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The Topeka state journal. [volume] (Topeka, Kansas) 1892-1980, August 01, 1907, LAST EDITION, Image 2

Image and text provided by Kansas State Historical Society; Topeka, KS

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016014/1907-08-01/ed-1/seq-2/

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THE TOPEKA DAILY STATE Jt)TJRtf Air THURSDAY EVENING, AUGUST 1, 1907.
BANDY -WENT UP.
Oklahoma's Star Twirler Meets
His Waterloo.
! brilliant batting and fielding of Red
Davis. Three hits out of four times
up, two runs and five putouts were his
record for '-yesterday. Four double
plays were pulled off, one of which, a
freak one, was pulled off. by the lo
cals. In the seventh inning with one
man out. Goes walked. .White hit a
hard one at Arnold and the bis pitch-
Exploded iii SeVebth winning on
Wednesday. . : - .
SOX THEN SCORED SIX.
Genial Southpaw Gave Way to
Another Pitcher.
Baiting of Daris Feature of
the Contest.
-By a. batting rally : in the . seventh
inning of Wednesday's . game,, Topeka
took the second of the series from the
Oklahoma City Mets.- Every pitcher
has an off day occasionally and yester
day proved to be one "of those events
Tor Pitcher Robert." JBandy. the' southr
paw. ; whose sunlit facial .expression
never fades.
Mr. Bandy started In as is his usual
custom - by striking out the first man
up. ' For ".five Innings b.e held the In
dian ein on the locals but after that
it was all off and Topeka batted him
out of the box in the seventh inning.
Mr. Roy Arnold, the handsome slab
artist of the Sox. toed the rubber for'
the local bunch and' the Mets were
candy for him" all. afternoon.". Only
four hits were secured from him and
but on one occasion d!d -connections
come close, together. This waiin the
third and one runner - crossed .the
gutta ivercha. . . . , - -
Woods, p.- ..
Totals ...
9
34 9 27
SCORE BY INNINGS.
Springfield ,..., ..O 0 O 0 0 0 0 2 86
Hutchinson .........o 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 2
The summary; Earned runs Spring
field 1, Hutchinson 3. Two base hits
Reed, Porter, Wilson, Lewis, Zink..
laree Dase hit Murray. Bases on bails
Off Kaufman 1, off Woods 5. Struck
out By Kaufman 4, by Woods 10. Left
on bases Springfield 9,' Hutchinson 7.
Stolen bases Cuthbert, Sacrifice hits
Cole, Casey, Noyes, - Weeds 2. Wild
pitch Woods. Time 1:50. Umpire
Mclnnes.
Western Association Standing.
Mr. Bandy Was Hit Hard in the
Seventh.
For five or six innings the game was
a prett- one and the fans got all they
wanted. The Mets were the first to
core. In the third inning Goes of the
voluminous proportions hit one to cen
ter field. White bunted and Arnold
threw to Ragan to catch Herr Wilhelm
Edward Goes at second, but Stevie
obligingl" let go of the ball, and both
men were safe. Bandy bunted and
Goes-was thrown out at third through
the agency of Mr. Arnold. With two
men on and one out. Johnny Pendry
hit a single and White pranced home
with the only tally of the entire after
noon for the Mets.
With Oklahoma City with the big
gest end of the stick the game dragged
along until the sixth inning, when the
Champs opened up for business. Davis
hit safe and was sacrificed to second by
Olson. Abbott fanned but Ragan hit
one to right field and Davis scored.
Ragan went out in an attempt to show
Jack Henry how to run bases.
This tied the score. But things
were not to be in a tied-ui state very
long. In the seventh inning Colonel
Runkel was the first gentleman for
Mr. Bandy to contend with. Runkel
hit a single over second base off the
"Laughing Gallery" and Wooley bunt
ed. Bandy threw the ball to - second
but m&de a poor peg and Runkel; waa
safe. Erwin also tried the hunting
game with the result that Bandy threw
the ball to Pendry to get Runkel a lit
tle bit after Mr. Runkel reached the
station and the bases were well oc
cupied. At this Juncture Price, the
new pitcher who took Spec's place,
made good by hitting over the Infield
for one base, scoring Runkel and
Wooley. Arnold helped out in the
good cause by hitting another single
and Erwin trotted home. Red Davis
cleaned up the bases with a triple and
scored on Olson's single. Jt was at
this psychological moment that Man
ager McFarland sent McCIintock into
the box. Abbott popped up a fly to
White and Ragan hit Into a double
play retiring the side.
McCIintock showed signs of losing
control in the eighth. With one down,
Wooley hit safe and then McCIintock
filled the bases by walking both Erwin
and Price. This ended it. for McFar
land went in himself and Arnold hit
into a double play. 1
The feature of the game was the
Stevie Presents Jack Henry With a Hit.
er stuck up his' mlt only to knock the
ball into Olson's waiting hands. Olson
touched Goes and threw White out at
first. Oklahoma City's double plays
were all of the fast and snappy order.
The score: .
TOPEKA
AB. R.
3
Player
Davis, rf. ......
Olson, 2b
Abbott, lb
Ragan, ss
Runkel, 3b
Wooley, If
Erwin. c
Price, cf. 3
Arnold, p 4
H.
3
2
1
1
O.
5
1
16
3
1
0
0
2
0
A.
0
8
0
4
0
0
1
0
6
Clubs ! Won. Lost. Pet.
Wichita 65 21 .756
Joplin - 49 37 . .570
Hutchinson 50 38 .568
Oklahoma City . 49 38 '" ' .563
Topeka .... 47 ' 39 .547
Webb City 36 46 .439
Springfield i 26 60 .802
Leavenworth -19 68 -.213
but one hit during he ten innings he Manager Griffith has long been covet-
NATTOXAL LEAGUE.
Totals 33
OKLAHOMA CITY.
AB. R. H.
. 2
. 2
. 4
. 2
. 0
, 0
7 12 27 15
rf..
Play.
Pendry, 3b. ..
Scoggins. If...,
GUI, lb
Rapps, 2b. ...
L. McFarland,
Henry, c
Goes, cf.
White, ss
Bandy, p
McCIintock. o
C. McFarland, p...
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
O.
0.
0
12
1
0
5
1
6
0
0
0
A.
0
8
0
' 5
0
2
2
. 2
0
4 24 13
Totals .30
SCORE BY INNINGS.
Oklahoma Citv 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 o 1
Topeka 0 0 0 0 0 1 6 0 7
Summary: Earned runs TODeka
5. Three base hits) Davis. Stolen base
Henry. Sacrifice hit Olson. Bases
on balls Off Arnold 4; off McCIintock
i. btruck out By Bandy 4. Left on
bases Topeka 6; Oklahoma City 6.
Double plays Arnold to Olson to Ab
bott; Bandy to Henry to Gill; McCIin
tock to White to Gill; Pendry to Henry
to Gill. Hits Off Bandy 11 in 6 in
nings; off McCIintock 1 In 114 innings.
Wild pitch Arnold. Passed ball
Henry. Hit by pitched ball Goes.
Time of game 1:30. Attendance
300. Umpire Guthrie.
Wichita 4. Joplin 0.
Wichita, Kan., Aug. 1. Wichita took
the second game of the series from Jop
lin by the score of 4 to 0. Speer's pitch
ing was the feature of the game. The
score:
WICHITA.
Player AB. H. O. A. E.
Milan, If 4 110 0
Becker, rf 4 12 0 0
Hetling, 3b 3 1 0 2 1
Bayless, f 4 1.5 0 0
Holland, lb 4 2 7 1 0
Weaver, c 3 0 7 0 0
Annis, ss 4 0 4 1 0
Kelley, 2b 4 2 110
Speer, p 2 0 0 1 0
Totals 32 - 8 27 '8 .1
JOPLIN.
Player AB. H. O. A. E.
Killman, ss 4 1 2 0 1
Harrington, cf. 4 0 2 0 0
Rohn, lb. 2 0 9 1 0
Persch. rf 8 0 1 0 1
Armstrong, If 3 1 0 0 0
Bankhead, 2b 4 0 4 1 0
Vanderhill, c 3 14 3 0
Fleming, 3b 2 0 2 1 1
George, p 3 0 0 4 1
Totals 28 3 24 10 l
0-0
SCORE BY INNINGS.
Joplin 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Wichita 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 0
The summary: Three base hit Arm
strong. Two base hit Fillman. First
base on balls Off Speer 3. off George 1.
Struck, out By Speer 6, by George 3.
Umpire Jacobs.
Webb City 2. Leavenworth 1.
Webb city, Mo., Aug. 1. Webb City
took the second game from Leaven
worth by the score of 2 to 1. The locals
were outhit by the visitors, but an er
ror by Quiesser in the sixth inning al
lowed Olson to score the winning run.
The score:
WEBB CITY.
AB. H.
...... 4 1
Player
Collins, cf. ..
Cheek, c
Olson, ss
Wrisht, lb. ..
Lofton, If. ...
Gray, rf
Blausser, 3b.
Nee. 2b
Meredith, p. .
Totals ....
Turner out-
3
4
3
3
3
2
2
...27
,o.
2
3
3
14
1
1
0
2
0
A.
0
2
7
O
0
0
3
2
4
26 18
bunted third strike.
LEAVENWORTH.
EE Real Luxury
of shaving is realized
only with the
Electric
Cup
nOT WATER
when you -want it, where
you want it, and at just
the right temperature
Connects to the electrolier
- like an incandescent lamp
Especially convenient
when the fire is low" or out
and there is no hot water
Simple Clean
Safe xy Durable
The Topeka Edison Co.
Player AB. H. O. A.
iawier, ir 2 i a n
Cobb, rf 3 0 0 0
Vaughn, 8b 4 2 0 1
Quiesser, rf 3 14 2
Schumyer, 2b. - 3 13 2
Qulgley, lb 4 0 9 0
Middieton, cf. 4 3 2 0
Turner, ss 3 0 8 3
Hollingsworth, p. .. 3 0 0 6
0
0
0
1
n
l!
0
1
0
Chicago 4, Brooklyn 1.
Chicago, Aug. 1. Reulbach,. pitched
in great form, holding . the visitors
helpless except in one inning, when
three hits gave them one run. Evers
stole home, scoring Chicago's first
count, a pass, a single, a triple and
long fly adding, the other three..
Score by innings. -R.H.E,
Chicago 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 0 4 8
Brooklyn ...0 0000001 01 4
Batteries Reulbach and' Kling;
Rucker and Ritter.
Pittsburg 7-15. Boston 4-1.
Pittsburg, Aug. 1. Pittsburg won
both games of a double header from
Boston by good, sound batting. Young
was driven off the rubber In the first
game and terribly punished in the
second which by mutual agreement
lasted only seven innings. Bates was
hit on the head by a pitched ball in
the first game and knocked senseless.
With the bases full Clarke knocked a
home run in the second game.
Score bv innlners. - . - , R.H.E.
Pittsburg 0 4101010 7 9 3
Boston 0 0 1 10 0 2 0 04 8 ;
Batteries Willis , and . Gibson;
Young, Peffer. Boultes and Needham
Second game Score by innings: R.H.E.
Pittahurar 4 0 2 1 1 7 15 15
Boston 0 0100001 6 3
Batteries Camnltz and .Phelps;
Young and Brown.
New York 4-4. St. Louis 3-3. .
St. Louis, Aug. 1. New York won
two games from St. Louis and both
scores were 4 to 3. The first game
tied in the ninth and St. Louis lost in
the tenth. Umpire O'Day put Bresna
han out of the first game in the eighth
for disputing a called .. third strike. -Score
by Innings. -. - R.H.E.
St. Louis 0 0 0 0 0 1 00 2 0-3 11 4
New York ...0 0 0 J.1 1 0 0 0 14 8
Batteries Beebe and. Nopnaa;
Wiltse. Bresnahan and Bowerman.
Second game Score by innings:" R.H.E.
St. Louis 0 0 0 0 3 0 03 6 4
New York ..2 0 0 0 2 0 04. 8 1
Batteries McGlynn and, Marshall;
McGinnity and Bresnahan.
National Leagne Standing.
rnirtis ' Won. Lost. . Pet.
Chfeaeo 7 24 - .736
Vlttshiire- 55 33 .625
New York 54 34 .614
Philadelphia 46 3S .648
Brooklyn 41 61 .446
Boston 37 61 .420
Cincinnati 37 52 . 416
St. Louis 21 75 .219
AMERICAN LEAGUE.
24
14 8
0 0 2
0 0 01
Webb
. Totals 29
SCORE BY INNINGS.
Webb City 1 0 0 0 0 1
Leavenworth 0 0 0 0 0 1
The summary: Earned rur
-,uy i, Leavenworth L Two base hit
uouins. Cheek, Wright. Bases on balls
Off Meredith 3, off Hollingsworth 2.
Stiuck out By Meredith 2. by Hollings
worth "4. Left on bases Webb City 5,
Leavenworth 7. Double play Olson to
Nee to Wright. Wild Pitch Hollings
worth. Passed ball Cheek. Hit by
pitched ball Nee. Sacrifice hits Cobb,
Turner, Olson. Stolen bases Lawler,
Oison. Time of game 1:35. Umpire
O'ConneU. Attendance 200.
Hutchinson 6, Springfield 5.
Sprlngftold, Mo..Auar. 1. Wooda struck
out ten men in the first seven innings,
when he weakened and almost lost his
game. Springfield had 21 assists In the
game. The score:
SPRINGFIELD,
Player AB., H, O. A, E.
Murray, cf. 5 -1 - 0 1-0
Cole, If 3 2 10 0
Cuthbert, rf 5 10 0 0
Reed, lb 6 1 14 1 0
Porter, ss 4 116 2
Smith. 2b 4 0 3 4 0
Begmyer, 3b. 4 13 2 1
Brennan, o 3 14 3 0
Kaufman, p 3 115 1
Totals 3 9
HUTCHINSON.
AB. H.
Player
Wilson, If
Petiigrew, rf.
Casey, 2b. ...
Noyes, 3b. ....
Lewis, c
V. Zink, lb. .,
Johnson, ss. .,
Zackert, c. ...
5
6
... 4
... 3
... 4
... 8
... 4
... 4
27
O.
0
0
1
0
11
13
1
1
A.
1
0
2
0
. 1
0
1
0
E.
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
Philadelphia 8. St. Louis 7.
Philadelphia, Aug. 1. Philadelphia
defeated St. Louis In a hard hitting
eleven inning contest, ..The home team
won out on three hits an error and a
wild pitch by Dineen.
Snore bv innines. R.H.E
St. Louis 0 000000250 07 14 2
Philadelphia 2 201200000 18 13 2
Batteries Howell, Dineen and
Spencer: Dygert, Hartley, Plank and
Schreck.
New York 2. Detroit 1.
New York. Aug. 1. New York won
a close game from Detroit. 2 to 1.
Newton and Mullin were equally ef
fective but the locals with two hits, a
single and a double, a battery error
and a wild pitch Bcored two runs in
the fourth, which were enough to win
the game.
S"fir hr fnnlnm. R.H.E.
Detroit 0 0000010 01 3 0
New York 0 0020060 2 3 2
Batteries Mullen and Pine; Newton
and Thomas. . . ,
Chicago 3. Washington 0.
Washington, Aug. 1. Walsh's pitch
ing was too much for Washington to
solve and Chicago won handily. 3 to
0. Remarkable catches by Manager
Jones were features.
Score by Innings. . .
Washington 0 0000000 0-0 z
Chicago v u u u u v 1 v
Batteries Gehring, Heyden and
Warner; Walsh and Hart.
Cleveland 4, Boston 2.
Boston, Aug. 1. Cleveland won the
game in the first inning, hatting ian-
nehill out of the box. The nnat score
stood 4 to 2. The home players began
to hit Joss hard in the seventh and in
the eighth filled the bases, witn none
out. Congalton hit to Joss, wno reu
flmirn hut managed to roll the ball to
Clarke and Umpire O'Laughliri called
Hoey out at the plate. A rase aouDie
nlav ended the inning and Boston's
chance of victory.
Score by Innings. aSH,;B;
Cleveland 4 0000000 04 9 1
Boston ..." ...000000 36 0-2 8 4
Batteries Joss and Clark; Tanne
hill, Prultt .Winter and Shaw.
American League Standing.
Clubs Wpr
Chicago 06
Detroit B
Cleveland 54
Philadelphia i
New York 2
St. Louis 36
Boston - 35
Washington 2S
WESTERN LEAGUE.
Pes Moines 1. Omaha 0.
Omaha, Aug. 1. Edmundson gave
Lost. Pet.
36 .609
35 - .593
37" .593
36 .5
.46 .477
63 .404
63 .398
57 .328
pitched t- which was responsible - for
Omaha's defeat. Rasran allowed but
three hits, but m of them, a three
base drive, sent-in the winning run in
the eleventh,
.; Score bv Innlnn . R.H.E.
Omaha .0 n 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 00 2 3
Des Moines 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 3
Batteries Raean. and Gonding; Ed
mundson, R. Miller and .Yeager.
Lincoln 10, Denver 3.
Denver, Aug. -'1. -Denver and Lin
coln broke even in a double neaaer.
Score by innings. , . R.H.E,
Denver .;Jo 0 0100020 3 10
Lincoln ..0 4 3 0 0 1 1 1 10 11 1
Batteries R. .Adams, Orth and Za
lusky; McKay and Sullivan.
Second earae-S bv inninfrs: R.H.E.
Denver ,.0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 6 11 8
Lincoln ....L..0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 1
Batteries C. Adams and McDon-
ough; Zackert. Jones and Zinran.
Pueblo 5; Sioux City 4.
Pueblo, Colo.;' Aug. 1. -Pueblo made
a strong finish and beat Sioux City in
the second game of the series.
Score by inninirs.--' J" R.H.E.
Pueblo w.s,. .0 0 0 0 01 0 1 3 6 11 1
Sioux City .".........0 0 1 0-0 3 0 0 0 4 9 1
' Batteries Jackson and Drill; Dress
ier. Jarrott and J. Sheehan.
. Western .League Standing.'
Clubs . -r - Won. Lost.
Omaha
Lincoln . ...
Des Moines
Denver
Pueblo
Sioux City ..
53
47
43
36
37
38
41
41
46
54
56
Pet.
.612
.564
.534
.483
.400
.398
AMERICAN , ASSOCIATION.
City,
7;
At Kansas City Kansas
Minneapolis. 2. . . . .
At Louisville Louisville, .1; irdian-
apolis, 3.
At Columbus Columbus, " 2; To
ledo.' 3.
At Milwaukee Milwaukee, 4; St.
Paul, 2.
r American Association Standing. -
Clubs
Toledo . .
Minneapolis ....
Columbus
Kansas City
Milwaukee .... .
Louisville
Won. Lost.
60
.-....67
...v.. 53
...... 60
49
46
Indianapolis 43
Bt. .ram ........ 41
39
44
45
vSO
49
54
69
59
. Pet;
.606
'.564
.541
- .500
.600
.460
.422
.410
Burr Oak 1. Cuba 0.
Cuba, Kan., '' Aug. 1. The fastest
game of baseball ever played in the
northwest was between Cuba and Burr
Oak, on the Burr Oak diamond, Tues
day afternoon, resulting in a victory
for Burr Oak, by: the score of 1 to 0.
Summary: Batteries Gibboney and
Thomason; White and Smith. Hits
balis Off Gibboney 1. Struck out By
balls Off Bibboney l Struck out By
Gibboney 6, by-; White 5. 'Errors Cuba
2, Burr Oak 3. Time of game 62 min
utes. Attendance 500: : .
Blue Rapids 2, Wamego 1.
Blue Rapids, Kan.V Aug. 1 Blue Rap
ids beat Wamego in a hard contested
game here by a score of 2 to 1. Bat
teries Starr and . Burbaker; Leonard
and Yokum. It was one. 'of the best
games of the season.-
. Selden II, Kensington 6.
.K-ermington, K.ar., , Aug. 1. in ; a
fast game here Wednesday- afternoon
Selden won fromt the home team by
a score-ox 11. to , The Selden team
are playing a. series of games in. mid
dle and eastern; Kansas. - .
Madison 1. Ncodesha 0. .
,Nodeshai -Kan.,oAugi j 1 Neodesha
was defeated by Madison in. an eleven
inning game, i;tp,--0.-. The features of
the game ware.b-e,. fast,- fielding of
Madison's team and-, Brennan's and
Martin's twobase- hits. Batteries
Kretzer and t Brown: , Brennan and
ous, but evidently Mr.- Fafrell is de
termined not to be forced into any ac
tion that will tend to 'effect the disci
pline of his team. -
Minneapolis Football Dates.
Minneapolis. Minn.. Aug. L Dr. ' H.
L. Williams, director of athletics at the
University of Minnesota, has announc
ed the complete schedule of games for
the Minnesota football team tor me
season of 1907. Gopher . gridiron fans
will be treated to four big games, three
of chamnionshiD caliber.
This fall will be; the first time since
1900 that a Chicago football team has
played in Minneapolis. The Minnesota
and Chicaeo universities are - on friend
ly athletic relations and followers of
the gopher team are happy over the I
fact that stagg-s men wiu come nere.
The schedule follows:
, Oct. 12 Ames at Northrop field.
Oct. 19 Nebraska a-t Northrop fibld.
Nov. 2 Chicago at Northrop field.
Nov. 16 Carlisle Indians at Northrop
field.
Nov. 23 Wisconsin at Madison.
WESTERN ASSOCIATION GOSSIP.
Westmoreland 4. Randolph 2,' "
Westmoreland. Kan.. Aue. 1. The
Westmoreland team defeated Ran
dolph by a score of 4 to 2 in a game
Played at Oldsburg. It was the first
game of a series of three.
Batteries Westmoreland, Richards
and Brandt; Randolph, Moore and
Lovegrow.
. Mcpherson 3, Undsborg J,
McPherson, Kan., Aug. 1. McPher-
sor defeated Undsborg Wednesday by
a-score of 3 to-J.,- . ,
McPherson secured2nine-hits: Linds-
borg one hit. Burgess struck out
eleven; Rosine struck out five. Bat
teries Swedes, -Rosine and Lysell;
McPherson, Burgess and Hoggett. .
Dodge City - 5, - Spearville 2.
Dodge City, Aug.- 1. Dodge City
won it third, consecutive victory
Wednesday afternoon, Spearville be
ing the victim.- - Nichols" three bagger
and Miller's two bagger were the
features.
"I Wish I Had a Little
Ready Money."
. How many men have
said that. Fix it so it
won't happen to you.
The Shawnee Building
and Loan Association,
: 115 West 6th Street, has
the best plan of syste-
: matic saving. Ask about
it.
Temporarily located In
the Columbian build
ing while our new
home Is being built.
HIGHBALL WAS LAME.
So Sonoma Girl Won the 2:15 Trot
With Ense nt Cleveland.
Cleveland. O.. Aug. 1. The contest
between the two stars, Sonoma Oirl
and Highball, In the 2:15 trotting event
scheduled for Wednesday, promising -a
shattering of records, drew to the sec
ond day of the Grand Circuit meet the
largest crowd that has witnessed light
harness trotting at 'the famous Glen
ville oval in many years. Unfortunate
ly, Highball was lame and had to be
withdrawn. As a result Sonoma Girl
won with ease, there being no other
starters that could force her to her us
ual speed. He best time was 2:06. .
Results: -
2:11 pace, purse 81.600. Alice Pointer
won three straight heats and the race
in 2:05, 2:06, 2:07.. Thorn way, Billy W..
Red Bow and Rushville also started.
2:15 trot, purse 35.000. . Sonoma Girl
won three straight heats and the race
in 2:08. 2:06, 2:07. Genteel H.,
Claty Latus, Henry E. Jr., Margorie,
Tolling Chimes, Wild Bell and Silver
Band also started. - ?
2:05 pace, purse 31,000. Ardelle won
two straight heats and the race in
2:07, 2:05. Nervolo, Hal C, Vesto
Boy and Custer also started.
2:09 trot, purse $1,000. Lillian R. won
two straight heats and the race in
2:06, 2:07. Allie Jay, Emboy. Charley
Relden, John Caldwell and Biflora also
started.
WILL NOT SELL ELBERFELD.
Frank FarreU Wouldn't Take $50,000
for the Player.
New York, Aug. i. "I will not . sell
Elberfeld for $50,000,'' and make that
statement as strong as you like."
; These were the decisive remarks made
by Owner Frank Farrell of the New
York American club yesterday. The
statement was made In Mr. Farrell's
office in answer to the .question, "Will
you trade Elberfeld if you think you
can strengthen the "Yankees by so do
ing?" A report came from Washington that
Manager McAleer of the St. Louis
Browns was on his way to New York
with the object of completing a deal
whereby he could secure Elberfeld in
exchange for Pitcher Glade and Out
fielder Hemphill.
There is no douht'thnt such a trade
would be advantageous to the St. Louis
club, and possibly to the Yankee, for 1
Pitcher Glade is a player of whom I
WHERE THEY" PLAY TOMORROW:
Topeka at Oklahoma City.
. Webb City at. Leavenworth.
Springfield at Hutchinson.
Wichita at-Joplin.
According to notices which have
appeared in the press of the Western
league at various times during the
past ten days, presioent -Xip" O'Neill
of the Western league has been ab
senting himself from that circuit for
some time and has been working on
plans for the formation of an eight
circuit next season, ho is planning
to take in Topeka and although he
was aereatea once is working as hard 1
as ever.
At the conclusion of tonight's game
every team In the league has made
two trips around the circuit and has
played-- . two series on the home
grounds., with every other team in the
league.. J-orty-two games still remain
on the schedule for each team, twen
ty-one. at , home, and twenty-one on
the road. Nearly every team, how
ever, is behind a game or two. To
peka has four games to be played off.
Two of these are with Springfield on
tne latter s grounds. One game is still
lert for the locals at Joplin and an
other for the locals on the home
grounds with the Miners. This leaves
but twenty-two games to be played on
the local grounds and one series of
three games each with every team in
tne league.
Captain Spec Hurlburt was out of
yesterday's game on account of sick
ness. Price, the new southpaw twirl-
er, took his place in the center garden
end behaved well. His hitting started
the bombardment in the seventh in
ning.
Eckman, who umpired In this cir
cuit until a few days ago when he
quit his Job, is now 'working in the
Iowa State league.- This leaves but
Guthrie, O Connell. . Jacobs and Mc-
Irnis on the staff of President Shively.
President Shively has announced
his intentions of scouting through the
Kansas State league for a new umpire
some time within the present week.
Shively says that- five are needed and
he intends to keep an extra man on
the staff for the rest of the season.
Arnold's score yesterday was the first
score which the popular young pitcher
has -made this year. Hd wever, Itf he can
pitch like -he did yesterday and as he
has done on several previous occasions
his hatting will be overlooked.
Ragan's courtesy yesterday allowed
Jack Henry- to seoure a hit in the ninth
inning after two men were out. The
ball was a grounder to shortstop and
Kagan made no effort to field it.
Manager Charles McFarland returned
yesterday from St. Louis . and took
charge of the Mets. He went in in the
ninth inning to stop the slaughter of j
his pitchers. In all probability he will
work today.- He brought a couple of
players with him from St. Louis.
Bill Rapps of the Mets, is now play
ing second base and is putting up a
good game. . A few days ago he was
playing first base while Gill was off
sick nursing a boll on his arm.. Bill is
equally good in the infield or outfield.
The team leaves tonight for Oklaho
ma City. They will visit Oklahoma
City, Wichita, Springfield, Webb City
and Leavenworth before returning
home. The next game on the home
grounds will be two weeks from Sat
urday when a three game series with.
the Webb City team is opened.
In the course of an interview in the
Springfield Republican, President
Shively makes the following statement
In regard to Umpire Guthrie: .1 Know
that there is much kicking against
Guthrie.",: said . President Shively. "but
he . is the . best-umphe in the associa
tion ..He. has . missed but one game.
since he was put to work and this was
caused by a .belated train. He is not
a. 'boozer.' either, and knows the game.
Of. .course his manner in walking and
speaking appear tough to tne specta
tors, Dut tnis aoes not warrant ms oe
Ing mobbed.". .
The attention of the lickspittle Is call
ed to the fact that Davis didn't do very
well in yesterday'B game. Out of four
times up he secured a triple and two
AM v. e
1 xii, Aureaac ja
over 25 in Dividends
To Policy Holders
v , The Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York
has paid more in dividends to policy holders than any
other company in the world. Since organization it has re
turned in dividends over $118,000,000. As a result chiefly
of increased earnings and decreased expenses the annual
dividends to policy holders this year, on policies issued in
1905, will be 25 to 30 more than in 1906.
Life Insurant
Company
- 1 . ' - -
. feels sure its policy-holders will be pleased with this great re
duction in cost The news may be doubly welcome now
when increased cost in other lines seems everywhere the
order of the day. Jf you have others for whose continued
care -you are concerned, you should learn for yourself . ,
how and how cheaply it can be guaranteed by the
staunchest life insurance company in the world.
The Time to Act is NOW.
For the new forms of policies write to
The Mutual Life Insurance Company
of New York. N. Y.
or ELOX S. CLARK, Manager,
Smith Building, Topeka, Kansas.
W T H Ml. T P fS W TT T Hik P H w w
rw.tirN i wuk i n
MILITARY
ACADEMY
Oldest and Largest in the Middle West
Patronage from f 7 States and Two
Foreign Countries.
Government Supervision.
Manual Training. T
Separate Department for Small Boys.
Additional Ground Purchased.
New Barrack Building.
Improvements Costing $40,000 Now j
Being Completed. X
l-iil frff,f Catalogue free. Address
The Secretary! Lexington, Mo. ;
1 V S
TRAINS
i n a v
TO
Topeka
:S0 A. M.
4: BO A. M.
ClGO A. M.
:00 A. m:
SiM P. M.
:2S P. M.
7:25 P. M.
7i60 P. M.
Returning'
Lv. Ksns City
tr5 A. M.
65 A. M.
1H00 A. M.
1J20 A. M.
oilO P. M.
10:00 P. M.
10:15 P. M.
10i80 P. M.
KANSAS CITY
DOUBLE TRACK NO STOPi-FAST TIME.
Ticket Offlcea .
First and Kansas Ave., and
831 North Kansas Ave.
la J
LAKE BREEZES
Can be Enjoyed in Safe Delight
on toe STEEL STEAMSHIP
f'.lflfllTOU
Pirt-ciflB Onlv-Paesengrer Service Exclusively'
ThrM M.tlfnm waakit between cnicago, v;onvcnx, nuronr opriufCM nun
MinM KundfSSrtor Detroit. Buffalo. DululU nd .11 JUrt.ru
. Ti2 and Canadian Point.
S3riX?xf- MISSOURI and ILLIXOIS !s
mwm m w hi x' lauaimii.
Petosker. Charlevoix. Uorthport, Traverse City and all Bay Pointa.
Avery weeKdar lexcepi piiiw,j ' l"
. i ... in-TrntinTin etc. adarea.
JOS. BEROLZHEIM. 0. P. A. Maniteu 6iemhip Co., Chicago, or
R. F. CHURCH, S. P. A. Northern usicninan mna w.,vmwm
'1 v
MM
1
three years, will bo a partner with
him.
Three of the franchise holders
aerreed to sell out immediately, but
some of them held out but have come
to terms and will close the deal with
in a few days. The price has been
agreed upon and all arrangements
singles, scored two runs, and accepted I have been completed for the sale of
five chances without an error.
The Joplio team is said to be ne
gotiating with . the Little . Rock , team
for the services of Dusty Miller, the
former Wichita outfielder, who is now
with the Littre; Team in the Southern
league, it? . ;.-
Wichita Beacon: The stockholders
of the local baseball- club have all
agreed to sell their interest in the
team to Frank Isbell. now a member
of the Chicago American world chain-.
pton.team and -to ; John- Holland,- f-P- secona DaBe on the local team
rain OI IIIC n ILliiia vcai.ds oouv.ia-
tion team. .
It has been known for a m'onth that
Frank Isbell, whose home is in this
city, has been angling for the local
team, but it has Just come to light
that .Captain Holland, who has been
with "the local club during-the past
Colds oh
the Chest
Ask your doctor the medical name for
a cold on the chest. He will say,
"Bronchitis." Ask him tf it is ever
serious. Lastly, ask him if he pre
scribes Ayer's Cherry Pectoral for this
disease. Keep in close touch with
your family physician. .
Wa pnbliah tne formtilaa JO. AyerCe..
of all our preparation.. Lowell, rnaaa.
the club. Although the deal has been
arranged, the new management will
not take, charge until the close of the
present season.
Local rans nave Deen anxious mat
Frank Isbell secure the team as h:s
ability as a ball player is well known
and it will insure. good ball for Wich
ita in the future. .With a thorough
baseball .man from a major league at
the helm Wichita"s chances for enter
ing the . Western league next season
are improved. Isbell has secured his
release from .President Comlskey or
the Chicago White Sox and will play
next
year. . .
The fans are also pleased to hear
that Captain Holland will be inter
ested in the . new club. Holland is
popular with the fans on account of
his Inside ball playing and because of
the way he . leads his men, by never
giving . up. .' Holland is a basebair
Dlaver who never believes a game is
lost or won until the last man is out
in the last inning. I
President Breese who has had
charge of the club announced some
time ago that this season would be
his last ir. baseball. It is said that he.
as well as the other stockholders wel
comed the chance to sell out to two
good baseball men, whose homes are
in this city. .- ? - -
: ' Hound ' Dead in' Swimming Pool.
: Philadelphia, Aug, 1.- Edmond R. !
Watson, . president of the Northern
National bank and treasurer of . the
Henry Hess Brewing company of this
city, was found dead in the swimming
pool of the Columbia club early to
day. Mr. Watson's family is away and
he had spent much of the summer at
the club. J
HAND
SAPOLIO
It ensures an enjoyable, inrig or
ating bath ; makes every por
respond, removes daad skin, '
ENEROIZES THE WHOLE B0D1
starts the circulation, and leaves a
glow equal to a Turkish bath.
LL CKOCERS AMD DRUOOIST
EASY HOME-GETTING
Pay a little on the debt each month,
at the end of the period, it i paid off.
The only sure way for moat people.
We can assist you.
Capitol Building and Loan Ass'n
534 KANSAS AVE.
L, M. PENWELL
Undertaker and Embalmer,
Bit Quincy Straati
Eotb Pnones 19

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