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Hilo tribune. (Hilo, Hawaii) 1895-1917, August 15, 1905, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016339/1905-08-15/ed-1/seq-6/

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fi THlt WliliKLV II1LO TRIHtJNE. HILO, HAWAII. TUESDAY. AUGUST te, igo$.
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Energy, Ambition, Cheerful
ness, Strength, a Splondid
Appotito, and Perfect Health
M&??m
igSS$35&,wS
may bo cecured by nil who follow the
oxamploof tho young lady who gives thl
testimonial :
'TTcry sprltifr, for )nt, I ummI to Ime
intolerable lieuilaclic nmt total lo of en-
ergy, o tint tlio roifou nlilrh aliould lo
welcomed liy mo tint a dre.nl; for, a tho
warm, )piiiiit ila) s nrrlvnl, tlicy liroupht to
me IimIiuiIo nmt pain. A friend ml vised tue
to take
Ayer's
Sarsaparilla
1 commenced ulmj It nml lm o not liail since,
tlien tlio first t)iiitoiii or lio.id n'lio. My
appetite iKKplemllil,ntnt 1 perform iiij ilnttoii
with nclicerfuliicM ami rmrgy tint nurprlMS
nijuclf, I take plmoiro In telling nil my
irlcmHof tho merit or Ajer'n Hirsiparllla,
and tlio luppy rcuiltnof lis tic."
There are many imitation
Sarsaparillas.
Bo sure you got "AYER'S."
Pr(prcdlyl)r.J.C.A)cr&Co ,Lotll,Muf.,U.S.A.
ATEtl-3 riLL8,thbfitfmlly Uutlv.
For Sale by HILO DRUG COMPANY
1 We deal in only the best.
We deal in the finest lenses.
We deal in the best frames.
We deal fairly by all.
We deal with one the same as
with another.
We deal with you at the first so
that you will deal with us to the
last.
Factory on the premises. '
A. N. SANFORD
OPTICIAN
POSTON BUILDING, - HONOLULU
Over Mny & Co.
Hilo Railroad Co.
Short Routo to Volcano
TIME TABLE
III effect July I, 1905.
Passenger Traius, Except Sunday.
7
A.M,
9
8 10
A.M. P,M.
9:40 SM5
9:35 5:40
9:201 5:25
9:i5 5!'.5
IM. STATIONS
2:30,1V Hilo ar
2:35 ar....Vniake.i ...nr
2:s3'ar...01aa Milt...ar
705'
7:22,
7:3
7:46
7'nn
3:iS'ar Keaau ar
y.Zopr... I'ermlale...ar
3:55ar..Mouut. V'w..ar
9:001 4:55
8-50 4MS
8:00
8:20
4:15 ar.. Gleilood...lv
8:30!
2 I
A.M.
10:48
I0:44l
10:28'
IO:22
IO.06 1
9551
9:35l
45
4
P.M.
5:i5
5:
4:56
4:50
4:35
4:25
4:05
I
A.M
3
P.M.1
2:30 lv,
2:36 ar,
2:55,ir,
3!02ar
3:'9r
SUNDAY:
SlOO
Hilo ar
8:o6'
WaiaUui .nr
35l
.Olaa Mill. ..ar
....Keaau ar
. Ferudalc.ar
8:32
8:49
9:05
95
3:35 ar..Mouut. Vw..ar
3:55 ar... Glenwool...lv
FOR PUNA:
The trains of this Company between
Hilo ami 1'uua will be run as follows:
WKDNKSDAY:
I.eae Hilo Station, by way of Rail
road Wharf, for Olaa and Pima, upon the
arrival of the Steamship Kiuau, runninp
through to Puna and stopping at Pahoa
both going and returning.
2wM)
M V7'rlS. v ft I
4SJS
13 '4
A.M. FRIDAY: a.m.
6:00 lv Hilo ar 9:55
ar.U. R. Wharf.ar q:so
6:06 ar....Waiakea ir 9:30
6:28 ar...O!aa Mill...ar 9:10
6:58 ar..Pnhoa Junc.ar 8:42
ar Pahoa ar 8:30
7:20 ar Pima lv 7:35
5
a.m SUNDAY: r.M.
9:00 lv....?. Hilo ar 4:40
9:06 ar... Waialcea...ar 4:35
9:25 ar...01aa Mill...ar 4:15
9:50 ar..lihoi June 3:47
10:20 ar Pahoa ar 3.35
10:55! ar Puna lv 3x0
Kxcursion tickets between all points
are hold ou Saturdays and Sundays, good
returning, until the following MoudBy
noon.
Commutation tickets, good for twenty
the rides between any two points, and
thousand mile tickets are sold at very
low rates.
D. V MJ'.T.GKR,
Superintendent.
To Shippers.
All Height sent to ships by our launches
will be charged to bhippers tinlesa accom
panied by a v. ritteu order from the cap.
tains of vessels.
3otf R. A. LUCAS & CO.
NO BREAKWATER MEANS
LOSSJTO SHIPPERS.
Board of Trade Make Detailed Report to Engineer
Slattery Hilo Bay Deepest Harbor and Largest
Area of Anchorage in Territory Loss Sustained
By Absence of Hilo Breakwater.
In response lo the inquiry made
by Lieut. J. K. Slattery, Corps of
Engineers, U. S. Army, who visit
ed Hilo a few wasks ago for the
purpose of preparing the prelimin
ary surveys of the proposed Hilo
Breakwater, the Board of Trade of
Hilo have prepared an elaborate
statement giving an estimate of the
increased cost of shipping and loss
to shippers by reason of the absence
of such breakwater.
All of this information is now in
the hands of Lieut. Slattery at
Honolulu, who has the breakwater
project under consideration and
who is preparing estimates as to
cost of construction of such a pro
tecting wall across Hilo Bay, which
figures and recommendations he
will forward when completed to the
Chief of Engineers, War Depart
ment, for an official report to Con
gress this winter.
In addition to tables showing the
imports and exports, the number,
tonnage and draughts of vessels
arriving and departing for the past
year, a committee of the Board of
Trade also went into the subject of
the area to be comprehended within
such a breakwater. A sketch of the
proposed sea wall, beginning at a
quarter of a mile east of Cocoanut
Island and extending to the whist
ling buoy, accompanied the report
which has been forwarded to Lieut.
Slattery. The Board recommend
that the breakwater be so construct
ed as to include the so-called
"pocket" or deep depression with
in the bay, which would almost
double the available anchorage of
the harbor. It is also claimed that
by including the deep "pocket"
within the scope of the breakwater,
the shipping would be protected
from the winds and high seas
which come from the north.
It is understood that Lieut. Slat
tery approves of the construction
along the lines indicated. By the
adoption of wider harbor scheme,
it is maintained the breakwater can
be built practically in shallow water
and at a nominal cost.
The report of the Board of Trade
in substance, is as follows:
Vessels arriving in the port of
Hilo are compelled to stay here
three days to three weeks, about
half of which time is lost on ac
count of rough weather. This time
could be saved if we had proper
protection from rough seas, which
would result from the construction
of a breakwater.
The port of Hilo is the largest
port in the Territory of available
anchorage and deep enough to
accommodate the largest ship afloat
and can be entered either by night
or day. Upon the completion of
the Panama Canal, Hilo will be a
port of call and probably a coaling
station for the various steamers
bound to and from the Canal
Zone.
As to the future possibilities of
this port in the event of the con
struction of a breakwater, we beg
to .say that in the table .submitted
to you we have figured only on the
sugar actually shipped from here
during the year 1904, whereas with
the completion of the breakwater
and a railroad running north,
which would naturally follow, we
could increase the outgoing sugar
from 68,000 tons to fully 150,000
tons, basing this upon the follow
ing: Upon the completion of the Ko
hala Ditch, now under construc
tion, the Kohala District will in
crease their annual yield of sugar
from their present output of 10,000
tons to ,10,000 tons, and the yield
of the llamakua District will be
increased from their present output
ui iuuu luin iu yj,uuu u.iH'j un
reason of larger acreage under culti
vation, till 01 which will probably
be shipped through Hilo instead of
being sent direct.
In our communication to you
dated June 22nd of this year, this
Board failed to include the yield of
sugar for the Kau District. This
amounts to 18,000 tons and if ship
ped through this port would bring
our outgoing sugar up to 168,006
tons.
At present we are shipping about
60,000 bunches of bananas every
year, whereas hid we proper protec
tion from the rough weather,
wharves would be built and steam
ers would call at Hilo permitting us
to raise and ship a very much larger
quantity.
Since you have left Hilo we have
'ascertained that there is plenty of
rock available in the near vicinity
to build the breakwater. About
one mile distant from town there is
a flow of lava from five to twenty
feet in depth covering an area of
about 200 acres. The Hilo Rail
road have tracks running almost to
this flow and it is described as be
ing in three layers, the first layer
being soft, the second layer being
sufficiently hard to be hammer
dressed, and the third layer being
as hard as flint,
The enclosed estimate of loss to
shipping and shippers is based on
the actual number of vessels enter
ing and the actual amount of incom
ing and outgoing freight for the
year 1904, and is, to our minds, a
very conservative one. We have
not based our figures on any prob
able increase in the future which
would amount to fully 50 per cent.
The proposed breakwater would do
much to increase property values in
Hilo and the surrounding country
and in every way tend to build up
this Island in a commercial sense.
Touching on the item of $30,000
loss to plantations, plantation land
ings, property and lumber yards
adjacent to the beach, is a very con
servative estimate inasmuch as it
includes loss to plantations by not
being able to rapidly receive incom
ing freight and ship outgoing sugar,
damage done to plantation landings,
damages to property, lumber yards,
etc., by reason ofhigh seas.
ItSTIMATK I' LOSS TO SlIIl'PliRS AND
SHIPPING IOR TIIK VKAK I904.
During the year 1904 there has entered
the port of Hilo:
.1 steamers which have been de
layed on an average of 3 da j s
each at an expense of $ 1,000
n day, making a total of, $ 9,000.00
5 steamers delayed on an aver
age of 5 days each at an ex
pense of $700 n day 17,500.00
10 steamers delaed ou an
average of 4 days each at an
cxpeiue of 5400 a day 1 6,000x0
15 sailing vessels delayed ou
an average of 7 days each at
5100 a (1 ty 10,500.00
5 s tiling vessels delayed ou an
average of 15 days each at
an expense of $ 150 a day 11,250.00
6 lumber vessels delayed ou
an average of 7 days each at
nn expense of $75 a day
2 island steamers delayed ou
an uverage of 30 days each
at an expense of J150 a day..
45.525 tons of incoming nier-
3,150.00
9,000.00
cuatnlise ou ulucll It ts
estimated a loss of fi per
ton was incurred including
lighterage 15i535-00
68,489 tons outgoing mer
chandise ou which it is esti
mated a loss of 75c per ton
was incurred including
lighterage 5ti3G-75
60,000 bunches of banauns ou
which a lighterage charge of
5c a bunch could be Mvcd... 3,000.00
Miscellaneous sundries such as
pineapples, coffee, and other
merchandise not above
enumerated 2,000.00
Loss to plantations, wharcs,
landing?, property and lum
ber jards adjacent to the
beach. 1 30,000.00
Total f208.2y1.75
Going into the question of tlie
probable increase in shipping which
will follow from the construction of
a .safe breakwater and the proposed
Kohala and Hilo Railroad, the
Hoard give detailed answers to each
'of the inquiries propounded
by
I lieutenant Slattery, as follows:
j "Would such a railroad be of any
particular advantage to these plan-
tntious?" Yes, for the following
reasons: 1st All the plantations
outside of Ililo bay have to ship
their sugar and receive their sup
plies at rocky landings on the wind-
ward side of the island where the
sea is often so rough that loading
and unloading is impossible for sev
eral days or a week, thus delnying
the ships that may be loading 111
Hilo bay. 2nd This condition
leads to great uncertainty of ship
ments with consequent uncertainty
as to the time of marketing. 3rd
The plantations are put to the cost
of maintaining the landings, nml of
warehousing the sugar until it can
be shipped. 4th The railway can
handle the sugar cheaper than does
the steamship company.
"Would it cause these planta
tions to ship a greater amount of
their product through Hilo than
they now do?" The construction
of the Kohala and Hilo railway will
not nfiect the shipment of sugar
from those plantations which now
ship through Hilo, for the reason
that their entire product is now
shipped through this port. It
would, however, add to the num
ber of plantations so shipping. At
present all the plantations lying be
tween Hakalau, on the north, and
Olaa and Puna, ou the south, ship
through Hilo. With the comple
tion of the railroad there would be
added to these all those plantations
and mills lying between Haktilau
and Kohala, with the possibility
that those in Kohala might also
ship some of their product through
Hilo instead of sending it direct.
The rate per ton on sugar and mer
chandise from and to those planta
tions now shipping through Hilo
by the local steamship company, is
$1.60 per ton.
"Could the plantations ship their
sugar to Hilo as cheaply by such a
railroad, as they now do by sea?"
We cannot say whether the rate
would be any less by railroad than
by sea from those plantations now
shipping through Hilo, but the rate
from those plantations north of Ha
kalau, which send their product
through Honolulu, would be very
much cheaper if sent through Hilo
by rail. The present rate by
steamer to Honolulu ranges from
$2.50 to $3.10 per ton, while the
rate by rail to Hilo would be from
$1.50 to $2.25 per ton.
The following tables explain
themselves:
AVl'.KAOlt ANNUM, VIKM OV TIIK SUOAR
PLANTATIONS Ol' HAWAII SIIlI'l'ING
TIIKIll 1'KOnUCT THROUGH HII.O.
Tons.
Waiakca Mill Co 8,753.00
Hawaii Mill Co 1,265.00
Hilo Sugar Co 8,766.60
Onomca Sugar Co 9.9H5.C0
Pepeekco Sugar Co 6,531.50
Houotnu Sugar Co 5.36-W5
Hakatau Plantation Co 10,237.60
Olaa Sugar Co 15.189.00
Putin Sugar Co 3,069.66
69,162.71
AVKRARi; ANNUAL VIl'.I.I) OF TIIK SUOAR
1'I.ANTATIONS Ol' HAWAII WHICH
WII.I. SHU' TlllilK 1'RODUCT THROUGH
HII.O AITUR Tim COMI'I.KTION Ol'
Till'. RAILROAD.
Tons.
Laupahoehoe Sugar Co 5,258.00
Ookala Sugar Plantation Co 3,160.60
Kukaiati Plantation Co i,5499o
KukaiauMill Co I,5J8.50
llamakua Mill Co 5,862.00
Paauluu Sugar Plantation Co 7,053.50
Houokaa Sugar Co 7,803.12
Pacific Sugar Mill 4i545-3o
36.7S0.65
AVI'.RAGl! ANNUAL YIKI.D Ol' Till'. SUGAR
PLANTATIONS 01' HAWAII WHICH
MAY SHU' l'ART Ol' TIIKIR VKODIICT
THROUGH HILO AlTl'.R THIS COMI'I.K
TION Ol' TIIK RAILROAD.
Tons.
Niulii Mill and Plantation 1,681.30
Ualawa Plantation 1,204.20
Kohala Sugar Co 3,355-4
Union Mill Co 1,702.00
Hawi Mill 2,431.60
10,279.50
Trusting the above data and en
closed estimate will be of service to
you and be the means of the begin
ning of the construction of a Break
water, wc are.
Yours very truly,
(Signed) John Holland,
Acting President.
(Signed) II. Vicaks,
f-'e :retary.
'o Xct'il of 11 Doctor.
Pains in the stomach and attacks
of colic conic on suddenly and are
so extremely painful that immediate
relief must be obtained. There is
no necessity of sending for a doctor
in such cases if a bottle of Chamber
lain's Colic, Cholera and Diarrhoea
Remedy is at hand. No doctor can
prescribe a belter inediciue. For
sale by Hilo Drug Co.
UNION BARBER SHOP
Agcnti for the
S SANITARY w
TEAM LAUNDRY
HONOLULU
Leave your packages nt the Union Har
bor Shop.
Delivered by every Wednesday's Klnau
No extru charge. Wc piy the freight.
PAY FOR THE BEST
IT'S CHEAPEST
AND THAT'S TIIK CLASS OF WORK
KXHCUTF.D HY
CAMERON
THE PLUMBER
FRONT ST., Op. SPRliCKKL'S BLOCK
THE HILO TRIBUNE'S MAIL CHART
TJOXJ0 1005.
MAILS ARRIVK IN HONOLULU
-i
M.
Korea
T.
W.
f fMlowcra
f July 28
July 29
a "siueria
J B
7
14
21
28
8x
Mongolia'
13
20
27
15
"Ventura
22
29X
30
Coptic
0
Alameda
tSonoma
16
Isiberia"
23
tAorangi
Alnmnrln
Vessels whose names appear OVKR the date ARRIVK front the Coast.
Vessels whose names appear HKLOW the date DKPART for the Coast.
Destination of Vessels () To San Francisco; (f) To Colonies; (J) To
Victoria; It. C; (?) To Yokohama.
S. S. Kiuau departs from Hilo for Honolulu every Friday at 10:00 a. nt.
S. S. Mauua I.oa'smail closes in Hilo on Saturdays and Tutsdays marked
(x) at 2:15 p. 111., arriving in Honolulu at daylight three days later.
TWO SPLENDID
CLUB.
OFFERS
TO CASH SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
By Special Arrangement with the pub
lishers, the TRIBUNE is able to present to
Cash Subscribers the following offers on
monthly magazines in combination with the
WEEKLY TRIBUNE. '
THE TRIBUNE is the brightest, newsiest
and most up-to-date weekly newspaper pub
lished iu Hawaii, having a special wireless
news service, thereby giving to TRIBUNE
readers, up to the hour of publication on
Tuesday morning of each week, the latest
foreign and cable news, besides general local
news.
The Combination Offers are open to new
subscribers or renewals. Magazines may be
ordered sent to one or several addresses, but
orders under this combination offer must be
accompanied by draft or postofiicc money order.
Publisher's CLUB A
Price
$2.oo-Saturday Evening Post,
i.oo-Ladies' Home Journal,
2.50-Hilo Tribuue (Weekly)
Publisher's CLUB B
Price
$3.oo-World's Work,
1 .00-Everybody 's Magazine,
2.50-IIilo Tribuue (Weekly)
Send ill your orders
HILO TRIBUNE
PLANTERS' LINE
OF
SAILING VESSELS
Direct Lino between SAN FRANCISCO
AND HILO.
Hark St. Cnlhnrlnp, Capt. Saunders
Hnrk Amy Turner, Capt. Warland
Sch. V. II. .Murstoit, Capt. Govo
QUICK DISPATCH
For freight and passage apply to
WELCH & CO., Agents, San Francisco
3. BREWER A CO., Ltd., Agents,
Honolulu, or
H. Hackfeld & Co., Ltd.
AUENTS, HILO.
Noticu Neither the Masters nor
Agent of vessels of the "Matsou Line"
will be responsible for any debts con
tracted by the crew. R. T. GUARD,
Agent.
Hilo, April 16, 1901 14-
AND DISPART AS FOLLOWS:.
T.
T
10"
"17"
24
31
F.
S.
f
1
1
2
Alameda
4
0
Ncbrask'n
12
II
I
18
China
IQx
Nebras'n
Alameda
20-
Sopt. I
Doric
tManuka '
20 f
i
Mongolia
Sopt. 2
right away.
PUBLISHING CO., Ltd.
$4.25
1$5.25
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