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The Topeka state journal. [volume] (Topeka, Kan.) 1892-1980, July 03, 1907, LAST EDITION, Image 2

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THE TOPEKA DAILY STATE JOURNAIi WEDNESDAY EVENING, JULY 3, 1907.
S. S. S. is recognized everywhere not only as the test of all blood puri
Eers and the greatest of all tonics, but the one medicine that can be taken
with absolute safety by everyone. Young or old, those in robust health, or
those whose systems are delicate and run-down, may use it with the same
good results, -and equally without fear of any unpleasant or injurious after
effects. - Next in importance to removing the cause of any disease is the
condition in which the system is left after a course of medical treatment.
Medicines containing mercury, potash or other strong mineral ingredients
often do permanent injury by eating out the delicate lining and tissues of
the stomach,- producing chronic Dyspepsia, unfavorably affecting the bowels,
and so deranging the system otherwise, that even if the original disease had
been removed from the system it is left in such a weakened and deranged
condition that the health is permanently impaired. S. S. S. enjoys the dis
tinction of being the only blood medicine on the market that does not contain
a mineral ingredient of some kind. It is made entirely of the healing, cleans
ing extracts and juices of roots, herbs and barks gathered directly from the
forests and fields of nature, under our own supervision, and when they reach
cut laboratory contain all their original valuable tonic and blood purifying
properties. We offer a reward of $1,000 for proof that S. S. S. contains a
particle of mineral in any form. Being made entirely from these vegetable
ingredients S. S. S. is absolutely harmless to the system, and while curing
disease adds health and strength to every part of the body. S. S. S. cures
Rheumatism, Catarrh, Scrofula, Sores and Ulcers, Skin Diseases, Contagious
Blood Poison, and all other blood troubles by removing the cause and sup
plying the circulation with health-giving and strength-producing qualities.
-' ' THE SWIFT SPECIFIC CO., ATLANTA, GA.
WHERE THEY PLAY TOMORROW.
Leavenworth at Topeka.
Webb City at Joplin.
SpringHeltf at Oklahoma City.
Wichita at Hutchinson.
Something is wrong and there Is
a leak somewhere. This department
la not In favor of criticising for the
sake of starting- something but it
wishes to otter a little criticism ill a
friendly spirit. There is no use of try
ing to explain conditions. The fact
is that the White Sox are not playing
ball as they are capable of doing.
There is something wrong some place
and the sooner this part of the team,
whatever it is, is remedied the sooner
the team will be playing ball. The
longer matters are allowed to drag
as they are now doing the worse the
management will suffer, and the less
will the public patronize the game.
Just what the trouble is is hard to tell
exactly. The fielding of the White
Sox classes as high, if not higher, than
that of any other team in the associa
tion. Erwin and Tonneman are both
good catchers and are on a par with
any - pair in the league. Abbott is
playing a -great game at first.- The
work of Rag-an'and Olson around the
keystone station would be hard to
equal even In much faster company
whiie Runkle ts always playing a
steady third and in always in the
game. In. the outfield the weakest
fielding is being done.,' Davis is the
only man who is ranking very high
In the outfield at the present time.
Lawler is not exactly sure on all fly
balls but In the main plays a fair
game in the field. Hurlburt in cen
ter field is not playing as he used to
when he first broke into this com
pany nor even as good as he did last
season.
In the outfield the batting of the
team is woefully weak although the
addition of Dalrymple will materially
strengthen this department. Lawler
is batting about .150 which for an
outfielder Is a poor showing. The out
fielders are supposed to do the bulk
of the hitting. Hurlburt hits only
spasmodically while Davis is the
only one who hits regularly. A little
more hitting in the outfield would not
hurt. Davis, the ouly good fielder in
the outfield is out of the game
through some trouble with the man
agement. On the Infield all the play
era are hitting as well as the average
Infield and some are even clouting
the Spalding with great regularity.
In the pitching department Topeka
Is well fixed. Jones is undoubtedly
as good a pitcher as there is -in the
Western Association. Halla always
pitches a good game but is a little bit
off at present. Bunton can be depend
ed upon to do good work at any time
when the team plays a little bit be
hind him. Wright is thought well of
fcy the players who have seen him
work and ought to give a good ac
count of himself. So it seems that
nothing more could be desired. Some
people seem to think that the team
work is lacking, but Topeka has de
veloped1 a better degree of team work
than any other team in the circuit.
The Champs are past masters at the
hit and run and squeeze-plays. In
fact they work this play too much
and all a pitcher on the opposing
team has to do Is to waste a ball and
the squeeze Is frustrated. A little bit
toes of the squeeze play and more of
pood swinging at the ball is what is
needed In this line.
It will only take a glance from a
non-partisan casual observer to see
that the team is lacking in one thing
.and that Is harmony. There seems to
be strife among the players. Some of
them who are ordinarily good play
ers seem to be losing heart and do not
care whether they play ball or not.
Whether this is caused by bad water
or an enmity of the management Is not
clear. However, many of the mem
bers of the team are very open in
their criticism of the method In which
the team Is run. There is scarcely a
i'n on the team who has not at some
time or another In the past six weeks
ft r.-j"1 the enmity of the manasre-
For Health's Sake
keep the bowels open, the liver
r .i-ulated, the kidneys active, the
stomach well, the blood pure, the
s.eep sound, the brain clear with
MeecAamZ
mm
Sold everywhere. Inboxesl0c.and25c
ment which has cost them a five dol
lar cut in their salary at the end of
the month. This has occurred very
frequently and only Monday a triple
application of the system was noticed.
Olson who is always in the . game for all
he is worth and who is one of the
most conscientious players on the
team was fined five dollars after he
had taken care of eight chances, some
of them so difficult that an error
would have added another score to
Leavenworth. This also occurred on
the day after he had stolen four bases
in a single game. In this same game
the team secured four hits of which
number Abbott took three. Notwith
standing this fact Abbott was fined
five dollars as his share in the loss of
the game. Lawler also got a little
package slipped over to him. This
policy, together with the policy of
publicly rebuking players who fail to
win the game by a heme run at a
critical time may be responsible for
the reversal of form shown by the
team. It has taken the ginger out of
the team and substituted vinegar.
What seems to the public to be the
wisest policy for the management of
the team at this time is to remove the
cause of the trouble and thereby heal
the wound. The - public supports the
team and would like to see ball play
ing which it would be a credit to sup
port. This little criticism is not in
tended as a roast or a. knock but is
merely a composite opinion of the fans
which is printed in these . colujros
through the office of a newspaper as
the voice of the public and not as the
friend or enemy of any player or of
tho management.
The Wichita Beacon takes the fol
lowing shot at Topeka's captain: Re
ports from Topeka indicate that Mr.
"Spectacles" Hurlburt missed . the
train and failed to arrive at Hutchin
son In time for the first game. We
notice that "Spec" hasn't been sus
pended yet.
Sisler who, in the early history of
the White Sox, worked on the third
corner of the diamond, is with Denver
this season where he is playing the
role of utility man. Sisler is a good
bail player but always liked something
else better which interfered with his
ball playing.
Leavenworth has purchased Third
Baseman Blausser from the Webb
City team and will play him at third
base.
Springfield Republican: The men
who are behind the Springfield team
say that they are determined to yet
have one of the best teams in the
league before the season ends. But
they are finding much difficulty in get
ting the right kind of men to strength
en the team. There are plenty of ball
players looking for a Job, but very few
of them are able to make good in the
class of ball put up in this league, and
hence the Springfield management is
using every effort to get men who can
make good.
Hutchinson Independent: Andrews
strengthened his pitching staff by get
ting Arnold from Topeka. He had it
on anything that Topeka showed here
and we can't see why they sold him.
He has a good head and almost per
fect control.. Why he should keep
Wright and sell Arnold is a mystery to
us. Hutchinson got more runs off
Wright in the eighth inning yesterday
than they got off Arnold in the twenty-one
innings pitched.
TJlrlch, the little pitcher, and Camp
bell, the catcher who caught for the
John Robinson circus team Sunday in
their game here, quit the circus yes
terday and are going to Leavenworth,
where they have been offered positions
on that team. Both men showed good
form here Sunday and have both seen
professional service.
There will be two games tomorrow,
one in the morning and another in the
afternoon. The morning game will be
called at 10 a. m. and the afternoon
game will take place at S:30 p. m.
Both teams will return from Leaven
worth tonight.
Bartiesvllle Enterprise: Cheney,
the big pitcher who was tried out by
the Chicago White Sox last spring,
pitched against Independence again
today after letting the team down with
one hit yesterday and won his own
game today In the eleventh inning by
putting the ball over the left field
fence for a home run. scoring the only
earned run of the game.
Umpires Most Be Protected.
Milwaukee, Wis., July 3. Presi
dent O'Brien of the American associ
ation has Issued an order that any club
manager or management failing to
protect umpires from abuse of crowds
for fifteen minutes after a game will
be fined J100.
COULOrnjELP IT
Topeka Took the Game Because
Leavenworth "Wouldn't.
Convicts Pitcher 0. K., But Er
rors Too Numerous.
SALT PACKERS WON.
Hutchinson Defeated Wichita
by the Score of 9 to 3.
Springfield and Webb City Move
Up a Notch.
Leavenworth, July 3. Errors on
the part of the local team were large
ly responsible for their defeat Tues
day afternoon and not the' twirling of
Hollingsworth, who really did first
class work in the box. Topeka made
two hits and two errors, both of the
latter appearing on Catcher Tonne
man's tag. The dissension In the To
peka team still seems to exist as Red
Davis and his trusty willow failed to
appear in the contest. Both teams
had five men left on. bases. Wright
and Bunton each took a turn at pitch
ing for the Cooleycrows. V " ' -TOPEKA.
Player AB. H. O.- A. E.
Abbott, lb 3 0 10 0 0
Olson, 2b 4 14 2 0
Halla, rf 3 11 0 0
Ragan, ss 4 0 1 3 0
Runkel, 3b 3 0 4 1 0
Lawler, If 1 0 3 0 0
Hurlburt, cf 4 0 110
Tonneman, c. 4 0 2 0 2
Wright, p 10 0 10
Bunton, p. .t 3 0 14 0
Totals 30 2 27 12 2
LEAVENWORTH.
Player AB. H. O. A. E.
Wooley. If 4 13.0 0
Middleton. cf 4 1 3 0 0
Govereau, rf 4 1 10 0
Vaughan, 3b 4 1.2 0 2
Quiesser, c 3 0 1.0 1
Sehumyer, 2b 4 1 5 6 0
Quigley, lb 3 1 12 10
Turner, ss 2 - 2 0 1 2
Hollingsworth, p. .. 3 0 0 4 1
Totals 31 8 27 11 6
SCORE BT INNINGS.
Topeka 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 03
Leavenworth ..0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 02
Summary: Earned runs Leaven
worth, 2. Two base hit Turner. Sac
rifice hits Halla, Lawler, Quiesser,
Quigley. Stolen bases Tonneman,
Olson, Ragan. Bases on balls Off
Hollingsworth, 3; off Bunton, I.
Struck out By Hollingsworth, 1; by
Wright, 1; by Bunton, 1. Hits Off
Wright, 3 in 2 innings; off Bunton, S
in 7 innings. Passed ball Quiesser.
Double plays Wooley to Vaughn to
Quigley; Bunton to Olson to Abbott.
Left on bases Leavenworth, 5;. To
peka, 5. Time 1:35. Umpire Kild
uff. Springfield, 5; Joplin, 8.
Springfield, Mo., July 3. Hyatt was
very wild and was relieved in the eighth
after giving two bases on balls and be
ing hit for a single and a double. Hen
drix walked his first man and ' a hit
cleared the bases. The score:
SPRINGFIELD. !, "
Player AB. ,11. . O. A. E.
Murray, cf .'...4 1- 6 0 0
Cole. If .. 4 0 '3 0 0
Cuthbert, rf 4 0 10 0
Olmstead. lb 4 1 14 0 0
Welter, f?s ... 1 0 0 2 1
Smith, 2b 3 . 1 . 0 , 4.0
Mayes, 3b 3 10 6 1
Nee, c. 3 1 3 0 0
Price, p 3 1 0 2' 1
Totals '". 29 6 27 14 3
JOPLIN.
Player AB. H. O. A. E.
Fillman, rf. 4 - 1 2-0.0
Harrington, cf. 4 1 0 0 0
Olson, ss .5 1 1 1 2
Rohn. lb 3 ' 1 6 0 - 0
Perseh, If 4 2 4 0 0
Quiesser, 2b 3 0 0 0 0
Vanderhill, c 4 1 9 0 0
Fleming, 3b 4 0 2 2 0
Hyatt, p 3 1.0 3 0
Hendrlx, p 0 0 0 1 0
Armstrong 1 0 0 0 0
Totals 35 8 24 7 2
Armstrong batted for Hendrlx in ninth.
SCORE BY INNINGS.
Springfield 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 B
Joplin 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 03
The summary: Two-base hits Mayes,
Harrington, Olsen, Persch. Bases on
balls Off Price 3, off Hyatt 7, off Hen
drlx 3. Struck out By Hyatt 7. Left
on bases Springfield 7, Joplin 9. Stolen
bases Welter 2, Olsen, Rohn, Quiesser.
Sacrifice hits Cole, Harrington. Double
play Fleming to Rohn. Wild pitches
Price, Hyatt. Hits Off Hyatt 4 In eight
and one-third innings, off Hendrlx one
In two-thirds of an inning. Time-r-l:40.
Umpire Guthrie.-
Hutchinson, 9; Wichita. 3.
Wichita, . Kan., July 3. Speer's wild-;
ness lost the game in the first two in
nings. He was relieved-by Clark,-who
kept the hits well scattered but did not
have good control, Barbour, who pitch
ed for Hutchinson, was also wild, pass
ing four men. The score:. ; ';.'.- -HUTCHINSON.
.'- '
Player AB.-H.. 0. ' A.- E.
Pettlgrew, cf 3 ' l.VJ 2 0 0
Wilson, rf ; 3 ;.'"" 2 . -": 8". '" 0 .- 0
Andrews, 3b. ........ 5,3 -O- :'? 1 -
Zink. lb.. i5 ; 0 , 9 0 0
Lewis, If '-.. " 2 1 - 0 . 0
Johnson, ss, ... 2 '' 0 . 4 2 " - 0
Casev, 2b 3 1 2 5 ' 0
Noyes. c. 3 0 6 1 0
Barbour, p. 4 0 0 6 1
Totals 32 9 ' 27 15 1
WICHITA.
Player AB. H. O. A. E.
Milan, If "... 2 0.3 0 0
Becker, rf 4 12 0 0
Hetling, 3b 4 0 2 3 0
Bavless, cf 4 0 2 - 0 0
Holland, lb 3 1 - - 6 1-1
Weaver, c. .......... 2- 1 4 ' 4 0
Nichols, c 1 1 3 0 0
Annis, ss '4 1. 1 20
Kelly,- 2b . , 4 ' 0 .". 4 2 0
Speer, p 0 , 0' . 0 . 1 ' 0
Clark, .p. ..: ':..-.. 0 1 ' 2
Totals ......1.32 27 ,13 .-' ' 3
SCORE BY INNINGS, i-
Hutchinson ....3.3 0 '0 0 11 0-14
Wichita 0 0 0.0 1, 0 0 23
The summary: Twos-base hits An-
I
'Arrow
CLUPCCO SHRUNK
Collar:
Quarter Sixes, 15c each, a for tsc.
v f LU5.1Z- "ooy 4. CO.,
drews, Holland. Three-base hits An
drews. Weaver, Casey, Becker. Home
run Nichols. Sacrifice hits Noyes,
Lewis. Stolen base Becker. Bases on
balls Off Speer 4, off Clark 1, off Bar
bour 4. Struck-out By Speer 4, by
Clark 3, by Barbour 3. Passed ball
Noyes. Hit by pitcher Johnson. Dou
ble play Casey to Johnson to Zlnk.
Hits Off Speer 3 In two innings, off
Clark 6 in seven innings. Time of game
1:45. Umpire Jacobs. Attendance
800. " " . ;
Webb City, 3; Oklahoma City, 2.
Webb City, -Mo.,r; July 3. Oklahoma
City was defeated by the locals, 3 to 2.
The visitors made only one hit. White's
error was responsible, for the local's
three runs, which came in the seventh
after two men were out. The score:
WEBB CITY.
Player AB. H. O. A. E.
Fleming, rf ; 4 11 0 0
Oyler, 2b ... 3 0 1 0 0
Olson, ss -. 4-1 0 31
Collins, cf 3 0 3 0
Lofton, if 2 0 7 0 0
Cheek, c , 3 2 2 0 1
Blausser, 3b 3 0 0 3 0
Gray, lb 2 1 12 10
Burns, p. ....;." 3 114 0
Totals ....1...:....27 27 11 2
OKLAHOMA CITY.
Player ; AB. H. O. A. . E.
Soogglns.lf ....2 0 0 0 0
Pendry, 3d. ......... 3 0 0 3 0
Goes 1 0 0 0 0
Gill, lb 3 0 11 o o
Rapps, cf ... 3 0 0 - 1 0
M. McFarland. rf... 3 1 0 1 0
White, ss 8. 0.3 3 1
Wisser. 2b 3 0 3 4 0
Henry, c ., 3 0 6 2 U
C. McFarland. p ... 3 0 1 6 0
Totals .27 1 24 20 1
Batted for Scojins In ninth.
SCORE BY INNINGS.
Webb City .....0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 3
Oklahoma City i. ,.2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 03
The summary: Earned runs Webb
City 1. Bases on balls Off McFarland
1. Struck out By Burns 1, by McFar
land 5. Left on bases Webb City 4,
Oklahoma City 1. ' Hit by pitched ball
Pendry, Lofton, Oyler. Sacrifice hits
Collins, Scoggins, QUI.- Stolen bases
Blausser, Rapps.- Time of game 1:40.
Umpire Eckman. Attendance 300.
Western Association Standing.
Clubs r Won. Lost. Pet.
Wichita .' 40 14 .741
Oklahoma City ............ 82 23 .580
Topeka . 33 25 .569
Hutchinson .... 32 26 .562
Joplin 30 25 .645
Webb City 26 30 .464
Springfield 17 35 .329
Leavenworth .... ......... 12 43 .218
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
Chicago, 5; Cincinnati, S.
Chicago, July 3.- Cincinnati's two
errors and both' of Coakley's passes
were followed by hits and gave the lo
cals the game. ."' Lundgren was replac
ed by Overall after, he had given nine
bases on balls.
Score by innings: R.H.E.
Chicago ..0 0 0 1 3 0 0 1 5 10 0
Cincinnati 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2-3 7 2
Batteries Lundgren, Overall and
Kling; Coakley," Mason, McLean and
Schlel. .- . - ....
Brooklyn, 8; New York, 2.
Brooklyn, July 3. Brooklyn out.
played New Tork In the first game of
the present serles5 winning 8 to 2.
Score by Innings r 2 R.H.E.
New York .0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 12 7 1
Brooklyn ..a. .3 0 0 4 0 0 1 0 8 12 0
Batteries: Ames, Lynch and Bower
man; Scanldn and Bergen.
Pittsburg, 4; St. Louis, 3.
Pittsburg, . July .3.. :In a close and
clean game tlreo Pittsburgs. defeated St.
Louis because Gribson made a' three
base hit in" thS sixth' Inning, driving
two runs across the plate.
Score by innings': - R.H.E.
Pittsburg .;w...-....u0 0 2 0 2 0 0 4 8 1
St.-Louis ....;.i0 10O3 0O-3 9 0
Batteries Camfiltz and ". Gibson;
Beebe and Noonan.
-. Boston, 2; Philadelphia, 1.
Philadelphia, July 3. Boston de
feated Philadelphia by hitting Moran
hard, while Dome held the locals safe
throughout. "
Score by inningsf ' R.H.E.
Boston ..i.l 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 8 0
Philadelphia -.-. O 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 5 0
Batteries Dorner and Brown; "Mo
ran and Dooln. - - .
National League Standing.
Clubs Won. Lost. Pet.
Chicago i... 49 16 .754
New York 37 . 23 . 617
Pittsburg 35 26 .674
Philadelphia .... :.."....'... 35 27 .565
Cincinnati 29 36 . 446
Boston 27 34 . 443
Brooklyn 26 38 .407
St. Louis .J-...., 64 ,-. ,.:JS5
AMERICAN LB'.QTO, .r'
Cleveland. 4? Chicago, 0. .-.".
Cleveland, July 3.7 Cleveland, open
ed its series with Chicago by shutting
out the ehampionsv ' Joss-was hit about
as hard as Walslj: hut, was i. effective
with men on bases. Both pitchers re
celved splendid' support. - Flick's hat
ting, Dougherty's fieldlng i and . 'Bir
mingham's base running were features.
Score by innings:, i -; ,: R.H.E!
Cleveland ...i....j.41 J 0-0 0 6 1 4 8 1
Chicago. . ........ ;.i-i,0, 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 00 7 1
; Batteries Joss and Clarke; Walsh
and Sullivan. : - -
Detroit, 8; St. Louis, 5.
Detroit, Mich., July 3. Neither
pitcher bothered the batters very much
but Detroit got to Powell at more tell
ing times while St. Louis missed sev
eral good chances, having 12 base run.
ners left. .- :', t - . .
Score by innings. R.H.E.
Detroit :.l 0 4 0 0 0.2 1 8 12 2
St. Louis .......,..a 0 0 0 3 10 0 05 12 3
Batteries Donovan and Schmidt;
Powell, Pelty and Spencer.
Washington, 6; Boston, 2.
Boston, July '8. Washington won
the game in the . third inning by bat
ting Tannehlll freely. Patten was not
in good form and was taken out of the
box after Boston had scored two runs
In the second. , , ,
Score by innings: R.H.E.'
Washington ..,.0 2 1 2 0 0 1 0 06 11 1
Boston .......0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 7.2
Batteries Patten, Hughes and War
ner; Tannehlll, Brultt and Shaw.
New York, 8: Philadelphia, 7.
.New Tork, July S. Timely hitting
by Keeler and Chase enabled New
York to beat Philadelphia in the tenth
inning after an uphill fight.
Score by Innings: R.H.E.
Philadelphia 005010100 07 14.. 0
New York 0 00022201 18 15 2
Batteries Wadd'eU; Bender, Dygert
.-.nd Schreck; Kitson and Thomas.
American League Standing.
Clubs . -' : - . : Won. Lost. Pet.
Chicago ..... 41 22 .651
Cleveland 41 24 . 631
Philadelphia 35 28 .556
Hetrolt 33 27 .550
New York 29 31 .483
St. Louis 27 39 .409
Boston 23 40 .365
Washington 20 42 .323
WESTERN LEAGUE.
Omaha, 2; Lincoln, 0. '
Omaha. July 3. -Saunders pitched a
hut out game against Lincoln and also
made the hit which brought In the first
run of the game, which was enough to
win. - -
Score by Innings: - R.H.E.
Omaha 0 0 0 0 1 0-10 2 , 7 2
Lincoln 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 00 5 1
Batteries Saunders and Gonding;
Zackert and Sullivan.
Denver, 12; Sioux City, 5.
Denver, July 3. In a hard hitting
game Denver defeated Sioux City, 12
to 6.
Score by innings: : R.H.E.
Denver 2 2102500 12 15 3
Sioux City 010103000 5 13 1
Batteries C. Adams and McDon
ough; Newlin and Sheehan.
Western League standing.
Clubs Won. Lost. Pet.
Des Moines 36 24 .600
Omaha 38 29 .567
Lincoln 34 31 .523
Denver 29 29 .500
Sioux City 27 - : 36 .429
Pueblo 25 40 .385
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION.
At Milwaukee Milwaukee, 1; Kan
sas City, 7. " -'
At Indianapolis Indianapolis, 2;
Toledo, 5.
At Louisville Louisville, 7; Colum
bus, 2.
At Minneapolis Minneapolis, 3; St.
Paul, 5.
JEFF I.IKKS SQUIRES.
Thinks the Australian "Will Make Good
in the Rlng.
San Francisco, July 3. Bill Squires
will be 'the next heavyweight cham
pion. Almost every man In San Fran
cisco seems to think so.
James J. Jeffries, the retired unde
feated heavyweight champion of the
world, made a trip to Shannon's place
to see this marvel from across the Pa
cific. Jeff was very anxious to see
Squires at work. He was also desir
ous of having a small chat with him
regarding his Interpretation of the
rules under which the men will fight.
Shortly after Jeffries arrived at Shan
non's the Australian came Into the
gymnasium.. Jeffries, modestly hold
ing a place in the background, stood
on the tips of his toes and took in every
detail of Squires' makeup from his Im
mense brown shoulders to his stocky
calves. For several minutes Jeff
watched the stranger at his work,
warming up for the afternoon stunt,
and then the undefeated champion
stepped softly to the door and closed
it after him.
"What do I think of him?" repeated
Jeff In answer to a question. "He is a
powerful looking fellow; and he has
the back and muscles which make a
punch a dangerous thing. A tough
fellow tough." And so Jeffries in
dorsed the universal verdict a tough
fellow.
- "Of course, I have never seen him
box," said Jeff, "and I can not form
any opinion of what he may do in the
ring. I have seen many a gymnasium
champion who left his fight there and
did not amount to anything in the ring,
and again I have seen many a sloppy
gymnasium worker work like a demon
when he got into the ring. I am not
much on this gymnasium appearance,
but if It looks good for anything, this
man has the equipment of - a great
fighter well muscled shoulders, a
loose way of .carrying himself, which
shows that he Is not muscle bound, a
pair of good arms and well developed
legs."
Tebean Trades Pitcher Frant
Kansas City, July 3. Word was re
ceived from George Tebeau, the owner
of the Kansas City, Louisville and
Denver clubs saying that the multi
magnate had" traded "Parson" Walter
Frantz for Pitcher Tate Cromley-'bf
Indianapolis, and, sold Chris ' Lirfdsay,
the high-salaried first ' sacker, who
was secured from-Detroit, to the same
club. The new Blue Leg will Join the
Blues at Milwaukee.
Will Run In England.
"New York," July 3. N. J. Cartmell,
Mike Murphy's speedy sprinter from
the University of Pennsylvania, has
sailed for Europe. He will compete
in the English championships which
are to be held this month. Cartmell
is to make a tour of the isles and pro
bably will race in Scotland and Ireland.
CALLED TO ACCOUNT.
Senator Clark Must Explain Dealings
Reaching $300,000,000.
New York, July 3. The American
says: By a decision of Judge Amend
in special sessions of the supreme
court, ex-Senator W. A. Clark must
account " for all the . dealings of the
Uriited Verde - Copper company, in
volving the sum of more than $300,
000.000. The decision comes after
eight years of litigation as the result
tf a suit brought by George A. Tread
well for the minority , stockholders.
The.. United Verde mine is located at
Jerome, Arizona.
Low Rates via Union Pacific.
'$17.50". to Colorado and return,
eve "day to September 30, 1907.
$30.50 to Ogden or Salt Lake City
and return, every day to September
30, 1907. . .
$42.50 to Spokane and return, June
2tt to July 12. 1907.
$50.00 to' Portland, Seattle, Tacoma,
Everett, Belllngham, Vancouver, Vic
toria or New Westminster and return,
June 20 to July. 12.
$50.00 to. San Francisco or Los An
geles and return, June 20 to July 6.
. $55.00 to : Yellowstone . Park and .' re
turn, Including rail" and stage, June 7
to Sepember 12, . " ' . - . . "" .
$60.00 to Portland, Tacoma. . Seattle,
San; Francisco, Los ' Angeles - or Sari
Diego and retUFh, .daily, to , Sepember
15, -1907. - , ' f -- ".: :'
62.50 . Circuit Tour , via y Sa,n. Fran
cisco Los " Angeles and Portland,; June
20 to July 12, 1907. . ; ' - ' ' . . ;- , .;
. $73.50' Circuit Torr , vl;i Sans .Fran
cisco, Los Angeles 'and Portland, every
day to' September 15, 1907, -,
$80.50 to Yellowstone Park -and re
turn including rail,' stage .and " , hotels
In Park for- regular tour, June. 7 to
September ' l ... - - , - . .
Also very low round trip rates.. June
1 to September 15, tomany other Ore
gon, Washington, Montana, Idaho and
British Columbia points via Union
Pacific. Inquire of F. A. Lewis, City
Ticket Agent, 525 Kansas avenue,. or
J. C. Fulton. Depot Agent.
Doctor James Albert Berrr. .
Specialty Diseases of the nose, throat,
ttomach. and Intestines. 725 Kansas avat
I'SBrlirf
BASE BALL
White Sox vs.
Leavenworth
THURSDAY AND FRIDAY j.
July 4th 10 a. m. and 3:30 p. m.
July 5th. 4:00 p. m. . " , .
General Admission, 25c Grand
Stand, 15c Ladies Free Friday.
Twelve Good
Breakfasts
for 12 Cents A
i
VI
1
J.
4 2
y D
4:jiG5f . If you
ssSSif hmr -ir"
n
s
a
mi
D
1
J
1
I
packages of
Biscuit for a quarter you have
a delicious, breakfast for a
penny more real nutriment
than is to be found in any
other food in the world for the
same money. It contains all the
body-building elements of the
whole wheat made digestible
by steam-cooking, sheddding
and baking.
For breakfast heat the Biscuit in oven to
restore crispness, pour hot milk over it, add a
little cream and a little salt; or, sweeten to
taste. Shredded Wheat is also delicious and
wholesome for any meal in combination with
fresh or preserved fruits. At your grocers.
0
2
I
0
1 t
I
0
'Oil EZZZ3 1 1 1 1 E53 1 1 811 KSES 1 1 9IISZZ31 10 1 1 CZa lit
EXCURSIONS
Christian Endeavor Seattle
B. Y. P. LL Spokane
Tickets Sold June 20 to July la -' .".-
One Fare for the Round Trip, With Return Limit Sept. IS, 1907
$50oo
From Topeka to Seattle.
Tacoma, Portland, Van
.couver" and return. ' .
From Topeka to
Spokane and return.
Special train of Endeavorers be
ing organized. Write to the un
dersigned for particulars.
A.
M. FULLER, City Pass'r Agent,
TOPEKA, KANSAS.
THOSE SORE, TENDER,
ACHING Teeth of your.,
want a Square Deal, and
a chance that's all. All you
have to do is to call at our office
and we will speedily attend them
We are Preserving Thousands of Them.
SPECIAL CARE WITH NERVOUS PEOPLE '
Best set of teetb ...iS.O
Good aet of teeth......................... t.oa
Gold crown, 22K 6.0i
Porcelain crowna 4.00
Bridge work, per tooth (.00
Gold fillings $1.00 and up
Silver nilins-s 60o to 11.00
Cement fillings 50o
Extracting; teeth, freezing; trum procei.50o
Extracting; teeth without medicine.. ....So
f PRS. LYON Sl HEATHERLY
T Office Established 15 years, Ind. Phone 111B.
T 5U Kansas Ave., Topeka, Kan. Over XV. A. L. Thompson Ildvr. m.
I PAINLESS I K5
DENTISTRY '
k OFFICIAL CALL OF MAY 6, 1907
RESOURCES
$2,583,226.93
DIRECTORS
J. R. Mulvane, President. A. Washburn
.A. W. Kriowles, Vice President. J. Mulvane
.7 J. "W. Thurston, Cashier. J. P. Grlswold
. J. W. Farnsworth W. H. Davis
T. B. Sweet
M. A. Low
Chas. Wolff
TRAINS
A DAY
TO
Leave
Topeka
4:30 A. M.
:80 A. M.
6:C0 A. M.
8:J0 A. M.
S:58 P. M.
8.-a P. M.
7:2 P. M.
7:S6 P. M.
Returning
Lt. ICan City
8:05 A. M.
9:60 A. M.
11:00 A. M.
11:20 A. M.
6:10 P. M.
10:00 P. M.
10:15 P. M.
10 ISO P. M.
KANSAS CITY
DOUBLE TRACK M0 STOPS-FAST TIME.
Ticket Office
- . Flrt and Kansas Are., and
881 North Kansas! Ave.

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