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The Topeka state journal. [volume] (Topeka, Kansas) 1892-1980, March 13, 1913, LAST EDITION, Image 6

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THE TOPEKA. DAILY STATE JOURNAL THURSDAY EVENING. MARCH 13, 1913-
IT SPENT MORE
This
Legislature $462,667
Ahead Last One.
Increase in School Attendance
Forbade Cut Big Items.
Appropriations 1911 $S,373.SS4.01
Appropriations 1913 S,83s,551.U
Increase 1913 j 462.etS7.12
That is the story of state taxes and
expenditure of public money as told
by the record of the 1913 legislature.
Not only will the appropriations at the
hands of the 1913 lawmakers elimi-
ataLs!TurinL0LeTsSnheS
a record for the expenditure of $462.
667.12 more than the 1911 session.
And the 1911 session set a reasonably
high water mark in Kansas.
Pledged to retrenchments, the
Democrats came to Topeka two
months ago to take charge of
state government. No one can fairly
charge that they haven't made a fair-;
ly honest effort to fulfill that pledge.
But when they looked around and
viewed the situation from all angles,
they counseled one with anotner- ana
agreed that there were but few spots
that would stand the pruning knife.
Not only were they unable to reduce
the educational appropriations, but
the Democrats found that the in
creased attendance at these schools
made it absolutely necessary to give
these institutions more money for
their work in 1914-15. An effort was
nailn to save money on the state ex
ecutive and judiciary budget, but there
was nothing doing. The few dollars
they 'saved, were swallowed up in new
holes that no one had seen .uniu
legislature stumbled right over them.
Items made ud by the ways and
means committees of the two houses
show that the 1913 appropriation
will be nearly a half million dollars
higher than those of 1911. And in
ivinia ioTTi urn not included the re-
appropriated moneys. " Such figures will
not be obtainable until tney are inauc
up in the state auditor's office.
To' be sure there-were several ex
cuse fiir the increased appropriations.
but the- fact that the appropriations
are larger is the real tnrag inai-interests
the taxpayer. For instance,
there was the $125,000 for western
Kansas irrigation purposes, the $75,
000 for aid of rural schools, the $325,
000 for the publication of school text
books and the increased appropria
tions for the educational institutions.
Figures by the ways and means
committee, which include all appro
priations made at this session, show
that $4,932,915.05 were made for the
year 1914, including deficiencies in
several departments for the. year
1913. Appropriations aggregating $3,
905,636.08 are made for 1915. ; Against
these figures are shown the following
appropriations by the 1911 session:
For 1911, deficiencies, $569,861.77;
for 1912, $4,212,441.16; for 1913, $3,
593.581.08; 'or a total of $8,3 i 5,
884.01. GORE MAKES CHARGE.
Alleges. Senate Doorkeeper Disposed
of Lorimer Case Document.
Washington, March J3 Charges that
Carl A. Loeffier, acting assistant aoor
keener of the senate, had been respon-
sihln for the disappearance of the
Holstlaw certificate of deposit, present
ed during the Lorimer trial in the sen-
ate, and which was never afterwards
located, was made in the senate toaay
by Senator Gore, of Oklahoma, when
Mr. Loeffter's re-election was proposed.
The senator said his informant was a
page of the senate, who had delivered
the certificate to Mr. Loeffier after se
curing it from Senator Bailey.
ihpoMntfeaTure.
Why the Best Dressed Men Patronize
the Merchant Tailor.
In face of the many offers for cheap
clothes at cheap prices, the well dressed
man must still turn to the custom
tailor for trie really correct fitting gar
ments. Every man is built slightly dif
ferent from every other man, and it
is only in the "Try-on" of a garment
that it can be made to fit, drape and
look well. Olof Ekberg is showing a
large line of woolens from which to
make right fitting suits for as low as
$25. 708 Kansas avenue. Adv.
HOME GARDEN CONTEST
Will Try to Raise $500 for Prizes for
Children's Gardens.
A joint meeting of the Topeka Real
Estate Dealers' association and the
newly organized Women's Commercial
club was held today at the Topeka
Commercial club quarters to discuss
the question of putting the home gar-;
den contests of the city schools on an
extensive plane the coming season
C. C. Starr, superintendent of city
schools, who was present at the meet
ing, gave a brief explanation of the
plan it is proposed to adopt. The city
e tr I"LfE?fji ES
win ue oiiereu nie yuungsieiH grow-,
lng the best gardens in the individual
districts. Then there will probably
be a grand nrize offered for the best
De a grana prize ouerea ior tne Desi
garden grown in the entire city. .
r- M withiniftrn who had rharM
. .' -,:',"' ." r j
ui eaiU:.i u, .i,:..,
vne rCu
According to C. B. ingett pres -
dent of the Topeka Real Estate Deal-
ers' association it is desired to raise
$500 to be divided into special prizes.
xne ariuisiiwusc """"J v. J I
reaay pieugcu uite ul uie nve uunuicu
dollars.
It is probable that the members of
the Women's Commercial club at their
next meeting will decide to assist in
the raising of money for the con
tests. Will Not Write Book.
Washington, March 13. "Uncle
Joe". Cannon is not going to write a
book of reminiscences. One reason is
that he regards his experience as a
thing to be forgotten. Another is I
that it is a crime to cut down forests
for tha manufacture of paper upon
which to print ninety-nin out of
every hundred books published now
adays. In Deplorable Condition.
' Albany, N. Y., March 13. Gover
nor Sulzer has made public a letter
from Dr. Austin Flint, the alienist,
which declares that the Matteawan
asylum for the insane is in a. deplor
able condition because Harry Thaw
and other inmates, one a woman who
I has committed nine murders, have
' been allowed free run of the- institu
tion, and further states that Thaw has
had several opportunities to escape,
all of which he has declined to take
advantage of. The letter will serve
as an added specification to - the
charges recently preferred against
Joseph F. Scott, state superintendent
of prisons. - .
NOT CONTAGIOUS
The Meningitis That Caused
Death of Two School Girls.
' But the. High School Was Fumi-
gated Just the Same.
There is no cause for alarm on the
part of the students of the high school
"r l"!" """" L8
that two of the popular girls of the
senior class have died of meningitis.
Physicians declare it was not the
dreaded and contagious o-
! spinal meningitis that caused the
deaths, but to make assurance doubly
sure the high school building has
been fumigated upon the suggestion of
the city physician.
Miss Esther Nelson, daughter of
Mrs. Lena Nelson of 722 Morris ave
nue, died last Tuesday afternoon. She
became suddenly ill Monday evening
and was attended by Dr. L. "V. Sams.
who took the place of Dr. C... F. Men-
ninger, who could not answer "the
call. The next morning both physi
cians were in attendance, but the pa
tient died within a- few. hours. The
disease was pronounced, to be a virile
form of meningitis caused from ery
sipelas. Miss Nelson was an attractive
girl and one of the leaders of her
class. - - . - - ' .
Miss Ksther Kleinhans, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. John Kleinhans, 817
Quincy street, died March 3 after an
illness of six weeks. The physicians
pronounced her malady to be tuber
cular meningitis. She was a girl who
had a host of friends, and her loss
is keenly felt by the members of her
class at the high school: "
Dr. C. F. Menninger and Dr. Sarah
Greenfield, state bacteriologist, who
examined the spinal fluid, stated that
there is no trace of spinal meningitis.
Dr. C. A. McGuire, who attended Miss
Kleinhans, stated the case was by no
means similar to spinal meningitis.
TWO INTERPRETERS.
They Were Necessary for Kolpicion to
Reach the Court.
Two interpreters were necessary in
a case tried in the county court this
morning. The trouble was that the
only man who could make himself
understood to the parties to the suit
was a German who was unable to
speak English. So the questions were
put to the English-German interpreter
who in turn put them to the German,
who in turn put them to the witness.
The answers came back into English
through the same tortuous route.
-The suit was brought by Carl Schiff
man, alias David Schiffman, alias Carl
Geiske against his brothr-in-law,
John Kolpicion, for the Recovery of
money sent to Russia to enaDie tne
brother-in-law to come to America,
The parties to the suit, however, were
from a province in Russia in which a
language is spoken that very few in
Topeka can speak. Thus the trouble
with the interpreters.
During the case it was charged that
the plaintiff was under sentence to
Siberia by the Russian government,
and- that he escaped by coming1 to this
country.
Girls on Strike.
Pittsburg, March 13. Two hundred
girls, employed in the Oliver Steel
and Iron Mills, are on strike today.
They demand a living wage. One thou
sand more girls are expected to walk
out. These girls are employed at
threading bolts. They are paid five i
cents a thousand. Their demand is
for an additional two cents a thou
sand. The striking girls declare that
it is not possible for any girl to earn
more than $8 a week. Some girls are
paid only 2 8 cents a day, the strikers
assert. Threading bolts is heavy
work for women. Frequently the
hands are lacerated. A great many
of all of the 1,200 threading bolts
wore bandages on their haids. With
hands bound up the yirls say it is
hard to work fast enough to make a
decent wage.
Graft Testimony.
New York, March 13. The vast
wealth reaped by the officials of the
system" through their graft grip on
the underworld was further disclosed
In a series of new revelations which
were made to District Attorney Whit
man and his assistants and to the
grand jury. The most amazing was
the testimony of old "Eve". Stacom, I
74 years old. She admitted that dur-
Vd?Jrd Mo111 WhhCVh-f ha2!Paen and for that reason? w pos -kept
disorderly houses she had paid ',: ,,n .v, ' ,. T
asents of the "system ' over $350,000
Herman Michaels, known as the "King
cf the Bookmakers." in Harlem, said '
he paid an average toll of $50 a week
or $2,600 a year.
Baby Picture Contest at Majestic,
launthVMajetAelVed
Il f. TllZ,?
-,j j.. . , , , .
Pnterest created a eood deal of
ijki". i ..o.i.. 1 .
Bables in variety were shown on the
screen and as the favorites came into
vle there was vieoroim InnlTiTdin
iew tnere was vigorous applauding.
ome were with clothes and
some
rtrtu?n .
were without; some were lying down
and some standing up. Nearly everv
one present mat a bot foryone
tno babies
The contest will be run for two wqeks.
Eacn patron or the theater with an
admission ticket Is allowed a vote.
DEATHS AND FUNERALS
Mr. Josie Nelson, a sister of Mrs.
George Parkhurst who lives on Ninth
and Tyler streets, died Tuesday In Kan
sas City, of pneumonia. She was sick
but three days and died before Mrs. Park
hurst or members of the family in To
peka had learned of her illness. Mr. and
Mrs. Parkhurst went to Kansas City to
attend the funeral which was held yester
day. They are expected to return home
today.
The funeral of Miss Esther Nelson of 72S
Morris avenue, who died Tuesday night,
was held this afternoon at 3 o'clock at
the First Presbyterian church. Students
of the high school attended in a body.
Interment was in the Topeka cemetery.
A Moose Dance.
Social dance w-ili be given .Friday
night, March 14 at their hall, 112-14
East 7th.
GOV. HODGES' VIEW
He
Was Not Pleased With
Work of Closing Days.
But Legislature as Whole Was
Most Successful.
- Governor George H. Hodges isn't the
least bit pleased with the work of his
Democratic legislature during the clos
ing days of the session. And Governor
Hodges, who has already established a
record for candid expression of senti
ment, doesn't hesitate to say just what
he thinks of the work of the last week.
In the last few days, party pledges
went to the scrap heap along with local
bills and pet measures of individual
members. JYom all outward appear
ances, the legislature forgot all about
party pledges in those closing days and
, worked with th i
nome as soon as possible. And in their
., haste some v important Democratic
, legislation was ditched,
I Here are some of the party measures
, an(J important bits of legislation that
failed in the closing week.
Initiative and referendum.
Mortgage registration tax law.
Compulsory grain Inspection law.
Minimum wage for women.
Maximum hour law.
Graduated inheritance tax law.
Judicial reapportionment bill.
Those are all Democratic party
pledges. In the last week of the ses
sion there was an opportunity to have
put every one of these measures in the
sack. But the legislature didn't do it.
"I am frank to say that I" am not
at all' satisfied- with the - closing
days -of the session," said Governor
Hodges today. "At least five or
six important Democratic party
pieages aiea on our hands and I don't
think there was any occasion for it.
"We needed a compulsory grain -inspection
law and needed it badly," con
tinued the governor. "At present the
grain shipper is the victim of the Kan
sas City board of trade and will be
until such a Imv is passed.
That Registration Tax Law.
"Then take the mortgage registration
tax law. It should have been passed and
the legislature should have agreed on a
conference report. The mortgage regis
tration tax was in both party platforms
and the Republicans are equally responsi
ble with the Democrats for the failure of
the bill. This law would nave lessened
the rate of interest to the borrower,
would have brought a multitude of new
funds into the state and would have
meant thousands of dollars in increased
taxes.
"A collateral inheritance tax law should
have been passed. I am opposed t0 the
taxation of direct heirs, but a tax on
the property owned in Kansas by non
residents would have meant much to our
state. Take for instance the railroad in
terests. They are controlled almost en
tirely by foreign capital. There is no rea
sorr why on the death of these magnates
that the state should not realize on their
vast properties.
"As for the failure of the initiative and
referendum, it was in both party plat
forms and the record of the Democrats
has been consistent. I only wish .that
the measure might have been passed.
"Viewing the session as a whole, it has
been most successful in my opinion. The
members have worked hard and faithful
ly and more party pledges redeemed and
more good laws written than, in the rec
ord of any former legislature in Kansas."
Governor Hodges also wanted the mini
mum wage and the maximum hour lawo,
as well as the Judicial reapportionment
measures. All were lost in -the elosins
hours of the session. Only a review oi
the work of the legislature for the 5S
davs it was in Topeka. adds to the hap
piness of the Kansas executive. He is not
pleased witn tne nnai weeK ana luimus
it. But for the session. Governor Hodges
declines to concede that any former leg
islature in Kansas ever made a . better
record.
MAY SUE THEM.
Mayor Billard Considers Slander Ac
tion Against Two Preachers.
Rev. Robert Gordon, pastor of the
First Baptist church, and Rev. Roy
B. Guild, pastor the Central Congrega
tional church, may be required to de
fend themselves in a personal damage
suit after the city election. Mayor J.
B. Billard and Mrs. Delia Sare.. . police
matron, will be the complaining wit
nesses. Mayor Billard practically admitted
that he would sue the preachers yes
terday. He believes that himself and
Mrs. Sare have been slandered and the
affair is being investigated for that
purpose.
Rev. Roy E. Guild- made a sensa
tional statement concerning affairs at
the police station for which Mrs. Sare
is responsible, several weeks ago. Rev.
Robert Gordon made statements in his
sermon last Sunday night which at
tacked the mayor and the latter be
lieves that the public sermon is libel-
M'avor TJiiiard will not allr. thi r
e v,
pone action until after the city elec
tion.
Crichton May Run for Mayor.
By the time the office, of the city
clerk in closed tonight another candi
date may be in the race for mayor.
Early this afternoon George N. Crich-
Jon of the Paper Box Factory,
1 T-' .. - , . .
.na.ii&cis aveuue was consiuering circu
lating his petitions in a hurry and
launching forth in politics.
Hoes Go "to $9.10.
Chicago, March. 13. A new ton for
the year was reached at the stock-
. . . . . . .
ya.ras ioaay wnen Dutcner nogs went
to $9.10.
LOCAL MENTION.
Free $7 extra pants with suit to order
$15. Order your Easter suit now. Satur
day last day. Glasgow Woolen Mills, Tli
Kansas ave. Adv.
Mark Nichols was arrested by the
police last night for running an auto
mobile without lights. He pleaded
guilty in police court this morning and
was fined $2.00.
"Hutch" the barber will be glad to
see all his old friends at the Chester
field Barber -Shop, 419 Kansas Ave.
Adv.
Suit for divorce charging the wife
with being subject to sudden fits of
passion and with neglect, was filed in
the district court this morning by L.
B. Ridings against Fay E. Ridings.
They were married December 8, 1910.
It will pay -cu to get our estimate on
that lumber bill. J. B. Whelan & Co.. 4th
and S. F. tracks. Phone 865. Adv. 1
ORDERED NOT TO FIRE.
American Troops Receive Such Orders
From Secretary Garrison.
Washington, March 13. American
troops on the Mexican border have
been forbidden to return the fire of
Mexican troops except upon specific
authorization from the war depart
ment at "Washington. - This instruc
tion has been sent by direction of Sec
retary Garrison to Brigadier General
Bliss, in command of the forces.
published in The Topeka State Journal
March 13, 1913.
HOUSE BILL NO. 461.
AN ACT giving to inn, hotel, boarding
and eating house keepers a lien on cer
tain property specified therein, providing
a penalty for obtaining board or lodging
under false pretenses,- and repealing
sections 4022 and 4023 of the General
Statutes' of 1909.
Be it enacted by the Legislature of the
State of Kansas:
Section 1. The keeper of any inn, hotel
or boaadlng house, whether individual.
partnership or corporation, shall have a
lien on tne baggage and other property
in and about such inn brought to the same
by or under the control of his guests or
boarders, for the proper charges due him
from such guests or boarders for the ac
comodation, board and lodging, and for all
money paid for or advanced to them not
to exceed the sum of two hundred dollars,
and for such other extras as are furnish
ed at the request of such guests.
Sec. 2. Said inn keeper or hotel keeper
, shall have the right to detain such bag
gage and othqir property until the amount
of such charges are paid, and such bag
gage and other property shall be exempt
from attachment or execution until sucn
innkeepers lien and the cost of satisfying
it are paid.
Sec. 3. Said inh-keeper, boarding house
or hotel keeper shall retain such baggage
and other property upon which he has a
lien for a period of ninety days, at tne
expiration of which time, if such lien is
not satisfied, he may sell such baggage
and other property at public auction, first
giving notice of the time ana place oi
sale by posting a least three notices tnere
of in public places in the county where the
inn or hotel is situated and also by mail
ing a copy of such notice addressed to
said guest or Doaraer at tne place oi resi
dence designated by the register of such
inn or hotel.
Sec. 4. After satisfying the lien and any
costs that may accrue, any resiaue re
maining shall, on demand, within six
months, be paid to such guest or boarder,
and if not so demanded within six months
from date of sale, such residue shall be
deposited by such inn-keeper with the
treasurer of the county in which the inn
or hotel is situated, together with a state
ment of the inn-keeper's claim and the
cost of enforcing the same, a copy of
the notice given, and the amount received
for the goods sold at said sale.
Sec. 5. Said residue shall be retained by
the county treasurer for a period of one
year, and if not claimed within that time
by the owner thereof, the county treasurer
shall place the. same to the credit ot the
common school fund.
Sec 6. Any person who shall obtain
food, lodging or other accomodation at
any hotel, inn, boarding or eating house
by means of any trick, deception or false
representation, statement or pretense,
with intent to defraud the owner or keep
er thereof, and shall fail or refuse to pay
therefor, shall be aeemea guniy ui a mis
demeanor and upon the conviction thereof
shall be punished by a fine not exceeding
one hundred dollars or, by imprisonment
in the county jail not exceeding three
months, or by" both such fine and im
prisonment. ' ' '' .v.
Sec. 7. Proof that lodging, food or other
accomodations were obtained by raise
pretense or by false or fictitious show or
pretense of any baggage or other property.
or that he gave iu imju. Vi, i
lodging or other accomodation a check or
other negotiable paper on which payment
was refused, or that he left the hotel inn
or boarding house without paying or offer
ing to pay for such food, lodging or other
accomodation, or that he surreptitiously
removed or attempted to remove his bag
gage, or other property, or that he regis
tered under a fictitious name, shall be
prima facie proof of the intent to defraud
mentioned in section six (6) of this act.
Sec 8. The provisions of section six (6)
and seven (7) of this act shall not apply
where there has been an agreement in
writing for delay in payment for a period
not to exceed ten days.
Sec. 9. Sections 4022 and 4023 of the Gen
eral Statutes of 1909, and all other acts
and parts of acts in so far as they are
in conflict herewith are hereDy repeaiea.
Sec. 10. This act shall take effect and be
in force from and after its publication in
the official state paper.
I hereby certify that the above Bill orig
inated in the House, and passed that body
February 24, 1913.
W. L. BROWN,
Speaker of the House.
A. A. DUNMIRE,
Ass't Chief Clerk of the House.
Passed the Senate March 7, 1913,
SHEFFIELD INGAIXS,
President oi the Senate.
BURT E. BROWN,
Secretary of the Senate.
Approved March 10. 1913.
GEO. H. HODGES,
Governor.
State of Kansas,
Office of the Secretary of State.
I, CHAS. H. SESSIONS, Secretary of
State of the State of Kansas, do hereby
certify that the above and foregoing is a
correct copy of the original enrolled bill
now on file in my office.
IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I have
hereunto subscribed my name
Seal. and affixed my official seal,
this 12th day of March, 1913.
CHAS. H. SESSIONS.
- Secretary of State.
Published in The Topeka State Journal
March 13, 1915.
SUBSTITUE FOR SENATE BILL NO. 230.
AN ACT amending sections 1 &3 of chap
ter vi me Laws or mil. entitled an
act to promote the health of employees
in coal mines, by providing bath houses
at coal mines and prescribing penalties
ior me violation thereor. ,
Be it enacted by the Legislature of the
State of Kansas.
Section" 1. It shall be the duty of the
owner, or lessee, its officers or agent's, or
other person or persons having the juris
diction or direction of any coal mines
within the state of Kansas to provide on
and after July 1, 1913, a suitable building,
which shall be convenient to the principal
entrance of such mine or mines, and equip
ped with benches or seats; said benches
or seats, and the interior part of said
bath house, to be kept clean and in a
sanitary condition. Said building or bath
house to have sufficient floor space for
the accommodation of miners or others
using the same. The flooring in said wash
room or bath room to be of concrete or
cement, and the flooring In the changing
room to be optional with the owner as to
material used. All lockers in new bath
houses when made of steel shall be not
less than twelve inches by twelve inches,
by forty-eight in height; when made of
lumber shall be not less than twelve in
ches by twenty-two inches, by forty-eight
lncnes m neignt. with partition in center
of wood lockers.
The lockers in each i
bath house shall be sufficient in number
to accommodate the employes using the
same, also proper lights, heat, hot and
cold water, and a shower bath for every
fifteen employes using the same, and
maintain the same in good order for the
purpose of washing and bathing of em
ployes, and changing of clothing. Said
employes are to furnish their own towels.
Hifl .
LEGAL
soap and lock for their locker, exercise
control over, and be responsible for the
property by them left therein. The in
dividual owner, operator, lessee, company
or corporation shall keep said bath houses
in a clean and sanitary condition.
- Sec. 2. No owner or lessee, its officers
or agents, or other person installing such
bath house at its or their mine, or mines,
shall be legally liable for the loss or
destruction of any property left by its or
their employes at or in said bath house.
Sec 3. Any owner or lessee, its officers
or agents, or other person or persons fail
ing or refusing to comply with the pro
visions of this act shall be deemed guilty
of a misdemeanor and shall, upon con.
viction, be fined the sum of not less than
fifty dollars -$50) nor more than one
hundred dollars ($100) for each violation
of the provisions of this act. And each
day there is a failure to comply with the
provisions of this act shall be a separate
offense, and punished as such. The state
inspector of mines shall have general
supervision of this law and the enforce
ment of the same, and it shall be optional
with said Inspector of mines to waive the
provisions of this act as to all bath houses
that have been constructed prior to the
taking effect of this act, but said state
inspector of mines is hereby given author
ity to require such bath nouses aireauy
in existence to be changed or improved
as in his judgment may be necessary.
Sec. 4. It shall be the duty of all per
sons using said bath ' house to remove
therefrom" all cast-off wearing apparel. It
shall be unlawful for any person to in
anywise break, injure or destroy any bath
house or any part or appurtenance there
to, or commit any nuisance therein.
Sec. 5. Any person found guilty of any
. . . . i A thla aft Hhnll.
vioiaxion m'ihh - w,.- - ,
upon conviction, be fined not less than ;
five dollars nor more than ten dollars, or ,
be imprisoned in the county jail not less
than ten days nor more man iuuu a-'r
v.. v. ,,v, fine nnii imprisonment, in
the discretion of the cdurt: provided that
the provisions or tne act biwu
to the coal mine located In counties hav
ing coal mines over 650 feet in depth.
Sec-6. All acts and parts of acts in
conflict with the provisions of this act
are hereby repeaiea.
Sec. 7. This act shall take effect and
be in force from and after its publication
in the official state paper.
I hereby certify that the above bill orig
inated in the Senate, and passed that
body March 4-1913.
L. P. KING, Pres. Pro. Tern.
of the Senate.
BURT E. BROWN,
Secretary of the Senate.
Passed the House March 5-1913.
W. L. BROWN.
Speaker of the House.
GEO. E. ROGERS,
Chief Clerk of the House.
Approved March 10, 1913.
1 GEO. H. HODGES,
' Governor.
State of Kansas,
Office of the Secretary of State.
I CHAS. H. SESSIONS. Secretary of
State of the State of Kansas, do hereby
certify that the above and foregoing is a
correct copy of the original enrolled bill
now on file in my office.
IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I have
hereunto subscribed my name
Seal.j and affixed my official seal,
this 12th day of March, 1913.
- " CHAS. H. SESSIONS,
Secretary of State.
TPublisned in The Topeka State Journal
March 13, 1913.
SENATE BILL NO. 43S.
AN ACT relating to the terms of district
court in the thirty-third judicial district
and repealing chapter fifty of the Ses
sion Laws of 1908.
Be it enacted by the Legislature of the
State of Kansas: .
Section 1. Terms of court in Rush coun
ty snail be held on the first Monday in
Trhrmj-v- second Monday in May and
third Monday in September in each year.
Sec 2. Terrris of court in Ness county
shall be held on the second Monday in
February, the fourth Monday in April
and the fourth Monday in September in
each year.
a q Tjfm of court in Lane county
&hall be held on the third Monday in Feb
ruary, the first Monday in May and on
the Wednesday following ihe fourth Mon
day in September in each year.
Sec. 4. Terms oi cum i m ovt. """--j
hoii v Violri nn th fourth Monday in
p.nirv tha third Monday in May and
the first .Ion1ay in October in each year.
!s s Terms of court in Wichita coun
ty shall be held on the fourth Tuesday in
January, the third Tuesday in April and
the Wednesday following the i-irst Moa
day in October in each year.
Sec 6. Terms of court in Greeley coun
ty shall be held on the third Tuesday in
Jai.uarv, the second Tuesday in April and
the Thursday following the first Monday
in October in each year.
Sec 7. Terms of court in Pawnee coun
ty shall be held on the first Monday in
March, the rourtn Aionaay m j
the first Monday in November in each
y Sec 8. Terms of court in Edwards
h heM on the third Mon
day in March, the first Monday in June
and the third Monday in November in
each year.
in Hodgeman
se. 9. Terms oi ul1
county shall be held on the first Monday in
An the second Monday in June and
the first Monday in December in each
year. . . .
Sec 10. At th3 September term in the
counties of Rush and Ness, and at tlve
Mav term in Pawnee county and June
term in Edwards county, i.nd at all terms
in the counties having a population of
less than three thousand, juries shall not
be called, except under the order of the
court or judge thereof, which may be
made during co' rt or at any time not ex
ceeding thirty days prior to the conven-
lnSechlf Chapter 50 of the Laws of IPOS
is hereby repealed. ,",
See 12 This act shall take effect ana
be In' force from and after its publication
in the ofHcial state paper.
I hereby certifv that the above Bill orig
inated in the Senate, and passed that
bodv Feb. 15-1913,
L. P. KING,
Pres Pro Tern of the Senate.
BURT E. BROWN.
Secretary of the Senate.
Passed the House March 7-1913.
W. L. BROWN.
Speaker of the House.
GEO. E. ROGERS,
Chief Clerk of the House.
Approved March. 10-1913.
GEO. H. HODGES.
Governor.
State of Kansas,
Office of the Secretary of State.
I, CHAS. H. SESSIONS. Secretary of
State of the State or Kansas, do hereby
certify that the above and foregoing is a
correct copy of the original enrolled bill
now on file in my office.
IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF. I have
hereunto subscribed my name
Seal. and affixed my official seal
this 12th day of March. 1913.
CHAS. H. SESSIONS.
Secretary of State.
Published in The Topeka State Journal
March 13, 1913.
HOUSE BILL NO. 597.
AN ACT relating to public bridges, and
supplemental to chapter 64, Laws of
1909.
Be it enacted by the Legislature of the
State of Kansas: .
Section 1. Whenever the'" board of coun
ty .commissioners of any eounty of this
state, having an assessed valuation for
taxation purposes of over ninety million
dollars, has been ordered or required, o
shall hereafter be ordered or required, to
remove, relocate, reconstruct or other
wise improve any public bridge under the
rtrfwlalnns of chanter fU. Fjivk nf 1Vi4
and there is any portion of such bridge.
which it is not practicable or necessary to
use in the reconstruction thereof, said
board o' county commissioners is heroby
authorized and empowered to use such
portion or portions of said bridge in the
construction of any other bridge over any
river in said county, and located within
two miles of the bridge so ordered or re
ouired to be removed, relocated, recon
How to i Cut
the Cost of
LEGAL.
structed, or improved, and for the pur
pose of paying any additional cost and
expense of the construction of such
bridge, may issue the bonds of such
county, without the same being author
ized by any election called or held for
such purpose, not exceeding in amount
me sum of two hundred and fifty thou
sand dollars and subject only to the limi
tations contained In this act.
Sec. 2. The county surveyor of said
county, when so directed to do by the
board . of county commissioners, shall
make all, necessary surveys and investi
gations and prepare plans and specifica
tions for the construction of such bridge
End the approaches thereto, together with
an estimate, under oath, of the cost there
of, and file such plans, specifications and
estimate in the office of the county clerk
of said county, said bridge shall be con
structed under written contract made and
&v arded to the lowest responsible bidder.
upon sealed proposals therefor based upon
tne plans and specifications so prepared
and filed in the office of tho county clerk
of said county. No contract shall be
awarded therefor at a price in excess of
a to .estimated cost. The mans and speci
fications prepared and filfid as above pro
vided shall be considered and appioved
by the board of county commissioners
and thereafter said board shall advertise
for tbrte consecutive weeks in the official
county paper for sealed proposals fo- the
construction of said bridge, and the con
tract therefor shall be awarded tc the
lowest -responsible bidder, and any con
tractor to whom any such contract is
awarded, shall enter into written con
tract therefor and to secure the faithful
performance thereof shall file in the of
fice of the county clerk of said county a
bond duly executed by one or more surety
companies duly authorized to do business
in this state to be approve-.l by said board
of county commissioners.
Sec 3. The bonds authorized to be is
sued by section 1 hereof, may be Issued
to the contractor constructing such
bridge, in payment therefor, or the sa'd
board of county commissioners may sell,
the same and pay said contractor out of
the proceeds thereof. Such bonds shall
b made payable In twenty years from
the date thereof, and shall bear Interest
at a rate not to exceed four and '"ne-t.alf
per cent, per annum, and shall hovs
semi-annual interest coupons attached
thereto. It shall be the duty of ihe board
of county commissioners of any county
issuing such bonds, annually at the time
of levying other taxes, to levy a tax each
year sufficient to pay the interest on sail
bonds as the same become due, on all tax
able property of said county, and ocfore
the date of the maturity of said bonds, to
levy a tax for the payment of The same
at their maturity. No bonds issued in
pursuance of this act shall be :ohl for
less than their par valu. nor shall any
commission be paid for the sale thereof,
and all moneys realized from the rale of
such bonds shall be used only for the
Purpose herein specified. Sal' bonis
shall be signed on behalf of the county
iruin2 the same, by the chairman of he
board of county commissioners, and at
tested by the county clerk of said county
with the seal of the county thereto af
fixed, and shall be registered by said,
countv clerk in his office, and snch regis
tration shall be certified to by said county
clerk, upon said bonds, undr nis official
signpture and the seal of said rrunty.
Said bonds shall also be renlstered by the
auditor of state and he snail certiry on
said bonds to the registration thereof un
der his official signature and seal of of
fice. All bonds isued under the jto
visions of this act shall contain a recital
that the same are issued under the pro
visions of this act and In conformity
with the provisions, restrictions and limi
tations thereof, and that such bonds and
the interest thereon are to ''.j paid by a
general tax levied ipon all of the taxable
property of the countv iasuinis the same,
end such recital ishall be conclusive in
favor of all persons purchasing such
bonds, that all proper acta have been
done, proceeding had and conditions pre
cedent performed, to authorize the issue
cf such bonds and the levy of all taxes
accessary for the payment of principal
and Interest thereof, when th same bo
come due, by the terms thereof.
Sec. 4. No street railway or other rail
way company shall construct, lay or
maintain any tracks upon or use for the
tr&nsrcrtation of passengers or freight,
gov bridge constructed under the pro
lisicns of this act without flrnt paying to
the county constructing such brilge, one
half of the total cost of such construc
tion of such bridge and the approaches
thereto; and no other person or corpora
tion shall use such bridge- or the piers or
abutments tbarwof for -any- private use
v-ithout first paying to the county con
structing the same such sum as the board
of county commissioners or other au
thorities having control of such bridge,
shall require as compensation for such
use. If any street railway or railway cor
poration shall construct, lay or maintain
any tracks upon or use for the transpor- I
Down
Living
Advantageous buying; is the
basis of economy. To know
( When and where to buy is a
problem, which can be easily
solved by reading: the announce
ments of the live merchants who
use the columns , of the State
Journal daily to enlighten the
public, on where and when to
buy. ;
The news columns play an im
portant part in the make up of
the newspaper, but the advertis
ing; columns are just as import
ant and in many instances are
of vastly more importance to the
reader who wishes to economize
in the high cost of living.
Begin now and economize by
reading and taking advantage of
the advertisements that are ap
pearing daily in the State Journal.
It will save you time and money!
LEGAL.
tation of its passengers, or freight, any
bridge constructed under the provisions of
this act without first paying therefor as
above provided, it shall thereby become
liable to the county for one-half of th !
cost of the construction of suc-h bridge,
and such county may sue for and re-s
cover t-uch sum in any court of competent
jurisdiction, and the use of such bridge
by any street railway or railway corpora
tion for the transportation of any cars,
papsengers -or freight, or the construc
tion o:- maintenance of tracks thereon
imj mimo De enjomen until compennati" i
is made therefor as hereinbefore pro
vided. AH tr.cney received for the use of
such bridge shall be used in the con
struction or maintenance thereof, or in
the payment of bonds and Interest there
on issued on account of the conetructiui
of such bridge.
Sec. 5. All bridges constructed under
the provisions of this act shall be under
the control of and maintained by thi
board of county commissioners of the
county constructing the same, and such
county commissioners shall have power
to contract with any city in which any
such bridge Is situated or with any per
son or corporation using any "such bridge,
for the maintenance or repair thereof.
Sec. 6. This act shall take effect and be
In force from and after its publication It
the official state paper.
I hereby certify that the above bill orwr
inated in the House, and passed that body'
February 18, 1913.
W. L. BROWN,
Speaker of the House.
GEO. E. ROGERS,
Chief Clerk of the House.
Passed the Senate February 27, 1913.
Mar. 3. 1913 Report of Conference Com
mittee adopted.
, SHEFFIELD INGALLS.
President of the Senate.
- BURT E. BROWN,
Secretary of the Senate.
Approved March 7. 1913.
GEO. H. HODGES,
Governor.
State of Kansas,
Offic of the Secretary of State.
I, CHAS. H. SESSIONS. Secretary of
State of the State of Kansas, do hereby
certify that the above and foregoing is a
correct copy of the original enrolled bill
now on file in my office.
IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF. I have
hereunto subscribed my name
Seal. and affixed my official seal,
this 8th day of March. 1913.
CHAS. H. SESSION'S.
Secretary of State.
Published in The Topeka State Journal
March 13, 1913.
SENATE BILL NO. 779.
AN ACT to amend section 2 of chapter 330
of the Session Laws of 1911 and repeal
ing said original section.
Be it enacted by the Legislature of the
. State of Kansas:
Section 1. That section 2 of chapter 2-J0
of the Session Laws of 1911 be amended
so as to read as follows, to wit: Section
2. When any court paper shall have been
designated as an official court paper, as
provided in section one of this act, any
legal notice, advertisement or publication
now required by law to be published in
any newspaper in any action or proceed
ings pending before trie district court, tho
probate court, any justice of the peaca.
or any court of record In said county,
may be published in such court paper
designated by the direction and order of
the court in which raid action is pending,
and such publication shall be deemed a
compliance with chapter 156 of Session
Laws 1891. as amended by section 1. chap
ter 239 of the Session Laws of 1901. an 1
as further amended by House bill No. M
enacttd into law at the present fesslon of
the Legislature.
Sec. 2. This act shall be In force from ,
and after Its publication in the official
state raper.
I hereby certify that the above Bill orlir
irated In tne Senate, and pawed that body
February 21, 1913.
L. P. KING,
Pres. Pro Tern, of the Senate.
BURT E. BROWN.
Secretary of the Senate.
Passed the House March , 1913.
W. L. BROWN,
Speaker of the House.
GEO. E. ROGERS,
Chief Clerk of the House.
Approved March 10, 1913.
GEO. H. HODGES,
Governor.
State of Kansas,
Office of the Secretary of State.
I, CHA8. H. SESSIONS. Secretary of
State of the i te of Kansas, do hereby
certify that the above and foregoing is a
correct copy of the original enrolled bill
now on file In my office.
IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I have
hereunto subscribed my name
Seal. and affixed my official seal,
this 12th day of March. l-3.
CHAS. H. SESSIONS.
Secretary of Stat.

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