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The Daily bulletin. (Honolulu [Hawaii]) 1882-1895, March 22, 1890, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016412/1890-03-22/ed-1/seq-2/

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DAILY BULLETIN: HONOLULU, II. L, MAJtCIl 22, 181)0.
iW'wrvwaia
Tiijs
Pledged to nrtthrr Sect nor Party,
lint established for the benefit of all.
SA'LTHDAY, MAIL 2l, 18'JO.
Among other reforms nii'aineiHletl
libel law Is required. Some coun
tries have lately adopted a law re
quiring the prosecutor of libel to
give security for costs in the event
of his losing the case. Another de
sirable object is the prevention of
prosecutions beingturned into perse
cutions. Thi9 is another of thoso
offenses for which summons should
be substituted for warrants of ar
re3t. The questioning of printers
to elicit olllce secrets anywhere off
the witness stand is nothing short of
outrageous.
With reference to the "wetting
down" of a prisoner animadverted
on by a correspondent, the Marshal
on being seen by a reporter said
that the circumstance had been duly
reported to him by the Deputy Mar
thai. The prisoner was very noisy
and obstreperous and the turnkey,
contrary to orders issued against
the process, turned the hose on him.
The matter is to be further investi
gated when, front what is heard on the
side of the police as to the character
and conduct of the prisoner in ques
tion, the occurrence may assume a
different aspect.
THE VOLCANO ROAD.
The Hilo Record of the llth Inst.
Kiys: "The work of freeing the vol
cano road from the nuisance of such
overflows as occurred last week has
been commenced by Mr. Marlin,
and in a short time there will be no
danger of the road being laid under
live or six leet of water, in any rain
storm that may happen here."' The
Advertiser of the 10th inst. tried to
deceive tiie public into the belief
that there were natural difficulties
absolutely preventing precautions
against floods on that road, saying:
'The mistake made in building the
volcano road was in the failure pro
perly to drain the gulches. These
ought to have been moved away al
together, or at any late the water
should have been di vetted from them
and made to flow up some conven
ient hill." This is supremely funny
but the humor will have a grim as
pect to the people when they find
they have lo pay two or three times
over ior parts of what was going to
be an economically built road.
There is likely to be a startling pro
portion of the next Appropiiation
Hill occupied by odds and ends 01
public works whose cost was esti
mated deficiently, or else their con
struction so bungled as to unneces
sarily increase the expenditure be
yond adequate estimates.
bably bo established In the near
future. It will be an outcome of
the great modern development of
machinery, combined with the con
temporary advance of popular in
telligence, which has fitted the work
ingman for a higher social plane
than he has occupied in past times.
There has been n great deal said
about the modern mechanic devel
oping into a mere machine, through
the more minute subdivision of labor
and the automatic nature of an In
creasing amount of the work done
by the machinciy he tends. While
Ihero is much truth in this view of
the mechanic's position as regards
his woik, it would be ridiculous to
assume that his intellectual capacity
lias been paralyzed through want of
brain exercise in his avocations.
Not only has industiial progress
opened up innumerable opportunities
for developing his inventive skill
and executive ability, but, while the
shop has been revolutionizing, a
revolution has been proceeding In
the social conditions of the mechanic,
lie is now in a position lo claim more
leisure for the cultivation of mental
and sociable qualities, and the adop
tion of the eight-hour system is in
the line of the world's progress that
skilled industry lias done so much to
advance. There may be some dis
turbing of balances in the labor
market for a while after the change,
but these things would not be long
in adjusting themselves and would,
perhaps, occasion no more unsettling
of values than the periodical fluctu
ations now incident to the law of
supply and demand in its effect on
botli labor and the products of labor.
COMING LABOR CONTEST.
Elsewhere appears an interesting
interview with the President of the
(Anieiican ) National Federation of
Labor. Jn his preliminary remark?,
too lengthy for copying in full, the
interviewer tas that the public ut
terances of the tedcialion ''have
been maiked by a sti iking degree of
conservatism: its arguments in favor
of the eight-hour day have appealed
lo common sense and Immunity, and
the statements of its case, have been
touched in language indicating an
unusually high order of intelligence
on the part of its leaders."
One thing is becoming clear, that
is, that the methods of woikingmen
to attain improved conditions have
themselves become greatly improved.
The dock laboiers ol London last
year, in the largest strike the world
has seen, eariied their points by
sheer torco of united fidelity to
their common cau-o and indivi
dual good heluuior. .Something to
be feared, on their own account, is
1 hat the laborers will not 1 est satis
tied with their great success they
raised the nice of labor thiity-tive
percent but renew the strife on the
same line instead of striving to sc
enic the best fruits of their llnanciul
advantage through measures of inter
nal social improvement. There must
be ionic limit naturally to what labor
is actually worth to its employers,
and when that is exceeded the em
ployment will necessarily cease and
the lal'oiers bo worse off than ever.
It is said, for instance, that the
(ieneral Steam Navigation Company
of London, which lost by the btrikc
a sum equal to a dividend of ten
percent, would in case of a' renewal
of the contest be compelled to trans
fer its shipping elsewhere.
The eight-hour system for which
a determined struggle is about to
ensue In the United States will pro-
THE LABOR PROBLEM.
The Minister of t lie Interior,
through the Advcitiser editorial
columns, invites all iuteiestcd in the
supply of plantation labor to meet
the Cabinet and the Hoard of Immi
gration at the Foreign Office, Mori
day afternoon at two o'clock. His
Excellency estimates that 10,100
additional laborers will be required
during the ensuing biennial pcnod,
exclusive of what may be needed on
projected tail way and other works
outside of plantations.
Mr. Thurston presents the follow
ing as questions for consideration:
'Where are these 10,100 laborers
to come from?
"Can the country or the planta
tions witli safety, add such a large
number in so short a time to the
number of Asiatics already here?
"Is there any other source from
which laborers can be obtained?
"Is there any method of co-opera
tion which can be engaged in, by
which so large a number of laborers
can be prevented from leaving the
plantations each year, and thereby
preventing i necessity of such a
large immigration to fill such vacan
cies?" The Minister has omitted another
very impoitant question, that has
engaged much public discussion, as
well as earnest thought of planters
themselves. That is. whether any
means can be devised for putting
the thousands of idle laborers, gen
erally admitted to be now in the
country, at work on the plantations.
AN
ESSAY ON AFTER-DINNER
SPEECHES.
Ity .liilUlinmiiH.
Wherever the fashion of after
dinner speeches had its lise, it lias
spiead to the four winds ol earth,
until all civilized nations catalogue
it among their popular institutions.
It is ai hard to escape as clawham
mer coats and black hats. Perhaps
it is thought more of and is more
slavi-hly followed by English-speak-ing
people than by any other.
Why, to abolish after-dinner
speeches from tho llritish Empire
and the American Republic would
be next to the downfall and utter
destruction of those two great na
tions would, at least, create "an
aching void" which nothing yet dis
coveted could possibly (ill.
It is not possible where there avo
so many Americans and Englishmen
as in this kingdom that after-dinner
speeches should not be the correct
and regular thing. Of course, these
people in a foreign laud, where they
have everything their own way, aro
not going to lag behind the civiliza
tion of tiie country of their origin.
Have we not telephones, and.elec
tritt lights, and tranicnrs? Y03, and
we have banquets and feasts, and
the indispensable accompaniment,
"spouting." Indeed, it is astonish
ing, considering the indolence
breeding nature of the climate, what
vigor and activity the speechilying
mania assumes among our people 011
all occasions of association for citing
and drinking.
Tho toasts calling for responses,
usually the world over, such as
"The Ladies," "Our host," "The
Press," etc., aro thoroughly accli
matized in the "Paiadise or the Pa
cific," and crop up on all occasions.
The Sovcieign, to lie sure, is never
forgotten in fact, is ticatcd with a
certain kind of consideration not
usual in monarchical countries ; for
here someone '19 expected to respond
for Ills Majesty. This in an Inno
vation purely Hawaiian. In John
Hull's dominions the only response
to the Queen's health is the national
anlhcin. Her Majesty is not con
sidered a proper subject for after-
dinner discussion ; and for the very
good reason, that in her public ca
pacity her acts and doings aic sim
ply those of her constitutional ad
visers, by which relation she is re
leased from accountability, and her
name thcrefbrc held sacred at a ban
quet. The toast is introduced as an
expression of loyalty, and not as a
topic of talk. The same icason for
the same custom exists in this king
dom. Then why not be induced by
it to adopt the same course of pro
cedure? Was the innovation consid
ered by its author to be an improve
ment and gcncially accepted as
such? Or, was it made intignor'ancc
by someone who didn't know any
betcr, and in the same way became
the regular custom? Probably the
latter. Anvhow, we had better drop
it, il only because it makes us ap
pear a little ridiculous in the eyes of
foreign visitors.
Occasionally, and very occasion
ally, we hear an after-dinner speech
that is really instructive and enter
taining, or entertaining without be
ing instructive. Hut geiicially
speaking these pioductions aic made
up of stuff that is simply sickening,
and would disturb the stomach of a
jackass, unless well tot tilled with
strong drink. When men have thor
oughly well dined, and filled the in
terstices with beer and champagne,
so that they arc utterly tight and
full to ovcillowing. their heads alone
empty, then is the very hour of in
spiration, when words of stiange
wisdom seem forced out of their un
derstanding by the pressure of
strong meat and th ink. Their
minds disdain the common drudgery
of cveiyday-lifc, and soar far aloft
into the blue empyrean of bunkum.
Men ordinarily sensible and reticent
take on a state of involuntary fizz,
and effervesce with volubility Irom
top to toe. Then comes the fluent
gusli of emptiness, the clatter of
conventional phrases, the silliest
vaiiely of fiddle-faddle, and hogs
heads of maudlin compliments ; and
eveiybody hammeis the (able, plates,
and glasses with knives and folks,
and stamps the floor like a maniac.
The roll of rhetoric and tiie rush
of eloquence may now ami then, at
rate intervals, get a chance to take
wind liv the inspiration affectum a
subject in a peculiar way. The un
billed spirit moves him to make a
speech. He rises lo his. feel, but
only says, "Mr. Chairman and gen
tlemen, gentlemen, Mr. Chairman,"
gets red in the face, stares hard at
the lights, and sits down again. If
lie is a well-to-do man, or as the vul
gar say, "some pumpkins," the
company cheer greatly. Never
mind if lie said nothing; they know
what ho intended to say, and ap
plaud his view of the question ; and
no man nt the table can deny that
the genllenian'ssentimcntsarc unob
jectionable, and such as to do honor
to his feelings and credit to the occa
sion, and so 011.
It must bo conlessed that the in
tellectual sterility of the talking on
these occasions is sometimes in a
measure agreeably relieved by a
good song acceptably sung. Yet
that is a commodity not exactly to
he expected. It may conic, or it
may not. If it should turn up, all
the better. Songs and singing, yes ;
they aro plentiful, and always to bo
had ; hut seldom of the class com
ing under the above description.
The power that generates vociferous
and empty speechifying is not gen
erally prolific of the most musical
vocalization. Tho singing is mostly
too much of a kind with the talking
horribly agonizing, setting scdato
people's teeth on edge, and frighten
ing till the pigs into convulsions for
miles around.
Now, all this sort of lliing may
be fjxtreinely enjoyable to tho good
people of cities. It must lie, or it
could not bo so popular. Hut it is
not to tho taste of an Arab of the
desert, to whom the ways of Ihu
Knlllrs arc an abomination ; and he.
would ask why some moro profitable
way of conducting banqueting occa
sions cannot be devised? Why
something cannot bo introduced
moro interesting and belter calculat
ed to improve than Idiotic vocifera
tion and the constant repetition of
trash? Is it not mote profitable to
pick up a litllo rationfd pleasure in
a quiet and moderate way, than to
imbibe from an ocean of champagne
a splitting headache that lasts all
the next day?
TnE
TO. LIF
uUip
yj? TVIT-W YOEK
5
I
AUCTION SALE
Is issujng a new form of insurance which provides, in the event of death, for a return of all premiums paid in ad
dition to the amount of the policy, or, should the iiisiued survive n given number of yeius, the Company will
return oil the premiuuin paid with interest ; or, instead of accepting the policy and pioilts in ens.li the Iciral holder
may. WITHOUT MEDICAL EXAMINATION ami WITIIOIT FURTHER PAYMENT OK PREMIUMS, lake In
lieu thereof the amount of policy and piollls in FULLY PAH) UP insurance, participating annually in dividends.
Remember, this contract i3 Issued by the oldest Life Insurance Company in tho United States, and the Lar
gest Financial institution in the World, lis assets exceeding One Hundred and Twenty-Six .Millions of Holiais.
tGr For full partlculais call on or address
S. 33. .liOSJE,
l)ec-'2l-R9 General Agent for the Hawaiian Islands.
-Of-
Crown
Land.
Tqq(
ItuuuOij
100
15y oriler of the CommfcilonciM of Crown
binds, tiie lue.et nf the follow.
ing lands for u
TERM OF TWENTY YEARS
Will be sold at Public Auction, at
tlic Ailttlinn llnnim of L J.
Levey, Honolulu,
On MONDAY, March 24, 1890,
XT I O'CLOCK XOOX.
1
I ftlfC'e
BAKERY
nnr mill
MIU UUH
rai
L
3 Bs3
IVUUANU, S'JFJEl'ISIiyX'.
ALWAYS ON HAND AND TO ORDER
Fresh Cakes. Pies, Buns, Rusks
pj
'j
'j
Mill. Iliend,
French
Giuliani
Hi end,
Family
Hi cud,
Hyo lireail,
lb end,
Twist
m Sain Bread
&&
Iliead,
J
Doughnuts, Picnic Rolls,
Soda Ciaeker.",
Holler Ciackcr.
Huston ('rnehent,
Water Crackers,
Graham Ornckoii",
Shoolly Ci acker.,
Si
Cnflce
' And will be
Tim, Chocolate &
I UUU1U1UUJ UiUUJ. MUUIUj
DELIVERED FREE of CHARGE lo any pail of the oily
Gates, BIB, Hie.
3
The FMiimml known n I'.'iilmla,
-liimtu at WnlUule. Dltiiet ofEwa,
Oahu. logi-lher with a Ptilp of Inml
Lid fed wide hoi del hi" along :dd
I'i-dipoud; Miliji'i-t lo right of way
gr.mtcd Oiiliu Railway t; Laud Co.
A I ea 2!l neroi. lriv(t price I.')
per minimi.
ti. All of tin1 1'iila l.mil adjoining I lie
above PMipoiid ami miming up lo
Ihi1 Ciovui'iiliR'iil Road to Valnn:ic,
containing -lit neie. I'psot SI 00
per minimi.
iS. Tim land known as Malciwal, m
liiMte at Kooliiupolio, Oaliu. eM-ept-ing
die lire lauils ami a mall peti
tion of the ICul. i. (iooil ipalujj
laud and well wnlcicil. Aiea l'JJ'2
nrii's more or lo". L'p'-tl J'.'.'ill per
minimi.
J. Tilt! Almpii.in of llonokawai. in
Kaunnpa'i, Maul, except the Taio
lands mid f lot-, of Kula laud liy
-uivey'JO I2-1P0. Principally gra
h g liiuil, and comprises an area of
.1.'J!!0 acres mine or les. Pp-et
."..'Oil per milium.
n. The Almpiiii.i of Walilkuli or Mala,
-iliiale in t.alialiin, .Maul. Craiiig
l.iud. Aie:i:Vn7 aere. Ppel -V-'OO
per annum.
The Lea.e of the land-. Ilonoknwai
and Walilkuli will lie sold subject to .1.
i;plnda'. leases which explm .(miliary
1, ISlii!, and Febuiarv 1, 1M.1, lospce
tlvelv. It is leipilied Unit paities pur
chasing the lease of the Mild lands will,
not later than l'- n oaths after the ex
I lratiiiu of the present leases, lemovu
all cattle, goats and animals tioin the
w mills, and during die remainder of the
new leuo keep the finest flee of a 1
tattle and milnial- of all kinds.
ESrMnp-s of all the above lands may
be seen and paiticiil.irs obtained upon
application lo the Agent of tiown
Lands. Altlolaul Hale.
(TRTIS P. IAl'KKV.
Agent of Crown Lauds.
12iiflt-S()l lw
Auction Sales by Jamss F. Korgan.
nir.dL,
Milk,
Soused Pig'.
ol FAHK:
Feet, Cold Hani,
Spiced Tongue, Spiced Reef, Salads, Etc,
FINE HAVANA, MANILLA AMERICAN CIGARS !
A l.AI'.OK ASSOItT.Mi:XT OP
IMjXi & CijyarotU' Tobacco, Pipeft, Cigar & Cigarette Holders, Cold Drinks, Etc.
iffiT Oneii I'ii in 'A '.) A. m. iinlil 11:110 l. M. Snliiiilnv niirlit. imen nil nitdil. Hell Ti'lenbone 82.
C" I ---- -. , or I O -1 .
Mutual Telephone
" . Tost () co o ITH
lT-T"T7VT"f i-.T ft-? -,r"rz&nmjmmejuavjwxxs:Mjmzzii.wm nawwawwi
IS7 lni
B. r.L JLJAJULfttSY,
.Ijinsngoi.
TAHITI
MANUFAOTUKEKS OF
LEMONADE,
esMi-: rum . hum,
n
Solo Proprietors of BAILEY'S SARSAPARILLA & IRON WATIR,
Giiiioi' Mb, Hop Mb, Grniiilin, RaspBerryade, Sarsanaril, Mineral Waters, Etc.
l2r
389 1m
IgLEPHONE 297.
O
All comimmiontloiiB and orders should bo addressed to
BENSON, SMITH & CO.,
Agents.
i. i if.egiaeMEyiiajii.uu'ijjAumiLi h-jmimbi'hjm'emou.'wj
1311' OUT A NT
Credit Me Sale !
Vy oriler ol JIcdhT. II PAVIKl &
CO., I will liultl nn inipoiiiiiit Credit
Sale of
Staple Goods
nt my Balesio un, C'lecn stioi-i, on
"Wednesday and Tiniraday.
M till 211 h :iiid'i7tli,
Coii.ineiieiiig at 111 o'clock c.k li day.
Tlic nwirtineiil tmbiaees a lame line of
tuple (iontls jiifI leeelwtl mid cpcf!
ally FOleeted tin this market, as lullinw
DRY -:- GOODS !
M Tinoi, Drerfi (J odt.
While mill lljottii C'oUouh,
Dji imi I'linf, etc, liv, ec.,
Tall line of
'I'AILOIS' GOO ow:
rants and Suits L'injj li,
GROCERIES -:- HARDWARE !
comprising
Kol'li"-, Smre l'.w, (5 ilvan'.i-il
It IRM
Gale City Stone Filter !
gs?fe
J ihs nnd liuekotR, ele.,
t'l-es. of Soipj u vciy
Kito
lull lino of
!IirtHll
Vi'rK KrBSSMHia
KW 'WiiJHBI
.' ) ' riiirJCjM
HUB LINE of DRESS GOODS !
Mew Styles of Wash Material
JUST OPENED AT
Chas. J. FDSHEL'S,
Milliociy it DresFninl;iiig Establishment, Corner Fort it Hotel sIb.
Mini! SIocK of INDIA GHALLIES at 10 fits for $1
soAN croirar
--fl6
Ls'
Tlicce 1'lllcis are eisllv cleansed,
and NRVKK beeome (MtACKKD or
UKA.ED by'ehantiO of !"inpeiatiiie of
'J ImTIltei iiii; Mrdiiiiii is a N'ATl'KAL
3-TOXi:, iniiiiil from llioenilb. It Is
'luillki! any other stone.
Ti, Docs Not. Absorb and
Jleconie 1'oul I
IMPURITIES never PLXLTRATE
it. but lie on the Mitfne and Internally
ilm Mono i cumins as nuts and wjiito
after years of 110 a when t.iken fioin
lhf it'll in'.
HAVE JUST RECEIVED Ex AUSTRALIA
A. Choice Line of Dry & Fancy Goods,'
INRI.UniNtl
I vll tJlovt-H from n lo UO IIutloiiM.
Hosiery, Salines, Scotch Ginghams, latest patterns; Wooleu Dress Goods,
ALSO, A CHOICE LOT OF
Boys', Youths' & Children's Clothing, Trunks, Bags & Valises.
OUOOH 12 TT2, "Y
.lu?l opened, comp is'u;
All sd'cs of Xnpplo3 and IJjwIi1,
Piteliorfl and Hisinc, (.' ps unit
SiiieciR, 1'lutiH, itc, eie.
Special attention Iseallel lo tli'h Bile
of new and Stuple Uoucu.
TI-JISMte laiSKIt.Vli.
H..'
J AS. F. MOIiGAX,
Aueiloncur.
CAiMKIJA FOK SAL15
Tin-finte Clly Mone Miter is a per
fect Microi.. It K llin only real tiller I
liao ever wen. I would nut bo without
out) foi anv eoii'-ldeialion. II converts
our lake water Into the best drbiKlnj;
water In the woild.
IIi:.nuv.M.1aman,M.T.,
i'i.i!t Wi'ht Adaiiis St , ClileiiL'o.
"TEMPL
-OU1-
FASHION"
COllSER HOTEL & TOUT STREETS.
n
S10 Ctmcia willi At Dirlo lt'ii, thrfc
pliiK'linldurs and tripod, will tell
elui.ip. Willi) "11. U. V. J-," llamllion
llmue. .'()!) !it
CST For Sale by
HAWAIIAN HARDWARE Co.,
Op od'e fprwkuls t Co.'s Haul;,
1 II if Fort street, Honolulu.
500 GALLON
A
WANTED
WOMAN Servant ei Servunt Old
to partly atleml to 2 ehildien, and
do Iinlil lioutiowcrU. tor n gentlenmn h
fatally on Iuiuai. No heiubliiuj.', lamp
eleaninij to licilono; olhfrtorviintukcpt.
Applv lo .1. E. llltOWX it CO.,
non tl Merclnnittrecl.
HE WEEKLY BULLETIN
JL yd coluninH, iiirely local mattoi
Mailed to rnrclgu eountrles, $5 pur
ttlllllllll.
i
iWaterTanks!
?
Creat Reduction Sale
MANY LINER OF
AFTER TAKING STOCK I
HAVE REDUCED
GOODS.
.JUST RECEIVED!
-ion saw: nv Tin:
UNION
FEED
478 lm
CO.
NSE BARGAINS ARE OFFERED
OF THE FOLLOWING GOODS
rjrill letorwary 15tl, Only.
124 pair of Undressed Kid Gloves !
(1 and 8 Huttons in perfect order at -lil a pair Great Daigainc.
All my DUESS GINGHAMS about 110 pieces to select from aro ou'ered at
Uoat Trice. A hiuall lino of
Scotch Ginghams at a Great Reduction !
HEAD THIS A largo assortment of HEAD THIS
WHITE IXOJEfeSS GOODS,
Such as PiqueR, Embroidered Swinpcs, India Linon, l'lain Swjpc, Nainpook and
ninny otbor lines of Wliito Goods. I will coll at melt a
piico tliat overybody will buy them.
gjO" Homember, February 15tli will closo tbla Salo,
-O'
!
-ml
i,v
Feb 1-00
S. EHRLICH,
Corner Hold & Fort Hhfto(.
-:;jife',.'
MjiU-lo'1 Ai iUk

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