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The Catholic times. [volume] (Columbus, Ohio) 1951-current, September 26, 1952, Image 10

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10
Matters Stand-------------
Joe Breig Says:
Me And Ben Fairless
I am greatly
encouraged by
a stat e e n
made the other
day by Benja
min Fairless,
president and
board chairman
of U. S. Steel
Corporation.
Fairless, who
will tour U. S
Steel plants
with Philip Hurray. president of
the CIO. spoke in Chicago at the
Centennial of Engineering.
Fairless warned that continued
government interventio. in indus
try dispmes will lead to nationali
zation of industry and the mur
der” of free enterprise.
Here are Fairless’ words:
“If wages and other major pro
duction costs are to be dictated
by any government appointed agen
cy. then the government itself
must soon take over our industries
and asst me direct financial re
sponsibility.
‘‘Shouk that occur, of course,
it would also mean the end of la
bor/ right to strike for the right
to strike against the government
is already denied by law.”
Now for saying something like
that, 1 have been denounced as
anti capital, anti-labor and even as
“communistic.” I don’t suppose
anybody will charge that Fairless
is communistic.
The reason I am encouraged is
that it seems to me that Ben Fair
less is beginning to see the prob
lem that faces us the problem of
contriving some kind of govern
ment nf industry.
And 1 think that Fairless would
agree that to he successful, such
government should be self govern
ment.
Several years ago. at the time of
the great railroad strike. I wrote
that it is imperative that machin
ery he created for cooperation be
tween management nd workers
Unless this is done, i said, our
industrial strife will not only im
peril the very existence ot private
enterprise and of labor unions, but
will undermine the stability of
government itself.
I pointed out that capital and la
hor. instead of co-operating for the
general welfare, are engaged in a
tug nf war. with periodic truces
Rut there inevitably come times
when this industrial -trift becomes
so dangerous to the nation that
government is forced to step in.
When government steps in say
hv seizing the railroads govern
ment becomes the employei And
I he employer has the police pow ei
OHIO BIDDING (0,
At that point, labor loses the
right to strike, because a strike
against government is a kind of
rebellion. Yet there is always the
peril that labor might strike any
how.
In that case, the public authority
would be faced with a potentially
revolutionary situation There is
simply no sense in letting things
develop to any such disastrous
point.
The solution. 1 wrote, is simple.
It is the Industry Council Plan,
advocated for many years by the
Catholic bishops.
The ICP is simply the applica
tion to industry of the same met’
od of representative self-govern
ment which has made America the
most successful nation in history.
The ICP would end the tug of
war. and replace it with orderly co
operation by common consent.. It
would balance the just right*- of
capital, labor, consumer, large and
small industries and businesses,
and the public It would open the
way to such economic prosperity
and peace as we have not yet
dreamed of.
If men like Ben Fairless are be
ginning to see the problem, is there
not good reason io hope that they
may begin to look at the solution?
On their journey this fall from
plant to plant of U.S. Steel, why
should not Fairless and Phil Mur
ray study the Industry Council
Plan?
In Chicago. Fairless said that al
though too much government in
tervention is dangerous, govern
ment must fix rules for the collect
ive bargaining process
I suggest tnat not government,
but capital, management, lahor
and consumers should fix the rules,
with government help. Collective
bargaining is not enough What is
needed is Industry Councils.
“In the end.” said Fairless in
Chicago, "we may even discover
that we're not antagonists after
all but just partners and friends.”
That’s what the bishops have
been saying, and that's what I’ve
been saying. Why not make it
unanimous?
-----------------o----------------
NH.C Pr»mhe»
Kid ’Io Foreign Student*
NOTRE DAME, Ind -(NC)- Ex
change students and DP students
will receive aid under a $50,000
overseas program approved by the
National Federation of Catholic
College Student's at its annual con
gress here Funds for the program
will be raised from students at
colleges belonging to the ledeia
tion. on a Voluntary basis i
Mattresses Made Into Innersprings
Dial tree* ee Made Io
Order A Rebuilt
Feeliter Renovating
& Upholetrring.
CALL
GA. 2461
PERPETUAL NOVENA
Our Lady of Perpetual Help
Every Tuesday 7:30 p.m.
St. Christopher’s
Church
Grandview & Ida
"A COMPLETE SERVICE"
Real Estate Sales-Mt'g. Loans
Improvement Loans Title Ins.
Call Fergus Theibert for Details
The Guarantee, Title & Trust Co.
22 W. Gay St. Columbus, O.
Est 1899 MA. 553)
TODAY ... IS THE DAY
Start your savings account now. Open an account for any
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Eacn individual account inauted up to 10,000 by the Federal
Savings & Loen Insurance Corporation.
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Central Ohio Federal Savings
79 South Third Street Between Bread and State
THE HERMAN FALTER PACKING CO.
PORK AND BEEF PRODUCTS
Greenlawn Areno. COLUMBUS, OHIO
5
HI
Fooling Outsiders
Statue For U.S. Churches
American diplomats branded the
move to abolish the Politburo
the top ruling group of Russia as
aimed simply at fooling outsiders
as well as Russian citizens into
believing that the Communist set
up is being democratized A much
more significant feature of the
Moscow decree, they declared, was
the announcement that 50-year-old
Georgi M. Malenkov is to replace
Stalin in the ride of rapporteur
for the Central Committee, a role
which involves laying down the
party line on domestic and inter
national policy for the years im
mediately ahead. The question ask
ed was. Is Malenkov in-line to
succeed Stalin as top man in the
Soviet command?
In some quarters, the commun
ist Congress obviously long in
preparation was interpreted as a
preliminary (or building Russia’s
war potential against the possibili
ty of World War 111. However,
there appeared to be no evidence
that Soviet leaders would use the
Congress either to declare war. or,
on the other hand, cal) off the so
called cold war which has plagued
the world during these past years.
In Washington, U.S. officials con
ceded that the last party conclave
at Moscow had set in train the
Hitler Stalin pact and World War
II, but they minimized the sugges
"Saints for Now" it fha title of
a now book by tho noted Catho
lic convert and former Congress
women Clare Boothe Luce (left).
Rev. Timothy J. Mulvey, OMI,,
(right) toted playwright and
radio speaker, has written a mov
*ng story about our fighting
men in Korea “These Are
Your Sons." (NC Photos)
LOOSI LEAF DEVICES
ft OFFICE SUPPLIES
ft FILING EQUIPMENT
ft FAVORS AND NOVELTIES
NITSCHKE BROS.
STATIONERS PRINTERS
IT Maa* Gay Street
COLUMBUS. OHIO
V
4 1
An indult has been granted by the Holy See permitting public ven
eration of Bessed Pius in churches in the United States under cer.
tain conditions The veneration is permitted in churches where the
Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, to which Pius gave added im
petus, is established and actively functioning. The church must als*
have a statue of the late Pope that is approved by the local Bishop.
In the above picture, His Excellency Archbishop Amleto Giovanni Ci
cognani, Apostolic Delegate to the U. S., stands beside a statue that
has been produced to fill this need. The statue was executed by An
tonio Dal Pino for St. Anthony Guild at the request of the Episcopal
Committee of the Confraternity of Christian Doctrine Pius was
Pope from 1903 to 1914. His Holiness Pope Pius XII, in the painting
above, beatified Blessed Pius in 1951. (NC Photos)
Why Is Stalin Calling 1st
Congress In 13 Years?
(N.C.W.C. News Service)
Soviet Russia appears to be
ready to embark on a major re
vision ot its domestic aod foreign
policies. Essentially this is all that
Western observers can say at the
moment regarding the All I nion
Congress the Russian Common
ist party which has been summon
ed to meet in Moscow Oct. 5. The
rest is pure speculation.
The decree summoning the Con
gress. the first since 1939, was
issued by the Central Committee
of the Communist party over
Premier Stalins signature in his
capacity of general secretary. It
disclosed that changes would be
made party organization, involv
mg, among other things, the aboli
tion ot the Politburo and the trans
fer of its function to a Presidium
of the Central Committee. Mean
while it was announced that a new
Five Year Plan would be launch
ed to effect a sharp increase in
the Soviet Unions military and
economic production.
tion that similarly momentous re
sults are likely to flow from the
pending meeting.
It is believed instead that the
congress will be concerned mam
ly with discussing every phase of
party policy, discipline and inter
nal organization and laying down
the communist tactical line on all
important issues. This will be done
after a review and report by Mai
enkov, who probably will point out
the progress made by the Soviet
Union since the last congress, cite
the nation's goals, and make rec
ommendations for the future. In
his report, Malenkov most likely
will give an up»to the minute ap
praisal. from the Soviet angle, of
issues involving Germany, the Far
East, the Korean War, and the pos
sibility of a third world war.
According to some observers, by
far the most vital of the Congress
agenda is the new Five Year Plan,
through which, they .said, the com
miiiiists may seek an economic
penetration of the western world
in an attempt at trade supremacy
over the West. The Plan calls for
a 70 pei cent increase in Russian
production over 1950 figures by
the end of 1955. However, since
Russian statistics are notoriously
vague, it is difficult to figure out
just what the increase would mean
in concrete terms.
------------_Q--------------—
W mils \sians Told
Ol Red Brutality
To Missionaries
WASHINGTON (NC) The
State Department has been mged
to get to the people ot Asia a mis
sage about the “disservice’ the
communists do them by persecut
ing missionaries in China.
In a letter to Secietaiy of State
Dean Acheson, Representative
Jacob K. Javits of New York has
called the death of Bishop Francis
X. Ford, an American Mar}knoll
Missioner in China, ’one in a long
list ot eases of the utmost brutal
ity and inhumanity shown by the
communist Chinese regime to
Americans.’’
He urged upon the State De
partment “a high level and elo
quent summation of the cases and
a protest intended to reach mill
ions of people of Asia itself who
have benefited I tom the work of
missionaries and can realize what
a disservice it is to the people of
Asia to persecute the \merican
missionaries who have served
China
The Congressman also recom
mended to the State Department
a special scrutiny” of al! econom
ic dealings with communist China
by any country aided by the U S.
CHECKER
ELECTRIC
THE CATHOLIC TIMES, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2 6. 1952
Stock
EQUIPMENT
Infra-Red Systems
Electric Power
Equipment Co.
IT K CBBSTNUT ST
May They Rest In Peace
FARRELL. Michael H. 73. 411
Oakwood avenue. Columbus. Sept.
17, St. John the Evangelist church.
O’NEIL. Anna R.. 82. 40 North
avenue. Newark, Sept. 16. Blessed
Sacrament church. Survivors: sev
eral nieces and nephews.
CUSICK. Ella. 90. Crooksville,
Sept. 13. Church of the Atonement.
Survivors: two sisters, a brothei.
five nieces and two nephews.
54. Cheverly
13, St. Leo
Survivors: a
FEIL, Catherine,
Manor, Md.. Sept,
church. Columbus,
daughter, three brothers, three sis
ters, a grandchild and several niec
es and nephews.
SHUFELT, Cornelius George. 88.
1915 W. Mound street. Columbus.
Sept. 13. St. Aloysius church. Sur
vivors. his wife, Grace tw'o sons,
a stepson, a stepdaughter, a grand
child, two .stepgrandchildren, and
two great grandchildren.
KAVANAUGH, Margaret, 554
Mt. Vernon avenue, Columbus.
Sept. 15. St. Patrick church. Sur
vivors: two sisters and two neph
ews.
WELLNITZ, John Joseph. 61. 483
S. Yale avenue, Columbus, Sept.
14. Holy Family church. Survivors:
two sons, three daughters, two
brothers, six sisters and 10 grand
children.
SULLIVAN, Nellie. 83. 41 Da
kota avenue,
Holy Family
a sister and
nephews.
Columbus, Sept. 14.
church. Survivors:
several nieces and
GETREU, Jacob. 86. 559 Berke
ley road, Columbus. Sept. 13, Holy
Rosary church. Survivors: his
wife, Anna three daughters, a
son. 12 grandchildren
great-grandchildren.
and seven
RADICA, Enrico, 67,
man avenue (rear).
187 Barth
Columbus,
Sept. 17. St. Ladislaus church. Sur
vivors: none.
SCHACHTELE. Anna. 86. 440 S.
Paint street, Chillicothe. Sept. 18.
St. Mary church. Survivors
son. a sister and seven grandchil
dren.
Reports Palestine
Refugees Needier
ITian Ever Before
BEIRUT, Lebanon (NO “I
consider the situation of the Pal
estinian refugees more serious to
day then it ever has heen before.”
This was how U.S. Ambassador
Edwin A. Locke, Jr., member of
the advisory commission of the
United Nations Relief and Works
Agency for Palestinian
summed up impressions
visits he has made to
camps in Lebanon.
refugees,
of recent
refugee
described
Ambassador Locke
the refugees as “forgotten people.”
lie said “The world knows little
ol them, little of their plight, their
poverty, and their hopelessness.
They are seldom seen by outsid
ers and rarely consulted.”
“Such meagre reeources as thev
may have had in the beginnint aie
now gone, and living conditions
are growing worse,” Ambassador
Locke added. “Their health is de
teriorating. Their morale, that
precious spirit ol courage and con
fidence which enables mankind to
endure so much, is tailing. The
refugees are inclining toward des
pair and extreme solutions.”
THE KNIGHTS OF
COLUMBUS CLUB
Now cotermg to
Banquets Parties
Luncheon Clubs
Bollroom Now Available
For Donees
For Information Phona
MA. 4451
MS!
See the
Hbbm
Dealer
in Yenr
Comme
■ity
HANNA PAINT
MF6. COMPANY
98 W. Ixmg Street
AT T■E I IG N OF
THE GIANT FAFNTKB
DeLOZIER. Clarence A., 57. 2881
Ontario street. Columbus, Sept. 16,
St. James the Less church. Sur
vivors: his wife. Ellen four daugh
ters. eight sons, his father, a sister
and three brothers.
GRAVES. Charles W., 48. 1168
E. Granville road. Worthington,
Sept. 17. St. Michael church. Sur
vivors: his wife, Jacqueline two
daughters, his parents and a grand
child.
ALBRECHT. Joseph, 70. 835 11th
street. Portsmouth, Sept. 16, St.
Mary church. Survivors: five sons,
three daughters. 13 grandchildren
and two great-grandchildren.
MEEHAN. James J.. 84. 205 Clin
ton Hts. avenue. Columbus. Sept.
16, Immaculate Conception church.
Survivors: five sons, four daugh
ters and a sister.
DISTELZWEIG, Charles. 29.
Youngstown. Sept. 15. St. Joseph
Cathedral. Columbus.
CAVANAUGH. Thomas J., 70.
842 Seymour avenue. Columhus,
Sept. 16. Holy Rosary church. Sur
vivors: his wife. Cornelia two
sons, four daughters and a half
sister.
BUYERS'
O. D. HOLLAR & SON
Plumbing and Heating
62 West Church Street
Offic* Phon* 2583—Rea Phon* M82
Authwiaed
GOOD SERVICE AT
A FAIR PRICE
Ganuina Parta
BATTERIES 87.60
(INSTALLED IN COUNTT)
Walker and Battat
Pkon. 6«1« 107 E. Main St.
BEST BUY IN USED CARS
TRADE WITH THE
ROE EMERSON
STORK
CLOTHES—HATR—FURN18H1NGS
SHOES
Th* L«r* Store as Well a* Dad's
Ted's Jewelry
Newark
Phone 49242
7 Union St.
,WA\\W.WV.*.‘.WAW.
"The Stere T/iat mf/arenl”
FURNITURE ft ACCESSORIES
Sam Alban
57-5B W. Mam St. Newark
'AVsWMWWsWkWsW
Sawyer's Market
Quality Foods
The
Newark.Ohio
393 E. Main
ALTMEYER
SHELL SERVICE
Most Powerful Gasoltn?
Buckingham and Granville St*.
Swanks Market
OPEN SUNDAYS
Phon* 32151
45 Granville Newark
Insured
THE
NEWARK TRUST
COMPANY
Member Federal D*po*H
lasurane* Corporation
CEMENT BRICK a.ND BLOCK
DSHD LUMBER
AND BUILDING MATERIALS
S G. (TEDO)
LOEWENDICK & SONS
L1NNVILLE ROAD
For Your Car Needs
BEAVER auto store
62-66 K. Main St. Phone 4466
NEWARK. OHIO
When You Want GOOD
Furniture—Go to
CARLILE'S
Address Correction Noted
Geraldine Sweeney, who became
a -postulant at the convent of the
Sisters of St. Francis of Mary Im
maculate Conception at Joliet, Ill.,
recently, is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Bernard Sweeney, 147
Erie Road, Columbus. Last week's
Times mistakenly gave the address
as 76 W. Ken worth avenue.
Miss Sweeney's father, Bernard,
hotter known as “Budd”, is the chief
announcer at radio station WHKC
in Columbus.
IN THE
HEART
OF THE
CITY
NEWARK
CLASSIFIED
SECTION
l«e ner nn*
nlnmbus 1*. O
SEPTIC TANKS
Pre-C«*t Concrete
SEPTIC TANKS
CONCRETE AND CINDER BLOCKS
W. L. MATTOX
Corner Forry and Daniel A*e., Phone 8864
______ Newark, Ohio
VAULTS CESSPOOLS
SEPTIC TANKS CLEANED
MODERN EQUIPMENT
Myers and Son
63802 NEWARK 2261
SERVICE STATIONS
HERTZ
DRIVE-UR-SELF SYSTEM
Phone 9087
PEARSON'S MARATHON
SERVICE CENTER
FIFTH AND CHURCH STREETS
Newark’* Finest Kerrie* Center!
SWEEPER REPAIR
A. B. VOORHEES
PHONE 81783—81 POPLAR AVENl F.
SWEEPERS
PARTS AND SERVICE
LABOR AND PARTS GUARANTEED
I RF E INSPECTION
VACl UM LF.ANERS AS FOLLOWS
Airway Kirby
Apex Premier
Bee V ar General Elertrie
aditlar Retina
Klerirolux Royal
Eureka Singer
Hamilton Rearh Universal
Hoover West inahou**
Kenmore Electro Hygiene
At Wonderful Sarin*!
George W. Arensberg
PHARMACIST
17C Hud»on A»«„ Newark. Ohl*
SPECIALIZING
IN PRESCRIPTIONS
Save at Penneys
J. C. Penney Co.. Inc.
Everything to IFear
PARK PLACE NEWARK
DOLANS
Clothing ft Shoes
59 5. 3rd St. Newark, O.
TOM STEVENS
Deposits
141 Everett Ave.
Newark, Ohio
102-108 East Main St.
War Vets Honor Stoneham
NEW YORK (NC) For con
tinued service to veterans and
members of the nation’s armed
forces. Horace Stoneham, president
of the New York Giants baseball
club, was given the Award of Mer
it of the New York County Chapter
of the Catholic War Veterans. The
presentation of the plaque was
made by County Commander John
J. Backes.
Read the Times Classified Ads.
EGAN-RYAN
FUNERAL SERVICE
BROAD St. at CLEVELAND Ave.
8*rnng th* Catholi* familiaa st
Central Ohio.
New Parking Lot
AMBULANCES
MA. 6665
MA. 6666
Service
GUIDE
Integrity
The
Park National
Bank
OF NEWARK
BORDEN'S
Dairy & Ice Cream Co
Phone 4053
Leo Reichert
Complete Insurance Service
Tel. «8IT
42 K. Sth St
Newark
THE HUB
/The Busy Store
Men's and Boys' Clothing
NEWARK, OHIO
Arcade
Drug Store
33
N. 3rd St. Newark
“Where you are always
welcome’
EGAN
Funeral Home
Ambulance Service
Phone 3580
132 W. Church Newark
THE
Newark Asphalt Co.
Builder* Of
ASPHALT DRIVEWAYS
PHONE 072
W Poplar Ave Newark. O
SCOTT'S
"Home Furnishers
For Over a Century"
PARK PLACE PH MW
E.
The
John J. Carroll
Store
Newark
NORTH PARK FLORIST
FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS
Ph. 6234 1237 Mt. Vernon Ave.
NEWARK TERMITE CONTROL
Your home u a precious possession Protect it with oui scientific
treatment. Free inspections and estimates within 100 mile area.
16 years actual experience All work fully guaranteed
8 Maholm St. Phone 4450 or 52941
NEWARK SHEET METAL
Roofing Spouting Heating
24-Hour Service
MATESICH DIST. AGENCY
Budweiser Wiedemann's Red Top
Gibson's Wine
CURRAN MOTOR CO., INC
Cadillac Oldsmobile Reo Truck
Sales and Sermce
Phone 3397
Zanesville, Ohio
Newark, Ohio

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