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The Topeka state journal. [volume] (Topeka, Kansas) 1892-1980, June 21, 1913, LAST EDITION, Image 2

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THE TOPTTKA DAILY STATE JOURNAL SATURDAY EVENING- JUNE 21, 1913.
NO COIN FOR VETS!
Funds Short to Care for Old
Soldiers at Gettysburg.
TYar Department Can Pay for
40,000 Xo More.
Washington, June 21. Ten thousand
veterans -who are planning to take
part in the semi-centennial celebration
and blue and gray reunion on Gettys
burg battlefield next month, will find
themselves without quarters or sub
sistence unless the celebration com
mission can arrange to provide for
them. The war department has been
notified that 50,000 veterans will at
tend, but there are funds to care for
only 40,000 and Secretary Garrison has
notified the commission that he would
not accept responsibility for entertain
ing the additional number.
Six confederate veterans, three Union
veterans, one Spanish war veteran and
eleven other representatives, including
Speaker Clark, will represent the house
at Gettysburg celebration. The house
formally accepted an Invitation from
the state of Pennsylvan.a to partici
pate and authorized the speaker to ap
point a committee headed by himself.
Later the ccn-.mittee was announced as
follows :
Representatives Talbott (Md.), Sted
man (N. C), Taylor (Ala.), Richard
eon (Ala.). Jones (Va.). Estinopal
(La.); confederate veterans, Sher
wood (Oliio). Goulden N. )Y.), Kirk
patrlck (Iowa); union veterans, Gra
ham (111 ). Sherley (Ky.), Booher (Mo.),
Dixon (Ind.), Mann (111.). Payne N
T.. Burk (S. D.), Austin (Tenn.), Mon
dell (Wyo.), Hu liners (Pa.).
In making the appointments Speaker
Clark discovered that there was not a
single union veteran on the Republi
can aide of th-j house.
FIREWORKS EXPLODE.
Sporting Goods Store at Leavenworth
Has Bis Loss.
Leavenworth, Kan., June 21. An
explosion in the basement of the Rip
ley sporting goods store Friday after
noon completely wrecked the estab
lishment and periled the lives of a
number of employees. Spontaneous
combustion is given as the cause.
Following the first report flames
burst out and a few moments later
another crash came that blew the en
tire, front from the building. When
the first explosion came Mrs. W. E.
Horsley, with a baby in her arms, was
passing the store. She was hurled Into
the street and was picked up uncon
scious. The baby was badly bruised.
Occupants of the store in which
also is located the Santa Fe passenger
office, were thrown to the floor. All
managed to escape through the dense
volume of smoke that filled the room.
The loss Is estimated at $5,000.
HAIR CAUGHT IN WRIXGER.
Abilene Woman Escapes Serioos In
Jury In Her Home.
Abilene, Kan., June 21. Mrs. John
Elwick met with a peculiar and what
might have been a very serious acci
dent at her home.
She was doing the family washing
and using a washer and wringer driv
en by a gasoline engine. She stooped
to pick up some clothes and her hair
was drawen into the wringer.
All the hair was drawn into the mi
dline up to the head and a small por
tion of it was pulled out. Fortunately
Mrs. Elwick in some manner got her
hand caught in the wringer and the
sudden stopping of the machine threw
off the belt leading to the engine.
- She was still held by the hair and
no one except a little daughter was
present. The girl phoned to her fath
er at the poultry house and he went
home with all speed. Before he ar
rived some neighbor women were call
ed in but were unable to release Mrs.
Elwick. There was no crank on the
machine and it took Mr. Elwick some
little time to back the wringer and
release his wife who was by that time
almost completely exhausted.
HAS 147 DESCENDANTS.
Aged Minister Dead Wooed Wife by
Pantomime.
St. John, Kan., June 21. George
W. Crissman, a Brethren minister and
pioneer Kansan, died here aged 84. He
came. to Kansas in 18S3 and has re
sided "in Stafford county since 1902.
The deceased leaves 147 descendants.
Including children to great great
grandchildren. He made a fortune In
the California gold fields in 1850. In
1850 he married Miss Susanah Stutz
man at Johnstown. Pa., who survives
him, aged 83. Mr. Crissman is an
Englishman and Mrs. Crissman a Ger
man. At the time of their marriage
neither could understand a word the
other said. The wooing was done In
pantomime. The marriage ceremony
wu performed with the aid of an in
terpreter. WANT HODGES ON WEST END.
Santa Fe Trail Men Planning Ron
Over Western Division.
Garden City, Kan., June 21 Jeal
ousy of the accomplishment of the
eastern grand division of the New
Santa. Fe Trail in organizing and
staging the recent run from Kansas
City to Hutchinson may result in a
similar run over the western grand
Dr. D. R. Paine's method
of fitting glasses proves
highly satisfactory.
He Is the only op
tician nearer than
Chicago who uses
this system of care
ful seientlfio exam
ination and accurate
fitting of glasses.
Optical Parlors
' 718 Kansas Ave.
Over Cozy Theater
REPUBLICANS LOSE JOBS
A J i -
r - 4
t ' (
P. 4.4 " I
" )
Ik .4K
Carter B. Keen.
Washington, June 2L Gradually Repub
licans are being ousted from responsible
positions In government and their places
being filled with Democrats. Three mem
bers of the dominant party recently have
received good Jobs, either from President
Wilson or from members of his cabinet.
Cato Sells, the new commissioner of In
dian affairs in the interior department, is
a lawyer and banker. He was United
States district attorney under President
Cleveland and during his tenure of office
prosecuted the pension fraud cases. His
new office is one that requires a great
deal of diplomatic ability as well as a
strong executive. R. G. Valentine, who
was the last commissioner, resigned his
place some time before the end of the
Taft administration.
Carter B. Keene has just been made
chief of the postal savings system, suc
ceeding Theodore L. Weed. He is from
Maine and was born in that state in 1S68.
For many years he haa been in the gov
ernment service and has held numerous
important positions. He is now the head
of the biggest bank in the world. Uncle
Sam's postal savings system, which has
13,000 branches, 400,000 depositors and more
than $36,000,000 on deposit.
The third Democrat to draw from the
plum tree is Alexander M. Stephens, who
has been appointed chief of the railway
mail service by Postmaster General Bur
leson. Mr. Stephens started life as a news
paper man, but has been In the postal de-
division from Hutchinson west with
t ' Ki-tr-n ir T I f-7 1 . riji rtici natinc. The
boosters of the western end of the
hAiiavA tVioir- oft inn is in as good
condition as the eastern division and
do not want to be eclipsed.
MARKETING WHEAT AT ELLIS.
Farmers Dispose of Old Crop Need
More Room.
Ellis, Kan.. June 21. Wheat Is
coming to market here again as the
farmers need their granary room for
the new crop. There is certain to be
some wheat as the recent rains causea
the grain to become green and grow
again even where it had started to
turn yellow from the dry weather.
Practically all or. tne yeiiow streaxs
have now disappeared. South of Ellis
the wheat is by far the best, especially
alone the - Smoky Hill river. The
wheat in that vicinity is the finest in
the county.
Tramps are already beginning to
come to town and Saturday evening
29 of them rolled out of a ear when
the door was opened. They made
their way leisurely to the usual loung-
inir place by the railroad ice house.
They say they are harvest hands, but
harvest is yet two weeks off here.
TRAINMEN FIND WOMAN.
Unconscious Form Near Track; Died
Without Identification.
Kanorado, Kan.. June 21. An ex
tra Rock Island freight, east bound,
found an unknown woman lying by the
sid of the track a mile and a half
east of here in an unconscious con
dition, supposed to have fallen or
jumped from some train. The extra
picked her up and brought her to
Kanorado, where she received medical
aid by Dr. Ferguson and Dr. Smith
of Goodland. The company physician
was promptly notified and arrived at '
2:20. The woman died about 15 min- j
utes later. She was about SO years!
of age. of medium height, light com-
plexion. was well dressed and had
about $60 in money on her person.
Nothing could be found to identify
her. Her body was taken to Good
land to await further developments.
KILLED IN PISTOL DUFX.
Filipino Boy Shot by Leavenworth
Police Died on Table.
Leavenworth. Kan.. June 21. M. N.
Maliste, a Filipino boy, was shot and
killed by Officer C. J. Walker, of the
police department, here. Maliste came
across the Terminal bridge from Dry
dale and began firing at a group of
persons at the west end of the bridge.
Officers gave chase and in the pistol
duel that followed two shots struck
Maliste. He died on the operating table
at police headquarters.
Maliste came to Fort Leavenworth
three months ago from Fort Douglas,
Utah, with Lieutenant Harry L. Jor
dan, Twentieth infantry, who was
transferred for duty at the military i
prison. Lieutenant Jordan reported his
servant missing Thursday morning.
HERINGTON MAN IS PAROLED,
Harry George Out In Effort to Clear
TTp Military Record.
Leavenworth, June 21. Harry'
George, whose home is at Herington,
was released on parole from the Kan
sas state prison today on condition
that he clear up his military record.
He was met at the prison gate and '
taken to Fort Leavenworth, where he j
will be tried for desertion. I
George, under the name of Jack
D. Mordant, enlisted May 10. .1912,
at Fort Logan, Colo. Eight days later
he deserted. A short time afterward
he was arrested in Sumner county on
a charge of forgery and upon convic
tion was sentenced to serve ten years
in the state prison.
THRESHING AT McPHERSON.
First at Canton Runs 16 Per Acre
Tests 55 Pounds.
Canton, Kan., June 21. The first new
wheat in McPherson county was
TO
DEMOCRATS AT WASHINGTON
f -' , ' - t
VSidh An. Jf j
Cato Sella (top) and Alexander M
Stephens.
partment since 1S94. He is a Mlssourian
bv birth and is forty-seven years old. He
succeeds Theodore Ingalls as general su
perintendent of the railway mall service.
which looks after mail over 268,000 miles
of railway and employs 17,000 men whose
salaries aggregate more than $30,000,000 a
year.
threshed here Friday. It ran sixteen
bushels here Friday. It ran sixteen
five pounds. It was estimated this
wheat would make eighteen bushels be
fore threshing. It sold at 75 cents.
MUNICIPAL ICE DEPOTS
Strike Forces City to Go Into the Ice
Business.
Cincinnati, June ZL The city of Cincin
nati went into the ice business today when
it established depots at all of the fire en
gine houses of the city and supplied fam
ilies that could not obtain ice from their
regular dealers on account of the strike
of the Ice wagon drivers, their helpers and
engineers of ice plants.
The action of the engineers in going on
strike resulted in the closing down of a
number of plants and a further curtail
ment of the ice supply.
TENNIS IN LONDON.
Philadelphian Lost to Britisher
Canada Defeats Africa.
London, June 21. Wallace F. John
son of Philadelphia was defeated in
the final round of the London lawn
tennis championship tournament this
afternoon by F. G. Lowe, after one
of the finest struggles ever seen at
Queen's club. The British crack won
7-5, 6-4, 4-6, 4-6, 6-4.
Canada won the deciding match
from South Africa in the elimination
round for the selection of a challenger
for the Dwight F. Davis lawn tennis
trophy when B. P. Schwengers of
British Columbia beat R. F. Lesuer of
South Africa in the singles, by three
straight sets, 6-3, 6-3, 6-3.
Whenever
You Are in
Kansas City
Make This
Store Your
Down-Town
Headquarters
Use the
Many
Conveniences
at Your Will
MMil i i m limit
POLITICAL GOSSIP.
(Continued from Page On.)
receive the Republican nomination and
be backed by a fairly reunited party,
would cause trouble for his opponent
in the district. But Calderhead is hold
ing back and watching the progress
of the harmony movement. Should the
two factions get together, then it is
claimed that Calderhead may again
become a candidate.
In the Sixth district it is reported
that L D. Young is anxious to "come
back." Young was beaten for congress
by J. J. Connelly last fall because the
Belolt man lined up with the Bull
Moose element of the party and was
later tried and convicted for desertion
by followers of both factions. Now
Young is being freely mentioned as a
"harmony" candidate in the Sixth and
his friends believe that he has regain
ed enough strength to enable him to
win back the congressional job.
John H. Crider, of Fort Scott, will
likely be the Republican harmony can
didate for congress in the Second dis
trict against Joseph H. Taggart, the
Wyandotte county Democrat who suc
ceeded the late A. C Mitchell. Crider
was chairman of the harmony conven
tion in Topeka. A year ago he sought
the Second district congressional nom
ination against a field composed of J.
L. Brady of Lawrence and E. A. En
right of Kansas City. Crider and Brady
fought as to who was the more Pro
gressive Republican. Brady won the
nomination, but met his second con
gressional defeat in the November elec
tion and has since gone body and soul
into the ranks of the new party. Crider
is now stronger than ever before, it Is
believed. He not only holds the con
fidence of tried and trusted Progres
sives, but ia strong with the Regulars.
When the question of the placing
Roosevelt electors on the Republican
ticket came up for discussion, Crider
said it wasn't right; although he him
self was a staunch Roosevelt supporter.
Crider's fight to put the Roosevelt
electors in the Independent colmun
made a big hit with the Taft forces
and didn't make many enemies with
the Roosevelt men. So Crider at this
time and distance looks like the sure
nominee of the Second district Repub
licans. Discussing the declaration of Joe
Longshore to the effect that he will
stay in the Republican party, William
Allen White wrote this editorial for
the Emporia Gazette regarding the at
titude of the former field agent for
the Stubbs administration:
"During the two long and happy
weeks since the 'harmony meeting no
Republican paper has devoted its
valuable columns to rejoicing at the
return of the Hon. Joe. And by the
same token no rules were turned in
the Progressive press at his departure.
The incident seems to have met with
universal approval. Which recalls a
story. During the recent campaign
one of the candidates for governor
was sitting at his desk, reading & pa
per. He said: 'I see Hodges has said
it will take him just five minutes to
fire Joe Dolley. Well, I can give him
eight minutes start and beat him in
firing Joe Longshore.' This is not set
down in any spirit of ghoulish glee;
but mere to record an interesting epi
sode." Senator James A. Troutman, who
was largely responsible for the Repub
lican harmony convention In Topoka,
is now working with members of the
organization committee and expects to
hold harmony meetings in all of the
congressional districts of the state
some time this fall. It is probable
that the meetings will be held late in
September or early October and at
least one meeting will be billed in each
of the eight congressional districts.
HUNGER STRIKE WON.
London Police Release Suff Who Re
fused to Eat In Jail.
London, June 21. 111 health arising
from a "hunger strike" resulted today
in the release of Miss Laura Geraldine
Lennox, former editor of the Suf
fragette, who was sentenced to six
months Imprisonment by the Central
criminal court on June 17 for conspir
ing to commit malicious damage to
property. Miss Lennox and her com
panions, all of whom were committed
for long terms, refused to eat anything
from the moment they were sent to
Jail.
BODIES LIE UNBURIED.
Semi-Decomposed Corpses
Fortress of Scutari.
Around
Vienna, June 21. An Interpella
tion was addressed to the Austrian
government in parliament today ask
ing for information about health con
ditions in Scutari. The Introducer as
serted that semi-decomposed and half
mummified corpses of Turkish sol
diers were still lying unburied in the
vicinity of the fortress and asked the
government to take steps to compel
"the negligent commander of Scutari"
to fulfill the duties demanded of him
by considerations of civilization and
humanity.
FORM NEW CABINET.'
Free Trader Appointed to Straighten
Out Austrian Affairs.
Melbourne. June 21. Joseph Hume
Cook, the leader of the Liberal party
in the Australian federal parliament,
was today commissioned by the gov
ernor general of the commonwealth.
Baron Denman, to form a new cabi
net to take the place of the ministry
under the premiership of Andrew
Fisher, who resigned yesterday.
Mr. Cook is a free trader and was
formerly minister of defense in the
Liberal cabinet under the premier
ship of Alfred Deakin. It was ha
who introduced the bill for the con
struction of warships and the intro
duction of compulsory naval and mili
tary service in Australia in 1909.
GOES AFTER LOBBIES.
Senator Thompson of Kansas Proposed
Regulation Bill.
Washington, ' June 21. Senator
Thompson of Kansas introduced a bill
today to regulate lobbying by having
a joint committee of congress super
vise the activities of agents of special
interests concerned in legislation.
PLACE FOR CORWINE.
Governor Hoodges Appoints Him Pa
role Officer Topeka School.
Governor Hodges has announced the
appointment of Rev. H. J. Corwine of
i Topeka as parole officer for the Boys'
! Industrial school at Topeka. The ap
i pointment is effective at once, the To
peka minister being named to succeed
the late Rev. M. Foster McKirahan,
who died in February.
Rev. Corwine is pastor of the Third
' Presbyterian church and is popular
among the people on the East side.
Last winter he officiated as chaplain of
the state senate. In event he finds it
irecesary to resign his pastorate on the
East side in order to look after the
work at the Industrial school, it is
probable that Rev. Corwine will then
officiate both as parole officer and
chaplain at the school north of To
peka. - Bank Clearings.
New York, June 21. Bradstreet's bank
clearings report for the week ending June
19 shows an aggregate of $3,285,218,000 as
against $3,304,031,000 last week and $3,087.-
757,000 in the corresponding week last
year.
Cities Amount.
Pct.
Pet.
dec
lnc.
6.9
4-4
New York $1,884,437,000
Chicago
309,312,000
Boston
Philadelphia
St. Louis
Pittsburg
Kansas Citj
San Francisco
Baltimore
Cincinnati .........
Minneapolis .......
Los Angeles........
Cleveland
Detroit
New Orleans..
Omaha
Louisville
Milwaukee ........
Portland, Ore
St. Paul
Denver
Indianapolis
Salt Lake City
Columbus
Toledo
Duluth
Des Moines
141,354,000
170,606,000
83.140,000
67,469,000
60,661.000
48,605.000
45,108,000
26,350,000
24,434,000
23,952,000
26.688,000
28.909.000
18.942,000
17,436,000
12,976,000
15,669,000
11.612.000
9.693,000
8,957,000
9.905,000
6,548,000
6.766,000
6,804,000
4,561.000
4,953,000
4,173,000
2,962,000
3,417,000
3,336.000
2.838,000
2,751,000
1,647,000
1,871,000
1.672,000
1,589,000
1,063,000
773,000
840,000
589.000
512,000
364,000
8,282,000
8,201,000
1,966,000
3.419.000
3,304.000
10.6
13.8
7.8
6.4
8.9
252
6.3
22.4
2.0
16.2
20.0
S.8
12.4
ii'.i
1.3
5.1
2.8
4.4
11.0
6.2
1.1
11.8
32.6
38.2
15.8
SpoKane
Tacoma
Oakland .....
Peoria .
San Diego
Dayton
TOPEKA
Sacramento .......
Csdar Rapids
Waterloo
Springfield, 111
Qulncy, 111
Bloomngton, 111...
Ogden, Utah
Decatur. Ill
Jacksonville, 111...
Washington
St. Joseph...
Lincoln
Sioux City
Wichita
4.5
4.S
9.6
SI. 6
1.9
31.6
15.6
10.8
6.'3
6.1
18.9
13.
11.1
25.5
11.8
27.7
18.0
2.9
4.7
Weekly Bank Statement.
New Tork, June ZL The statement of
the actual condition of clearing house
banks and trust companies for the week
shows that they hold $43,809,650 reserves in
excess of legal requirements. This is an
Increase of $4,997,160 from last week. The
statement follows:
Actual condition: Decrease.
Loans $l,894,lbi,000 $1,410,000
Specie 357,847,000 5,761.000
Legal tenders 85,015.000 "1,105,000
Net deposits 1.762,210,000 "5.623,000
Circulation 47,082,000 "3,000
Banks cash reserve in vault $379,282,000
Trust companies' cash reserve
in vault 63,580,000
Aggregate cash, reserve 442,862,000
Excess lawful reserve 43,809,660 "4,997,150
Trust companies reserve with clearing
house members carrying 25 per cent cash
reserve, $67,055,000.
Summary of state banks and trust com
panies In Greater New York not Included
in clearing house statement:
Loans $ 557.404,400 $5,477,000
Specie 65.856,100 483,600
Legal tenders 7.606.200 308,400
Total deposits 632,025,700 1,433,300
Increase.
Children like Shetland ponies. Tou
can get them one by saving the tissue
wrappers from Havana Sprigs, the
dandy new 6o cigar. Adv.
Borrow money on your city proper
ty. The Prudential Trust Co. Adv.
TODAY'S MEfWoBT.
Chicago, June 21 WHEAT Wheat de
veloped strength today because of wet
weather interfering with the satisfactory
harvest of the winter crop. Heat condi
tion in the spring wheat country, especial
ly South Dakota, further encouraged the
bulls. Offerings proved unusually light.
The market opened the same as last night
to Vc off. September which started un
changed to He lower at 90c to 90o ral
lied to 9191C.
Reports that the Balkan allies were de
manding $200,000,000 Indemnity led to con
siderable buying. The close was steady
with September c net higher at 91c.
Cash Wheat No. 2 red, $100-51.04; No. 3
red, 9498c; No: 2 hard. 92934c; No. 3
hard, 91ia92c; No. 1 northern, 93Mig85e:
No. 2 northern. 9294e; No. 3 northern, 91
93e; No. 2 spring, 92f3S3c ;No. 2 spring, 91
92c; No. 4 spring, 86(390c; velvet chaff, 91
95c; Durum, 9Kg-96c.
CORN Corn turned upward with wheat
after early weakness due to rains in Iowa
and northern Illinois. September opened
at 61c to 61c. a loss of Va to c and
then rose to 6262Hc.
Afterward the market again became de
pressed in consequence of reports or aaai
tlon rains. The close was nervous at 61c
fnr- Sentpmlier. c last nisrht.
Corn No. 2. 6US61c: No. 2 white. 62'S
62c; No. 2 yellow. USlc; No. 3, 60
61c; No. 3 white. 61 A4c; No. 3 yellow,
6161c; No. 4, G&m$f; No. 4 white, 61c;
No. 4 vellow. 6060c. ,
OATS Shorts taking profits overcame
the effect of unloading by longs tn oats.
September, after starting c to He down,
at 41Hc to 41c. reacted to 42ff42c.
Oats No. 2. 39c; No. 2 white. 42ic No.
3 white, 31fi'3114c: No. 4 white, 4041c;
standard. 4242c.
PROVISIONS Provisions showed steaa
win, hn. First sales varied from
last night's level to 5c decline, including
September options at xor puin,
$11,221,4 for lard and $11.6716 for ribs.
RYR No. 2. 61c.
BARLEY 50S5c.
TIMOTHY $3-504.50.
CLOVER Market nominal.
PORK $20.85.
LARD-$11074.
RIBS $11.75(gl2.25.
CMtMO Sral" Market.
Chicago, June 21.
Close
Open High Low Today Tea
WHEAT
Julv .. 9W4 91 9W4 W 90S4
Sept. .. 904-T4 91?4- 90 91H 907i
Dec. -.9314- 94 93 94-H 93
CORN
July
Sept.
Dec.
i-eitt 6014
61- 62H 614
59'i-y. 59 58
60 60T4
61- 61
58 69-
.. 41-4H4 41 41 41 41
Sept. .. 41- 42 41 41 42
Dec. .. 42-43 43 42 . 42 43
PORK July ..20.70 20.77 20.70 20.77 20.80
Sept. ..20.40 20.44 20.35 20.42 20.45
LARD
July ..11.07 11.15 11.07 11.12 11.07
Sept. -.11-22 11.30 11.22 11.27 11.22
Oct. ..11.27 11.32 11.25 11.32 11.27
RIBS
Julv ..11.721,4 11.75 11.72 11.75 11.72
Sept. ..11.70 11.75 11.67 11.75 11.70
Oct. .01.47 11.65 11.45 11.55 11.47
STOCK SHIPPERS
To Insure Yourselves Best Results Consign to
CLAY, ROBINSON & CO.
Live Stock Commission Merchants, Stock Yards, Kan. City
We Also Have Our Own Offices as Chicago, So St. Joseph, So. Oma
ha, Denver. Sioux City, Sl-. St. PauL, E. Buffalo. E. SC Louis and
fort Worth.
Kansas City Produce Market.
Kansas City, June 21. WHEAT Cash :
Market unchanged. No. 2 hard. 87g3c;
No. 3, 86S424c; No. 2 red. &895c; No. 8.
85g92c.
CORN Market lc lower. No. 2 mix
ed, 6959e; No. S, 5868c; No. 2 white,
5959 c; No. 3, 58g69c.
OATS Market unchanged. No. 1 white,
41c: No. 2 mixed, S9c.
RYE Market unchanged.
HAY Market unchanged.
BUTTER Market unchanged.
EGGS Market unchanged.
POULTRY Market unchanged.
WHEAT Receipts 64 cars.
CLOSE): WHEAT July, 85c; September,
864c; December. 89H89o.
CORN July, 69c; September, eOVfrSSOc;
December, 56c.
OATS September. 41c; December, 42
42c
Chicago Produce Market.
Chicago, June 2L BUTTER Market un
changed. EGGS Market unchanged.
POTATOES New, higher, 66i390c; re
ceipts 20 cars; old, unchanged; receipts i
cars. .
POULTRY Market unchanged.
New Tork Produce Market.
New York, June 21. BUTTER Market
weak. Creamery extras, 27j28c; firsts,
2627c; seconds. 26g-26Vie; common to
fair, 2425c.
CHEESE Market steady and un
changed. No exports.
EGGS Market steady. State Pennsyl
vania and nearby hennery browns, 2325c;
ditto gathered browns and mixed colors,
wsec. , , , .
POULTRY Dressed, weak; fresh killed
western chickens. 2830c; fowls, MV419ttc;
turkeys, 18g19c.
Minneapolis Grain Market.
Minneapolis. June 21. WHEAT Close:
July, 9091c; September, 83c; Decem
ber. 95iAc. Cash No. 1 hard. 93V4c: No. :
northern, 92493c; No. 2 northern, 9(H42
91c.
Liverpool Grain Market.
Liverpool, June 21. WHEAT Spot,
steady; No. 1 Manitoba. 7s 9d; No.
7 6Ad : No. 3. 7s 4Ad. Futures dull.
CORN Spot, firm; American mixed,
nominal. No stock. American mixed,
new, kiln dried, 6s 4d; American mixed.
old, via Galveston, OS na. ruiurea uuu,
New York Stock Market.
Wall St., New York. June 21. STOCKS
Large offerings in stocks at the opening
today bore down prices rapidly. All of
the leading Issues were sold freely, with
especially large transactions In the metal
stocks. Steel declined a point to 61T
Lehigh Valley, Canadian Pacific, North
ern Pacific and Amalgamated fell 2 points,
Reading 1, Union pacific and General
Electric 1 and Baltimore and Ohio, Mis
souri Pacific, St. Paul, Brooklyn Transit,
Smelting, Can and Interborough prefer
red a point.
The action of the interstate commerce
commission . regarding the application of
the eastern railroad for a five per cent
increase in freight rates which was in
terpreted as meaning a long delay in final
settlement of the matter was responsible
for heavy selling which continued through
the first hour, borne stocks fell over
point between sales. Reading dropped
2. Union Pacific 2, Steel and others
The market closed weak. The unsettle'
ment continued throughout the half day
session although trading grew quieter
toward the close. Selling for both foreign
and domestio account was on a large scale
and business during the first hour was
larger than the total transactions of
either of the two preceding days.
Disturbed conditions in London and con
tinental markets caused further liquida
tion abroad, resulting in foreign selling
here.
The chief depressing factors, however.
was the refusal of tne interstate com
merce commission to reopen the freight
rate advance case.
This eave the bears an opening ol which
they made the most, being aided in their
efforts by offerings of long stock bought
recently in expectation of a continued rise
in prices following the sharp break of last
week. Decunes rangea up io aoout o
points in several Instances, with the
whole list showing material losses.
Bonds were Heavy.
New York Money Market.
New York. June 21. MONEY Money on
call nominal. No loans. Time loans,
easier; 60 days, 34 per cent; 90 days,
3S4 per cent; 6 months, 65V4 per cent.
CLOSE. Prime mercantile paper, 6 per
cent.
Sterling exchange steady with actual
business In bankers' bills at $4.83 for 60
day bills and at $4-86.85 for demand. Com
mercial bills, $4.82.
SILVER Bar silver, 58c; Mexican dol
lars, 48c.
BONDS Government bonds steady, rail
road bonds heavy.
New York Rnjrar Market.
New York, June 21. SUGAR Raw,
steady: Muscovado, 2.83'?2.86: Centrifugal,
3.33S?3.36; .molasses, 2.582.61; refined,
steady.
Wichita Live Stock Market.
Wichita. June 21. CATTLE Reclpts 25.
Market steady. Native steers, $7.008.26:
cows and heifers. $5.50?8.00; stockers and
I feeders. $6.00g7.25; stockers and heifers.
$5.00(36.25; buns, zt.2aB.i3; caives, ttt.mxji
8.50.
HOGS Receipts 500. Market steady.
Top, $8.60; bulk of sales, $8.528.60.
St. Joseph Live Stock Market..
St. Joe, June 21. CATTLE Receipts 100.
Market steady. Steers, $7.268.75; cows
and heifers, $4.WV3.36: calves, $7.009.00.
HOGS Receipts 5.000. Market 5c lower.
Top, $8.70; bulk of sales, $8.658.65.
SHEEP Receipts 600. Market steady.
Lambs, $6.507.35.
IC.in T Hrr stock Mnrlirr
Kansas City, June 21. HOGS Receipts
2.000. Market steady. Bulk of sales, $8.60
8.70: heavy. $8.55-38.65: packers and
butchers, $8.658.70; light, $8.65S.76; pigs,
$7.008.00.
CATTLE Reeclpts 200, Including 150
southerns. Market steady. Prime fed
steers, $8.25'S.75: dressed beef steers. $7.60
8.25; western steers. $7.508.60; southern
steers, $6.007.90: cows and heifers, $4.8&
7.25; heifers. $6.758.90: stockers and feed
c fi.Offi8.15; bulls, $5.5O7.0O; calves, $8.75
9 50.
SHEEP Receipts none. Market steadv.
Lambs, $6.257.75: yearlings, $5.0006.25;
wethers, $4.50S6.25; ewes, $4.254.75;
stockers and feeders, $3.00g6.00. .
Chicago Lve Stock Market.
Chicago. June 2L HOGS Receipts 9,000.
Market slow at yesterday's average. Bulk
of sales, $8.65a.76; light, $8.508.80; mixed,
$8.4&g8.S0; heavy, $8.258.75; rough, $8.25
8.45; pigs. $6-758.50.
CATTLE Receipts 200. Market steady.
Beeves. $7.20g8.05; Texas steers, $6.90ig8.00;
western, $7.00ig.10; stockers and feeders.
$5.90g8.O5; cows and heifers. $3.808.40;
calves, $6.76:69.50.
SHEEP Receipts 3,000. Market weak.
Native, $4.6035.50; western, $4.755.50; year
lings, $5.S.40; lambs, native, $5.10g.75;
western, $5.26-36.75; spring. $6.2&?.S0.
Ulcers and Skin Troubles
If you are suffering with any old, run
ning or fever sores, ulcers, boils, ecsema
or other skin troubles, get a box of
Bucklen's Arnica Salve and you will get
relief prompUy. Mrs. Bruce Jmes, of
Birmingham. Ala., suffered from an ugly
ulcer for nine months and Bucklen's
Arnica Salve cured her in two weeks. Will
help you. Only 25c Recommended by
Arnold Drug Co. Adv.
Topeka Markets.
Furnished by the Chas. Wolff Packing
Co. yards close at noon Saturday. We
cannot use pigs, thin sows or bogs
weighing less than 170 lba, Do not mar
ket hogs unless same are well finished
as we cannot use half fat stuff. We give
be low prices effective at once, until 5ui3
ther notice.
THOGS K"- JUn SL
MIXED AND BUTCHERS. $8 20ffg 80
HEAVY 8.2025
LIGHT r.
Prime $8.8097.71
Good to choice, corn fed... n
Fair to good i-7fU..
prime fS.ES0C.7
Gocd to choice 4.S066 (
Fair to rood... .304.'7
Common to 'alr.. s.
Prime S6.3097B9
Good to choice t.to.xi
Fair to good.... 4.80e6.7S
Common to falr... 4.264.7
Prime, fat : $6.65ff.S0
Fleshy 4.606. 5
Mediums - ....easj4sa
VEAL CALVES.
Prime, fat... .K4J.oo
Medium good I.O0&.M
Fair ' -'V"" 4.5OS6.00
Market price paid for dry lot cattle.
If you will favor us with your inquiries
advising number of head, quality, age
and length of time on feed, we will make
you an offer or arrange for our buyers
to call on you.
Topeka Fruit and Produce Market.
Selling prices by Sanr'l E. Lux. wholesale
Fruit and Produce.
Topeka, Kan., June 21.
CALIFORNIA CANTALOUPES Stand
ard per crate, $4.60; Pony per crate, $160.
GOOSEBERRIES Per crate, $3.50.
CURRANTS Per crate, $3.00.
NAVEL ORANGES Per box, $5.53)6 7&.
MONTMORENCY CHERRIES Pr
crate. $2.25.
CALIFORNIA APRICOTS Per crate.
$2.25.
BLACKBERRIES Per crate. $2.75.
RASPBERRIES Per crate, $3.76.
FLORIDA GRAPE FRUIT per box.
$5,254(5.50.
LEMONS Per box. $9.60.
PINEAPPLES Per crate, $4.00.
POTATOES New, per bu., 90c; old, per
bu., 60c
CALIFORNIA CABBAGE New, per lb.
2o.
BANANAS Medium sized bunches, per
bunch, $1.7552.25; large bunches, dot
bunch, $2.50g2.75; per lb., 3540.
ONIONS Per bu., $1.25.
RHUBARB Per lb.. 2c; 100 lbs. or
more, l.c.
WAX BEANS Per diamond basket. 0c;
per lb. in sacks weighing 26 to 35 lba,
7(g8c.
ASPARAGUS Per dos, bunches, 60c.
TEXAS CUCUMBERS Per basket, $1 00:
per crate, $1.26; per bu. crate, $2.00.
TEXAS TOMATOES per crate, $1.18.
FLORIDA TOMATOES Fancy and
choice, per crate, $2.75.
FIELD LETTUCE Per basket. 40c
MANGO PEPPERS Per crata. ts 7X."
per crate. $1.50.
home uKumpi fer diamond
basket, $100.
CAKKOis-rer 00s, Duncnes, 40c.
SUMMER SQUASH Per H bu. box. 76 o.
HOME GROWN SPINACH-per bu., fOc.
HOME GROWN RADISH P-.H T.T
per doz. bunches, 20c; 6 doz. bunch lots!
i.e.
BEETS Per doz. bunches, 25e.
TURNIPS Per doz. bunches, 26a
GREEN ONIONS Per doz. bunches. 20c
6 doz. bunch lots. 18c '
Topeka Produce Market.
Correctly reported dally by the Con'
Sales System. Phone 1300. $677 now
409 Harrison street. lc
Topeka, Kan., June 21
EGGS Fresh candled, doz., iec
BUTTER Packing stock, lb.. 260
POULTRY-Brollers.lVi to 2 lbs., per lb
8c: broilers, 1 to 1 lbs., per lb lte".
frying chickens, 2 to lbs., 15c- hen.'
fat, per lb.. 12c; turkeys, hens, per lb. luT
turkeys, young toms, per lb., 15c; turkeys'
old toms, per lb., 13c; ducks, broilers. tuTi
lb.. lc; ducks, old F. F. F.. per lb lie
geese, not wanted: pigeons, old. doz' sn
squabs, fat, doz., $1.20.
Topeka Grain Market.
Furnished by J. B. Blllard, corner Kiw
sas ave. and Curtis st-J
Topeka, Kan., June xi
WHEAT 75S80C ' M "
CORN 60c.
OATS 85c
Butter and Eggs.
Furnished by The Continental Crunm
Co.. Topeka, Kan.
Topeka, Kan., Juna U.
CHICAGO EGGS 1717e.
NEW YORK EGGS 1919c
CREAMERY BUTTER Chicago, 27e
N. Y.. 2830c; Elgin, 28o; Topeka whole!
sale, 28c.
Topeka Butter. Egga and Poultry.
Furnished by the Topeka Packing coj
Topeka, Ken.. June 21
EGGS Fresh country, 16c.
POULTRY Hens, all sizes. 12c: snrln..
over I lbs., 11c; broilers, Jibs, and und.5'
20c; over 2 lbs.. 11c; old cocks, c; duckS
c; geese, 7c.
TURKEYS Hens turkeys over fibs 14
young Toms over 12 lba. 14c; old Toms!
BUTTER Packing stock, 20c
Topeka Hay Market.
Furnished by T. A. Book. 212-214 E. fth J
PRAIRIE HAYST '.C"
NEW ALFALFA Choice, nam. -
$9.00. " V
Topeka Hide Market,
Quotations furnished by James c snl.
Hide Co.. 108 East Third StTi EU
St-J
GREEN CUREEsInV"?
1. 13c; No. 2, 12c; Side Brands Hll'inS'
Bulls and Staggs, 8-g9c; HorsH0'
No. 1. $3.003.60; No. 2, $2 60 Hides,
DRY HIDES Butchers' heavr arw.
dry salt. 1315c. vy' 21e;
TALLOW 4&5c.
KANSAS. NEBRASKA AND oirt a
HOMA WOOL-Bright medium. lSaTsT
dark medium lSlSc; light fine. uS

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