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The loyal Georgian. [volume] (Augusta, Ga.) 1866-1867, March 03, 1866, Image 4

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CHILDREN’S COLUMN. .
Avnt EstHer’s Rurgs,—ln thinking
what to write for thie wonth, my wicd
goes far back to the days when I was a
little girl, and yszd to spend many bappy
bours in Aunt Esther’s parlor. talkiug
with her. Her favorite subjec’ was als
ways the hahits and eharaoter of different
animals, and thewr various ways and, ins
stincts, and she used to tell us sp many
wonderful, yet perfeetly authentic, stories
about all these things, that the hours
passéd away very quisily.
Some of Mer rules for the treatment
and care of animals have impressed them
selves so distinctly on my mivd, that I
shall never forget them, and [ am going
to repeat some of them to you.
Oue was, never -to frighten an animal
for sport. I recollect I had a little white
kitten, of which I was very fund, a:ud one
day I was amusing my-elf with making
ber walk up and down the key-board of
the piano, and laughing to see her fright
at the strange noises which came from
ander ber feet. Puss evidently thought
the plaee was haunted, and tried ¢t
escape; it never occurred to me, however,
that there was any cruelty in the opera
tion, till Aunt Esther said to me, © My
dear, you must never frighten an apimal,
I have suffered evough from fear to know
that there is no suffering more dreadful,
and a belpiess animal, that cannot speak
to teil its f ight, and cannot ui derstand
an explanation of what alarwms it, ought to
move your pity. \
L bad never thought of this before, and
then I remembered h w, when [ was a
very, very little girl, a grown~up Loy
amused himsclf with me and my little
brother much the same way as that in
which I had amused myse'f with the
kitten. He hunted us under one of the
school room tables by threatening to cut
our ears off if we cawe our, and took out
his penknife, and opened it, aud shook it
at us whenever we offered to move. Very
lik-ly he bad not the ieast idea that we
really could be made to suffer wit = fear
at so absurd u threat—auy more than I
had that my kitten could possibly be
afraid of the piano; but our suffering was
in fact us real as if the boy realiy bad io
tended what he said, aud was really able
N
Auother thing which Aunt Esther im
p es~ed strougly ou wy mind was, that
wheu there were domestic animals about
a house which were pot wauted iu a
family, it was far kinder to have them
killed in some quick and certain way than
to chase them out ot the house, and leave
them to wander homeless, to be starved,
beaten, and abused. Aunt KEsther was
a great advocate for killing anicals, and,
tender hearted as she was, she gnve wus
many instructions in the Kkindest and
quickest way of disposing of one whose
life must be sacrificed. _
Her ins ructions sometimes bere most
remarkable f uits. I recollect one little
girl, swho had becn trained uvder Auut
Esther's care, was ouce cowing home
from school across Boston Common, when
she saw a party of noisy boys and dogs
tormenting a poor kitten by the side of
the frog poud. The little wretches would
throw it into the water, and then laugh at
irs vain cfforts to paddle out, while the
dogs addea to its fright by their fero~
cious barking, DBelle was a bright eyed,
spirited little puss, and ber whole soul
was roused in indignation ; she dashed
in among the throng of boys aud dogs,
aud rescued the poor half-drowned liutle
animal. The boys, asham d, slank away,
and little Belle held the poor, cold,
shivering little creature, considering what
“to do for it. Tt was half dead already,
aud she was embarrassed by the reflec
tion that at bome there was.no room for
another pet, for both catand kitten never
were wanting in their fawily. “ Poor
kit,” she said, “’you-must dic, but I will
see that you are uwot tormented; ”—and
ghe kuoelt bravely down and held the little
thing under water, with the tears ruu~
ning down her own checks, till ail its
earthly sorrows were over, aund little kit
was beyond the reach ot dog of boy.
This »as real brave bumanity, Many
pe vle cail themselves teuder-: earied,
beeause they are unwilling to bave a I.t—
-ter of kitteus killed, und so they go and
throw them ever fences into people’s back
yards, avd comfort themselves with the
reflec.ion that they will do well enough.
W iat becomes of the poor little d=fence
less things ¥ [on nive cases out of ten
they tive'a hunted, miserable li'e, erying
from hunger, shivering with eold, barass
ed by criel dogs, aud tortured to wake
sp-rt for brutal boys. How much Kind
er and wore really humane to take upon
ourselves the mowcuntary suffering of
causing the death of ao animal, than to
turn owt back and leave it to drag out a
life of torture and misery.,
Aunt Estber used to protest much
against another kind of torture which
well meaning p.rsons inflict on animals,
in giviug thew as playthiogs ty very little
children who do not kuow how to haudle
them. A mother sometimes will sit
quietly sewing, while ber baby boy is
torment.ing a helpless kitteu, poki“g his
fiugers into its eyes, pulling its tal,
stretching 1t ont as on a rack, squeezing
its feet, aud, when the poor little tormeut
ed thiug tries to run away, will send the
nurse to catch dear little Johnny’s kitten
for him. I ‘
Aunt Esther always temonstrated, too,
a_ainst all the pract.cal jokes and teas~
iug of aniwals, which many people prac
tisc under the uame of sport—like throw
iu. a dog into the water for the sake. of
seeing hun paddle out, dashiug water
~apon the cat, or doing any, of the mauy
luttle tricks by which auimals are made
‘uncomfortable. * They lLave but. one
shott little life to live, they are dumb and
caunot complain, aud they are wholly, in
our power, —these were the motiy-s by
which she appealed to our geuerosity.
- Aunt Estber’s boys were s 0 well train
ed, that they would fight valiautly fo: the
rescue of auy ilstreated animals. Little
Master Bili was a brightseyed feliow,
who was u’t much taller than s father's
_kuee, and wore a lowsnecked dress with
white ruffies. Bat Bill bad. a brave
_beart iu hus little body, aud so oue day,
- as he was comiug f.om school, be dashed
in among a crowd of dogs which were
pursuing a kitten took itaway from them
'and held 1t as ligh above bis hea. ashis
little arm conid reach.. The dogs jumped
upon bhis white neck with their rough
paws, and scratcted his face, but still ue
' stood steady till a man cawe up and took
the kitten aud frighteued away the dogs.
- Master Biil grew up to be a waun, and at
;thc bavtle of Gettysburg stoud a three
' days’ fight, aud resisted the cuarge of the
' Liouisiaua Tigers as of old he withswood
} the charge of the dogs. A really brave
| bearted fellow 18 geueraily tende. aud
¢uupnssionate to the weak ; ouly cowards
l starve heipless prisoucrs or torture help
| less animals
I can’t help hoping thas, in these
stories about differeut pets, 1 have made
some fricnds amoong the boys and that
they will remewber what [ have said,
and resolve always to defend the weak,
and not permit any cruelty waere it is in
their power to prevent it. Boys, you
are strong and brave listle fello.vs; but
you ought n’t to be strong and brave for
nothiuy; and if every boy about the
street. would set bimselt to defeuding
helpless avimals, we shuuld see muci less
cruelty than we do now.—Qur Youug
Folks. .
If the beginning of one’s life be vanity,
we need not wonder if the end of it be
vexation of spirit.
* It is not the size of a market basket,
but that which is in It, that gives it value.
A silver chain around a dogs neck will
not prevent his barking or biting.
- Some men who are the first and the
loudest to cry fire are the least and the
last to help to put it out.
By long sermons, some clergymen, like
Pbaraoh, will not let the people go.
Be careful that, in helping others, you
do not unfit them to help themselves.
BEAL &BUTTS
0y [ \ g
' )
FAMILY GROCERS AND FPYRO
VISION DEALERS,
HAVE constantly on hand all kinds of groo>-
ries and provi:ions at the lowest market
prices.
In connection with our business, we have opened
a Rest.urant, where meals can be procursd at ail
hours and at cheap rates.
FPREEDMAN'S
'REEDMAN’S
/) A
SAVING BANK.
THE office of this Bank is now open on Camp
bell Street between road end Ellis. We
invite the attention of the citizens to our adver
tisemuent and hope they will give us a share of
p ablic patronage. A
N. B.—Laborers wishing employment will ap
ply at the office of the bank to the undersigned.
23 " PRINCE AVES
TO THE FREEDMEN OF AUGUSTA
AND VICINITY.
'I‘HE undersigned is now prepar:d with his
hor:e un | wagon, or buggie tv convey pass
enzors, packages trunks, or freizht of any de
s'ri[;ii vto the ceuntry or city. Parties wishing
our services W | p eaze leave their orders at the
Office of he Frcedman’s Sivings Back. Prompt
a tention guaranteed.
Offics on Campbell Street, between Broad and
Eliis. PRINCE AVES.
T
LAHTRDOCK,
FAMILY GROCER,
HA\‘ some Choice GROCERIES, which he
offers for sdle at the lowest figures. His
Stock eounsisis ol
Fiour, Nugar
Bacon, Lard
Tea, Coffie !
Syrup Batter .
Choice tH{ams, Salt Pork
Cheese, Crackers
nov.3o—lm. Soap, Starch, ete., ete.
INFORMAT!UN WANTED
.~ 3IF Stepney Hartthorn. who fo-merly belonged
«J to Mrs Jas Gardner of this city—was sols 1
Auzust. 1864, to a gentleman living near Wil.
wington, N. C. Any information of his where
abouts will be thankfully received by bis father
at This Office. RUBEN HARTTHORN,
2. ; « .
A COMPLETE PICTORIAL HISTORY
r . OF THE TIMES.
The Besf, Cheapest, and most suceessful 'Fat;xily
f Paper in the Union. =
CUHAIARPER'S WE EKLY,
.. SPLENDIDLY ILLUSTRATED.
8000 Oriti 'al Notieswof the Press)
: £ . 4 N »6y “ X\ . 3 -
"' “The yst Family Paper publizhed in the United
States wNew Londen Advartiser. b -
The Model Newspaper of our country—eom
plete in all the ‘departments of an American
Family Paper—Harper’s Weekly has earned for
itse f a nzht to its title * A JOURNAL Ox CIVI
LIZATION.? —N Y Eve ing Post. i
This Paper furcishes the best illustations, Qur
future historians will eurich thewselves ous of
H-rper’s Weeklv long after writers, and iiu‘ors,
and puklishers are turned to dust.—N Y Evan
galist ;
A necessity in every household —Boston Tran
lcript- g
It is at onee a leading political and historisal
annalist of the nation.—Philadelphia Press.
The best of its class im America,—Boston
Traveller. .
SUBSCRIPTIONS—-1868,
The publishers have perfected aystem of mail
ing by whrch they can sapply che Mugizine and
We &ly promptiy to those who preforitp receive
their periodicals dirsetly from the Office of Publi
~ation. Postmasters and others desirous of 'get:
ting up Clubs wilt ba supplied with a bandscme
piet rial show bill oo applicztion.
The rostage on Harper's Weekly is 20 cents a
y&ar, wh ¢h must be paid at the subscriber’s post
offige. "
TERMS.
Harper’s Weekly, one year, . . . $4OO
An extra copy of eitber the Weekly or Maga
zin2 wilj be supplied gr tis for every club of Five
Subsoeri erz at $4 U 0 each, in one remittesee; or
six Cop es for $2O 00, A
Back numbers can be supplied at any time.
The Annual Volumes of Harper’s Weekly, in
neat e'oth binding, wili be sent by express iree
of expense, for 7 each. A complete set, odwm
prising Kight Volumes, sent on r ceipt of cash at
the rate of 5 25 per vol., freight at expense of
purchaser. Address HARPER & BROTHERS,,
Franklia Square, New York.
UNQUESTIONABLY THE BEST
SUTAINED WORK OF THE
. KIND IN THE WORLD.
HARPER'S NEW MONTHLY
MAGAZINE.
' Critical Notices of the Prees,
It is the foremost Magazine of the day. The
fireside uever h:d a more delightful companion,
noe the million a moie enterprisinegriend, than
Har: er’s Monthiv Magaszive.— Methodist Pro
testant ( Baltimore.)
The most popular Monthly in the world. —New
Yor- Observer ;
We mnst refer in termz of eulogy to the high
tone »nd varied excellencies of Harper's Maga
zine a journal with a monthly ecirculation of
170 000 copies—in whose pages are to. be found
some of the choicest light and general reading of
the day. We speak of this work as an evideoce
ot the American people; and the popularity it has
acquired is merited Bach namber €outains fully
144 pages of reading matte , appropriately illus
trated with g od wood eu's; and 1t combine: in
itself the racy monthbly and the wore philosophizal
Quarterly biendet with ths best features of the
daily journal. It has great power ia the dissemi
nstion of a love of pure literature. —Trubner’s
uide to American Literaiure, London.
The volumes bound constitiate of themselves a
librAry of miscellaneous read ng such g* can noy
be found in the same complss in any other publi
cation that has comne under our notice.— Boston
Courier. ‘
SUBSCRIPTIONS—IB66.
The publishers have perfected a system of mai!-
ing by whi¢h they can supply the Magazine and
Weekiy promptly to those who prefer to receive
their per odicals direet'y from the Office of Publi
cation The postage on Harper's Magazine is 24
cents a year which must be paid at the sub
seriber’s post office.
" TERMS.
Harper’s Magazine, one year . . . 8400
An Extra Copy of either the Magazine or
Weekly will be supptied gratis for every elub of
Five Subseribers at 34 00 each, in one remittance,
or six copies for 2 00, d
Back numbers can be supplied at any time. -
A complete set, now comprising thirty one
volumes in neat cioth binding, will be sent by
express freight at expense of purchaser, for $2 25
per volume. Single volumes, by mail, postpaid,
$3 00. “loh cases for binding 58 cents, by
mail, postpaid. Add-ess
HARPER & BROTHER,
Franklin Square, New York,
DON"!‘ feed the eerpent who bites you, or
the jack ass who brays for food, then kicks
you out of Jerusalem. ¥
At 131 Broad St., you can have your watches
repaired at reduced rates and warranted, and no
snake about it. Also watches and jewelry lor
trade or for sale, very low. Al who faver us
with their patrorage will find us very thankful
and obliging, with fair treatment to all, and mo
snake about it. ‘ d giny
Come and see for yourselves. Never, mever
feed the ungratéfal serpent who bites you ! !
D. P. BALDWIN. 131 Broad St.
- | Near the Lower Market| B
13 : Augusta, Ga, Lesod
INFORMATION ‘WANTED,
()X MUSES. WA LKINS, who was sold
from W, Rob’t Watkins, When last heard cf
he'b:longed to Mr. Robert McWhorter, 5 miles
from Woodville o the Athen 'Braneh Railroad.
If he is living, be:'ds about 20 years of age and
of dark complexion, ‘ b ;
LEWIS: B CARTER
HAS removed to Elis Street, between Mur
Gmue&;rgt:&d’ McKwney Sts Come and ;ese bis
: ABRAHAM MALLORY,
LACKSMITH & WGEELWRIGHT,
on fho
HARRISONVILLE ROAD,
\VH ERE royhiog 8 my line will be
promptly attended to at ¢heap rates.
-« " ne T
PETER M’LLAIN
HAS always on hand,
FRuUSH MEATS, z
> BEEF AND
PORK
for the special accommodation of his up town
friends. He ocan be found at his old stand ov
GREEN ST, where ho would be g'ad to see and
wait upon bis friends. o
GROCERIES! GROCERIES!! GROLERI=3!!
at .
WM. HALE'S,
WASHINGTON STREKETI,
[A few doors from EROAD.]
YOU ean always find a choice supply of
Groceries of every description, and at the
lowest price possible.
SGARPER & LADEVEZE,
- DEALERS IN
PICTURE FRAMES, TASSELS, CORD
and NAILS, LOOKING GLASS, PIC
TURE GLASS,
Also, VIOLI\S and Violin STRINGS, etc.
A gqod Supply always on hand.
No 32 McINTOSH ST,
nov. ) —lw Cpposite Post Office.
Bi, ACKSMITIHK W ORK,
JOSEPH K. WILLTAMS is now prepared
to execute any kind of Blacsksmish Work at
shortest notiee. Country people woun'd do well
to give him a call as he is master of all plantation
work, He can be found at his :bop, ocofner of
Jackson and Boundary streets. ;
TURNING T
THE UNDERSIGNED respectfully informs the
‘public that they can have any kind of
TURNING dovne at Neisou’s Bobbin Factory,
near the Augusta Factory.
Any person favoring me with a Job, will have
it attended to at shortest notice and 'n the neatest
style.
nov.2s—lm. : S. INGRATIAM.
Brickmasonry !
THE UNDERSIGNED recpectfully informs
his frie: ds and the Colored Public zenerally,
that he is now preparedto do any kind of BKICK
WORK at the Colored Cemetery, such as Vault
ing up Graves, repairing tne Drickwork around
t.mbs, enclosing Squares, ete., etc., in the neatest
style and at the shortest notice, at one third of
the usual price. Call and see eat the Colored
Cemeterv
nov.2s—lm JOHN GARDINER.
WALKER & GREEN,
Bricklayers & Plusterers.
OR DERS left at the GLOBE HUTKL will.-bo
promptiy attended to.
28+
En the Press.
TIIE entire Procevdirgs of the Freedmen’s
Convention of Georgia, cuntaining the ad
dresses of General Tillson and Captain J. E.
Bryant on the occasion Orders for copies may
be left at the officé ot this pajer, coreer of Jack
son and E'lis ftreets.
5 1 ’
Country Produce.
“]E have opensd a store on Walker Street,
- No. 136, near the Georgia Raiiroad Pas
senger Deput, where we will keop a constant
supply of C untry Procuce, sgch as Chickens,
Beas, Butter, Lard, Meal, Tallow, Wax, Ches
nuts, &ec , &e.
16 KFNT, COTTON & Co-
INFORNATIUON WANTED
OF Catoline Barnwell, formerly belonging tc
Mr. Kingstou, at Calhoun. Ga., has not been
heard of in two years. Any information of her
whereabouts will be thankfully received at this
office. : MARIA JENKINS.
JAMES PARKS
‘VISH ES to in‘orm the Citizens of Augusta
'Y that he i 8 prepared to dray with 7 drays
ard can do-it promptly and with dispatch. Can
be found at Phinizy & Clayton’s Warehouse on
Reynold Street. 1I
, °
. Just Pablished,
TIIE BLACK MAN, a book of 300 pages,
containing biographical sketches of all the
celebrated colored men that have Jived in this and
the last centary. Price per copy $1 2s.
Copies can be procured at my residence on
Marbury Street, near SpringfieMd Chureli. =
5 : . J B.SMITH.
INFORMATION WANTED,
OP HCWARD SATTAWHITE, was in Ba
vannah when last heard of He left there
gome time in November last for Grahamaville, S,
C. He was a drummer in the 103 d regiment. U.
'S. 0. T.° Any information of his' whereabouts
willbp thankfully, received by his father at this
“office. JOHN SATTARWHITE.
[ll/Fo the mj
.If‘e?ling. that ap Orgn y,,
'-b\at would ignore all PARTI
PARTY DIFFERENCES, ;nd
up for the -maintoineng,, of
JUS’I:ICE’ and RIGHT to g
irrespeetive of CLASS o COND|
we have commenced {he Publicy
THE "
LOYAL
BENDET )
At present, ib is issued evary §
morming, but we purpose soon
daily.
It containg. the LATEST I\'l‘
both HOME AND FOREIG
the Latest Quotations of the X
besides being a rich repository of
GENERAL
LITERATUR
It shall be our endeavor 16 ¢
the public taste in all things whi
enlighten and advance our readen
scale of °~
Morality ani
Intelligent
Being destined to reach an 1
EXTENSIVE
CIRCULATIO
thr.outghout this State, Its el
‘affords peculiar advantages for
ADVERTISEMEN
which will be inserted on the most I
terms.
TERMS OF
SUBSCRIPTION ¢
One Year. 83
Six Months,
L ALWA Y 8 IN ADVAN
¢ orgia Equal Rights Pablishiog
sooiation. T, P. BEARD, 4%
Office; corper of Jacksoo “H
Streets.

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