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The Topeka state journal. [volume] (Topeka, Kansas) 1892-1980, September 03, 1904, Last Edition, Image 9

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THE TOPEKA STATE JOURNAL, SATURDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 3, 1904.
9
V
IT'S 63ILLI0NS.
Authentic Fignrts on This
fear's Wheat Crop
Glren Oat bj Stat Board
Agriculture.
of
CORN CONDITION, 65.
Kiowa K4.740
Labette 327,7il
Lane 134.058
Acreage It About th Sam a
Last Tear.
tTbtat Crop Is Abort th Artr
ags for Ten Tears.
Leavenworth
Lincoln .... .
Linn ........ .
Logan .
Lyon .... ....
Marion
Marshall .....
Mcpherson ..
Meade
Miami .... ...
Mitchell
Montgomery
Morris
Morton
Nemaha .. ..
Neosho
Ness
Norton .... ..
Osage
Osborne
Ottawa .... .
Pawnee .... .
Phillips
Pottawatomie
Pratt
Rawlins .... ..
Reno
Republic
Rice
Riley
Rooks
Rush
Russell
Saline
Scott
Sedgwick ....
a7,ti2
..l.OSw.O'O
.. lW.(a)
.. 033.872
.. 30, 7)
.. 5i.ai3
..iUSO,(H4
.. 1S.4S0
.. 1O1.0C4
..1,330.71S
.. 4tS,02
between
According to a bulletin Issued by the
tate board of agriculture, this year's
wheat yield in Kansas amounts to 63,
421.15 bushels. These figures are based
on assessors' returns combined with
statements from growers, and they are
ubject to some revision after the
threshing is all done.
f The same bulletin places the corn
area of Jansas this year at 6,492,521
' acres and its average condition at 63
per cent.
The wheat yield is a little less than
11 bushels per acre for the entire area
own. which was 5,816,395 acres, but it
must be remembered that a large
amount was plowed up and more was
totally destroyed by the flood, so that
the yield per acre of that harvested
was far above eleven bushels.
This crop, while 32 per cent smaller
than the record-breaking crop of 1903,
Is 17 per cent above the average for the
last ten years.
According to the growers estimates
something near 70 per cent, or 45.000.000
bushels, is "of good, merchantable
quality," and the remainder more or
less damaged by excessive rains at and j
li;er narrai umc I Turkish
The K.ittt of this vear's output is. as J -luraisu
usual, produced in the central third of
the state; 25 counties in this section
each, save one, yielding one million
bushels or more, are credited with
about 73 per cent of the total crop.
Sumner Is found to have the largest
Btrereirnt vield of any county, 3.827,64
)ii:hps and the lareest area likewise
Reno ranks next with 3.723.190 bushels
and is first in average yieia per acre
IS hushels.
wheat is a constantly dimin
tahinjr factor in Kansas' agriculture,
and in the past decade its area has de
creased 72 per cent, being in 194 only
45.217 acres.
Ccrn The state's corn area, 6.4D2.3-1
acres, is virtually the same as in 1905.
and conditions environing its prosperity
have been somewhat similarly discour-
seiner. The present average condition
for the whole is 65 per cent, and the
more promising prospects seem to be
In the counties of the central third of
the state, but in the Tfcain these are not
counties ordinarily having the larger
acreages nor producing the heavier
yield'. Owing to floods and incessant
rainfall in the fore part or tne season
In th strictly corn producing territory
little corn found a favoring seed Dea:
Its beginning was so unpropitious that
long time growers in those parts of the
state reported with much unanimity
that under no circumstances could a
normal yield be matured, and present
returns verify their earlier opinions. -On
a basis of 100 representing a good
average condition. Barbe,r, Barton.King-
mar. and Rooks each report iw, ana
amcng those with a condition of 9t or
above are Edwards, Ford. Harper,
Kiowa, Mitchell, Osborne.Phillips.Pratt,
P.eno. Russell, Sheridan, smith and
Tr-go.
The quality of old corn found by as
sessors in farmers' hands March 1 was
24.90.117 bushels, against 45,723.703
bushels in 1903.
Wheat on hand 3.753.799 bushels. On
hand last year 4.692.579 bushels.
The following table gives, by counties
the total yield of winter wheat as esti
mated by the board's correspondents.
and the acreage and present condition
ci corn in each:
70.080
It. 72
351.2U
3W.534
4S.S36
...... ...l.TS.O".
, ...l,Uit.'jc7
l,M.iS7
S3U.611
91.435
2,r-i.3'.)
32S.065
3,7-S,l!
32.524
251.578
11S.755
l.wi.tao
922.170
1.717.f8
1,375.836
34.548
1,819.620
Shawnee . ......... 77.i5
Sheri-lan 4il.5H
Sherman 2.1)
Smitn 7'.;)
Stafford -2,757,48
Stanton
Stevens
1 Sumner 3,SZT.42
Thomas 2f,195
Trego 311.545
Wabaunsee 114.170
Wallace 5.214
Washington 672,100
Wichita 61.WO
Wilson 107.334
Woodson 22.712
Wyandotte 142,215
17,566
89.190
3,519
51.963
51. 168
90.647
3.S19
111,704
93, 706
194,796
75.837
1.25
WI.S
?
75,643
25
194.300
87.529
8.549
11,69
131.267
72.691
53.112
13.272
13o.374
122.311
40.476
32.655
13.5i
165. SOT
5M.S51
65.434
14.53
25,906
53.397
2.47
132,374
133
W.450
32.3MS
11.7P9
166.271
S0.2
176
35
79.&U8
1S.S91
12.341
92,S
1,571
175.W7
3.2
Sti.044
56. 1
12,2L4
.95
.54
.76
.59
SO
.41
.
.37
.62
.65
.63
.76
.48
.94
.40
.60
.47
.32
7
!33
.!
.So
.80
.91
.L8
.93
.5
.'.6
.55
.90
.70
100
.a
.96
.6
.56
.71
.:0
.o)
.60
.S6
.7S
..16
.53
.S3
.57
.93
-3o
.49,
FIGHT AT VAN.
I.Vl AS
M '..ft ?
6V -ft
4m
i n ill in
11
fm
mi in she?
mjriyiiu.Li
II
i
A
m
Armenians Raid the Town and Attack
the Soldiers.
Wheat. Corn
Counties Bushels Acres Con
dition Alien SS.M6 t?o ,2S
Anderson 62.2T2 S4.92S .37
Atchison .... 34. 22 6-S.6:6 .51
Barber 1.074.433 3i.5j6 1"0
Barton 3,667.33s 26.9 Jon
Bourbon .... 7. 276 j.79 .56
Brown 3vC!.6K9 123.0S3
Butler l.St-S 133.'i7 .65
Chase 21.9 40.763 .50
Chautauqua 73.128 57.7 .64
Cherokee 37.3'T 75.M.
Cheyenne 4S.9S6 2.Z17 .45
Clark SS.6X) 3.633 .iS
Clay TvS.SB J6.964 .
Cloud 9?9.6S6 96.233 .77
Coftev 33.415 10T.S12 .45
Comanche 171.744 S.6S6 .SO
Cowlev S21.2V2 .7
Crawford 326.744 .179 .64
tecatur 3j7,-"5 93.543 .4
Dickinson 1.310..T4 3.v .yj
r3niohan ?,i7.772 7
Douglas 234.906 6S.196 .63
K.lwards L041.3JU 23.3i .Mi
Kik l'7.3M 7v4i .5;
Ellis 1.552.977 S.44 .7
KHsworth 1,647.46 350 .
Finney 23.4 759 . 62
Ford 632." JO.631 .;.)
Franklin 41.751 , 9S.359 .41
Oeary 2T5.7H 38.5 .72
Gove ls.65 1".4"7 .30
Graham 391.236 45.4GS .W5
Orant. ; - 77 Co
Gray 17.200 1.579 . 76
tlreelev 30 SS-1 .90
Oreenw.-Kvd 35.138 117.63) .il
Hamilton 2.1 13) 7
Harper 2.7TS-S40 49.2S-4 .94
Harvey 1,000.967 62.510 . 7C
Haskell 8.-74 322 .So
Hodgeman 15556 4A .40
Jackson 4!'.456 111.325 .7
Jefferson 15.224 '(SA'iS .60
Jewell 566.22S 213.16 .So!
Johnson 344.6-f-i 64.572 . 37)
Kearny 3.423 3.; .78 !
Kingman 1.915,312 S3.7) 1j0
Constantinople, Sept. 3. A hot fight
Armenian Insurgents ana
troops took place at Van,
August 31, in which more than a score
were killed.
Armenians to the number of 150
raided the town, charged four houses
and barricaded themselves. Troops
attacked the houses and in the fight
which followed two soldiers and twen
ty other persons were killed. The
authorities set fire to a number of
adjoining houses so that the troops
might be better enabled to besiege the
lasurgents.
The town was panic stricken, and
those inhabitants who had not fled to
the mountains took retuge in me
churches and convents.
It is stated by the authorities that
other Armenian bands are preparing
to cross the Persian frontier.
MANY MEN" ARE WANTED.
Union Pacific Needs Help to Build Its
New lane.
There are a good many positions
hunting for applicants at the free em
ployment agency. It is evident that
no one need be idle these dais.
The Union Pacific wants ten men to
work at Belvue with a grading gang.
The Rodgers Brick plant, west oi
town, needs a few more men. i.wo
girls can get positions for the winter
doing housework out in
A dairyman is needed on a dairy farm
near Topeka. There is tne usual ae-
mand for house girls, some very gooa
positions at good wages being open.
RATE MADE TO PAOLA.
Railroads Will Haul Passengers
One Fare.
for
The railroads have granted a rate
of one fare r!us 50 cents for the G. A.
R. reunion which is to be held at
Paola, Kansas.. September 6 to 10 in
clusive. The rate applies to St. Jo
seph and Kansas City and all points
in Missouri within a radius of iuu
miles of Paoia.
The G. A. R. reunion at Faola gives
promise of beins well attended, ana
one of the most successful of the many
reunions which have been held in
Kansas.
Horse Fell on Him.
"Floyd McMahon. a young man who
lives at Hoyt. ran into a horse and
buggy on Kansas avenue Friday af
ternoon . between r irth ana sixtn
streets while riding a bicycle. The
horse slipped on the wet pavement
and fell on McMahon. When he was
picked up and carried into Lake s
drug store he was unconscious. His
head was bruised and there were two I
deep gashes on his forehead. No bones
were broken and ne regained con
sciousness and was taken to a physi
cian's office to have the scalp wounds
sewed.
walnut Grove Methodist EoiscWoaJ
church, corner Sixteenth and Harrison
streets. Rev. F. E. Adell, pastor.
.Morning, preaching service 11a. m.; ev
ening, preaching service 8 p. m. Sermon
by the pastor, subject, "Jehovah-Jireh."
At the evening service the new electric
lights will be used for the first time. A
special feature of this service will be
the music as follows:
Rejoice in the Lord" Carl Bruche
Choir.
Solo "The yesper Prayer" Brackitt
Mr. A. S. Ritz.
"Not a Sparrow Falleth. .Carl Bruche
Mrs. Grace Riley, Miss Grace Nettles,
Mr. J. M. Stark, and Mr. L. G. Thorpe.
First Church of Christ, Scientist,
corner Huntoon and Polk streets.
Services at 11, subject. "Substance."
Children's Sunday school at 9:30:
Wednesday evening meeting at 8
o'clock. Free reading room in the
church edifice, which is open daily,
Sunday excepted, from 1:30 to 5- p. m.
Highland Park school house
Preaching services at 11:15 by the
Rev. Clyde H. Hale. All are cordially
invited to attend.
The Topeka Ministerial nr. ion will
hold its first meeting after the sum
mer vacation of two mouths in the
city T. M. C. A. parlors, at 10 o'clock
a. m., for organization and business.
Central Park Christian church,
corner Sixteenth ana Clay streets.!
Bible school at 9:45. Preaching and
communion at 11 a. m. Preaching at
8. Everybody welcome.
Third Presbyterian church, comer
Fourth and Branner streets, three
blocks east of Santa Fe depot, ,W J.
Hatfield, D. D., pastor. Preaching at
11 a. m. and 8 p. TO- by the pastor.
Morning subject, "A Faithful Servant
and His Reward." Evening subject,
"The Good Complained of and Com
mended." First Lutheran church, corner Fifth
and Harrison streets ,Rev. H. A. Ott,
pastor. Services with sermon at 11
a. m. and 8:00 p. m. Morning sub
ject, "Setting Up Our Banners." The
pastor will resume regular services in
the evening after, discontinuing same
during July and August. I
First Christian church on Topeka
avenue. between fcixtn ana seventn
streets. Charles A- Finch, pastor. Bi
ble ..iool 9:45 a. m. Communion
and preaching 11 a. m. Evening ser
mon 8 z. m.
Third Christian church, corner of
Third and Lake streets, F. E. Mallory,
minister. Preaching . at 10:45 a. m
subject, "A Plea for- the- Homeless.
Mr. George Adamson and Mrs.-Mattle
Howes will sing at the morning ser
vice. Preaching at 8 p. m. by George
Lewis Hosford. Prof. F. F. Dawdy
and wife will sing at the evening ser
vice.
d : -
I WE ffllW JICTWfflT YDU -Ml I
Chicago and Return 520.00 via
Santa Fe.
Tickets on sale June 1st . to Sept.
10th. final limit returning Oct. 31st.
liood via St- Louis in one direction,
either going or coming. For full in
formation address T. L. King C P. &
T. A Toseka.
Homeseekers Excursion.
The Chicago Great Western railway
will on the first and third Tuesdays up
to October IS, sell tickets to points in
Alberta, Assiniboin, Canadian North
west. Minnesota and North Dakota.
For further information apply to G.
W. Lincoln. T. P. A.. 7 West Ninth
street. Kansas City ,Mo.
Lane chapel C. M. C. church Four
teenth and Van Buren street. Preach
ing by the pastor, 11 a. m., subject
"The Importance of Prayer." a p. m.
subject will be "The Dry Bones." Rev.
Andrew Berry, pastor. .
First United Brethren church,
Twelth and Quincy street.. Rev. T. D.
Crites. pastor. Preaching at 11 a. m.
and 8 p. m. Evening subject, "The
Price of Good Character."
Second United Presbyterian church,
Fillmore and Huntoon streets. Preach
ing by the pastor. Rev. John P. White,
at 11 a. m. and 8 p. m. Subject in-the
morning. "The- Churches' Encourage
ment" Isa. 41:10. Evening subject.
"Prove All Things" 1st Thess. 5:31.
Mrs. C. A. Conroe will give a Bible
reading at the Young Women's Chris
tian Assoeiation Sunday afternoon at
4:15. Subject. "The Future Joy." All
women are invited to come and bring
their Bibles. j
Meeting at the Tabernacle, corner
Tenth and Madison. Feast meeting
same as last Sunday afternoon. Preach
ing at 8 p. m. Everybody welcome.
Ftrst Presbyterian church. Harrison
street, opposite capitol. Rev. S. S.
Estey, Ph. D., pastor. Preaching by
the pastor morning and evening. 11 a.
m. subject, "Rejoicing in the Lord."
Oakland Presbyterian church, Rev. S.
A. Alt, pastor. Sunday school at 10
a. m. Morning service at 11 a. m. Sub
ject. "The Bible's Most Difficult Com
mand." Evening service at 8 o'clock.
Subject. "The Root of All Evil." A i
number from this church will be at
the C. E. convention at Holton next
week.
Westminster Presbyterian church.
Preaching at 11 a. m. by Rev. E, A.
Fredenhagen. C. E. service at 7 p. m.
Central Congregational church. Rev.
Charles M. Sheldon, pastor. Morning
services at W'ashburn college chapel;
afternoon and evening service in west
In the way of Traveling Equipment
: before you taKe the train to go to the
.;. EWORLD'S -'FAIR.
OR ANYWHERE ELSE
Consult us as to the most convenient way to carry your luggage.
WE ARE AM INFORMATION BUREAU FOR THAT PURPOSE
IT IS CHEAPER TO BUY THAN TO BORROW
WE'LL TELL YOU WHY:
"You borrow a friend's Grip, Suit Case, or Trunk. It gets
lost or marred, and you feel in duty bound to replace it with
another, more expensive even than the one you borrowed.
Is n't thaft so ? Motto : Buy for your own use. It's yours,
then, and if it is damaged you don't feel so bad.
We manufacture Trunks, Suit Cases and Grips, in all sizes
at all prices. We've got one for you.
Our Leather Goods Department is the Largest in the State.
ALL THE LATE NOVELTIES
No middleman's profit here. 4,
TIE
... .- a
Phones 233
no r
a .mufti
GEO. V. H0SSFELD, Prop.
TED
M
K
IFfiOTiPaY
510 Kansas Ave.
room at church. -9:45 a. m., Sunday
school; -11 a. m., sermon by Rev. Dexter,
secretary State Temperance union; 7
p. m.-, genior Endeaver; Consecration
service, topic, "New Courage for New
Work."
First Congregational ' church. Rev.
Francis L. Hayes. D. D.. pastor. Set-
vices at 11 a. m. Sermon by Rev. B. F.
Hayes -of Lewiston, Me.
First Eaptist church, corner of Jack
son and Tenth streets. Rev. Q. M.
Brink, D. D.. of Manhattan. Kan., will
preach at 11 o'clock and also at 8
o'clock. Tonne People's meeting at
6:45, led by Miss Fink Paxton. Preach
ing at 8 o'clock.
Evangelical church, corner of Fourth
and Monroe streets. Rev. Peter Schu
mann, pastor,' residence 329 .Monroe
street. Preaching 10:30 a. m. and 8 p.
m.: Young People's Alliance p. m.;
normal class, Friday at 8 p. m.
Second Church of Christ. Scientist.
108 West Ninth street. Services: Sun
dav. 11 a. m.. subject. "Substance."
Reading room open every auernoon
except Sunday, from 1 to 5 o'clock. All
Christian Science literature kept upon
the reading table for the use- or tne
public. '
Quinton Height's school house. Sun
day school3:lS p. m. The Rev. Si.
Smith assistant secretary of the Rail
road Y. M. C. A., will preach at 8
o'clock. -
First United Presbyterian church, cor
ner Eighth a4 Topeka avenue. Rev.
J. A. Renwick, pastor. Preaching 11 a.
m. and 8 p. m.. by the pastor.
First Methodist Episcopal church,
corner of Harrison and Sixth streets.
Preaching at 11 a. m. and 8 p. m.; the
last sermons of the temporary pastor.
Rev. Wilson S. Naylor. Morning topic:
"The Struggle With the Powers of
Darkness." Evening topic: "The Man of
Ethiopia."' Class meeting Tuesday ev
ening at 8 o'clock. .
Mrs. C. D. Landish, Holland Was ell
run down: could not eat. sleep or work.
Hollister's Rocky Mountain Tea made me
strong and robust. Great tonic. 35 cents.
Tea or Tablets. Gatlin Drug Co.
SULTAN SHOT AT.
Was Saved by Coat of Mail Which He
. Always Wears.
Paris, Sept. 3. The Paris edition
of the New York Herald prints the
following from its " Geneva corre
spondent.
"A high official of the Ottoman
court has received news of a serious
fight between the sultan's guards and
Bosnians, which continued almost to
the doors of the harem. Many were
killed or wounded.
"It is said that one Albanian shot
at the sultan, the bullet glancing off
the coat of mail which he always
wears.
"The sultan has asked the Prince
of Montenegro to supply him with a
guard. This report is certain to be
denied, tut its truth can be affirmed."
MR. WALL Wnjj WAIT.
City Has Made No Provision to Fay
Sewer Contractor.
GETS IMPORTANT JOB.
A. Hanley Appointed General Live
Stock Agent of Rock Island.
J. A. Hanley, formerly freight traf
fic . manager of the Kansas City
Southern, has been appointed general
live stock agent of the Rock Island
system, with headquarters in Chicago.
Previous to going to the Kansas City
Southern in 1896 he was freight traf
fic manager of the Santa Fe railroad,
from which position he retired in 1894.
Like the majority of railroad of
ficials Mr. Hanley rose from the
ranks. He entered railway service in
1871 in a minor capacity on the St.
Louis & Southeastern railroad and in
short time he was made traveling
auditor. From 18i6 to 1881 he was
agent for the Rock Island at Rock
Island. In 18S2 ne .became general
freight agent of the Minneapolis &
St Louis railroad. He held the po
sition four years, when he went to the
Maple Leaf as t raffle manager. In
18S9 he became freight traffic man
ager of the Santa Fe and in 1898 was
made freight tramc manager or tne
Kansas City Southern railroad.
Work on the construction of the
proposed outlet for the Potwin sewer
will be delayed until after the next
council meeting on Monday night. It
was proposed to begin the work last
Tuesday, but owing to the fact that
the city has made no provision for
paying M. Wall, the contractor, Mr.
Wall decided to wait a while.
It is thought now that the city will
arrange some way to borrow the J500
necessary to pay for the work, and
return the loan when the sewer as
sessment is made and collected.
The scheme for raising the money
to pay for the work is somewhat com
plicated. One district has been creat
ed to build a sewer in Lowman Hill,
connecting with the Potwin sewer.
Another district has been created,
covering both Lowman Hill and Pot
win to pay for the work of building
the proposed extension of the sewer
outlet, so that the sewage will cross
a large sandbar which now blocks the
mouth of the sewer. The council has
passed the ordinance creating the ben
efit district, and has let the contract
for the work on the outlet, but so far
no appraisers have been appointed to
fix the valuation of the property, and
no assessment has been made. The
city officials have been postponing this
work so that it might be done at the
same time the Lowman Hill sewer as
sessment is made.
CABLE PARTED.
Elevator Fen Ten Stories. Killing Two
Passengers.
Abscess.
W. H. Harrison, Cleveland, Mis.,wrltes
Aug. 15, 1S02: 'I want to say a word of
praise for Hanaro, s snow unimeni. i
stepped on a nail, which caused the cords
In my leg to contract and an abscess to
rise in my knee, and the doctor told me
that I would have a stiff leg. so one day
I went to J. F. Lord's drug store (who Is
now in Denver, Col.). He recommended a
bottle of Snow Liniment: I got a 50c size,
and it cured my leg. It is the best lini
ment in the world."
ABSCESSES, with few exceptions, are
indicative of constipation or debility.
They may. however, result from blows or
from foreign bodies, introduced into the
skin or flesh, such as solinters. thorns. etc.
Sold by Rowley & Snow and W. S. Miller.
Chicago. Sept. 3. Two persons wera
killed and six seriously injured today
by the falling of a freight elevator In
the store of Sears, Roebuck & Co.
The passenger elevator was out of re
pair and the freight elevator waa
used during the day by th customers
and employes. While a load of pas
sengers were being carried up, tha
cable parted, allowing the elevator
with its load of ten persons to fall ten
stories. The conductor of the eleva
tor, Philip Caldwell, and Mrs. Kata
Hayes were killed.
FELL FROM A LADDER.
Memphis Fireman Hurt While Fight'
Ing $300,000 Blaze.
Memphis, Tenn, Sept. 3. A fire of
unknown origin destroyed the six
story building occupied by the Oliver
Finnie company, wholesale grocers,
on Front street at an early hour to
day, causing a loss estimated at $100,
000, partially insured.
Frank Buffenbaugh, a fireman, was
seriously injured by falling from a
ladder. Six other firemen were over
come by heat and smoke and wera
removed to hospitals. where It la
stated all will recover.
.WABASH TO ST. LOCIS.
World's Frtr
Route Fonow
Flag.
tha
Only line to World's fair main en
trance. Five daily trains from Kansas
City. Shortest line. Ask your agent
for tickets ever the Wabash.
L. B. McCLEIJAK,
Western Passenger Agent.
Kansas City, 11a
H. C. SHIELDS,
Traveling Passenger Agent,
Kansas City. Mo.
INTERESTING LOCAL NEWS EVENTS OF THE PAST WEEK AS DEPICTED BY THE STATE JOURNAL CARTOONIST.-
BUM DAT.
K0NBAT.
TUESDAY.
WEDNESDAY.
THT7SSSAY.
FRIDAY
SATURDAY.
The Saints clean up Sedalia with, per- I Governor W. J. Bailey issues his
feet com. 1 Labor day proclamation.
1-7
'AJI
1W
3
Trouble in the office force of the I Grocers a ad butchers hold a barbecue
local Democratic organ.
j and picnic.
Southern part of city visited by minia
ture cyclon. : -
aAfO.
i
The Republican pilgrims return from
their trip to Marion.
RAiRSotM
Manager Leach marshals his football
forces for practice.

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