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Hilo tribune. [volume] (Hilo, Hawaii) 1895-1917, March 14, 1905, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016339/1905-03-14/ed-1/seq-3/

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THE WEBiqy HILO TRIBUNE, HILO, .HAWAII, TUESDAY, MARCH 14, 1905.
3
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fGjH
Ask for and
insist upon getting
PRIMO LAGER
Its purity is guaranteed.
It is made of the finest
hops and barley malt,
combined with pure arte
sian water.
Sold everywhere In bottle and keg
MAUI UKl'MKH.
AiiRucr to Auiciut
of Small
DEMOSTHENES' CAFE
Comfortable Rooms ... Hot and Cold Baths ... A Wcll
'Stocked BuTet ... Mixed Drinks and Fine Wines ... A
Cold Storage Plant on premises with all the Delicacies
of the Season ... Open Till Midnight
WAlANUENUE STREET, HILO
CUISINE UNEXCELLED FIRST-CLASS SERVICE
SVEA
J23
INSURANCE
COMPANY
Of Oothenburg, Sweden
Assets (Home Office) .... J713aa.063.36,
Assets in U. S. (for Additional Security of American Policy Holders) 656,678.43
radGc Coast Department: EDWARD BROWN & SONS, General Agents
411413 California St., San Francisco.
H. HACKFELD & CO., Ltd., Resident Agents, HILO
liiiIIIIIiSfafi.-'
Many
Clever
People
Become prejudiced against an article of merit without
investigating it. With a fair, impartial trial everyone likes
RAINIER BEER
A good flavor, a fine tonic and other qualities which
make for it a friend after each trial.
RAINIER BOTTLING WORKS
AGENTS, HONOLULU -
fa"
WHILE IT LASTS
3
3
i Wills' English Smoking Tobaccos j
"Pure Latakia," '- 5Dc a tin j
I "Best Birdseye," - - '40c a Tin j
"Travelleps' Mixture," 35c a Tin 1
4 fromC P CUAUIUncleam's 1
IO.b.OnAW CIGAR SfORE 1
luuuuiuuuuiuiuiuiuiuumiuiiuiuuiumuuuuuiua'i
lien on Fnllnro
Farming.
Growing out of tlic publication
of the letter written by Aucust Itcn
of Olnti, appearing originally in the
Honolulu Uttllcttn and printed in
the Tkibunu on February 21st,
there has been n flood of correspon
dents ready to refute Mr. Itcn's
statements. Besides F. B. Mc-
Stocker, a writer callinc: himself
"Maui" has addressed n communi
cation to the Maui News, which is
as follows:
Editor News. Sir:
Herewith I hand you a cutting
from the Evening Bulletin of Ho
nolulu which is a fine example of
the results of small farming on Ha
waii. As it is likely that small
farming in this country will be
condemned in the opinion of many
on such showings as this, it seems
appropriate to point out wherein
the small farmer failed, so that
similar mistakes may not be made
in the future.
In the first place the small farm
er admits that he raised 51 tons of
cane on nn acre ol land, which pro
duced when ground 6i tons of su
gar; this on non-irrigated land is a
first class result, and shows that
the small farmer can raise good
cane.
It cost him per acre cultivated
as per statement S139.00 which is
also fairly cheap work. He pro
duced 51 tons of cane for $130.00,
cost then is $2.73 per ton of cane;
this however docs not include har
vesting, this being done by the
mill which ground the cane; the
cost of this however is stated at
$4.00 per ton of sugar, or say $50.
per ton of cane. The small farm
er has then produced and delivered
alongside of the cane carrier 51.
tons of cane from oue acre of -land
which took him two years time and
cost in all $164,50.
This is cheap work for this coun
try, considering the conditions un
der which it was done; then why
did not the small farmer make
money at this? The answer is that
he did not make a proper bargain
with the milling company when
be entered in the business.
There were people in the Hilo
district t at tnat time raising cane
(no better than that described),
and selling it delivered to the
flumes at $5.00 and over per ton of
2000 lbs, and they may be doing i t
yet; but Mr. Small Farmer sells
his cane to the milling company
for a proportion of the net proceeds
of the sugar due to his cane, and
not knowing anything about that
part of the business, took too small
a proportion of said net proceeds
for his share! That is all there is to
it; aud these whines and groans
about "corruption funds," "small
profits" etc., amount to nothing
more than the squeal of the pig
when it is stuck.
Had the -snail farmer sold his
cane at $5.00 per ton delivered.to
the flumes; he would have realized
grops per acre $225, deducting ex
penses $164.50; the profit per acre
would have been $90.50, which is
a better profit than can be success
fully grown .and marketed in this
country, in the same tme.
Let the small farmer confine
himself to doing something he
knows something about, to wit, the
cultivation of sugar cane; any of
the mills in his neighborhood
would be glad'to pay him $5.00 per
ton of good cane delivered at the
factory, even if sugar should be
lower than 4 cents per pouud, and
he wiil find that there is more
money and greater certainty of a
prompt return in his business,
than in any other farming work
practicable, for the small man in
these Islands.
It must be noted however that
this only applies to non-irrigated
lands, irrigation introduces a factor
into the business entirly against
the small farmer, because of the
immense cost of putting the water
on the land. I enclose my card
and am.
Yours truly,
Maui.
In answer to F. B. Moscow
nrticle, which was printed in the
Tribunk on February 2rst, Mr.
Itcn has written the following reply:
Editor Eveuing Bulletin;! fully
subscribe to the very words of Mr.
McStockcr when he says: "If we
arc to approach this snbjcct, let us
at least do so in a fair spirit as cer
tainly nothing is to be gained by
misrepresentation."
It was not my intention to enter
into any long newspaper contro
versy about the raising of cane by
the small farmer, but for the reason
that the Pinkham Commission, act
ing in a sort of semi-official capacity
submitted a list of questions to me
wiich I answered as fully as the
nature of the document would per
mit and such brief replies having
been published, against which I
have no objection, I deemed it
proper to submit for publication a
detailed account of my cane crop,
which the Bulletin kindly pub
lished; although in the publication
a very laughable mistake occurs,
viz:
"Fertilizer $ 1.00
"Spreading Fertilizer... 12.00"
Of course it was readily apparent
that I did not spend $12.00 spread
ing $1.00 worth of fertilizer on an
acre. x
The copy which I sent the Bulle
tin read:
"Fertilizer $12.00
"Spreading Fertilizer.. V.oo"
I had no intention of casting nny
reflection on Mr. McStocker, who
was then manager of the Olaa Sugar
Company, aud I am aware that the
contracts given by the Olaa Com
pany are more liberal than those of
any other sugar company in the
Territory so far as I have been able
to ascertain, but that does not settle
it nor does it refute my claim that
the mill does not give the small
farmer a fair share. It is the sys
tem (as Jared Smith puts it) not the
Olaa Company or its manager.
Furthermore, when the Planters'
Association passes and publishes a
resolution expressing solicitude for
the small farmer, it looks like
"rubbing it in."
Mr. McStocker says: Accepting
Mr. Iten's figures as correct (he
does not credit his account with the
value of. the seed taken) we find
that this cane cost him $2.72 per
ton of cane.
Now! will make short work of
that proposition. I did not take
any seed. The mill took cane seed
and all and sold the seed for a
higher price than it paid me per ton
for the cane. However, I care
nothing about that and the whole
thing resolves itself back to the
original statement I made concern
ing profits on a ton of sugar, viz:
Mills expenses , $17.20
Mills profits ...- 17.17
(My) Small farmer's expenses- 53.65
Muall farmer's small profits 7.43
Now Mr. McStocker gratuitously
does considerable figuring for me,
and like, the proverbial Scotchman,
answers a question by asking
another.
He fails to explain, the mills
profits. $17.37, except that to cover
6 per cent, interest on the capital
invested in "cost of mill, mill site,
flumes, hicluding flume from water
head, cars, track, etc., (the items
that come in direct contact with
the planter (small, farmer) should
expect about $4.75 .per ton of
sugar."
Now deduct $4.75 from $17.37
and we have $12.62 mills profit yet
unexplained except that he pre
sents other items as follows:
Cost of fluining, watchmen, de
lay, etc $,,
Handling flume boxes, haulage, In
stallation and removal, waste,
etc., say 4.00
(None of the latter item was ex
pended in my case.) , v
Tnke that $6.00 off and there
would still remain $6.62 mill's profit
unexplained.
If it cost $6.00 per ton of sucar
for the items named labove to re
move oue crop of 20,000 tons or
$120,000.00, its uo wonder that the
company went nearly "broke."
I can uot see where it ,is. material
to go into the cost of ray land,
houses, fences, machinery, etc,
etc. I took my land from the gov
ernment at $3.50 per acre which
was just, that much too high as it
costs more than its worth to clear
it, but that has nothing to do with
this mill profit 011 the smnll fnrmpr
proposition.
Respectfully yours,
. AUGUST TTRN-
Mountain View, Hawaii, Feb. 23,
1905.
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SUITABLE FOR
EVERY DAY
PRESENTS
FANCY GOODS
We have opened a choice lot, sttcli as :
Bohemian Glassware
Carved Swiss Woodwork
Italian Statuettes, Busts, Vases, etc.
German Music Boxes
" Steins
Bronze Goods
Japanese Fancy Goods
Satsuma Ware, Vases, Cloisonne Ware
CIGARS
A new shipment of the favorites of Hilo
smokers just to hand:
"LaPlonta"
" El Belmont " Needles, Perfcctos, etc.
" Cremo "
Call on us and inspect them.
H. Hackfeld & Co.
LIMITED
Waiauuenue Street. Hiln.
j 4 4t4.
1 ",
'
PUNTERS, ATTENTION!
SPECIAL ATTENTION IS CALLED TO THE FACT THAT,
THE ONLY
ORIGINAL AND
CELEBRATED
A
FERTILIZER
Is that which has been manufactured for the past fifteen
years exclusively by the
California Fertilizer Works
SAN FRANCISCO, OAL.
Whcu purchasing be sure that in addition to the brand
the name of the California Fertilizer Works is on every
sack, otherwise you' will not be getting the genuine articler
A large stock of our Diamond A aud our
XX HIGH-GRADE FERTILIZER
Is kept constantly on hand and for sale at San Francisco
putcs, puis ouiy ireigut ana actual expenses,
By Our Hilo Agents,
L. TURNER CO.
LIMITED
Hilo Electric Light Co., Ltd.
Houses Wired and
Lights Installed
In accordance with the rules of the Na
tional Board of Fire Underwriters.
A complete stock of
ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES
Fixtures, Shades, Table, Bed and Desk
Lamps, etc., always on hand.
Fan Motors . . . QI6
Fan Motors, swivel frame 8
Sowing Machine Motor 20
Power for operating them $1 a month
Installation charged extra.
Estimates furnished on all classes of
Electrical Work and Contracts taken to
install apparatus complete.
HILO MARKET CO.,
LIMITED.
Telephone No. 39.
Bridor St. - Hij.0, H. I
Pacific Heat Market
Front St., Hh,o, H. I.
Choice Cuts of
PAY FOR THE BEST
IT'S CHEAPEST
AND THAT'S THE CLASS OF WORK
EXECUTED BY
CAMERON
THE PLUMBER ,
FRONT ST., Op. SPRECKEL'S BLOCK
Beef, Mutton,
Pork, Veal.
POULTRY of all Kinds
FRESH ISLAND BUTTER
Fine Fat Turkeys.
. . Sucking Pigs.
NOTICK Neither Mm Mncf,.,
Agent of vessels of the "Mntson Line"
will be resnnitsililn far n..,. ,1-1, i -..
traded by the crew. R. T. GUARD.
Agent.
Hilo, April 16, 1901 34.

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