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The Topeka state journal. [volume] (Topeka, Kansas) 1892-1980, October 06, 1905, LAST EDITION, Image 1

Image and text provided by Kansas State Historical Society; Topeka, KS

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016014/1905-10-06/ed-1/seq-1/

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EVERYBODY
12 PAGES
READS IT.
EVERYBODY
12 PAGES
NEEDS IT.
LAST EDITION.
TOPEKA, KANSAS, OCTOBER 6, 1005.
TWO CENTS.
THE CARRIERS.
Lively Times in the Circulation
Department.
Journal Delivery Department
Reaches Circular Stage.
Carriers Get Fabulous Price
Hence Value Privileges.
HIGH PRICED LABOR.
Many Carriers Earning Twenty
Five Dollars' Monthly
And Will Continue to Do So
Under ?iew Plan.
A BOON TO STUDENTS.
One Dollar and More An Hour
Paid for
A Little Work and Some Exer
cise Daily.
Progressive people and progressive
pape
in tl
who
slow
rs always have obstacles thrown
eir way. It Is the fast runner
is in danger of being tripped; the
footed never reach the goal In
time.
In our efforts to give the people
of Topeka and the state of Kansas a !
first class newspaper in every respect
for every day in the year, there are
naturally a few ties, boulders and j
other obstructions thrown on the
track of the "20-Page Limited."
In the 20-page flying wedge which
was started into the city of Topeka
last Sunday morning there have been
a few people whose toes have been
slightly stepped upon, maybe, and who
have thrown out their feet in an effort
to overthrow the center rush and the
various quarterbacks and halfbacks
who are pushing the State Journal
in all its various departments.
The carriers of the Topeka State Jour
nal probably constitute the highest i aio
labor In the city of Topeka.
Many of these carriers, who are cir
culating petitions today, claiming that
they have in the past only made the
"small profit of lass than four Cent per
week on each subscriber," are making
more money than many a kindly dis
posed advertiser or subscriber who
signs the petition without knowing or
asking the State Journal's side of the
controversy, because. naturally, he
would not refuse to sign any such peti
tion. Many carriers have been making from
six to ten dollars a week, twenty-five
to forty dollars a month, for an average
of an hour or two in the evening after
school for pleasant exercise. How many '
who signed this petition are making no
more working ten hours daily at hard
labor.
The story is told that Rev. Father
McCabe, one of the best men who ever
lived in Topeka, once circulated a peti
tion on a wager asking that F. S. Mc
Cabe (himself) be hanged for high
crimes and misdemeanors, and thirty
people attached their names before they
discovered the joke.
We presume a petition could be
circulated in this town, particularly
around the state house grounds, in the
treasury, or attorney general's office,
asking that the editor and proprietor
of this paper be hung, and probably
sixty or more people would sign it.
Some of them would mean it, too.
People have telephoned us that
they received a circular inserted in
the copy of the State Journal deliv
ered to them, and which they pre
sumed we had not authorized, and
have asked, "How aboiM this carrier
business?"
In the first place, this insertion of
this circular was a violation of one of
the rules of this paper, that no cir
cular or matter of any kind shall be
Inserted in a copy of the paper for
the delivery of which we pay and py
well.
If the carriers had asked us to print
this circular In the State Journal last
evening we would have done so with
out cost to them and it would have
been printed In every copy of the pa
per circulated in this city.
However, as this is a matter of spe
cial importance to the carriers, we
will waive any violation of the proprie
ties in this particular instance.
The forty-three carriers of the State
Journal are such a nice lot of young
men that we really dislike to sav any
thing reflecting upon them. There is
rtalnly not a better lot of newspa
pr carriers in Kansas than our own.
As a rule, they are high-minded, hon
orable, faithful and industrious and it
Is the rarest of occasions that have
caused any friction between the car
rier service of the paper and any other
department.
An Unkind Circular.
It is human nature to represent
one's own side. Without apparently
realizing the gross injustice that the
carriers are doing the proprietor of
this paper and the injury that they
are bringing upon themselves, they
have scattered broadcast over this
town a circular which has poisoned
the minds of some of our readers.
We presume hundreds of people
have signed some petition against the
plans of this paper, and these people
have attached their signatures with
out hesitation at the solicitation
of a carrier, and knowing but one
side of the controversy. We have
heard of it. People have signed pe
titions without thought and as a rule
merely to get rid of the solicitor.
Accordingly, petitions have little
weight.
Original Plans Wttl Be Carried
Out.
So far as the State Journal is con
cerned, we care not if 5,000 people
sign a petition of this character. We
will consider the matter, but it will
have the same effect on us that it
would have on you, the reader, when
you know absolutely that the signer
put his name there without being in
formed as to the situation except from
the carriers' side, when he had not
heard our side.
Greatest Carrier Proposition . in the
Str.te.
W might even forgive the carriers
tor some of their indiscretions, but we
wish to say here and now that this
movement of the State Journal, in
establishing a seven-day paper, has
been in preparation for years. The edi
tor and owner of this paper, who is
writing this article, has on deposit in
several banks of this city several thou
sand dollars, the surplus accumulation
of many years' work in this city. He is
prepared to spend all this monsy, if
necessary, to establish the edition of
the State Journal for Sunday morning
along the lines he has marked out, and
one of these plans is to charge the car
riers one cent for the twenty-page pa-,
per. We are not increasing the rate to
the carriers, as the subscriber may have
imagined. We are really decreasing it.
Carriers have paid one cent per copy
readily, freely and gladly for the ten
page paper. We are now offering them
a twenty page paper for one cent that
is to the carriers, mind you. To every
body else it will be five cents or 2
cents, even to newsboys and news
dealers. The people who are associated with
the proprietor of this paper in conduct
ing the State Journal understand their
business. We all know the newspaper
business better than college students,
and yet we like college students and
we mean to entourage and protect
them. We have the money in the To
peka banks to pay spot cash for the
new press next month.
If the carriers of this paper had used
one-fourth of the energy in getting ad
ditional subscribers (which are coming
in by virtue of the Sunday naper),
they might have already increased
their routes sufficiently to more than
offset the difference between three and
It ur cents.
We have offered the carriers twenty
cents per hour to solicit their own
routes, but they have generally refus
ed to do so, fearing evidently they
might get so many new subscribers
that they would at once make more
money under the new plan than they
did under he old and refute their own
tale of woe.
It is an astounding fact that in in
terviewing personally two-thirds of the
carriers, scarcely one of the two-thirds
would solicit subscribers. What do
you think of that? Was there ever a
greater proposition offered to the peo
ple of Topeka than the one we are now
making. To put in a twenty page paper
for ten cents per week?
Now to the circular. Here it is, and
here are our replies to it. Please read
the circular carefully and read our an
swers to each paragraph.
Here is the carriers' circular ver
batim: To the Subscribers of the Topeka State
Journal.
The following statement is an ex
planation of the position of .the car
riers of the Topeka State Journal in
regard to the recent action of the
company in publishing an edition of
the paper for Sunday.
The State Journal is distributed
over the city of Topeka by forty-three
carriers, a large majority of whom
are students, either in Washburn col
lege or the Topeka high school.
It has been the policy of the Topeka
State Journal to recognize the transfer
of the different routes from one car
rier to another. For more than ten
years these routes have been bought
and sold among the students of these
two schools. At the present time each"
of the carriers has invested in his
route from five hundred to one thou
sand dollars, depending upon the size
and location of the route. In many
cases this money has been borrowed
by the carrier ill order that he might
purchase a route and thus work his
way through school.
The price of the Journal has been
10 cents per week to each subscriber.
The carrier pays to the State Journal
six cents a week and earns for him
self four cents a week on each sub
scription. Out of this four cents
profit the carrier stands all losses on
collections.
On Saturday, September 30th. the
company announced that they would
publish an edition of the paper fou
Sunday, and arbitrarily increased the
rate to the carrier from six cents to
seven cents per week for each sub
scriber, the subscriber paying ten
cents per week as before. By so do
ing the carrier's profit is reduced to
three cents per week on each sub
scription out of which the losses on
collections must still be met, while the
carrier must make seven deliveries
each week instead of six, the addi
tional delivery being at a most un
seemly hour.
We consider this new arrangement
unfair and unjust for the following
reasons:
1. The carrier's already small profit
of less than four cents a week on etch
subscriber is reduced to less than
three cents. Although one cent a week
on a sire'e subscrintion may seem a
j small amcunt; yet it means to each
; carrier a loss of from fifty to one hun
j dred and fifty dollars a year, depend
ing upon the size of his route. No one
can afford to carr:
at this re-
duced rate; yet w
tinue to carry on f
rced to con
f the money
I which we have invested in our routes.
2. The reduction in the profit from
four to three cents a week will make
j paper carrying no longer desirable or
I profitable. The present carriers bought
their routes upon the four cent basis.
: The reduction to a three cent basis will
i make it impossible for the carrier to sell
j their routes for the amounts which
i they paid for them; in fact, they will
j be forced to sell at a very great sacri-
3. "While the carriers do not object
to the increased woikthey do object
j to the increased workr at decreased
j pay. They believe this manifestly un-
i The carriers have always been glad
l to accommodate their subscribers in
1 every way possible. We are willing
j to carry the seven issues of the paper
: at the same profit of four cents per
I week and have asked The Topeka
1 State Journal that we be allowed to
I cio so. This offer has been flatly turn-
We believe that our subscribers will
see the injustice of the Topfeka State
Journal in asking us to carry the pa-
; per at the proposed rate.
In this connection we
j that the Topeka Daily C:
' lishing a seven clay pape
tice to their carriers all
i old profit of four cents r
might state
pital is pub
. but in jus
tw them the
sr week.
w e believe that our subscribers will
lealize what it mears to a st-:de:.t, in
! the midst of his school course, to be
j forced to sustain a loss of hundreds of
dollars with no means of protecting
I himseli.
As your carriers, we have never hesi
j tated to deliver your papers regularly,
at all times and in all weather. We
feel certain that you will recognise
the fairness of our cause and we ask
your cooperation in securing justice at
the hands of the Topeka State Journal
company. Respectfully ycurs.
THE CARRIERS OF THE TOPEKA
STATE JOURNAL.
There is no "company" running the
State Journal: the name of the editor
and sole proprietor appears at the head
of the editorial columns every day in
the week and he 's responsible for any
past, present or future acts under his
management.
We have forty-three carriers, main
ly Washburn college or hteh school'
students, xne state Journal pays out
every month to its carriers over
$1,000. What do you think: of that?
Have you ever heard it before? Every
Washburn route on the State Journal
is a scholarship.
' Dozens of our carriers make
their entire way through college from
carrying the State Journal, and have
time to do additional work and to
attend to their studies and rank high
in their grades. The work they do on
the State Journal is mainly good ex
ercise and experience.
The State Journal's present owner
originally arranged the present system
of delivery. It never charged a car
rier a dollar for a route. Other papers
here sold routes to carriers for hun
dreds of dollars. We permitted the
carriers to transfer the routes from
one to another, particularly as they
graduated from school and new stu
dents came in. In only rare instances
have we failed to approve the trans
fers, for the reason that our main ob
ject was o have the paper delivered
regularly and promptly by young men
of good character. We make our
money on selling papers and adver
tising, not routes. Occasionally when
a dishonest man applied for a route
he was refused.
Students are wild to carry the State
Journal routes. For years we have cau
tioned them in their eagerness, but
the profit has been so great that they
have paid for the privilege several
hundred dollars. Do you know of any
position for which a man would pay
$500? Well, the State Journal has
scores of them, and they pay the
money, despite our efforts to keep the
privileges within bounds.
The Slate Journal routes are worth
as much today as they were ten days
ago. Some may have been valued too
high. The price of the Sttae Journal
has been ten cents per week, and the
carrier has paid one cent per copy and
made a profit of four cents. He does
not have to buy the papers unless he
wants to unless it is profitable for him
to do so. There are scores of people
who are ready to buy the papers. We
must fix the price. Generally, what is
profitable for us will be profitable for
the carrier. Formerly the State Journal
was fifteen cents and the carriers se
cured five cents; later the price was
reduced to ten cents and the carrier
made four. Now we have added the big
Sunday paper, and the carrier will make
three cents, but many of them will
make more than they did formerly,
because they will have more subscrib
ers. A profit of four cents on three pa
pers for instance is not so good as five
cents on four.
The losses on collections should be
very slight. The rate is ten cents per
week . Carriers are supposed to collect
weekly. They are not asked to deliver
: a paper to anyone that does not pay.
Those who will not pay should be cut
off. Regarding the curriers' "already
I small profit," explanation has been made
above.
The circular says, "No one can afford
! to carry papers at this reduced rate."
I The State Journal could put on a hun
i dred carriers tonight, two for every
route it has by selling the papers to
newsboys or carriers for one cent per
i copy for the seven papers and pennit
! ting the charge of ten cents to the sub
j scriber.
"The reduction in the profit will
I make paper carrying no longer desir
! able or profitable." This is so untrue
j that it is not worthy of an answer,
j For a long time evening papers have
j been delivered in other cities on a
! profit of three cents to the carrier.
The Kansas City Star, when it was
j running its evenins and Sunday
I morning edition charged seven cents
for the seven papers, and the carrier
collected ten cents.
The State Journal has a better pro
I position today for its carriers than any
: other paper in Kansas,
j The carriers will not be forced to
sell at-a great sacrifice. They should
not be forced to sell at all. They have
I the best thing they ever had, all
; things considered, and should kaep it
, and cherish it. All they have to do is
to. get out and hustle for new subscrib
! ers and present the great attractions
1 of the tweny page Sunday ediion.
"The carriers have always been glad
I to accommodate their subscribers in
' every way possible," says the circular.
Two-thirds of the carriers have unani
, mously urged the proprietor of this
; paper to now abandon the Sunday edi
tion and return to the six papers for
i ten cents. Is that accommodating to
subscribers? We propose to give the
subscribers seven papers instead of six,
; and the seventh paper will be the best
j we print and we believe the best that
has ever been printed in Topeka.
You cannot compare the new twen-
ty page Sunday edition of the State
Journal with a new eight page Monday
morning paper. You mignt compare
the two Sunday papers, but comparison
last week was in favor of the State
Journal, and the next issue for Sun
day will be better than the last. We
will leave that to our subscribers.
The carriers in their circular dis
tributed to every State Journal sub
scriber, advertise the Topeka Daily
Capital and commend the Capital and
condemn the State Journal. What do
our fair-minded readers think of that
method of doing business? The car
riers were thoughtless, of course; but
j isn't it a shame to pay a thousand
! dollars a month to a body of carriers
j who thoughtlessly and willfully ad
! vertise and commend a rival and con
i demn their own paper's policy?
The Topeka Capital is a morning pa
per. That is harder to deliver for that
i reason. It is seven mornings. There
are not so many Capitals and there is
less profit in it. The carrier can de
i liver the State Journal at a profit of
I three cents and make more money
; ihan he can by delivering the Capital
in the same territory at a profit of four
I cents. The circular states that the
State Journal has asked for the deliv
ery of a seventh paper "at an un
seemly hour." The Capital is deliv
ered at an unseemly hour every morn
ing. We deliver Sunday morning and
give the carrier time to rest and go to
church if he wants to. The other six
days he delivers the paper in the even
ing and has exercise and profit.
'"hat is a!!.
Ve apologize to our readers for tak
ing this space, but the interests of
twenty years' work are more or less at
stake.
The subscribers need have no fears.
They will get their paper tonight and
every night, and Sunday morning,
whether our present carriers deliver
the papers or not.
"If the carriers will hustle like
everybody else about this office and
not clog the wheels, they will make
money and need have no gloomy
thoughts or morose forebodings.
The State Journal is a cheerful pa
per and it takes a cheerful view of
things, even when it throws in a twen
ty-page paper to the carrier for a cent
and to the subscribers for nothing.
A Few of .Many Instances.
E. W. Brown, a student at Wash
burn, carries State Journal route No.
1. located between the east side of
Kansas avenue and the side streets to - paper to other dailies), this carrier, pre
Quincy from Seventh street to the suming that not a single additional sub-
Kansas river. He carries a total of ,
ITS copies of the State Journal, but
just now has a substitute carrying his
route for the reason that he is play
ing football at Washburn. If he car
ried this route, as he should, and
worked and canvassed the territory
properly he would be carrying a great
many more copies. The State Jour
nal has been so friendly to Washburn
and the carriers generally that it has
permitted at times a substitute to be
put on a route when the regular car
rier was away on a vacation, the un
derstanding being that the substitute
shall receive the entire profit on the
route. A carrier has no business to
permit anything to interfere with the
regular and prompt delivery of his
route, but we permitted Mr. Brown
in this instance to put on a substi
tute. By paying the low price of one cent per
copy for the 20-page Sunday edition (and
carriers have cheerfully paid one cent for
a 10-page paper and even for an S-page
paper to other dailies), this carrier, pre
suming that not a singU' additional sub
scriber can be secured, will make, under
the plan which will now be1 enforced, the
snug sum of $5.M per week, or about a
dollar an hour a little more if he takes
less than one hour for his delivery, a little
less if he consumes more time, whether lie
be slow or swift, cycle or afoot.
Ray G. Doane, a student at Wash
burn, carries State Journal route No.
6. bounded by Sixth. Eighth. Qulncy
and the Santa Fe tracks. He carries
a total of 216 copies of the State
Journal, although in this particular
route there are only 190 residences
and business houses. He carries more
papers than there are buildings for
the reason that in a number of places.
such as office buildings. Santa Fe hos- j
pital and boarding houses, he has sev
eral subscribers.
By paying the low price of one cent per
copy for the 20-page Sunday edition (and
carriers have cheerfully paid one cent for j
a 10-page paper and even for an S-page
paper to other dailies), this carrier, pre- j
suming that not a single additional sub
scriber can" be secured, will make, under
the plan which will now be enforced, the j
snug sum of $S.30 per week, or about a !
dollar an hour a little more if he takes i
less than one hour for his tleliv
11LIU
less if he consumes more time, whether he
4. e 'slow or swift, cycle or afoot.
R. R. I'fford, a student at Wash
burn, carries State Journal route No.
5, lying northwest from Gordon street
and Central avenue, North Topeka.
He carries a total of 224 copies of the
State Journal. There are 298 resi
dences and business houses in his ter
ritory. This shows that his route
should bo increased
ticularly with the
thrown in.
By naying the low-pi
materially, par
Sunday paper
ice of one cent per
copy for the 20-page Sun
ition (and
carriers have cheerfully paid one cent for
a . " , c
10-page paper and even for an 8-page
paper to other dallies), this carrier, pre
suming that not a single additional sub
scriber can be secured, will make, under
the plan whicli will now he enforced, the
snug sum of $6.72 per week, or about a
dollar an hour a little more if he takes
les than one hour for vs delivery, a little
less if he corisumes'mfcre time, whether lie
be slow or swift, cycle or afoot
C. T. Jacob! a student at Washburn,
carries State journal route No. 8, cov
ering a portion of East ropeKa De
ween Sixth and Eighth and east of
he Santa Fe tracks. He carries a
t
th
total of 196 copies of the State Jour
nal. There are 2 23 residences and
business houses in his territory.
Bv paving the low price of one cent per
copy for the 20-page Sunday edition (and
carriers have cheerfully paid one cent for
a lO-page paper and even for an 8-page
paper .to oilier aaiuesi. mis ciiiriei, pn.-
iinesl. mis earner, pic-
a single additional sub-
c-urctl. w ill maae. unaer
sunung tnat not
scriber can be secu
the nlan which will now be enfor
snug sum of $5.SX per week, or obtiut a
dollar an hour a little more it he takes
less than one hour for his delivery, a little
less if he consumes more time whether he
be slow or swift, cycle or afoot.
Frank Ritchie carries State Journal
route No. 9, covering a portion of East 1 ess if he consumes more time, whether he
Topeka between Fourth and Sixth j be slow or swift, cycle or afoot,
and east of the Santa Fe tracks. He James Cottrell, who carries State Jour
carries a total of 210 copies of the , nal route No. 17, bounded by Tenth and
State Journal, although a recent can- j Fourteenth, and Harrison and Western
vass shows 3't resinences ana ousmess
houses in this district,
for Frank. He has
route enough. Fifty
Here's business
not worked his
minutes carries
the route now.
By paving the low price of one cent per ;
copv for the 20-page Sunday edition (and
carriers have cheerfully paid one cenvfor ,
a 10-page paper and even for an S-page
paper to other dailies), tjiis carrier, pre-
suming that not a single additional sub-
scriber can be secured, will make, under
the plan which wilt now be enforced, the I
snug sum of $6.27 per week or about a j
dollar an hour a little more if he takes
less than one hour for his delivery, a little
less if he consumes more time, whether he
be slow or swift, cycle or afoot. I
Albert Hollister, a student at Wash-
burn, carries State Journal route No.
12, known as the Quinton Heights!
route. He carries a total of 216 copies
of the State Journal. Number of resi
dences and business houses in terri- i
tory. 3 2 8. Here's another chance to
build up a list. Some of these people j
get the paper at their stores.
r- nnvinp tho low nrice of one cent tier !
copy for the 20-page Sunday edition (and :
carriers have cheerfully paid one cent for i
10-nage paper and even for an s-page
ncnr tn other rtnilies). this carrier, ore-
suming that not a single additional sub-
scriber can beseeured, will make, under
the plan which will now be enforced, the
snug sum of $6.45 per week, or about a
dollar an hour-a Jf, J"". SJ2H
- , , .. u.i
Ss $ "he cosumes'nTor
1
be slow or swift, evele or afodt
Forest McDonald, a student at i
Washburn, carries State Journal route
No. 14, on Topeka avenue, Tyler and
Polk, between Sixth and Tenth. He I
carries 190 copies of the State Journal.
Two hundred and thirty residences and j
business houses in tnis territory.
By paying the low r-rice of one cent per
conv for the
211-page &unaay eaition iauu;ous expense ana tne xcetu. per copy tuett
carriers have cheerfully paid one cent for
a io-page paper and even for an S-page
paper to other aaiuesi, mis carrier, pre
suming that not a single additional sub
scriber can be secured, will make, under
the plan which will now be enforced, the
snug sum of $5.67 Per week, or about a
dollar an hour a little more if he takes
less than one hour for his delivery, a little
less if he consumes more time, whether he
be slow or swift, cycle or afoot.
J. F. Worley, a student a Wash
burn, carries State Journal route N"n.
19, lying east of the Santa Fe shops.
He carries a total of 240 copies of the
State Journal, although in this rou'e
there are 394 residences and business
houses. Mr. Worley has a fine field
which he has only partly covered.
By paying the low price of one cent per
py for the 20-page Sunday ediiion (and
conv
carriers have cheerfully paid one cent for
a 10-page paper ana even tor an s-page
paper to other dailies!, this carrier, pre
suming that not a single additional sub
scriber can be secured, will, make, under
the plan which will now be enforced, the
snug sum of $7.20 oer week, or about a
dollar an hour a little more if he takes
less than one hour for his delivery, a little
less if he consumes more tirne. whether he
be slow or swift, cycle or afoot.
R. W. Avers, a student at Wash
bum, carried State Journal route No.
21. known as the South Topeka route.
He carries a total of 216 copies of the
State Journal. There are 300 resi
dences and business houses in this dis
trict. By paying the low price of one cent per
copy for the 20-page Sunday edition (and
carriers have cheerfully paid one cent for
t'j-yiiRe paper ana even tor an s-puge
?tIluV ca" DiL secured, mu maae. unaer
the plan which will now Be enforced, the
snug sum of $6.48 jer week, or about a
aouar an hour a little more if he takes
less than one hour for his delivery, a little
less if he consumes more time, whether he
be slow or swift, cycle or afoot.
11. L. Cowgill, a student at Wash
burn, carries State Journal route No.
2 2, known as the Low-man Hill route.
He curries 190 copies of the State Jour
nal. Number of .residences and busi
ness houses in this territory, 376. Cow
gill, by pushing his list, can make his
privilege on this route, worth more
under the new plan than it was before.
By paying the low price of one cent per
copy for the 20-page Sunday edition fand
carriers have cheerfully paid one cent for
a 10-page paper and even for an 8-page
paper to other dailies), this carrier, pre
suming that not a single additional sub
scriber can be secured, will make, under
the plan which will now be enforced, the
snug sum of $5.67 per week, or about a
dollar an hour a little more if he takes
I less than one hour for his delivery, a little
less if he consumes more time,, whether he
be slow or swift, cycle or afoot.
J. A. McClure, a student at Wash
I burn, carries State Journal route No.
j 2 8, bounded by Quincy, Third, the riv
i er and the Santa Fe tracks. He car
! ries 251 copies of the State Journal.
In this route there are 325 residences
and business houses.
By paying the low price of one cent per
copy for the 20-page Sunday edition (and
carriers have cheerfully paid one cent for
a iu-page paper ana even tor an 8-page
paper to other dailies), this carrier, pre
suming that not a single additional sub
scriber can be secured, wiil make, under
the plan which will now be enforced, the
snug sum of $7.53 per week, or about a
dollar an hour a little more if he takes
less than one hour for his delivery, a little
less if he consumes more time, whether he
be slow or swift, cycle or afoot.
John M Davis, a student at Wash
burn, carries State Journal route No.
29. known as the Oakland route. He
carries a tocal of 191 copies of the State
Journal. There are 308 residences and
business houses in this territory.
By paying the low price of one cent per
copy for the 20-page Sunday edition (and
carriers have cheerfully paid one cent for
a 10-page paper and even for an 8-page
paper to otner dailies), this carrier, pre-
unminTV ..... o . .. T . i ....... i c.V.
acriher cn n hf aooiircrl will n , lr nnilor
the plan which w-ill now be enforced, the
snug sum of $5.63 per week, or about a
dollar an hour a little more if he takes
less than one hour for his delivery, a little
less if he consumes more time, whether he
be slow or swift, cycle or afoot.
Frank Short, a student at Washburn,
carries State Journal route No 30,
known as the Washburn College and
Seabrook route. He carries a total of
1!8 eopiesjf the State Journal. Number
of residences and business houses in
this territory, 303. This is badly scat
tered territory far out.
By paying the low price of one cent per
copy for the 20-page Sunday edition (and
.... ... 1,...,,. ,.l..,H ......
carriers have cheerfully paid one cent for
a n-page paper ana even tor an s-page
! paper to other dailies), this carrier, pre-
suming that not a single additional sub
scriber can be secured, will make, under
! the planjwhich -r"l now be enforced, the
snug sum of $5.94 per week, or about a
1 dollar an hour a little more if he takes
less than one hour for his delivery, a little
i less if he consumes more time, whether he
be slow or swift, cycle or afoot.
F. S. Koons. a student at Washburn,
carries State Journal route No. 31, lo
j cated on Taylor, Western avenue and
j Fillmore from Fifth to the river, and
on Clay from Tenth to the river. He
carries 209 copies of the State Journal.
In this territory there are 340 residences
and business houses. Mr. Koons is now
neglecting his route, although we pay
him well.
By paying the low price of one cent per
, ropy or the 20-page Sundav edition (anc
carriers have cheerfully paid one cent foi
j R jQpage paper and even for an 8-pag
ia
paper to other dailies), this carrier, pre
suming that not a single additional sub
scriber can be secured, will make, under
the plan which will now be enforced, the
snug sum of $6.24 per week, or about a
dollar an hour a little more if he takes
I is than one hour for his deliverv n little
avenue, aiviaea tnis territory into two
routes and sold the same for more than
one thousand dollar. 270 copies of the
State Journal are now being carried in
this territory.
The Publisher's Statement Yesterday.
The following statement was deliv
ered to the carriers yesterday noon and
the circular of the carriers' followed
last evening and was delivered with the
parer to the subscribers. Here is our
sti'.tfni'-nt of yesterday:
Topeka, Kan., Oct. 5, X905.
To Jas. A. McClure and Other Carriers
of the State Journal.
Gentlemen: I have your various
communications of different dates, in
cluding the one of October 3 sUined by
Geo. S. Badders as chairman carriers'
committee.
Permit me to say at the start that
our records do not show that Geo. S.
Badders is at present a carrier on the
State Journal.
While I prefer to deal entirely with
the carriers, I will assume that the let-
; .uuc. o.Ui..n.Cn .
large numDer or tne carriers.
I have given your communications
very careful and full consideration but
cannot under any circumstances agree
I to let vou have seven oaners for six
cents. I am willing, as stated in my
cents. x etui .10 at-ttteti 111 111.
first communication to you on Septe
ber 30th, to give you the papers for all
regular subscribers at the rate of one
cent per copy for each and every is
sue, namely, seven cents for the seven
papers, including the edition for Sun
day mornins. That is final.
In adding the handsome and com
plete paper which we inaugurated last
i Saturday nignt J. nave gone co enoiiii-
you pay for the paper will pay for
bu a mere fraction of tne additional
cost, the great bulk of which I must
assume. I believe that the paper for
Sunday morning, that is, the seven pa
pers for seven days per week, will an
chor and secure the paper permanent
ly in the hearts and homes of the peo
ple of this city and will greatly in
crease the circulation as hundreds of
words of commendation have been re
ceived from your subscribers who are
generally delighted with the paper.
Among the reasons I set forth in
my statement to you last Saturday
was one that other papers were pre
paring to put us at a great disadvan
. Th u.tinn 1 tiinlr I aspire
't protect you as weil as myself
j " - . nnm. . vou un.
rne action iook i
The price of the six papers to you un
der the old arrangement has for a long
time been entirely too inadequate to the
enormous increase in the size, quality
and expense of getting out the State
Journal. This price has remained un
changed to you for ten or more years.
During this time the expenses have
more than tripled and yet your profits
per subscriber have not only remained
unchanged, but in totals have increas
ed largely by reason of the increase in
the number of papers in your respec
tive routes.
The profit in carrying the State
Journal has been so great that today
the carriers on this paper probably
constitute the highest paid labor in the
city of Topeka, many of the carriers
receiving a dollar or more per hour
for the time they give to the service.
I have never taken a dollar from any
carrier for the privilege granted him of
carrying the paper; I have never sold
any routes, except, I believe, in one
instance where the carrier left us in
the lurch and we turned over the route
for the 'amount due on it. This was
many years ago in North Topeka.
The State Journal is now issuing:
4 papers of 10 pages, equal 40 pages.
1 issue 10 to 12 pages, equal 10 to 12
pages.
1 issue 16 pages, equal 16 pages.
1 issue 20 pages, equal 20 pages.
Making a total per week of 86 to 88
pages.
The next largest paper in the city is
issuing:
6 papers of 8 pages, equal 48 pages.
1 issue 16 to 28 pages, equal 16 to 28
pages.
Making a total per week of 64 to 76
pages.
In other words, we are giving to our
readers from 12 to 22 pages more per
week than any other paper, which would
be equivalent to about 8 papers a week
to the other's 7.
I cannot be governed by the action of
other rapers. We must stand on our
own merits and business principles.
I am glad to note in your communica
tion of Oct. 2rd the handsome opinion
you express of the paper wherein you
say:
"We carriers believe, and we know
that our customers share our belief, that
the State Journal always has been and
will continue to be the newsiest, and in
all respects, the leading paper of To
peka. In fact we feel that there is no
room for comparison of the Journal
with any other Topeka paper."
In my communication of Sept. 30th I
set forth several additional ways In
which I propose in the future to protect
the carriers: namely, by charging the
newsboys 2 cents for the edition for
Sunday morning. Furthermore, to allow
the carrier the profit on regular sub
scribers in his route when those sub
scribers ar absent ofi a vacation, or
for any other brief period, and stop
the paper going to the regular place in
Topeka.
Furthermore, I announced that we do
not intend to take any subscriber for
the Sunday morning jpaper alone, but
make one price, 10 cents, for the seven
issues to the subscriber and seven
cents for the seven issues to the car
riers. If you should not be disposed to
carry the papers under the same old
rate of one cent per copy, but for seven
issues instead of six, I will be com
pelled, regret it on your account as I
would, to at once arrange for other
carriers to deliver the paper in the
i routes where any carrier, for any rea
I son is not willing to pay the addi
tional cent for the additional paper.
Under conditions in Topeka it is ab
i solutely impossible to get more than
10 cents per week for the seven papers.
In regard to the edition for Sunday
i morning, I can take no backward step.
'It is a permanent feature and that
j issue will be better in the future than
i it was on the first date.
In considering this matter you must
bear in mind that many of the car
riers on the State Journal are making
more than S8 a week and that the
I mere privilege to carry the paper has
been disposed of by carriers from time
to time, subject to our approval, for
$500, or more.
You are doubtless aware that at
present one Topeka paper is being de
livered by carrier for a trifle less than
three cents per week per subscriber.
Any carrier who has been delivering
the Journal recently for forty cents
per month and we have heard of such
instances although the rate is forty-five
cents -received about three cents per
week per subscriber for his work.
While we do not like to do it, we
might be compelled by the carriers to
charge an open rate to newsboys of
one cent per copy straight for the seven
issues and let them get subscribers
anywhere they could. That is the way
it is done in some cities, but we do not
wish to do it unless in self-protection.
I regretted to learn yesterday after
noon that not only were some of the
carriers making no effort to increase
their lists, but that they were throw
ing obstacles in the way of the State
Journal endeavoring to increase its
lists in Topeka, and thereby increase
the carriers' profits and reimburse
ourselves in part for the expenditures
inaugurated.
The offer of 2 0 cents per hour to
carriers to solicit brought compara
tively few replies, except those which
j might come from people who are in
! different to the fact whether the list
j was large or small in the respective
I routes.
While every one else on the State
I Journal is striving to progress, I hope
i the carriers will now join in the work
'along with us enthusiastically and en
i ergetically. You have never had such
I an opportunity to build up your routes
as the edition for Sunday has given
i you.
I I will expect an answer from you by
j 3 o'clock Friday. If by that time you
I feel you are not willing to carry the
! paper under the new arrangement I
j have proposed. I will be compelled to
j take immediate action and cause the
' papers to be delivered in Topeka be-
ginning Friday evening by other car
! riers, although I do not contemplate
j at this time selling any routes to any
j one. Under the new arrangement
many of the carriers will receive more
jthan $5.00 and $6.00 per week for
their services.
My business methods in the past
have been successful and I think you
may now feel no uneasiness about your
! interests. You are doubtless aware
' that many papers have been and are
! being carried for 3 cents per week;
I and in some cases for from H4 to 2
cents per subscriber per week; but I
do not believe in cheap labor.
Very respectfully,
FRANK P. MAC LENNAN.
If any subscriber now thinks he has
done any injustice to the State Jour
nal, he might authorize us to with
draw his name from the petition.
Subscribers' Petition.
A big petition from subscribers was
filed late this afternoon. It is fully
answered above, and does not change
the situation.
Chief Goodwin Sued.
A suit for $702.88 was filed in the
district court this morning against A
G. Goodw-in and J. C. Goings on a note
given by them to H. K. McDead and
A. N. Hutchinson, of Ellis. Kan. The
note which was given for 60 days last
April shows two payments of $10 each.
Weather Indications.
Chicago, Oct. 6. Forecast for Kan
sas: Fair tonignt and Saturday: con
tinued high temperature;
southerly winds.
fresh
GUILD ISJMMED.
Lieunteant Governor of Massa
chusetts Galled Higher.
Nominated by Republicans for
Governor of Bay State.
PRAISE OF ROOSEVELT
Is a Prominent Feature of the
Party Platform.
Standpatters Win in the Fight
Over Tariff.
Boston, Oct 6. Lieutenant Governor
Curtis Guild, jr., was nominated, for
governor by the Republican state con
vention by acclamation.
Following Is an abstract of the plat
form :
"We congratulate the president upon
his overwhelming triumph at the polls
at the last election. Such a splendid,
endorsement was given by the people
because it was deserved."
Referring to the president's part in se
curing peace in the far east the plat
form says:
"It is everywhere gratefully recog
nized that peace so earnestly desired is
due the largest measure to the untiring
efforts of President Roosevelt. He has
earned the gratitude of all the world."
The president also is heartily en
dorsed for his "fearless enforcement of
laws enacted to prevent great corpora
tions from oppressing the people by un
just discrimination or by the destruc
tion of lawful competition."
On the subject of the tariff the plat
form says:
"We believe that the policy orvthe
protection to American labor and
American industry should be main
tained. The Republican party of Mas
sachusetts reaffirms its devotion to the
principle of protection and is opposed
to tariff changes tending to depress
or destroy any of our industries or to
lower the wages of American labor.
But we recognize the fact as declared
by the national Republican convention
at Chicago that rates should be
changed when conditions have so
changed that the public interest de
mands the alteration of schedules. The
times at which revision of the tariff
should be undertaken must be deter
mined by the reports of the party from
all parts of our country. We approve
the position taken by our senators and
representatives at the last session of
congress in favor of present action and'
we rge that they should continue to
press upon their party associates in
congress from other states the wisdom
of a consideration of the tariff for the
purpose of revision and readjustment.
"We further recommend for the con
sideration of congress the enactment
of a tariff provision which shall pro
tect our exports against discrimination
and secure to the United States the
treatment accorded to the most favor
ed nations in all foreign markets."
The president is endorsed in his ef
fort "to devise a just and effective
method of building up a strong com
mercial fleet, through the commission
authorized in response to his request
which makes its final report to the
next consress. The lack of American
steamship communication with South
America and our feeble share in the
ocean trade of the Orien. are both a
peril and reproach to the United
States. The large and active merchant
shippinz would mean profitable em
ployment in a congenial field for New
England capital and labor. It would
mean widening markets for the entire
nation and the reinforcement of the
navy by an Indispensable reserve of
auxiliary ships and seamen."
IT IS THREATENING RAIN.
Threatening clouds have been over
hanging the city all day and the indi
cations are that the elements are get
ting ready for a deluge during the night,
if not before. The temperature for to
day is just about the same that it has
been for the past week and manages to
reach the 80 mark or a little above
during the hottest part of the day.
The hourly temperatures for today
were :
7 o'clock 7611 o'clock 78
8 o'clock 7812 o'clock 78
9 o'clock 78 1 1 o'clock 78
10 o'clock 78 2 o'clock 78
Wind south seven miles at 2 p. m.
G. H. Mathews In Business.
G. H. Matthews, who has been in the
shoe business in Topeka for a number
of years, is fitting up the room for
merly used as a lunch room by the
Oxford hotel, and will have a stock of
shoes in the building as soon as It Is
ready for occupancy.
Printers Strike at Duluth.
Duluth. Minn.. Oct. 5. Union print
ers in all shops in this city struck to
day for an eight hour day and a closed
shop.
WANTED CARRIERS.
The State Journal w-ill give em
ployment to the first forty-three car
riers who apply at this office this
afternoon. Four or five should have
bicycles or horses.
The rate paid for this service will
be 30 per cent, of the 10-cent per
week subscriptions. This is the new
rate to the carriers by reason of the
added cent for the 20-page paper.
WTe may have work for these carriers
tonight and indefinitely, including
Sunday morning, but we reserve the
right to pay any applicants for to
night only or for as many nights as
we may desire their services, or for
tonight without exacting any service.
Carriers must be over eighteen years
of age, must not carry any other paper,
must be of good character, and, i?
strangers, be vouched Xor by one or
more well known merchants or citizens.
The time required will be from oa
half hour to two hours.

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