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Hilo tribune. [volume] (Hilo, Hawaii) 1895-1917, March 06, 1906, Image 6

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016339/1906-03-06/ed-1/seq-6/

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Mi WMUavJiltO ktaUNWi llIW, HAWAII, MhsiOAY, MAkOll 6, iyofl,
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HILO FURNITURE STORE
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Established 1892
Furniture, Upholstery
and Undertaking
Established 1892
t
IIIKS3"
Wood, Cane and
Leather Seat
Dining Chairs
Extension Tables
Bullets and
Sideboards
Bookcases
Desks of all Kinds
Rockers
Parlor Suits
Lounges
f .la&OTt A .tOrt A .L-" .tt2 m
mmmmm
maem
iiij'iyiSSKiXj"ytx
&&.-&&.
mm
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TSji", v dp
.."- I'!1
Q. W. LOCKING
-
Malresses, PilloAVS
Spring Beds
Bedsteads
Bureaus
Chiffoniers
'ashstands
Bedroom Suits in
Oak, Birdseye
Maple and
Mahogany
Matting and Rugs
Toilet Sets
tylg?Cg?pC
cvn
mmmmi
tH
mmmmm
Front Street
Energy, Ambition, Cheerful
ness, Strength, a Splendid
Appetite, and Perfect Health
nay be secured by all who follow the
example of the young lady sho gives this
testimonial :
"Every spring, for jrarn, I used to lure
Intolerable headaches mid total loss of en
ergy, so tlut tlio season wlilth should be
welcomed by me was a dread ; for, as the
warm, pleasant da) s nrrlt cd, they brought to
me lassitude and pain. A friend advised me
to take
Ayer's
Sarsaparilla
I commenced using It ami hao not had since
XhCU tlin tlr Mnm f litutlachu hly
appetlto lspleiidid,aiidIpurforiiiiiiydutles
with a ihvcrf illness and energy tint surprise
in j self. I take pliamiro in telling all my
friends of the merit of A)cr's Banuparllla,
and the happy results of its tine,"
There are many imitation
Sarsaparillas.
Be sure you got "AYER'S."
PrcpiredtyDr.J.C.Ar&Co.,Lowtll,Msts.,U.S.A.
AYEIVS PILLS, theb.it f.mlly 'aiatlrt.
For Sale by HILO DRUG COMPANY!
TO LET
Rooms and Cottages
To Let
APPLY to
L. SEVERANCE
Front St., next to Cameron's
EVOLUTION' Of TIIESUUAIt BULL.
Enterprise of Our L'lnuters In I'cr
fecUiiK L'rocess of Blnnufiicture.
The process of evolution through
which the manufacture of sugar has
passed on the Islands is told in a
report of the committee on machin
ery read at a recent meeting of the
Planters' Association. The devel
opment of the sugar manufactory
from the primitive mill of thirty
years ago to the present complica
tions of machinery and apparatus
of the mills of the present, is inter
esting. It indicates that the plan
ters have been fully alive to the
interests of the industry and have
brought the milling process up to a
hich decree of perfection. The
committee report recognizes the
fact that the Waiakea mill at Hilo
has been in the forefront in success
fully adopting new mechanical de
vices, and this is undoubtedly due
to the fact that its manager has a
special, practical interest in ma
chinery. The following are ex
tracts made from the report:
The year 1876 was the first year
in which we enjoyed the benefits
of the Reciprocity Treaty, and
through that treaty a new impetus
had been given to the sugar in
dustry a steady improvement hav
ing been the rule since then, in
every department of the business.
At that time no one ever dreamed
that mp'e than one 3-roller mill
was necessary for crushing cane,
and extraction was not often men
tioned as a criterion of efficiency.
Wnat we did hear often was,
"How many tons are you making?"
"Ob, about ten!" and, mark
you, this referred to a whole day's
work, although candor compels the
admission that it was not a twenty-four-hour
day. But certainly it is
a vast step from ten tons of sugar
per ten-hour day, to as much as
too and 300 tons in a twenty-four-hour
day, which is now accom
plished on some of our larger
plantations.
When 8 cent sugar became ajiast
experience, and all indications
foretold a still lower price, it be
came obvious that we woulc have
to get more of the sugar whi h was
in the cane, into the market The
first improvement with this :nd in
view was made in the year 1880,
when a two-roller mill was ilaced
behind the existing 3-roller jill at
Spreckelsville, Maui. This could
not be called a successful speri
ment, as great difficulty was icperi-
roller
refore
e ob
ject of the additional mill, vis out
enced in getting the new :
mill to take the feed, and th
drier grinding, which was t
of the question. This di
did not prove an insurmoi
one, however, for in 1 884 a :
mill was installed at Wi
which had a patent feeder,
vention of Mr. Alexander vaung,
then manager of the Honolul Iron
Works,
This combination was emi
successful, the results beiit
beyond any expectations,
percentage of extraction was
iculty
itable
roller
akea,
lie in-
ently
far
The
aised
from the seventies to eighv-five
and ninety. This was such 11
increase in extraction that
doubts were expressed as t
large
rave
the
accuracy of the reports. Chduists
came from Honolulu to
them, and did so. liven
erify
then
doubting Thomases were rif and
one fine morning the S. S. Ii elike
arrived in Hilo, with a lot of n :gass
in bags, to put with a fair an sunt
of maceration, through the new
2-roller mill at Waiakea. Th en
gineer of the plantation sendin the
megass came along to see fair lay.
The result of this special trial was
conclusive, and the plantatio re-
lerreu to, ordered a mill w 11 a
feeder at once. Orders then vent
to Honolulu Iron Works so fast,
that working day and night, they
couldjnot supply the demauc but
bad to bend to San Francisco and
have some made the same a the
original. We called these nillsi
"Maceration Mills" on accomt of
the water used.
I well remember while thejjwere I
yet new, how sceptical manyfvere,
as to their necessity. Mr. Alex
auder Young said to a plantation 1
owner one day, standing behind his
mill. "Mr. So and-so, you are not
getting more than 65 per cent, ex
traction with that mill of yours."
"Sir," said Mr. So-and-so, "you
say that agaiu and will have you
arrested." "Well, I would like to
put in a mill to catch what is left,"
said Mr. Young, and the planter
felt badly hurt at the implication.
He is still amongst us and may be
here today, but he now has three
3-roller mills.
Maceration was such a decided
improvement, that various com
binations of mills were tried in the
effort to get increased extraction.
It soon became evident that some
method of preparing the cane was
necessary, so that the first mill
would take its feed steadily and
evenly, and discharge a blanket of
megass, which after dilution, would
feed to the second and third mills
without baulking.
Rollers which were held ab
solutely rigid could only do good
work with a feed of uniform thick
ness, but the then necessarily un
even feed was partly overcome by
the application of the toggle springs
to the cap bolts of the top roll.
This, however, did not assure as
steady a .feed at the first mill as
was necessary, and in our efforts to
overcome this defect, we were
shortly adding to our crushing
plants, the Krajewski Crusher, the
National Cane Shredder, and the
Smith Revolving Cutter: the first
installation of each being placed at
Pepeekeo, Wainaku and Waiakea
respectively. Some of these ma
chines are now a part of nearly
every factory, and their value is
beyond question. Some factories
indeed, have installed both a cutter
and a crusher, and many cutters,
which were thrown to one side
shortly after installation, have been
since resurrected from the scrap
pile, and are now doing duty nobly,
thanks to Mr. H. Lorenz, who ad
mired the knives the first he saw
them at work.
After a short but comprehensive
experience with the diffusion pro
cess of extraction, the Ewa Planta
tion Co. determined to discard this
process and adopt crushing. This
mill, having three 3-ro1' , with
the top roll of each fitted with hy
draulic rams, the pressure applied
to the rolls being within immediate
control, and a unitorm known pres
sure being assured for cane and
macerated bagasse, was a distinct
advance over our previous combina
tions. The extraction rose from
go per cent, up to 93 per cent., and
it was so necessary by this time to
get everything possible out of the
cane, that all interested desired
such mills for their factories.
This combination (three 3-rollers)
with the various feeders remained
the standard, until the installation
two years ago at Oahu Plantation
of a four 3-roller mill, behind their
three 3-roller combination. This
installation was the first of its kind
in the world. The adoption of this
idea and its application is entirely
due to the progressive spirit of Ha
waiian planters and engineers and
the results have amply justified
their judgment. Increased capacity
and better extraction with a min
imum of maceration have been ob
tained. The decrease in maceration
is obtained by taking the thin
juices from the fourth mill to
macerate at the back of the first
mill.
Construction of Steamer.
J. A. Kennedy has advertised for
bids in San Francisco for the new
15-knot boat to displace the Kinau
on the Hilo-Honolulu run. The
new steamer is to be an exception
ally fine vessel, with ample pass
enger accommodations, and eclips
ing in some respects the passenger
arrangements of some of the ocean
going liners calling at this port.
The new vessel is to have a saloon,
piano, library, hardwood dining
tables, etc. Especial attention is to
be given to the staterooms. The
new boat may bum oil for fuel and
she may be ready to go into com
mission at the end of the present
year.
Hilo Railroad Co.
Short Route to Volcano
TIME TABLE
In effect July 1, 1905.
Passenger Traius, Except Sunday.
7 9.
A.M. P.M.
7:00 3:30
75 3!35
7!2J 2:53
7:30 3:15
7 3:30
8:00 3:55
8:20 4:15
I 3
A.M. P.M.
8:00 2:30
8:06 2:36
8:25 2:55
8:32 3:02
8:49 3:i9
9:05 3:35
95 3:55
STATIONS
IV Hilo ,
or... .Waiakea..,
ar...01aa Mill..,
ar Keaau....
ar... Ferndale...
ar..Mount. V'w.
ar.. Glen wood..
SUNDAY:
iv illlo ar
ar.... Waiakea ...ar
ar.:.01aaMill...ar
ar Keaau ar
ar... Ferndale ...ar
arMouut. V'w..ar
ar... Glenwood...lv
8
A.M.
9:4
9:35
9:20
9:i5
9:00
B:50
8:30
2
A.M.
10:48
10:44
10:28
10:22
10:06
955
9!35J
10
P.M.
5'4S
SMo
5:2s
5:i5
4:55
45
4:2s
4
P.M.
5:i5
5-.II
4:56
4:5
4:35
4:25
4:05
FOR PUNA:
The trains of this Company between
Hilo and Puna will be ruu as follows:
WEDNESDAY:
Leave Hilo Station, by way of Rail
road Wharf, for Olaa and Puna, upon the
arrival of the Steamship Kinau, running
through to Puna and stopping at Pahoi.
13
A.M
6:00
"6:06
6:28
6:58
7:20
5
A.M
9:00
9:06
95
9:50
10:20
10:55
FRIDAY:
,lv Illlo ar
. ar.R. R. Wbarf.ar
... ar.... Waiakea. ...or
..Jar.. .Olaa Mill...ar
.... jar..Pahoa Juncar
.... ar Paboa ar
.... ar Puna Iv
SUNDAY:
Iv Hilo ar
Jar.. .. Waiakea. ..ar!
.jar.. .Olaa Mill...ar
ar..Pahoa June.
ar Pahoa ar
.,ar Puna Iv
14
A.M.
9:55
9!jO
9:30
9:10
8:43
8:30
7:35
6
P.M.
4MO
4:3S
4:15
3:47
3.35
-12?
Excursion tickets between all points
are sold on Saturdays and Sundays, good
returning, uutil the following Monday
noon.
Commutation tickets, good for twenty
five rides' between any two points, and
thousand mile tickets are sold at very
low rates.
D. E. METZGER,
Superintendent.
ALL KIND3 OP
RUBBER GOODS
GOODYEAR RUBBER CO.
R. II. PEASE, President.
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., U. S, A.
Subscribe for the Tribunw,
Island subscription $2.50 a ycat,
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