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Hilo tribune. (Hilo, Hawaii) 1895-1917, May 01, 1903, Image 7

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016339/1903-05-01/ed-1/seq-7/

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If you iiro young,
you naturally ui
if ir .... ..t.l
11 J1MI WU UlUf
why appear so?
Ayer'sllalr Vigor
will surely rcstoro
coliir to your gray
liulr, ntul will rIvo
to It nil tlio
wealth nnd
(gloss of ear
ly life It
will stop
(tilling of
t ho hair '
also; and
i will koop
tho scalp clean and healthy, cntlroly
frco from dandruff.
And It makes tho hair grow thick
and long. This Is bocauso It Is si hair-
food, giving to tho hair Just what It
needs to rnako It grow as naturo In
tended. Ayer's Hair Vigor
Thoro's a ploasuro In offering to you
such a preparation ; whlloyou will cor
taiuly feel a mmisu of security in using
somothlng that others have used for
halt a century.
Do not bo deceived by cheap imita
tions which will only disappoint you.
Mako suro that you get tho genulno
Amor's Hair Vigor.
Prtpirtd j Dr. J. C. Aver & Co.. Lowell. Mu.. U.S.A.
For Sale by HILO DRUG COMPANY
Union Barber Shop.
GARCIA & CANARIO, Props.
me Sbavc, ut fair and Shampoo
at Ect-Elvc Rales. i
1
We also take particular pains with Chil- j
dren'sllaircutting. I
Union Building, i
Waianucuue St. '
CRESCENT CITY
BARBER SHOP
CARVALHO BROS.,
Proprietors.
The Old Reliable Stand is
still doing
UP-TO-DATE WORK
Razors honed, Scissors and all edged
tools perfectly ground. Satisfac
tion Guaranteed.
PRONT STK1515T.
The
) Corner
Restaurant
FRONT AND CHURCH STS.
If you appreciate a good
meal nicely prepared call
and sec me.
Meals 25c Up
C. SHIMAMOTO, Prop.
Lato Suppers from 8 p. m.
to I a. m.
iOfe
BafisffiL: r
warm
fr jJjvI
'( f.HX
JtimiMw-Jv
KIN ALL.
SALOON
C. Bnddnky, Prop.
Rainier and
Prinio Beer
bottled and
on draught
Best Wines
and Whiskies
Two Beers lor
twenty-live cents
Call and oxamlno our stock
Telephone 38
HILO MARKET GO.,
LIMITED.
I
. Telephone No. $9.
I Ukidois St. , - Hilo, II. I
Pacific Heat Marke1
Front St., H11.0, II. I,
Choice Cuts of
Beef, Mutton,
Pork, Veal.
POULTRY of all Kinds
FRESH ISLAND BUTTER
Flno Fat
Turkeys.
. Sucking
Pigs.
NItW YORK
SAN FRANCISCO
HONOLULU
H. S. GRINBAUM & CO.,
MMITKD.
BROKERS and COMMISSION
MERCHANTS
...l'IRK INSURANCE..!
Dealers in llryGoods, Notions, Cigars
and Tobacco. Special attention given
to consignments of colfec and sugar.
...All kinds of...
RUBBER GOODS
GOODYEAR RUBBER CO.
R. II. 1'EASU, President
San Francisco, Cnl., U. S. A.
WM. G. IRWIN & CO., Ltd.
Sugar Factors,
Commission Agents.
Sole Agents for
S'aUonal Cane Shredders,
Baldwin Locomotives,
Alex. Cross & Sons' Sugar Cane
and Coffee Fertilizers.
HiloNRailroad Co.
Short Route to Volcano
TIME TABLE
In cfTect January 1, 1903.
Passenger Trains, IJxcept Sunday.
1
No. 1 No. 3 No. 4 No. 6
A.M. P.M. STATIONS A Mf ,, M
7:30 3:301V Hilo ar 9:30 5:30
7:50 3i5oar...01na Mill.ar 9:10 5:10
8:00 4:00 ar Kenan ar 9:00 5:00
8:15 4:15 ar... Ierndale...ar 8:45 445
8:30 4:3oar..Mount. V'w..lv 8:30 4:30
SUNDAV.
A.M. P.M. A.M. P.M.
8:00 3:301V Hito or 10:30 5:30
8:20 3:50 nr... Ohm Mill... nr 10:10 5:10
8:30 4:00 11 r Kcaau ar 10:00 5:00
8:45 4:15 ar... Ferndale...ar 9:45 4:45
9:00 4:3oar..Mouut. V'w..lv 9:30 4:30
Mxd. FOR PUNA Mxd.
a.m. Thursday. p.m.
11:00 Iv Hilo ar 2:00
11:20 ar...O!aa Mill...nr 1:40
11:40 ar Pahoa ar 1:20
12:00 ar Puna Iv 1 :oo
Pas. Sunday. Pas.
A.M P.M.
9:00 Iv Hilo ar 4:30
9:20 ar...01aa Mill...ar 4:10
10:051 ar Pahoa nr 3:40
10:30! ar Puna Iv 3:00
The only desirable means of reaching
the Volcano. Connections at Mountain
View with btnges daily morning trains
going; afternoon trains returning. Fare
from Hilo for the round trip $&. This
route is through Olaa plantation, the
largest in Hawaii, virgin forests of koa
and wild ferns, and through many coffee
farms.
I The natural wonders of Puna make
1 that district the most interesting spot in
j Hawaii. One can spend a most delight
1 ful day exploringthc underground caves,
I swimming in the famous Hot Springs
and resting on the cool shores of Green
' Lake.
I Excursion tickets between all points
' are sold on Saturdays and Sundays, good
I returning, until the following Monday
, noon,
' Commutation tickets, trood for twenty-
j five rides between any two points, and
thousand mile tickets arc sold at very
low rates."
W. H. I,AMHP,RT,
Superintendent.
AMKIUUAN1HM.
Ax Defined hy Judge l.lltlc III nn
Address Sunday Might.
The meeting at Waiakca Mission
Inst Sunday night, addressed by
Judge I,ittle was attended by a
larger crowd than could find accom
modations in the house. The aud
ience was made up of Hawaiians
and haoles. Rev. S. L. Desha
interpreted the address of Judge
Little. Vocal and instrumental
music contributed to the pleasure
of the evening.
Judge Little's address was a typ
ical American speech. He told of
the possibilities ahead of every boy
who is born under the American
flap, and varied his discussion of
American institutions with anec-
. t
dote and story.
Among other things Judge Little
said:
"The President of the United
States is but a man, an American
citizen of the best type. He is se
lected because of his peculiar fitness
for the place. When his term of
office expires he retires, another
man is selected to take his place
and exercises the same powers as
liis predecessor. As a President,
the American "people trust him im
plicitly. For example the Congress
of the United States has from time
to time conferred on the President
extraordinary powers in national
danger or on extraordinary occa
sions. For instance, we have two
great political parties in the United
States, the Republican and the
Democratic party, and on the occa
sion of the blowing up of the
"Maine" in Cuban waters, the Con
gress of the United States, without
a dissenting voice and amid a scene
perhaps unparalleled in the history
of any 'nation voted fifty million
dollars into the hands of President
McKinley, with which to protect
the rights of our citizens and the
honor of the nation. There was
no party at this moment. All were
American statesmen. All were
alike solicitous lor the honor of the
nation. President Roosevelt, as I
have said to you before, donned the
habiliments of a soldier and faced
the storm of bullets in pursuance of
iuui sentiment 01 Americanism.
The President of the United States
as such is more powerful than any
monarch who ever lived. He is
commander-in-chief of the Army
and Naval forces, and in time of
war of the militia of all the States.
"The President, for example, has
the power to define what is meant
among Americans by the "Monroe
Doctrine." It does not matter, so
far as Americans are concerned,
whether the "Monroe Doctrine" is
"International Law" or based on
tht principle known as the "Con
cert of Europe;" it is enough for
them that it is embodied in the
principles of Americanism, and the
President knows that there are per
haps twenty-five million bayonets
and ten times that many millions
of dollars behind him at any mo
ment he decides to enforce the
principles embodied in that doc
trine. It is a "Leg is Jion serfyla"
to Americans and will last and be
enforced so long as the flag shall
wave over a united country.
"These statements are no boasts:
hey are not effusions of egotism;
they are simply facts known to all
well informed Americans and, when
you hear of them through the
newspapers or hear any public
speaker discussing them, it is
proper that you should know what
the terms mean and how they are
to be applied. Time will not now
permit me to enter into an exten
sive explanation of the origin or
extent of the "Monroe Doctrine"
perhaps it would not be interesting
to you at this time, but I incident
ally referred to it to illustrate the
various principles involved in the
oue general priuciplaof American
ism. "I feel sure both native born and
adopted citizens of the United States
who have familiarized themselves
with its history aud watched the
progress of events will bear witness
to the fact that America nnd the
principles of Americanism, as un
derstood by her citizens and recog
nized by congress in the enactment
of the laws that govern us, repre
sents ever aud under all circum
stances boundless and unrestricted
progress in every chanuel of thought
and action, Law,polltiai,coiuiucrcc, 1
mechanics and religion, each holds1.
its appointed place in national af
fairs, neither dare supercede nor
infringe upon the jurisdiction of the
other. Americanism represents
advancing civilization; it sheds its
rays of beneficent Christain light
over the wdste places and lights up
the wilderness of human affairs.
Its principles are not confined to
the United Stales, its influence is
felt everywhere beneath the circuit
of the sun, keeping step with the
outer line of advancing civilization,
planting thi seeds of knowledge,
power aad Christain grace every
where. Thus has the principle em
bodied in it served to establish a
nation and a nationality distinctive
in form, self-reliant, influential, and
imprcguable as a world power, the
pride of Us citizens and the best
type of a liberal, progressive, Chris
tian government. In America the
best efforts of the master mind arc
always vigilant in their observations
with relations to the public service
of the government. The convul
sive struggles that take place at
every national election, or in the
adoption or rejection ot any plan,
method or principle suggested by
the restless energy of our people,
are watched with zealous interest
and the good or bad effect, wjth
reference to the best interest of our
country, is at once noted for the
public good.
"The principle of Americanism
differs widely from that of any other
nation, in. this, that its first aud
most inflexible rule requires that
no matter from whence a foreign
principle or element is introduced
or sought to be introduced within
the domain of the United States of
America, it must at once become
American. .Language, mauners,
dress, habit of life, customs and
commerce, man, woman aud child,
must alike conform to the laws and
government established by the
United States of America, for in
no other way can the homogeneity
of our people be brought about.
"Americanism, as our citizens
understand it, teaches that, in order
to be useful to our country, our
neighbor and ourselves, we must be
equipped with a knowledge of our
country's vital and progressive
philosophy; we must enrich our
minds, in the very best possible
mauuer that our environment will
permit. Above all we are taught
to know distinctly the priceless and
inestimable value of the time allot
ted to us in this life, that we may
make the most of it. No "mahope"
principle can be effective or success
ful in America. We are expected
in all cases to do our duty as men,
as citizens, and do that duty
prompty and not drift into that
method of procrastination and lan
guor of mind and body which always
finds the vital forces jaded and in
effective. We live in a great, active
period and must therefore govern
ourselves accordingly. My friends,
if you will inscribe this truth on
your heart and brain and count the
moments of time as more precious
to you in your every-day life than
pure, washed grains of gold, and
devote every spare hour to mental
und spiritual improvement, you will
find soon that you hold the key to
the gateway through which the
high plains of an unbounded suc
cess are reached. The American
ism, as we all understand it, has
inscribed on its banner the doctrine
of utility and progress and our citi
zens have marched forward beneath
its folds for the last century and a
quarter into new aud illimitable
fields of discovery, and invention
and to an imperishable national
glory.
"Every American born boy may
be a ruler of his own great nation;
every boy born under our flag can,
under the plan of our government,
turn his face to the front and strive
for the laurels of the present and
future of his country, and reap the
benefits of his genius in any voca
tion of life, uutrammeled aud un
restrained, including the Presidency
of the United States.
"The United States of America
and Americanism syuouomous
for the purpose of these remarks in
struct its citizens for the struggle to
make everything useful aud bene
ficial; it points out the cud and
means of action according to the
rules of right reason; as someone
has said, "It is a clarion call to a
higher civilization." The soil of
the plains, the ore of the mines, the
stones of the mountains, the waters
of the rivers and the ocean, the air
we breathe, the light of the sun,
the bursting blaze of the cjoiuls
have all been thrown, as it were,
into an inexorable crucible aud, by
the American doctrine of utility
and progress, they have been di
sected particle by particle and all
their mighty, hidden forces dis
covered aud appropriated to the use
and advancement of our' national
progress aud power.
"As examples of the highest
possibilities of personal attainment
in America, the speaker reviewed
at length the lives of President
Roosevelt and Governor Taft.
Hilo niercaniile Gompany. Li
Plantation Supplies of
' All Descriptions
Builder's Hardware
Plumbina Goods
Paints and Oils
Fertilizers
Iron and Steel
Lumber
Windows
Blinds
Doors
A Full and Complete
Line of Groceries
SOLE AGENTS FOR HAWAII
KEEN
P. O. BOX 94-
N. Ohlandt.
J. C. Ohlandt,
ESTABLISHED 1864
N. OHLANDT & CO.
Manufacturers
FERTILIZERS
Of Eoeru, Description.
Bone Meal,
Sulphate, of Potash,
Sulphate of Ammonia,
Alaska Fish Scrap,
High Grade Tankage.
127 Market Street. uAN rKnNljluuU, uAL Indiana 4 Yolo StsJ
Certificate of Analysis accompanies our shipments, which we guarantee
to be correct.
Agent for the Hawaiian Islands.
ORDERS FILLED AT SHORT NOTICE.
WE DESIRE..
To call your attention to a new collection of
Hawaiian Songs just published by us entitled
"SONGS OF HAWAII"
This collection contains a number of old Songs
aud Hulas never previously published. This
book is beautifully illustrated; Price $1.50
postpaid. Order direct of the
BERGSTROM MUSIC CO., Honolulu
Box 576, Honolulu, T. H.
SVEA
Of Gothenburg, Sweden
Assets (Home Office) .... $73o63.36
Assets in U. S. (for Additional Security of American Policy Holders) 656,678.43
Pacific Coast Department: KDWAKI) BROWN & SONS, General Agents
411-413 California St., San l'rancisco.
H. HACKFELD & CO., Ltd., Roslclont Agents, HILO
DbALEKS IN
KNIVES AND HOES
TELEPH ONE
4A
4B
J. A. Buck
C. II. Buck
and Dkalhrs in
Hoof Meal,
Muriate of Potash,
Nitrate of Soda,
Double Superphosphate
h
INSURANCE
COMPANY
' IM

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