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The Topeka state journal. [volume] (Topeka, Kansas) 1892-1980, January 25, 1913, LAST EDITION, Image 8

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THE TOPEKA DAILY STATE JOURNAL SATURDAY EVENING- JANUARY 25, 1913-
DRAMATIC NEWS
Adeline Genee Next Attraction
at Grand.
Then Comes George Sidney as
"Busy Izzy.
COUNTESS COQUETTE NEXT
A French Musical Vaudeville
Show for Feb. 4.
Zara Carmen's Troupe at the
Novelty.
At the Grand.
January 28. Adeline Gpnee.
February 1, George Sidney.
February 4, Countess Coquette.
February 8, Billy the Kid.
February 10, The Million.
February 15. The Enchantress.
February 17. Aborn English Opera
Company In "The Bohemian Girl."
February 20, 21. 22, Lyman H. Howe.
The theatrical event of next week
in fact, one of the most important of
the year is the concert to be given
by Adeline Genee, the fifth number on
the Farkhurst series?. Genee stands
alone in her art, unapproached. unex
celled. She has never been in Topeka
before, but her fame has spread over
the continent. One of the most con
vincing of her press notices is taken
from the Pall Mall Gazette:
'"She is never still. Surely she must
dance to the theater twice daily; it is
impossible to imagine her walking or.
most horrible thought of all. sitting
still in a taxi-cab.- Then her dance
walk down the stage, with the quaint,
perky swish of the short skirt like the
clipped tail of some bird of paradise.
"When it was all over the curtain
came down in a storm of applause in
that huso theatrically-cold building-,
fS S3 ' Ji-f J
Gypsy Camp Scene in the Aborn Opera Company's ItevJval of the ".Bohemian Girl.
a large chorus come to the Grand Feb
ruary 1 in a musical comedy entitled.
"Busy Izzy." The play is reported to
have a carload of scenic grandeur,
pretty girls and all sorts of costumes.
"The Countess Coquette," which
comes to the Grand February 4. is a
rollicking French musical vaudeville
by Marcel Janvier, of Paris, where it
has been running for the past two
years. The lyrics are by Melville Al
exander, and the music by Anatol
Friedland. The latter compares favor
ably to anything by Lehar or Strauss.
Mile. Genee, the Dainty and Celebrat ed lanseuse, Who Will Appear at the
Grand in Matinee Next Tuesday.
where a hundred handclaps are but a
single cheer on the field of Waterloo.
"Up again, and Genee courtesies her
way to the footlights with that perky,
tail-sw-irling walk, forever dancing. A
tower of roses is seen coming over the
horizon at the back of the hall
carried by the first of the pro
cession of attendants with floral offer
ings chiefly roses encased in the
quaintly cut paper holders of the
period.
"Down falls the curtain again, cut
ting off the long queue of flowers in
its very growth. Up again, and Genee
again bowing; the queue of flowers
continues again and the applause never
falters for a moment. Another cur
tain cuts off more flowers; and then
reveals a bank of blooms three bower
like baskets and some twenty bouquets
but at first no Genee; she .s hidden
in flowers.
"At the final fall of the curtain
timidly appears through the opening
the face of a stage hand, fearful that
there may be more flowers clamouring
for admission."
One little, haunting melody "Spring
time" which threads through the play,
is expected to attain the popularity
of the "Merry Widow" waltz. The
company is recruited from the best
New York organization, and is headed
by Knox Wilson, who created the lead
ing comedy roles in "The Silver Slip
per," "The Land of Nod," and "The
Burgomarter" with Anna Held. ' Oth
ers prominent are: Vera Allen, last
vocally difficult musical numbers, the
chorus has been recruited for singing
ability as well as good looks.
A personal letter from A. G. Dela
mater, who manages the "Countess
Coquette." to Mr. Crawford, reads in
part as follows: "I positively guar
antee the play to be the equal, if not
the superior, of any similar attraction
that has ever played your city. If
the audience does not pronounce it so
after the first act, you are at liberty
to keep the gross receipts."
The "Countess Coquette' plays one
night stands only between Denver and
Kansas City. Topeka is seeing it af
ter Paris, but before either Chicago
or New York.
Miss Kitty Gordon, the beautiful
prima donna who comes to the Grand
February 15 in the "Enchantress,"
was educated to be a pianist and
studied at the conservatory in Dres
den. While there she had the. honor of
playing before the king of Saxony a
number of times, and began her pro
fessional career under the most aus
picious circumstances. But the con
cert stage in England is over-supplied
with pianists and Miss Gordon found
herself barely able to make both ends
met. During one of tbe few con
certs she played her first season, nine
years ago, she received a flattering
offer from Georpe Edwards to take
a small part at ths Gaiety in London,
and so immediate was her success
that she has followed her adopted
profession ever since.
The program which Lyman Howe
will show for three days at the Grand
contains many comparisons which are
striking, especially for Americans
who, living in an environment that is
modern to the last degree, can appre
ciate all the more the strange scenes
of foreign lands that are not as progressive-
as our ovra. Such reproduc
tions cultivate the power of observa
tion. This in turn awakens new
thoughts, for the more one sees the
more accurately one thinks.
The four vaudeville acts, billed for
the Majestic next week, promise to be
exceedingly good. For the first half
of the week Johnson and Hendricks,
late principals of the Madame Sherry
company. will present "variety de
luxe," and Douglass and Douglass will
endeavor to make people laugh. The
last half of the feature act comes di
rect from the Garden theater in Kan
sas City H. S. Whitney's operatic
dolls. The picture program, including
dramas and comedies from well
known companies, is one of the best
in the city.
uary 20. Instead of giving the cus
tomary souvenirs the management ar
ranged to celebrate the occasion by
having Mr. Orville Harrold, the fa
mous grand opera tenor, appear in the
third act and sing two duets with Mile.
Trentini.
The trained flock of geese, or two
of them, furnished most of the comedy
element in the performance of "Koen
igskinder" at the Metropolitan opera
house.
When it came time for them to exit
so that Carl Jorn. the king's son, could
make love to Miss Farrar, the oose
niture ever made," is her reason.-''With
a dressing table and a big wardrobe in
a bed chamber there is no need of
them. They have no use and are mere
disfigurements." From -i the . Matinee
Girl.
Ford's theater, in Washington, scene
of the assassination of Abraham Lin
coln, is soon to be torn down. The
house in which the president died, di
rectly opposite, is used as a public
museum of Lincoln relics.
The Dramatic Mirror, in its decidedly
interesting number for January 15, de
clares that 1912 made the season's rec
ord for productions. There were eighty
eight new dramatic and musical plays
up to January 1, 1913.
At a ' conference between Maude
Adams and Charles Frohman, held on
Tuesday. Jan. 6, it was decided to or
ganize a stock company, to be headed
by Miss.Adams, for the purpose of pre
senting a complete cycle of J. M.
Barrie's plays. The nucleus of this
company is to be selected from the
present Peter Pan company,- and this
to be gradually augmented from other
sources, the organization shall be suf
ficient for the whole cycle. From the
Dramatic Mirror. '
A WEEK OF FEATURES.
Cozy and Best Theaters to Show All
Three Keel Pictures.
Next week the Cozy and Best theaters
will have unusual offerings for the
patrons of these motion picture houses.
Each house will have three-reel feature
films during the entire week. Each title
will be a complete program in itself,
and all will be of a high class.
The Best theater will show "Tracked
by Wireless" on Monday and Tuesday.
This is a detective story produced by
the makers of the famous "Zigomar"
series. Wednesday and Thursday "The
Redemption," a much talked about
European film by the Eclaire company,
will be shown.. On Friday and Satur
day a big Western feature film will be
the offering, the title being "The Peril
of the Prairie."
At the Cozy "The Star of Bethlehem,!
is to be shown Monday and Tuesday.
GRAND uA&tli
THE METROPOLIS OPERA CO. (Inc.)
Presents
A Musical Comedy from the French of Marcel Janvier
Lyrics by Melville Alexander
Music by Anatol Friedland
THE
COUNTESS
COQUETTE
An All Star Cast With
KNOX WILSON
VERA ALLEN, TEMPLAR SAXE, MAUD WILLIAMS,
HARRY PAUL!. EM1LE LA CROIX
A CHIC CHORUS STUNNINGLY GOWNED
"THE PERSIAN FLIP," A DANCING NOVELTY
Boxes, S2.00; Floor, $1.50; Balcony, $1.00, 75c, 50; Gallery 25c
Mail Orders Now
18
CATCHY
MUSICAL
NUMBERS
18
3 REELS 3
2 ACTS 2
3 REELS 3
Shaw and Wilson in "Back to Missouri" at Xovelty Xext Week.
girl, her eharges refused to make a
auiet eetaway. The two most unruly
Two acts from the Garden theater ' ones led Miss Farrar a chase around
will be headliners for next week's bill the stage.
at the Novelty. The special feature is j "Wo liefst du her?" sang Miss Far-
Zara Carmen's troupe of hoop-rollers rar as sj,e made a dive for a big gray
and jugglers, and Shaw and Wilson KOOSe, and she got it by the wings
in a vaudeville sketch. Frank and and started after its mate. She finally
Door billed as ' Those Entertaining captured the errant goose by the neck
Boys,' are said to be excellent musi- Q j t t, it i,n, .i,
cians with harp and violin. Bert , Meanwnile the musrc waited for her
Jordan is an eccentric dancing come
dian. An added feature will be Mr.
and Mrs. Arthur Young in a spectacu
lar sketch called "Early ljays East
season prima donna soprano with the and West." The entertainment closes
Chicago Grand Opera company, and
hailed as "Tlu; American Trentini" by
Chicago critics; Maud Williams, who
had leading parts in "The Sultan of
Zulu." and "King Dodo." with Ray
mond Hitchcock: Templar Saxe, who
created the loading baritones in "The
Gay Musician." "The Earl and the
Girl." and "Pin". Faff. Pouft;" Harry
Pauli. who was principal tenor with
"The Heartbreakers" and "A Stub
born Cinderella;" and Emile La Croix,
who was with a number of Charles
Frohman's successes. The scenery is
from the famous studio of Dodge and
Castle, and the costumes were design-
George Sidney, Carrie Webber and ed by iouret of Paris. Owing to the
with an especially good Essanay film.
Mrs. Leslie Carter will make her
first Xew York performances of the
season during the week of January 27
at the West End theater.
The most important opening of the
current week will be the New i'ork
premiere of Franz Lehar's latest oper
etta. "The Man With Three Wives,"
under the management of the Messrs.
Shubert. at Weber & Fields' new thea
ter in West Forty-fourth street.
The one hundredth performance of
Mile. Emma Trentini in "The Firefly,"
tock place at the Casino theater Jan-
return to go on with the opera. Chi
cago Record-Herald.
This week's Dramatic Mirror has a
charming cover design of Maude Ad
ams, who comes to Topeka this season,
probably in "Peter Pan."
"Fine Feathers," the play that was
rumored coming to Topeka, has opened
at the New York Astor theater, but,
according to the "Mirror," "owes its life
and being to an excellent cast and a
pistol shot in the dark."
Billy Burke, who would have been a
house furnisher and interior decorator
had she not become an actress, has
banished bureaus from her new home,
Burkeley Crest, . at Hastings-on-the-Hudson.
"They are the ugliest pieces of fur-
f u : ;i tilers. !
I v . "r nV
This picture is considered a wonderful
achievement in motion pictures, being
really an illustrated Bible story. Mrs.
Bradden's story. "Aurora Floyd," will
be shown Wednesday and Thursday. On
Friday and Saturday a film portraying
a famous Civil war event will be the
attraction. The title of this picture can
not be announced until latec as the film
has not yet been released for exhibi
tion, and Lew Nathanson has managed
to get it for one of the first showings.
DINNER STORIES.
The sign in front of a Harlem res
taurant attracted the eye of a farmer and
be went in. He had a raw, a fry, a stew,
a pan roast, a broil and a steam on
toast. When he got through he laid a
quarter on the cashier's desk, only to be
told that he was shy a dollar and a
quarter. "No. by jing," said the farmer.
"A quarter's right. Doesn't you sign say,
'Oysters in every style for 25 cents'?"
Miss Rosy Nohall had just returned
from a finishing school, and had evidently
fulfilled all that was required of her in
the scholastic line.
She and her father were sitting in the
dining room. -
"That air " remarked her relative.
"Father dear," interrupted Rosy, it'
vulgar to say 'that air, you should say,
'that there." or, preferably just 'that.' "
"Well, this ear " commenced her
father; but he was cut off again.
MOVING PICTURES WITH VAUDEVILLE
MOVING PICTURES WITH VAUDEVILLE
MOVING PICTURES WITH VAUDEVILLE
MOVING PICTURES WITH VAUDEVILLE
T
HI
t X
K
AT THE MAJESTIC
K
"IT'S A DIME"
T
H
AT THE MAJESTIC
MOVING PICTURES WITH VAUDEVILLE
MOVING PICTURES WITH VAUDEVILLE
MOVING PICTURES WITH VAUDEVILLE
MOVING PICTURES WITH VAUDEVILLE
T
H
5
3 REELS 3
2 ACTS 2
3 REELS 3
ELBERT HUBBARD
WILL LECTURE AT THE
GRAND OPERA HOUSE
Monday Evening, January 27
Subject:
"The Romance of Business"
Admission Fifty Cents and No More
Tickets on sale George Stansfield's Drug Store,
Commercial Club, Daily Capital and State Jour
nal offices.
Reserved Seats (Xo Kxtra Charge)
Theater Office Saturday.
at Majestic
kind one day called upon Moliere and
said to him:
"I have heard, Moliere, that you
have a physician. What is he doing
to you?"
"Sire," answered the author of the
"Malade Imaginaire," "we chat to
gether, he writes prescriptions for
me, I don't take them and I am
cured!"
Young RicUeigh's father allowed hira
to take a trip to Europe last summer. Be
fore starting, the youth made up a cable
4 Ilb
Huox WUsen and Chorus in llie "Countess Coquette" al the Grand Thursday, February I.
"No father, smirked the dutiful daugh
ter. "That's just as vulgar. Ton must
avoid such expressions as 'this 'ere' "
Kather became irate."
"Look here, . my girl," said he, "I'm
going to say what I mean. That air Is
bad for tbis ear of mine, and I'm going
to shut the window!"
And after that Rosy said no more.
Moliere had written many plays to
ridicule doctors and medicine. ' Iouis
XIV beard that the author had, how
ever, a doctor at his service since he
became famous and well to do, so the
code of his own for possible use while
abroad, and handed a copy to his father,
who locked it up in his desk without look
ing at it.
A month later Richleigh received a
cable consisting of one word, "L.augh."
He laughed. It seemed to be somethirg
quite pleasant. His code was at the hou.
He went up there in the best of humor.
He got out the code and read:
"Laugh Send me five hundred dollars. "
A London story illuminates the career
of Horace Hamfat, an actor. Rich today,
he was poor and a failure up to the age
of forty. His life, up to that age passed
in the provinces on two or three quid a
week. One Saturday in Manchester
Horace Hamfat's show went up, the man
ager fled and Horace for three days lived
on bread and dripping. Tnen a letter
came to him from a London admirer en
closing 10. The admirer forwarded also
an item from a theatrical page that Hor
ace himself had written: "Horace Ham
fat is starring in Monchester.' But the
type setter had made this item read, truly
enough: "Horace Hamfat is staving in
Manchester!"
-rd Rocksavage, who leads the Duke
of Westminster's set, is handsome, a fine
rider, a superb shot, and very, very smari
in dress. He was strolling one warm and
sunny winter morning on the terrace at
Monte Carlo.. From the cut of his grav
flannels, a pickpocket realized Lord Rock
savage's opulence and attempted to steal
his sovereign purse. But the young noble
man seized in his strong brown hand the
pickpocket's grimy paw, and, looking at it
disgustedly. he Mid, as he flung it from
him: "How dare you put your hand in a
gentleman's pocket without washing ic
first 7"
NOVELTY
WHERE THEY ALL GO
HIGH TONE VAUDEVILLE
COM. WON. MAT. JAN. 27
SPKCIAIi FKATCRE
Direct From arden' Theater,
Kansas City
ZARA CARMEN TROUPE
Hoop Rollers and Jugglers.
FIRST TIME HERE
SHAW AND WILSON
The Street Fakir and Ills Ial
Those Entertaining Boys
FRANK AND DORR
Violin and Harp
BERT JORDAN
Eccentric Dane-ins Comedian
tfR. & MRS. ARTHUR YOUNG
in tbe Spectacular Sketch
EARLY DAYS
EAST AND WEST
3 SHOWS DAILY 3
3:00 7:459:15 p. m.
10c 20c 30c
j DAILY MATINEES 10c
COME EARLY

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