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The Topeka state journal. [volume] (Topeka, Kansas) 1892-1980, July 13, 1918, HOME EDITION, Image 10

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THE TOPEKA DAILY STATE JOURNAL SATURDAY EVENING, JULY 13, 1918
10
A
THE ECHO
By Frank Crerie
ADELE GARRISON'S NEW ,
REVELATIONS OF A WIFE
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59
Cli aw'
WENT straight to my mother-in-law's
room as soon as I entered the
house, for I wished to maka eertaln
that I would not bo disturbed while
reading the nota which the Japanese
servant of the mysterious men next
door had slipped into my hand In such
stealthy fashion. I knew that to enlist
her aid was the surest means of at
talning my end.
She was sitting by the window look
ing out Into the side lawn where my
rennlal plants, transplanted a few
weeks befora from the old Brannan
place, were just beginning to ahow
their first blossoms. Cousin Agatha, a
book of poems In her band, was sitting
near her and evidently had been read
ing aloud. Cousin Agatha's reading
voice is an anomaly. It is entirely dif
ferent from her speaking voice, whieh,
with Its martyr-like whine, usually
makes the cold chills run np and down
any back. But put a book Into Cousin
Agatha's hand and her eadenaaa become
musical, a delight to the ear.
Neither woman looked up as I entered.
It Is a discourteous little custom com
mon to both of them when a member
of the Immediate family or a servant
comes into the room. Even Dicky is not
always exempt, although both women
generally shew him mora courtesy than
they do me.
Mother Graham "Remembers."
I have found so many sterling quall
tlea in my mother-in-law that I have
ceased to remark the little custom or
laok of it in her. But I always resent
It at the hands of her oousln, for t al
ways fancy there Is something specially
marked in her studious Ignoring of my
pre ence until I have spoken to her.
"Do you know, Margaret, I believe
your columbines and sweet Williams
are going to do very nearly as well as
they did over at the other place," my
mother-in-law remarked aa I crossed
the room toward her. I was feline
enough to Ignore the presence of Cousin
Agatha to the same degree that she
Ignored mine.
"That's due to Jim." I returned, with
a grateful remembrance of the way in
which Katie's husband bad worked
over the transplanting of my favorites.
"Don't you remember the big balls of
earth he took with each plant?"
"1 remember that I directed him ex
actly how to do It," retorted my mother-in-law
tartly, and I had bard work to
repifss a smile, for Jim had trans
planted the perennials befora we moved
our furniture, and the day ha did the
work was one antedating by nearly a
wek the day of my mother-in-law's
reti-rn home.
i:ut I knew better than to contradict
her. tlhe wasn't deliberately dishonest
In claiming credit for directing Jim's
WORDS of WISE MEN
Nothing la humbler than ambition whra
ft in about to climb. Anon.
-
A bold stirpriae at a ballet la nmotlnnw
th best argument against It.
London Quarterly.
Amid all the changes that art going en
around us, I believe that nothing true or
good will erer perish. Anon.
when a man has no design but te
piLK plain trutn, tie isn t apt to be talk
ative. Gsorpe x. Prentics.
m
Ksver does a man know the force that
Is In him till some mighty affection or
grief has humanized the soul.
Robertson.
e
Our duties to others ought to be cor
Unually looked at from their standpoint.
Essay on Social Subjects.
I Diary
of a Fashic
She Learns How Cotton Cloth
IT is astonishing how much we have
learned to do with some of the cot
ton fabrics that we used to consider
"not quite good enough" to he made np
into fancy frocks. Ginghams and cot
tons that we frequently used only for
the simplest frocks, are now draped nod
Afternoon Dress of Gray and Gold.
trimmed so u to be appropriate for
afternoon or even formal wear.
Today we fitted a simple cotton mar
quisette to a popular movie star, and In
spite of the Inexpensiveness of the
fabric she looked queenly In It.
Like many other young women, she is
confining herself to sombre colors in the
Kjaln, and she came In with her mind
Hoio Cousin Agatha Unconsciously Aided
work. But her habit of thought was
distinctly arrogant, and she had been
for many years the absolute dictator of
her daughter's household. I knew she
really believed that no delicate task
either was or could be done without
her assistance.
"Then I ought to thank you," I re
plied diplomatically, "and I shall cer
tainly remember the process If ever I
have any transplanting done again. For
they are surely blooming In royal fash
Ion." "Out with It."
A little gratified smile twitched the
comers of my mother-ln-law's mouth,
and I thanked my stars that a danger
ous comer had been rounded safely.
But X reckoned without the quiet
malice of Cousin Agatha. She gave a
dry little laugh, then quickly affected
to smother It. Her cousin looked up
sharply.
"What are you eaokllnc aboutr she
demanded.
"Nothing," Cousin Agatha returned
demurely.
"Fiddlesticks I" returned my mother-in-law.
"Ton always mean mischief
when you snicker like that. I can re
member your doing rt when we played
dolls together. Out with it!"
"I was simply amused." Cousin
Agatha drawled with seeming reluct
ance, although t knew that she was
Secrets of Health
Stammering Not a Physical
Only an Emotional Defect
By PR. LEONARD KEENE HIRSHBERG
A. B., At. A., M. D. (Johns Hopkins University)
TANTALUS starving ani thirsting in the water with
the finest fruits hanging overhead, only to recede
when he strove to drink or e4 of them, suffered
little more than does the stammerer.
Mr. Ernest Tompkins, M. E, an engineer who has
perhaps contributed more than any physician or surgeon
to an understanding and a remedy for thia speech dis
order, says: "Probably the most tantalising human dis
order is stammering absent in singing, in solitude, in
concert reading or reciting, in ecstasy, in terror, yet
present when the
phone, to apply for
Da. HiasHBERO Most doctors, as well as the genera public, misun
derstand stammering, and medical men, alienists, psychologists and others
accustomed to parade ostensible erudition are apparently hopelessly dead
locked in contradictions, yet the pne.
nomena of stammering are In plain
sight. They Ignore or fail to record
these simple faots:
Points to Remember.
The stammerer shows signs of em
barrassment, and he also exhibits evi
dence of misdirected effort. Ha presses
his lips tightly together, the tongue
against the upper teeth.
The stammerer also exhausts his
breath, holds his breath and holds his
mouth widely open. Tou or any one
who tries to talk with the Hps pressed
tightly together, or in any of the above
mentioned ways, will discover that
opeech ia impeded.
Tou may not stammer, because you
are eold-blooded In your attempt, and
you experience no embarrassment. If,
however, you are telling a strange story,
as Prof. Tompkins suggests, and your
llpa suddenly stick together and your
cheeks puff, your auditors will laugh
and you might be embarrassed.
This is what the stammerer feels. His
51 If 11
ion ivioaei
May ltike a Stunning Dress.
made up to select some dove-gray gar
ment. he is tall and a positive brunette. She
has a natural high coloring, and. con
sequently, a soft gray frock of any kind
gives her figure a touch of reserve and
dignity which la very attractive. In
view of her black hair and good color
ing she can wear the various tones of
yellow and gold, and they're exceeding
ly becoming to her.
Thia afternoon dress is a charming
gray and yellow color scheme. The
color is gray cotton marquisette, and
the skirt is threetiered. The two upper
panels depend from the waistline in soft
gathered folds, and are finished at the
bottom with gray silk fringe.
he Mouse is perfectly plain, ending
at the waist with a soft satin belt. The
roll collar ia of yellow organdie, and la
clasped at the right shoulder with a
tiny mother-of-pearl buckle. The sleeves
are long and loose with bell-shaped
cuffs of yellow organdie.
Miss L. looked positively queenly In
the frock, simple though It was, hut
It was perfectly obvious that the gown
showed oft to such splendid advantage
because of her build and color. Gray
and yellow are two oolors that the pale.
pallid woman cannot wear unless, of
course, they're counteracted by some
other striking color. The brunette with
colorless cheeks may be able to wear
yellow In combination with burnt orange
or eleetria blue or some equally atrik- ALL INQUIRIES to Dr. Jr. Birth
ing shade. j berg, in care of this office.
This particular frock, although made .
up in two difficult colors of gray and
gold, nevertheless Is designed with a
view to neutralising the sombre effect
of the dominant color of the dress
gray. As the Illustration shows, the
gray Itself doesn't lie near the face, for
there are few complexions that can
stand close proximity to gray without
Its absorbing all their freshness and
color. But soft yellow organdie around
the neck reflects rather than absorbs
the color of the complexion as the gray
would.
Bo, too, there is yellow organdie at the
cuffs. It is a mistake to have a dark
color like gray or black at the cuffs
unless the hand is especially plump and
white. These dark colors worn up to
the wrist give the hand a yellow cast.
The organdies In yellow and pink can
be introduced into the cuffs of almost any
dark frock to set off the hands and cause
them to appear to better advantage.
Madge.
simply bubbling with eager, malicious
mischief inside, "to hear dear Margaret
chime In so reedlly with your state
ment that you directed Jim how to aet
those plants, when I distinctly remem
ber your looklnsj at the bed when we
first came over here and Inquiring who
did them and how they had been done.'
She dropped her eyes to her book
again, and I could cheerfully have
slapped the smugness from her visage
when I saw the gray pallor of humilia
tion steal across my mother-trtrw's
face. The elder Mrs. Graham la one
of the proudest women I know. It la
her besetting sin. To be proved wrong
Is a tragedy to her. To realise, as sh
did in that moment of enliEhtenimrtt.
that I had been humoring her In de
lusion as I would a child, must have
been gall and wormwood to her.
I fairly trembled In my shoes as I
stood waiting, wondering what she
would do or say. I fully expected that
she would Include me In her raasug
ment. - But to my surprise she turned to me
with a look that touched me deeply, it
held so much of loving gratitude.
"Margaret, will you let me come to
your room awhile?" she asked. "X am
very tired of this one."
Her tone was so significant that I
saw her oousin wince. But she went on
with her reading aa if she'd aetiosd
nothing.
and Happiness
victim desires to say his name, to tele
a position, to Introduce a friend."
speech ia suddenly blocked, and be is
guiltily conscious of the afreet on the
others around. It embarrasses him, he
remembers the embarrassment, and he
stammers because he fears that he will.
Children begin stammering either by
baste In speech thoughts rushing to the
tongue's tip faster than the muscular
mechanism can move by imitation or as
a Joke.
Almost any Interference with speech
accompanied by emotional excitement
glandular overflow, fright and conscious
ness that leads to embarrassment may
start stammering. The fright or emo
tion is involuntary. Distraction such as
recitation or singing ecstacy will release
the check and allow normal speech to
flow.
Due to Panic.
.Evidently then, stammering is pan
icky Interference with normal speech.
The least common denominator or the
roost frequent cause of practically all
stammering is a temporary interruption
of speech.
The stammerer's false idea is. there
fore, that he has a physical speech de
fact, because he haa difficulty with
words. His conclusive efforts must be
stopped. He must be taught calmness.
Ho must be taught to substitute easy
words, to use signs, to write, but net to
stammer. He should have congenial com
panionship, an absence of aU arguments
wiu ueaiea aiscussions. a change of
Kcua w proviae attraction and easy
subjects of conversation.
Finally, the mere absence of the "hitch
In bis speech." the convulsive effect, is
often sufficient to show him that there
im ,u niueroai pnysicai defect but only
( Answer! to Health Qi
uestioni
tl, " Q-Would you please advise
7 ii 8 to mak a thin face
,, A,M""tg'' the face either with
little cocoa butter or olive oil.
.
M. r. 8. Q What should be done for
iua.i ib tailing out excessively
A Massage the head
with a little of
the following:
Quinine 1 dram
Pilocarpine grains
Salicylic acid u grains
Lanolin ounce
Petrolatum- ounce
Br. Hirshberg will answer qmtum
hygienic and- sanitation subjects that art
of general interest. He cannot alwaus
undertake to -prescribe or offer advice
not or general interest Utter will be
j answered personally, if a stamped and
addressed enuelooe is enclosed. Address
c FLORENCE
THE light in the kitchen is in the centre of the room at our house,"
said the caller, "and I am going to have another put in over the sink.
It's so trying to work in one's shadow and I have to get supper late
when the boys work until ten, as they do every other week."
"Of course, that will have to be done," said her husband, "but I hate
to put any money into that old house."
"Mother had the same experience when we moved here," said Bess,
"and the maid we had then was always blaming the centre light for poor
work, until Mother arranged a mirror so that it reflected the light right
Into the sink. Just a cheap mirror, but it saved nerves, time and money.
"Try that and see if it doesn't solve the problem for you."
'REN the ships sail away
of them bears the ONE maa of her heart, she calls to him
where'er she may he her farewell "God speed." Whether
she stands on a headland overlooking the sea, and with her own
eyes watches the boats of battle dim Into the horizon, or only sees
WINIFRED BLACK
DIDyoi
aghc
ID yon ever read an old-fashioned
ghoul?
remember the first one I
was In a red-covered fairy book that I kept hidden
in the crotch of the apple tree right in the edge of
the orchard where the hammock was. And when I
came home from school I used to get a lot of apples
and a plate of cookies and run out to the hammock
and settle down in the shade and read. And al
ways, no matter what other book I took with me.
before it was time for me to go into
dinner, I reached up into the crotch of
princes and genils, and fairies and hobgoblins, and godmothers and
mermaids, but always and always I went back and read about the ghoul.
She was a pale, delicate creature of marvelous beauty who lived in
some wonderful palace In the gorgeous east. She wore a robe of cloth of
silver, embroidered In diamonds, and her black curls were Interwoven
with diamonds so .that they sparkled as dew sparkles in the grass and
her husband, the Young Prince, loved her to madness. Bnt there was one
strange thing about her she would never eat with him or drink with
htm, and there was something queer in the light of her eyes and one
night he followed her, and there she was In the graveyard and when he
spoke to her she screeched and turned into a panther, and then he knew
that she was a ghonl who lived on the flesh of human beings.
A Gfeowl in
That story held me with a hideous fascination. There was some
thing about the picture of the Princess that made me think of one of my
teachers poor thing, she was as good as gold, but she was pale and she
had red lips, and her hair was quite black, and she would have looked
lovely lh a gown of silver embroidered in diamonds. I noticed that she
never ate very much lunch, not even when we brought her pieces of
mince pie and chocolate cake, and I used to sit in school and look at her
and Imagine and imagine. I wonder what she thought I was thinking
about?
But yesterday I met a ghoul and talked with her and heard her
terrible voice and saw her living upon human beings, though she didn't
look like the Princess at all. She was a big woman, very fat, and her hair
wasn't black, but bright yellow, and her face was not pale at all, but had
scarlet blotches on each cheek and her eyebrows were very black and her
skin was as white as snow. She wore enormous earrings and a lot of
cheap rings on her hands, which were stubby and not very clean, and the
room where I saw her wasn't hung with ancient draperies or relieved
with satin or rustling with cloth of gold or silver. It was a dirty little
dingy room in a dirty, dingy little flat, and there were cheap curtains at
the windows and there waa a plush cover on the table.
This woman told me that she saw standing beside me the figure of
Ad
vice to
riSAA ANNIE LAURIE:
I am 17 yeara of age, and have
been going with a certain soldier for
six months. Do you think I am old
enough to know the difference be
tween real and "puppy" love?
He is 22 years of age. and X know
HOWARD
tConrrixht. 1918. b Kfwnanr Faatur Serrlca. Ino
on the great adventure and one
Copyright. lSls. br Newspaper
story about
ever read. It
the house for
the old apple tree ana read about
Real Lif.
I
Girls J By
he loves me. not only because he has
told me so. but because all his ac
tions show it.
The other afternoon to be frank,
it was just yesterday he asked me
to go automoblling with his sisters
and other relatives.
After the tide I was down at his
place, and met his parents. AU his
people were very nice to me, and
they seam to like me.
I like them all. especially one of his
slaters, and I have a question to ask
concerning her. On our short ac
quaintance do you think it would be
improper for me to send her a birth
day gift, as her birthday is In, Au
gust? If It would be correct, would you
please let me know what I could
send her? Something that would not
be so very expensive.
I know that you will help me out,
so I will expect an answer shortly.
Please write me personally.
PLORajNCB.
FLORENCES I'm awfully sorry, my
dear, but it's Impossible for me to
write personal letters. You see, I'm
j so busy answering letters through the
1 paper that I really haven't the time to
them sail with the eyes of her love, she calls to him with her
HEART. Is tt a phenomena of the great outdoors or the magic of
love back to her comes the echo, magically changed HIS voice it
is whispering his last cheery hail to HER till back he sails home
In VICTORY.
about A Human Ghoul
Feature Service, Ins,
one I loved most dearly, and that she had a message for me from him,
and when I did not answer, she repeated the message and my heart stood
still no, not with joy, not with tremulous affection, but with bitter anger,
tor the woman who told me these things was a ghoul and she was trying
to feed upon my aching heart.
Another woman was with me in that room, one who lost her little
daughter, the very core of her very heart. Bhe doesn't say much about
It, but I know that life has never been much to her since that little girl
closed her eyes and lay down to sleep the deep sleep of those who never
awaken again. My friend, whose little girl is gone, does the best she
can to fill the aching desolation in her life by calling children around her
and reading to them. She tells them stories and makes candy for them
and tries to make them as happy as she can. but sometimes when one of
them has come close to her, I have seen her face contract as if she were
in some terrible agony, and I know what it is she feels.
1 ThT
Gearse
She would give every drop of blood In her veins for lust one touch
of the little chubby hand she knew and that ghoul sat there and tried to
make that woman believe that her little girl had come back and was
sending her a message. There wasn't a thing about these messages she
gave that sounded in the least like either of those for whom she pre
tended to speak. They sounded exactly like her coarse and vulgar, and
without understanding and withont feeling, and she faded away from my
sight and all at once I was back in the orchard reading about the ghoul
who lived upon the blood of human beings.
I am going to hunt through all the book stores and find the old red
story book with that story in it about the ghoul, and I'm going to mark
it and send It to this woman whose hair isn't black, and who doesn't wear
cloth of silver, and who isn't a Princess, but who is for all that, a ghoul.
I wonder if she will know what I mean when I mark that story and
send it to her?
DOING
Practical Suggestions on Individual
to Help Win the War
' Br ALBERT BARRETT SAYRKS
Serving Enticing Dishes.
The difference between a really good
cook and one who merely can cook. Is
often largely a matter of serving the
right food in an unusual way. That is.
Annie L
devote to personal correspondence. Hut
I'm sure you'll understand, and I know
you'll see your answer.
Of course, at 17 you may know the dif
ference between real and "puppy" love,
but If you really and truly do, you're
one 17-year-old girl in many hundreds.
But this shouldn't make any difference
In your liking thia "certain soldier," nor
should It interfere with your liking or
friendship for his family. If I were you
I shouldn't think of love at all. I'd Just
be my own good, sensible, kindly self,
and leave the rest to time.
There's no reason why you ahouldn't
remember his sister's birthday. But
there'a every reason why you shouldn't
send her a gift of value. Just a few
simple flowers her favorite flowers. If
you can learn what they are accom
panied by a simple little note of con
gratulation upon her birthday would be
Just about the right remembrance.
Annie Laurie Ac ill welcome letters a
inquiry on subjects of feminine interest
from young women readers of this paper.
and uhll reply to them in these columns.
Letters to Miss Laurie should be ad
dressed to her. cars this office.
Deception
MY BIT"
of two cooks whose food is equally good
as nourishment, the one who is account
ed "a good cook" Is the one who serves
her food In most enticing style.
Particularly and especially is this true
!n these days when so many are learn
ing more about the right way to pre
pare food and what foods are best m
point of nourishment. Economy and
patriotism dictate the aaving of every
crumb of bread and every ouaoa of meat
and vegetables. Therefore, there must
be no leftovers that go to waste. The
ability of the good cook now is best
shown In so preparing and serving left
overs and unfamiliar dishes that they
entice the appetite of every member of
the family.
Using ap Fish.
- Fish Is a problem to some housewives
to use up without a particle of waste.
Cold fish Ian t relished by many, and
some refuse to eat of fish at a second
meal. If you are confronted by this
problem In finicky appetites, try the fol
lowing: '
Make little individual fish pies In
ramekins and within each ramekin cook
some mashed potato.
Saving Every Bottl.
When once a bottle is emptied see that
It fcs returned to the milk dealer, if it's
a milk bottle, or that those bottles which
you buy outright are preserved for your
own use. Even the smallest are valu
able for the preserving of fruit juices
or for extract which may be made
at home.
Can you finish this picture?
Draw from one to two and so on to
the end.
nit. HO LY-YCEN. Chinese Physician
tnm
UBS niur uci urn. aiu svwiss
from Cblna. tin Attained re-
ma rkaoie cures 01 a piwduiciii.
to mac-h. female cutnplninta. rbea
mfltlam. catarrh, kidoe.va and aU
rbronlc ailments. Sextuf weak
nens anl private rilaeaaea. No
Mn operation or ununciuus u us.
Call or write for tnterestinK book. Enclose
I Stamp. . ansjea. M
TEETH
I For First Class comparatively Palnles
Dentistry, at the Most Reasonable
Prices, consult
734
KANS, AVE.
Topeka, Kan.
The present war, or high cost of liv
ing, has not caused him to raise his
prices. Tou can afford to travel miles
to patronize him, and wave money.
AI.iL, DEXTAli WOUK UVAIMK 111 li
Office hours, 8 to . Sunday. 10 to 12
Phone 78. Lady Attendant.
MOTORISTS 1VHKH Itllli
STARTER
gives von trouble tmU. It sa
KEELE ELECTRIC CO.
MS W. Slltt are.
Phone S7i
r
FRANK R CON WELL
Funeral Director
US EAST STB ST.
Phone SSI. Res. Phoae SSO-R a
Personal Service
DR. CEO. PORT ASH TON
Dentist
V. W. Car. Stb and K ansae Ave.
Phone S2S
THE OBJECT
To help you own a home. To
provide a profitable investment
'or your savings.
Monthly Savings Accounts.
cAPrror. Brn.niG a loan
ASSOCIATION.
534 Kansas Ave.
Louis Van Dorp
S09 Jackson St Topeka
Phone 130
Galvanized Iron, Slate,
Tin Work
HALFTONE!
i gr PltPLY ETCHED. i
SLN. BRIGHT &IHAPRY f
ZINC ETCHINGS I
(nSIUlBTIWIlWJ I

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