negligee Shirt,
with detached cuffs,
35 o
Fine Madras Cloth Shirts,
50o 75o
S1.00 to $2.50 .
3 dozen
White
String
Ties,
25
Men's
35c
Baibriggan
Underwear,
25c
Men's
Pearl
Fedora
Hats,
95c
i
BRYAN'S MAIL INCREASING.
His Private Secretary Gets About 200
Letters a Day.
Lincoln, Neb.. June 22. William' J.
Bryan is expected to arrive in this city
from his Wisconsin outing on Saturday
or Sunday next, coming direct to Lin
coln from Lake Minocqua. He will re
main quietly at his home until after the
Kansas City convention adjourns.
Mr. Bryan s mail is already beginninir
to assume enormous proportions. The
letters alone which reach the office of
his brother and private secretary, Chas.
W. Bryan, number about 200 each day.
Every week the photos of three or four
baby namesakes arrive and are added to-
the collection being made by Mr. Bry
an's daughter Ruth, who now has near
ly 1,000 pictures of namesakes of her
father.
An effort will be made bv Nebraska
Democrats to induce the eastern dele
gates to the national convention to stop
in Lincoln on the way home. This state
will send 3,000 persons to Kansas City
and all will return to Lincoln immedi
ately after the convention to attend a
reception that will be given, by Mr. and
Airs, uryan.
DAMAGES FOR PICQUART.
Echo of Paris Is Condemned to Pay
Lim the Sum of 100,000 Francs.
Paris, June 22. The action of Colonel
Picquart, who, it will be recalled, was
prominently identified wdth the Dreyfus
case as one or tne accused's defend
ers, against the newspaper Echo of
Paris, was decided today. The court
condemned M. Lepelletier, who wrote
the article complained of, and the man
ager of the paper to pay a fine of 2,000
irancs, and in addition granted dam
ages to the amount of 100,000 francs.
The company owning the paper was
neia civilly responsible for the dam
ages. The hearing of the action of M. Rein-
ach was adjourned for a week.
ALL TO SEE HIS MOTHER.
Indiana Man Who Escaped From
Prison Surrenders Himsel
Logansport, Ind.. June 22. Edward
Cantley, who seven years ago escaped
from the Michigan City prison, where he
was sent to serve a three year term
for embezzlement, has returned and
given himself up. He first obtained
irom tne governor the promise of a
parole for six months, in order to see
his mother, who is very sick, and who
was likely to pass away without seeing
ner son again unless he should sur
render, since he did not dare visit her
for fear of arrest.
Since leaving prison Cantley has re
sided in Chicago and Philadelphia, and
nas rapidly advanced In railroad circles.
He married about five years ago, first
explaining to his wife his position, and
she is familiar with the particulars of
his surrender. He will return to prison
after six months, unless pardoned.
At the time of his arrest eight years
ago cantley was a stenographer, em
ployed at Long Cliff insane asylum.
and was sent up from Marion.
Capital Elevator Sold.
A deal was made Friday whereby the
Capital elevator of North Topeka has
been transferred from T. L. Ewan to
E. F. French of Champaign, 111., ihe
consideration being $25,000. The new
management will assume charge on I
June 27. Mr. Ewan, who is a member
of the Kansas City board of trade, an
nounces that he will go to Kansas City
about the first of July and organize a
grain company.
James Case Commences
The case of State of Kansas Vs. T. M.
James for shooting W. M. Hayes, is be
fore the district court today. The case
has been tried twice before and each
time resulted in a mistrial. It is for
assault with intent to kill and was the
result of a boundary line fence quarrel.
i It H f N
i
Hit 7 f ITS
tftmffli
Tsin, Destroyed by Uninese Army.
-
i J 4 ,1 1 I i,it
TOWNEJO COME,
PopulistYice Presidential Nomi
nee Will Speak in Topeka.
To Address the Silver Republi
can State Convention.
SILVERITES COMING.
Butler County Engages Accommodations-For
25.
Political News Which Will In
terest Kansans.
F.. B. Lawrence, of El Dorado, na
tional committeeman for the silver
forces in Kansas, has received from
Charles A. Towne, of Minnesota, the fol
lowing: "Will be in Toneka to attend the
state convention of the silver Repub
licans, and will be pleased to accept
your invitation to address the conven
tion." From Toteka Mr. Towne, the vice
presidential nominee for the Populists,
will go to Kansas City to attend the
national convention of the silver forces.
which will be held in conjunction with
the national Democratic convention
H will be in Topeka July 2.
Mr. Towne will also see what he can
do towards insuring for himself the
nomination by the Democrats for vice
president.
Dr. Lawrence has engaged accom
modations for twenty-five Butler
county delegates to the state silver
convention.
HAVE AN ORGAN.
Fight on W. A. Deford Opens in
Earnest.
The Coffey County Populist, pub
lished at Waverli", is a new paper
which has made its appearance, with
O. M. Rice, who was a member of the
first Populist legislature the state had
as editor.
The purpose of this paper is to de
feat w. A. Deford, the Ottawa Demo
crat nominated for senator in the
Franklin-Coffey county district.
The paper announces that after it has
succeeded in defeating Deford it will go
out of business.
MB,. JEFFREY RISES.
He Says Taylor Riddle Is Not in
Fight For State Senator.
Now comes J. R. Jeffrey, of Elmdale,
a Democrat, who puts Taylor Riddle's
candidacy for state senator m a bad
light. A report was brought to To
peka a few days ao by Marion
county Populists claiming that a deal
had been fixed whereby Riddle was to
have the nomination for stenator
against George P. Morehouse, of Coun
cil Grove, in the district comprising
Marion, L'nase and Morris counties.
This report brought Mr. Jeffrey to
the front. He Is a candidate and has
been given considerable support, and
was as a result much surprised at the
rumor of Riddle getting the place.
Mr. Jeffrey says:
I have a personal letter from Mr
Riddle, in which he says he is not
candidate, and does not desire to make
the race for senator."
OPPOSE TWINE PLANT.
Lawrence and Wichita Papers Full of
Criticism.
The Lawrence Journal and the
Wichita Eagle are leading the knockers
on the state penitentiary twine plant.
These two papers are criticising the
state legislature and the state admims
tration for wasting the people s money
in this venture.
The Journal's principal complaint is
that, the province of such an enterprise
is to remove the profits which go to
the middlemen, but claims that the
possibility of such a result has been
removed bv the recent determination
and action in selling the twine direct
to the dealers.
HELEN KIMBER'S WORK.
Begins Organization of Woman's Re
publican Clubs.
Miss Helen Kimber, who has ren
dered the Republican state committee
of Kansas valuable assistance for sev
eral years, has started into the work of
organizing Republican clubs for the
campaign. The first club was organ
ized at Humboldt, the following offi
cers having been selected:
President, Mrs. W. T. McElrby, wife
of the editor of the Humboldt Union.
Vice president, Mrs. C. M. Smith.
Secretary, Miss Ida Greenfield.
Treasurer, Mrs. E. N. Wert.
FEARED THE DOG.
A Newfoundland Rescues a Victim of
Strikers.
St. Louis, June 22. While Mamie Lit
tel, 7 years old, was playing in Twenty
second street last night, she was struck
in the head by a rock thrown at a
Chouteau avenue car, sustaining a frac
ture of the skull. At the city hospital,
where an operation was performed by
the physicians her injury was pronounc
ed very serious.
William C. Harvour, a member of the
sheriff's posse was fearfully beaten by
three men supposed to be either strikers
or strike sympathizers, in Michigan av
enue. Mrs. Louisa Saidle saw the as
sault and.calling a powerful Newfound
land dog ran to the scene of the attack.
When the assailants saw the woman
and dog coming to the rescue they ran
away.
BRYAN FELLS A TREE
Then Makes the Lumbermen a
"Stump" Speech.
Minocqua, Wis., June 22. The fish
ing expedition of Wm. J. Bryan has
enied and the colonel departed for
Chicago en route to Omaha.
While here Mi. Bryan was the guest
of a lumber camp, and ate with the
lumbermen. He also relied a three-
foot pine tree, and on being called on
to make a speech mounted the stump
the tree just felled. He said that
he had often , been accused of making
"stump" speeches, but that this was the
first time that
he had ever made a
genuine one.
ROBERTS GUILTY.
Ex-Congressman Convicted of Po
lygamy in Utah.
Salt Lake, Utah, June 22. The jury
in the case of B. H. Roberts, on trial
for unlawful cohabitation, returned a
verdict of guilty. Roberts in an agreed
statement of facts put before the jury
admitted that he entered into a polyga-
mous marriage with Maggie B. Shipp
and lived with her and his legal wife,
barah Louisa. It is claimed that Rob
erts relies on the supreme court to re-
Terse tne verdict on technical grounds.
New Rate Agreement.
Chicago, June 22. By an agreement
of the presidents of the western roads
the rate making power of all lines will
be vested entirely in the executive offi
cers of the roads. No line party to the
agreement will have power to issue a
new rate sheet until it has been sub
mitted to the local committee where
the business originates, and has the
approval of the highest executive of
ficer in charge of the traffic of the in
terested road. Committees will be lo
cated at Kansas City, Omaha. Sioux
City, Council Bluffs, St. Paul and Min
neapolis.
Ticket Forger Convicted.
Denver. Col., June 22. A telegram
from General Passenger Agent Bailey
of the Colorado Midland railway who is
now in JNew xork, announces the con
viction there of W. J. Blaze, who was
arrested last September on the charge
of forging tickets of the Midland road.
About a hundred of these tickets were
found, the loss to the company being In
tne neighborhood of 53,000. The tickets
were of the coupon variety over eastern
lines with which the Midland connects.
This is said to be the first time a ticket
forger has been convicted in this coun
try.
Bryan Wouldn't Say a Word.
Monocqua. Wis., June 22. Col. W. J.
Bryan will leave for his home today.
Col. Bryan kept well posted on what
was going on in Philadelphia and re
ceived numerous bulletins from friends
during the day. He was asked to ex
press his opinion on the platform adopt
ed in Philadelphia and the nomination
of McKinley and Roosevelt, but he de
clined to discuss politics.
Railroad Bridge Wrecked.
Gunnison.Col., June 22. The Colorado
and Southern Railway company's iron
bridge across Gunnison river, two and
one-half miles above this town wa3
wrecked by an explosion of giant pow
der Friday morning. The explosion is
believed to have been caused by sym
pathizers with the strikers at the Bald
win coal mines in order to prevent the
running oi trains from the mines.
Dora Clay Brock's Present.
Versailles, Ky., June 22. General
Cassius M. Clay of White Hall, has pur
chased from J. H. Varnell of Pinkard
this county, and deeded to his former
child-wife, now Mrs. Riley Brock
house and three acres of land adjoining
Mrs. Brock s present home. This is the
third purchase of land that Gen. Clay
has made for her since her marriage to
KUey .Brock.
Death of Capt Towle,
New Tork, June 22. The death is an
nounced in London of Captain George
F. Towle, U. S. A., retired, age 65. He
was twice breveted for gallant and mer
itorious service during the civil war.
TODAY'S MARKET REPORT
Chicago, July 22. WHEAT A feeling
that the northwest shortage had been
played for all it was worth was an in
fluence In the wheat pit during the fore
noon session on tne ooara or traue toaay
The reports from the spring wheat tern
tory were still gloomy and buying orders
came in from that section, but there was
considerable selling and after the opening
tne maricet snowed a disposition to Keep
under yesterday's closing figures. July
opened lv.c to c over, yesterday at 83c
to S3c, but reacted to S2Vic. A recovery
at Liverpool, which early was lower, was
a factor in a rally which followed the
Initial dip, July advancing to S3'3ifceT
j nis Duige was not supported, However,
and another decline to b2V4c, accompan
ied profit-taking. The market was active
and nervous, but the trade was somewhat
less heavy than it has been during recent
sessions. Local receipts were 144 cars, 3S
of contract grade. Minneapolis and Duluth
reported 425 cars against 433 last week and
669 a year ago.
The tone of the market later was dis
tinctly firmer. The crop reports from the
northwest were decidedly calamatious.
Expert Snow wired that the Dakotas
could not raise over 40,000,000 bushels and
the Manitoba situation was growing
worse. July advanced later to SSc and
in the face of heavy realizing held steady,
closing Vnc over yesterday at SiJVsC.
CORN The corn market was moder
ately active, but easier. Wheat was the
chief influence. Country offerings were
liberal and there was some buying by the
old local bull crowd. July opened slic
higher at 414(&afeC in sympathy wiih wheat
and also in sympathy with wheat declined
to 40fc. A recovery to 41 '4o followed
the dip on the local support. Receipts
here were 722 cars.
The close in corn was strong, July ?ic
higher at 41V2d5sC.
OATS Oats were rather nervous over
complaints from the northwest. July
opened He higher to 4c lower at 24-e to
2414c and touched 24c. but later recov
ered to 245-sC. The steadiness of corn was
a help. Receipts here were 268 cars.
PROVISIONS Provisions were quiet
but firm, finding support in light hog re
ceipts and higher prices at the yards. July
pork opened 5c over yesterday at $11.62,4
and advanced to $11.75; July lard began
the session 2fyc up at $6.70 and sold to
$6.80. and July ribs opened 21c improved
at J6.77H. selling to $5.S2H'06.85.
FLAX Cash: JS. V., Jl.H): S. W.. $1.80:
Sentember, $1.39; November, $1.33.
RTF July, 61c
BARLEY Cash, 3&345c.
TIMOTHY September, $3.05.
Chicaeo Livestock Market
Chicago, June 22. CATTLE Receipts.
1,500. including 100 Texans: steers strong
to 10 cents higher; butcher stock steady.
Good to prime steers, $5.10g5.75; poor to
medium. $4.45ti5.00: stockers and feeders,
$3. 4054.75: cows. $2.9564.40; heifers. ?3 0Tr6
5.00; canners. $2.2552.90: bulls, $2.90ffi4.25:
calves, $5.00fi6.75; Texas fed steers, $4.40(J
5.20: Texas grass steers, $3.75!&4.25; Texas
bulls. $3.CNW3.50.
HOGS Receipts today, 19.000: tomorrow.
ln.fXO; left over. 3,437. Five to 7-2 cents
higher: top, $5.22. Mixed and butchers'.
S5.Wf(io.2-M: good to cnoice neavy, lo.io'eu
5.221,,; rough heavy, S5.00'.i5.10; light, $4.t5a
5.17V. bulk of sales, $5.105.20.
SHEEP Receipts, 11,000: sheep weak at
yesterday's decline. Good to choice weth
ers, $4.5055.10; fair to choice mixed. $3.Dt"5
4.60: western sheep, $4.25fi5.00: vearlings,
$5.0O'tJ5.40; native lambs. $5.0OS6.30: west
ern iambs,' $6.00g6.25; spring lambs, $5.00!
6.75.
Official receipts and shipments yester
dav: RECEIPTS Cattle, 10,431; hogs, as,0o3;
sheep, 35.750.
SHIPMENTS Cattle, 5,239; hogs, 9,131;
sheep, 4i)5.
Kansas City LivestockMarkst.
Kansas Citv. Mo.. June 22. CATTLE
Receipts. 2.500; market steady. Native
steers, $3.5o&5.40: Texas steers, $2.850.30:
Texas cows; $2.50.33.25: native cows and
heifers. $2.25fi4.75: stockers and feeders,
$3.0'!t4.90: bulls, $2,2514.50.
HOGS Receipts. 9.o: market strong to
5 cents higher. Bulk of sales. .5.00!5.15:
heavy, $5.00i5.20; packers. $i.971i'a5.15:
mixed. $4.955.10; lit?ht, $4.!OC5.07Vj: york
ers. $5 o. "ft 5. 071.',: pigs, $4.S5T5.00.
SHEEP Receipts. l.OuO: market steady.
Lambs, $4.CKg 7.00 ; thutto'ns,"$3.7&&5.50 '
Kansas City Produce Market.
Kansas City, Mo., June 22. WHEAT
July. 734fle: September, 75;-zC. Cash: No.
2 hard, 74W375: rot 3, 724t74c; JNO. 2 rea,
78"S7yc: INo. o. 143 .w.
CORN July, ZHc: September.
Cash: No. 2 mixed, 39c; No. 2
40Hc: No. 3, 39M-C-
OATS No. 2 white. 2614c
white.
HAY Choice timothy $10.00510.50; choice
prairie. $..00. .
BUTTER Creamery, l&JflSc; dairy, fan
cv. 14c.
EGGS Fresh, 8c
Market Gossip.
London: Wheat, Id lower.
Argentine shipments: Wheat. 1.643.000?
corn, 696.0UO.
Chicago receipts: Wheat. 144 cars, ernrl.
ed. 38: corn, 722, graded 393; oats, 2sS.
graded 58.
Northwest receipts of wheat last year:
Duiuth, 255; Minneapolis, 414.
Liverpool: vvneat, a lower; corn, 4
lower. - ,
Omaha:- Hogs, 5,500. .... t . . . ,
No rain in the northwest.
Four cars of wheat received at Tnnflta
today and a sample of new wheat testing
. x rea, tjz pounas.
ine weather map shows no rains in the
northwest and weather indications for
tne next 48 hours predict clear and hot In,
the spring wheat territory.
Private wire houses at Chicago say that
there has been an attempt to break wheat
iucmy, Dut buying orders carry tne Dears
off their feet. If the market starts up
from these rtrl.-3 it will be a runaway
market and no telling where it will stop.
i nere is good buying of September pork.
Looks like the fever is likely to spread
from the wheat pit and set other markets
on fire.
Estimated hoes tomorrow nt Chicasro.
16.000 head.
Kansas Citv reoint- trhoat fis nr3.
last year 138; corn, 39 cars, last year 19;
oats, 13 cars, last year 5.
Northwest receipts of whpjcf todav: Du
luth, 1S9 cars: Minneapolis. 226 cars.
furs on Chicago July wheat, good to
morrow, iPc; calls, SHc Puts on July
corn, 40ViSsc; calls, 42c. .
New York TTp-Town Gossip.
New York. June 22. The mnrnir.tr nra
Indicating the probabilities of action on
the vice presidency was regarded as en
couraging and expectation was confirmed
by the renomination of President McKin
ley and the association on the ticket with
him of Governor Roosevelt. If Wall
street and business interests in general
believe in the gold standard and in con
servatism of action, it would seem nat
ural that they would express their belief
by buying stocks in anticipation of the
success of conservative men and policies.
Vigorous and confident bull operations
would find a somewhat nervous short in
terest upon which manipulation would ba
liKeiy to produce a decided effect. Ihe
cry of the moment seems to be for a
leader. Few persons acquainted with street
aJtairs expect anything like a Doom, Dut
there are important interests which might
be willing to exert personal and money in
fluence to bring about more of a scare
on the part of the bears than the Stock
Exchange has witnessed in some time. It
seems to be hope, however, rather than
confidence which is now influencing capi
tal. There are other questions than these
of domestic policies which are not under
discussion in banking and business circles.
In one respect improvement is almost in
sight. The iron and steel markets are now
adjusting themselves to the basis de
manded by decreased consumption. Pro
duction is being curtailed even at the ex
pense of risking or of causing some idle
ness on the part of labor. There is no
war, however, in the iron and steel indus
try and consequently when the buying ele
ment decides to come into the market
there will be less stock of manufactured
goods on hand and a surplus back of most
of the selling industrial companies.
Topeka Markets Today.
Topeka, June 22. .
CATTLE.
COWS J2.50'a3.75.
DRY LOT STEERS $4. 0034. 50.
DRY LOT HEIFERS $4. 004. 53.
HOGS.
LIGHT-4.60fi4.75.
MEDIUM AND HEAVY $4.55'34.SS
GRAIN.
NO. 2 WHEAT 6Se. :
NO. 2 CORN 36!q 37c
NO. 2 OATS 23Vic
HAY $5.00.
PRODUCE.
EGGS 9 cents.
CHICKENS 6S cent. ,
BUTTER 13c.
Topeka Hide Market.
. . Topeka.. June' 22.
Based on Chicago and Boston quota
tions. The following are net prices paid
in Topeka this week:
GREEN SALT CURED 6c
NO. 1 TALLOW 3iic.
GREEN SALT HALF CURED e'ic
New York Money Market.
New York, June 22. MONEY Money on
call nominally, 1 per cent: prime mer
cantile paper, 31,i414 per cent. Sterling
exchange weak with actual business in
bankers' bills at ti.kiV'it for demand and
at $-!.84Q4 for sixty days; posted rates,
$4.S5fuii and $4.88; commercial bills, $4.83'
4.S3H-
SILVER Silver certificates. 60J61c; bar
silver. 606C: Mexican dollars, 47,c.
BONDS Government bonds steady; U.
S.. 2s, refunding, when issued, registered,
1024; do. coupon, 103Li; 2s, registered, W):
3s. registered, loS; coupon. 109; new 4s. reg
istered. 134V4; coupon. 1341: old 4s. regis
tered, 114: coupon, 115; 5s, registered, 113;
coupon, 113.
Butter Market.
New York, June 22. BUTTER Steady,
creamery, extras, 16619c; factory, lSnc.
Sugar Market.
New York, June 22. SUGAR Raw,
strong.
COFFEE Quiet,
Cotton Market.
Galveston, Texas, June 22. COTTON
Firm, S'-sC
New York, June 22. COTTON Spot cot
ton closed quiet, c advance: middling
uplands, 9 5-16c; middling gulf, 9 9-ldc
Range of Prices.
Furnished by J. C. Goings. Commission
Merchant, 112 East Fifth street, Topeka,
Kan., receiver and shipper of grain.
Chicago, June 22.
Article.
WHEAT
Open High Low Close res.
June ..
July .,
Aug. ..
COhN
June .
S2H 81
83 H 8?H
84V 83
83-4- 83"4
84y-5s
82H
83
4H4- 40
41 4V.i- 4"Ts
40H-
July .
Ausr. .,
4114.54 4174
OATS
June .
July .
Aug. .
24
2t- 24
244 24l
ZIH
24H
24
11 57
11 57
-11 75
6 67
6 67
6 80
6 75
6 75
6 82
?4i- 25
25Vk 25tt
PORK
June .
July .
Sept .
12 in
12 07
12 32
.11 62
12 12
12 35
11 62
11 82
..11 85
LA.UD
June
July ... 6 70
Sept ... 6 85
6 95
6 95
7 05
6 97
6 97
7 07
6 95
7 07
6 70
6 85
RIBS
June
Julv ... 6 77-80 7 00
Sept ... 6 S5 7 10
KANSAS
6 77
6 85
CITY.
73'4
WHEAT
July ... 74
Sept ... Tohi
COKN
July ... 3S
Sept ... 38
74
75
3SH
39
73
752
394
73H
3H
3H
3SH
Ranges of Price3 on Stocks.
Furnished by J. C. Goings. Commission
Merchant, 112 East Fifth street. Topeka,
Kan., receiver and shipper of grain.
ill"
Stocks lOp'nlHlghlLowlCl'selYes.
I ' I I I
I
I
1
Sugar
I 114
115
98
87
3 PA
112' 112 113-4
People's Gas .
Am. Tobacco .
A. S. & W. ...
B. P.. T.
Federal Steel .
C. B. & Q. .-
C, R. I. & P..
C. M. & St. P.
Atchison com.
Atchison pfd .
Manhattan ...
97'
87
31
C2H
83;
86V). 87
3 S0-4
M i 62
30 i 31
1234:124
1044 I1474
jio'iiin
2: 24
-74i 70
84-4i 85ii
77! 78'.
47 i 47
71! 71
4.: 4974
82I 82'4
128 12H
31.; 31
57 I 57
3.1
63 i
31
124 v4
l.V4
111 !
24
70
86
78
47H
3141 3"
124 1 12.1H!
105U1 lWV4j
1U:; H04
247is! 24i
86l
78
IS14
72 '
50iil
8S:
77 Vi
4S'.
71H
Western Union
Mo. Pacific
U. Pac. pfd ..
U. Pac. com ..
Atchison adj ..
71
50
49i.
82'.
82
32 I
N. Y. Central..
121 12NV4: 12s
So. Pac. pfd
C. C. C
C. & O
Reading pfd
B. & O
T. C. & I. ...
N. Pac. pfd .
N. Pac. com.
L. & N
C. & G. W. .
31
321
57
25
5Si
74
65
7PA
31
57
25
57
57
25V4
57
74
25 1
57
73'
73 ii
64
64'Ai
64
7H
70i4j
70Vii
49
50
48
4
14
10
74
4
10!
10
10
101 10i
f
If-
i i
7i
63
72
m

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